Col. William Chillicothe "Chilly" McIntosh, CSA

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Col. William Chillicothe "Chilly" McIntosh, CSA's Geni Profile

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About Col. William Chillicothe "Chilly" McIntosh, CSA

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Chilly_McIntosh

Chilly McIntosh (1800–1875) was an important figure in the history of the Creek Nation. Born in Georgia to William McIntosh, chief of the Lower Creeks and his wife Eliza, he was the half-brother of D. N. McIntosh and the nephew of Roley McIntosh, another Creek chief.

In 1861, both Chilly and his younger brother, D.N. McIntosh, signed the treaty that formally allied the Creek Nation with the Confederate States of America. Despite his age and relative lack of prior military experience, Chilly entered the Confederate Army with the rank of lieutenant colonel, commanding the First Battalion of Creek Cavalry. ln 1862, he was promoted to full colonel as the unit was reorganized into the Second Regiment of Creek Mounted Volunteers. He and his troops fought in several battles in the Indian Territory, such as Round Mountain, Pea Ridge, Fort Wayne, and Honey Springs.

http://www.okhistory.org/publications/enc/entry.php?entry=MC029

Chilly McIntosh, son of legendary Chief William McIntosh Jr. was an important Creek leader with roots in both ancient Scotland and the Creek Wind Clan. He formed the perfect amalgam of both cultures. As elected chief of his tribal township he made efforts to straddle the divide between both the traditional and progressive factions, while at the same time performing duties as clerk of the Creek Tribal Council. McIntosh weaves Chilly's personal story into the general saga of the Creek people. From his youth in the Indian towns of the Southeast to his ultimate relocation to the Oklahoma lands that were to be his final home, the book explores the many facets of his long and varied life.

The local legend is that Chilly McIntosh escaped from his family's burning home at McIntosh Reserve on the faithful day in 1825 when his father was murdered. He had been sleeping in an outbuilding because there was no room in the main house. Chilly McIntosh's life story shows that he was part of both the white and Indian world, here in Georgia and in the Creeks' new home in Oklahoma. Chilly and his half brother, Daniel Newnan McIntosh, were both Confederate officers during the Civil War. Chilly eventually became a Baptist minister, preaching the gospel to members of several Indian tribes before his death in 1875.

Chilly McIntosh was a political and military leader of the Creek Nation. Born in Georgia, McIntosh was the eldest son of Lower Creek chief William McIntosh, and half brother of Daniel N. McIntosh. Chilly McIntosh signed the 1825 treaty of Indian Springs, but, unlike his father, who negotiated the agreement, escaped execution for having sold the tribe's Georgia lands. In 1828 McIntosh led the first party of Lower, or McIntosh- faction, Creeks to Indian Territory. As a nephew of Lower Creek chief Roley McIntosh, he signed the major Creek treaties of the period, including the 1861 treaty of alliance with the Confederate States of America.

Despite his advanced age McIntosh began the Civil War as a lieutenant colonel in command of the First Battalion of Creek Cavalry. He was promoted to colonel when his battalion was reorganized as the Second Regiment of Creek Mounted Volunteers in 1862. In 1864 his men combined with other units to form the First Indian Cavalry Brigade under the command of Brig. Gen. Stand Watie. McIntosh's troops participated in several battles including Round Mountain, Pea Ridge, Fort Wayne, and Honey Springs. After the war McIntosh retired to his farm near Fame in present McIntosh County, Oklahoma, where he died on October 5, 1875.* Reference: Find A Grave Memorial - SmartCopy: Nov 28 2018, 7:07:52 UTC


Chilly McIntosh, son of legendary Chief William McIntosh Jr. was an important Creek leader with roots in both ancient Scotland and the Creek Wind Clan. He formed the perfect amalgam of both cultures. As elected chief of his tribal township he made efforts to straddle the divide between both the traditional and progressive factions, while at the same time performing duties as clerk of the Creek Tribal Council. McIntosh weaves Chilly's personal story into the general saga of the Creek people. From his youth in the Indian towns of the Southeast to his ultimate relocation to the Oklahoma lands that were to be his final home, the book explores the many facets of his long and varied life.

The local legend is that Chilly McIntosh escaped from his family's burning home at McIntosh Reserve on the faithful day in 1825 when his father was murdered. He had been sleeping in an outbuilding because there was no room in the main house. Chilly McIntosh's life story shows that he was part of both the white and Indian world, here in Georgia and in the Creeks' new home in Oklahoma. Chilly and his half brother, Daniel Newnan McIntosh, were both Confederate officers during the Civil War. Chilly eventually became a Baptist minister, preaching the gospel to members of several Indian tribes before his death in 1875.

Chilly McIntosh was a political and military leader of the Creek Nation. Born in Georgia, McIntosh was the eldest son of Lower Creek chief William McIntosh, and half brother of Daniel N. McIntosh. Chilly McIntosh signed the 1825 treaty of Indian Springs, but, unlike his father, who negotiated the agreement, escaped execution for having sold the tribe's Georgia lands. In 1828 McIntosh led the first party of Lower, or McIntosh- faction, Creeks to Indian Territory. As a nephew of Lower Creek chief Roley McIntosh, he signed the major Creek treaties of the period, including the 1861 treaty of alliance with the Confederate States of America.

Despite his advanced age McIntosh began the Civil War as a lieutenant colonel in command of the First Battalion of Creek Cavalry. He was promoted to colonel when his battalion was reorganized as the Second Regiment of Creek Mounted Volunteers in 1862. In 1864 his men combined with other units to form the First Indian Cavalry Brigade under the command of Brig. Gen. Stand Watie. McIntosh's troops participated in several battles including Round Mountain, Pea Ridge, Fort Wayne, and Honey Springs. After the war McIntosh retired to his farm near Fame in present McIntosh County, Oklahoma, where he died on October 5, 1875.

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Col. William Chillicothe "Chilly" McIntosh, CSA's Timeline

1804
1804
Georgia, United States
1811
June 1811
Georgia, United States
1816
1816
Georgia, United States
1833
August 11, 1833
McIntosh County, OK, United States
1837
November 12, 1837
Alabama, United States
1847
April 7, 1847
Oklahoma City, Oklahoma, Oklahoma, United States
1848
21, 1848
Oklahoma City, Oklahoma, USA
1848
Oklahoma, USA
1850
1850
Georgia, United States