Capt Alexander Harvey Biggar, SV/PROG

Is your surname Biggar?

Research the Biggar family

Capt Alexander Harvey Biggar, SV/PROG's Geni Profile

Share your family tree and photos with the people you know and love

  • Build your family tree online
  • Share photos and videos
  • Smart Matching™ technology
  • Free!

Alexander Harvey Biggar, SV/PROG

Birthdate: (57)
Birthplace: Cork, County Cork, Ireland
Death: December 27, 1838 (57)
Bloukrans, Chieveley, Natal, South Africa (Wounds received in Battle of Opathe)
Immediate Family:

Son of Major Robert Harold Biggar and Ann Biggar
Husband of Mary Biggar, SM/PROG
Partner of NN Zulu partner of Biggar
Father of Margaret Graham Biggar; Anne Harold Dunn, SM; Mary John Biggar; Jean Straton de Smidt; Georgina Biggar and 8 others

Managed by: Private User
Last Updated:

About Capt Alexander Harvey Biggar, SV/PROG

Death Notice

According to his death notice he died 27 December 1838; in line with opinion of many historians.


http://www.southafricansettlers.com/?p=189

1820 British Settler

   

Alexander Harvey Biggar 39, Capt, was Leader of his own Party on the Weymouth, and together with his wife Mary Straton 39, and their 11 children, they emigrated to South Africa.

Party originated from Hampshire. Departure 7 January 1820. Arrival Table Bay, Cape Town - 16 April 1820. Final Port - Algoa Bay, Port Elizabeth 15 May 1820.

Area Allocated to the Party : Brak River

Children :

Margaret Graham Biggar 20

Ann Harold Biggar 18

Mary John Biggar 16

Jean Straton Biggar 14

Georgina Biggar 12

Agnes Elizabeth Biggar 10

Charlotte Biggar 8

Robert Biggar 7

Alexina Biggar 3

Helen Biggar 1

George Biggar (born at sea)

---------------------------------

Marriage in Brechin, Angus, Scotland 2 March 1799 Lieutenant Alexander BIGGAR of His Majesty's 15th Regiment of Foot and Miss Mary STRATON, daughter of the Rev Mr. George STRATON, Episcopal Clergyman in Brechin, were contracted in order to marriage; and their banns having been published three several times and no objection offered were married the 3rd current.

-------------------------------------------------

Wikipedia


The Biggar family, Alexander Harvey Biggar (29 October 1781 – 27 December 1838) and his two sons Robert (12 September 1813 – 17 April 1838) and George (20 February 1820 – 17 February 1838), were pioneer traders at Port Natal, in what was to become the Colony of Natal. Subsequent to the massacre of Retief's delegation, they became involved in the exchange of attacks between Zulus and settlers. Although contributing to the overthrow of Dingane, all three lost their lives in the conflicts of 1838. Alexander's grandson John Dunn became a well-known Natal pioneer in his own right.

Marriage in Brechin, Angus, Scotland 2 March 1799 Lieutenant Alexander BIGGAR of His Majesty's 15th Regiment of Foot and Miss Mary STRATON, daughter of the Rev Mr. George STRATON, Episcopal Clergyman in Brechin, were contracted in order to marriage; and their banns having been published three several times and no objection offered were married the 3rd current.

___________

Dick Pierce and his wife worked in PE as servants to Robert Newton Dunn, also an immigrant of 1820. When Robert Dunn moved his family in the 1830s to Port Natal, where his father-in-law, Alexander Biggar was a leading figure in the fledgling settler community, with – like most of the other Englishman there – a son by a Zulu woman, the Pierces went with them.

http://www.30degreessouth.co.za/the_great_trek.html

Many ineresting aspects of his life covered by Robin Binkes in his book "The Great Trek Uncut", 2013


Biggar, Alexander, retired paymaster of H.M.’s 85th Regiment of Foot, head of a party from Hampshire, in the Weymouth. The location assigned to them was in the Kareiga Valley adjoining Major Fraser’s farm, and not far from the Theopolis Mission Station. In 1834 he removed to Durban, Natal, where about thirty Englishmen resided, either permanently or in the intervals between hunting excursions.

In 1833 he was appointed Landdrost by Mr. Landman, in the name of the “Association of South African Emigrants.” He was suffering under great depression of spirits, consequent on the loss of his sons and his entire property, and declined to perform the duties of that office.

His son, George, was murdered by the Zulus in the great massacre of the Boers by Dingaan, 17th February, 1838.

His son Robert was in nominal command of a force from Port Natal against Dingaan, com- prising twenty English traders and hunters, twenty Hottentots, about 1,500 blacks, fugitives from Zululand, and succeeded in capturing 3,000 to 7,000 head of cattle, with which they returned to Natal. Soon after this, in command of another expedition against the Zulus, he was killed in battle 17th April, 1838.

He played a vital role in the battle of blood river: http://samilitaryhistory.org/misc/bldrvr.html It is interesting to speculate on the role played by the Natal settlers, i.e. Capt. Alex Biggar, Joyce and Parker as well as the Port Natal Bantu. The position of Biggar's scots cart is unknown but its unique shape when compared to a Voortrekker wagon would probably have excluded it from the [- 7 -] outer ring. It would seem reasonable to assume that Biggar, Parker and Joyce took their places in the firing line. The Port Natal Bantu are more problematical. It is known from accounts of the Battle of the Tugela fought on 11 April 1838 that Joyce, presumably a former member of the 12nd Regiment, had his division of Port Natal Bantu armed with a fair number of muskets which they were trained to fire in volleys at his command. At this battle they shot the advancing Zulus down in hundreds. It is doubtful if they were armed or organised in the same way at Blood River and probably played a passive role. Serving under Commandant A.W. Pretorius was Karel Landman as his deputy while there were six other commandants: J.H. de Lange, (Hans Dons), J. Potgieter, P.D. Jacobs, S. Erasmus, J.J. Uys and L. Meyer. With them moved a force of 464 Voortrekkers plus three English settlers, Parker, Joyce and Capt. Alex Biggar. The latter had moved up from Port Natal in the company of Karel Landman and had with them approximately 120 Port Natal Bantu and Biggar's scots cart. They joined the commando at Skiet Drift.

On the 23rd December, 1838, Alexander was killed in battle with the Zulus.

His eldest daughter, Margaret Graham Biggar, died unmarried at Graham’s Town, 31st May, 1890, at the advanced age of ninety years ; his other daughters, Ann, married Charles Maynard, Esq., a merchant at Graham’s Town ; Mary, married — Kuhr, a merchant at Port Elizabeth ; Jane, married II. von Ronn. merchant at Port Elizabeth ; and Helen, married N. P. Krohn, merchant at Graham’s Town.


DEPOT South African National Museum of Military History TYPE Manuscript REFERENCE 968.04 DESCRIPTION Blood River, Battle of. STARTING 0000 ENDING 0000 SUMMARY + Article by GA Chadwick re battle of Blood River.

         +    Article  from Cape Times, 7.12.1938 re Before and after          
              Blood River by N Gluckmann.                                      
         +    Picture  of  painting  of  Blood   River   by   E   van          
              Musschenbroek.                                                   
         +    Picture of painting by WH Coetzer.                               
         +    '''Article from the Sunday Times, 15.12.1957 re the battle          
              and Capt. Alexander Biggar'''. 
view all 16

Capt Alexander Harvey Biggar, SV/PROG's Timeline

1781
October 28, 1781
County Cork, Ireland
1801
August 18, 1801
Age 19
Renfrewshire, Scotland, United Kingdom
1801
Age 19
1804
1804
Age 22
1806
1806
Age 24
1808
1808
Age 26
1810
1810
Age 28
Dover, Kent, United Kingdom
1812
September 27, 1812
Age 30
Edinburgh, Scotland
1812
Age 30