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Daniel Black

Birthdate:
Birthplace: Dunbar, East Lothian, Scotland
Death: December 05, 1689 (56-65)
Boxford, Essex County, Massachusetts
Immediate Family:

Son of John Black
Husband of Faith Black (Bridges)
Father of Margrett Black; Daniel Black, Jr.; James Black; Mehitable Black; John Black and 3 others

Managed by: Private User
Last Updated:

About Daniel Black

1. Daniel Black was born before 1628 in Scotland. He married Faith Bridges, daughter of Edmund Bridges and Alice Millington [SIC: Elizabeth] in Sep 1660 at Boxford, Massachusetts. He died on 5 Dec 1689; (December 5, 168-). He died on 5 Dec 1699/0.


He was one of the Scotch Soldiers that Cromwell sent over to this country to be sold. He was one of the prisoners after the Battle of Worcester September 3, 1651 at or near Dunbar Scotland. Daniell Blacke arrived in the colonies aboard the John and Sarah on May 13, 1652. 2 He put into service at the Lynn Iron Works. The first we know of him is from Essex court records, where we find that: "1660, September, Daniel Blake is fined 5 pounds, and respited for 4 pounds, conditionally, for making love to Edmund Bridge's daughter, without her parent's consent." This daughter was Faith Bridges, who he afterward married. It does not appear that he owned land in Boxford, he did own a small tract in Topsfield in 1663, near Boxford, Fish Brook. In 1664, he complains of his wife. Daniel and his wife, Faith were condemned to set in stocks for domestic disturbances. They were instructed not to miscall each other while so confined. Afterward, he was to treat her properly and she was not to be seen in the company of other men. The stocks were probably located in or near the meeting house green in Ipswich, Massachusetts. He was probably employed by the iron company here, as we find by court records that he sued Henry Leonard for a debt of 5 pounds 12 s. 10 d. and received satisfaction by the court at Ipswitch, in September, 1673. Daniel Black was appointed Tithing-man to see that the sabbath was well kept and this was aggreable to the Act of the General Court on May 23, 1677. He resided near what is now the Junction of route 97 and the Kelsey Road in Boxford, Massachusetts. That part of Boxford was in Rowley prior to 1680. In the General Register the tax was for 2 shillings and according to the register Daniel Black was a cripple and he had 0 heads, 1 house, 10 acres land, 1 hourse, 4 cows, 1 young cattle, Boxford 1687. "On the 12th of June in 1688 the Selact men of Boxford met to hear the poorer & did order daniell Black Juner to help his father as mush as hee head need of in hay time & to give a Count of it to the Selact men."


http://worldconnect.rootsweb.ancestry.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=pjmpjm&id=I7961

Ancestors of Malu Del & Tahlia Elphia McDonald

Entries: 57323 Updated: 2008-08-09 14:25:21 UTC (Sat) Contact: Patrick McDonald Home Page: The World-Wide Family of Malu Del & Tahlia Elphia McDonald

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ID: I7961

Name: Daniel BLACK

Given Name: Daniel

Surname: BLACK

Suffix: ("the Immigrant")

Sex: M

_UID: D452D918F5700B448BDED665ACE0A2CF6C0C

Change Date: 5 Oct 2004

Birth: BEF 1628 in Dunbar, East Lothian, Scotland, UK

Note:

1. Daniel Black was born before 1628 in Scotland. He married Faith Bridges, daughter of Edmund Bridges and Alice Millington, in Sep 1660 at Boxford, Massachusetts. He died on 5 Dec 1689; (December 5, 168-). He died on 5 Dec 1699/0.

He was one of the prisoners after the Battle of Worcester, on 3 Sep1651. Daniel was a blacksmith in Boxford, MA and worked at the Lynn, MA Ironworks. Many of his descendants are found in Massachusetts, Maine and Vermont.

He was one of the Scotch Soldiers that Cromwell sent over to this country to be sold. He was one of the prisoners after the Battle of Worcester September 3, 1651 in Scotland.

Daniell Blacke arrived in the colonies aboard the John and Sarah on 13 May 1652. He put into service at the Lynn Iron Works.

The first we know of him is from Essex court records, where we find that: "1660, September, Daniel Blake is fined 5 pounds, and respited for 4 pounds, conditionally, for making love to Edmund Bridge's daughter, without her parent's consent." This daughter was Faith Bridges, who he afterward married.

It does not appear that he owned land in Boxford, he did own a small tract in Topsfield in 1663, near Boxford, Fish Brook. In 1664, he complains of his wife. Daniel and his wife, Faith were condemned to set in stocks for domestic disturbances. They were instructed not to miscall each other while so confined. Afterward, he was to treat her properly and she was not to be seen in the company of other men. The stocks were probably located in or near the meeting house green in Ipswich, Massachusetts. He was probably employed by the iron company here, as we find by court records that he sued Henry Leonard for a debt of 5 pounds 12 s. 10 d. and received satisfaction by the court at Ipswitch, in September, 1673.

Daniel Black was appointed Tithing-man to see that the sabbath was well kept and this was aggreable to the Act of the General Court on 23 May 1677. He resided near what is now the Junction of route 97 and the Kelsey Road in Boxford, Massachusetts. That part of Boxford was in Rowley prior to 1680. In the General Register the tax was for 2 shillings and according to the register Daniel Black was a cripple and he had 0 heads, 1 house, 10 acres land, 1 hourse, 4 cows, 1 young cattle, Boxford 1687. "On the 12th of June in 1688 the Selact men of Boxford met to hear the poorer & did order daniell Black Juner to help his father as mush as hee head need of in hay time & to give a Count of it to the Selact men."

Faith Bridges was born in 1645.

Children of Daniel Black and Faith Bridges were as follows:

i. Margrett was born on 21 Oct 1665 at Topsfield, Massachusetts. She was christened on 21 Oct 1665 at Topsfield, Essex, Massachusetts.

2. ii. Daniel Jr., born 24 Aug 1667 at Boxford, Essex, Massachusetts; married Mary Cummings; married Sarah Adams.

iii. Mehitable was baptized on 10 Mar 1671 at Boxford, Essex, Massachusetts. She married William Briggs on 16 Jun 1696.

iv. John was born on 28 Jul 1672 at Boxford, Massachusetts. He was christened on 28 Jul 1672 at Topsfield, Essex, Massachusetts. He died in 1697 at York, York, Maine.

v. Edmund was born on 6 Feb 1674 at Boxford, Essex, Massachusetts. He was christened on 6 Feb 1674 at Topsfield, Essex, Massachusetts.

3. vi. James, born May 1669 at Boxford, Massachusetts; married Abigail Johnson; married Mary Barker.

4. vii. Josiah, born Sep 1676 at Boxford, Essex, Massachusetts; married Mary Black.

5. viii. William, born Sep 1670; married Sarah (--?--).

1

Death: 5 DEC 1699

Note: He could also have died on 5 Dec 1689. 1

Immigration: 13 MAY 1652 MA U. S. A.

Note: He arrived on the ship "John and Sarah." 2 3

Occupation: tithing-man, appointed by the General Court 23 MAY 1677 Boxford, Essex, MA U. S. A. 1

Occupation: worker at the Lynn Iron Works AFT 1652 Lynn, Essex, MA U. S. A. 2

PROP: a small tract of land, near Fish Brook, Boxford, 1663 Topsfield, Essex, MA U. S. A. 1

Residence: ABT 1687 Boxford, Essex, MA U. S. A.

Note: He resided near what is now the junction of Route 97 and the Kelsey Road in Boxford, MA. That part of Boxford was in Rowley prior to 1680. 4

Residence: Topsfield, Essex, MA U. S. A. 4

Event: Military 3 SEP 1651 Worcester, Worcestershire, England, UK

Note:

Daniel Black was one of the Scottish soldiers that Cromwell sent over to North America to be sold. He was one of the prisoners after the Battle of Worcester 3 Sep 1651 in Scotland, which was the scene of Oliver Cromwell's final victory, with the complete rout of Charles II and the Scots.

=========================================================

3 September 1651 at Powick Hams and Fort Royal

The Battle of Worcester signified, at the end of the day, the final battle between the Parliament armies and the Royalist armies led firstly by Charles I against the Earl of Essex and then his son Charles II with mostly Scottish regiments against Oliver Cromwell during the nine years of a bloody and civil conflict.

August 30th:

Cromwell arrives at Spetchley, home to the Berkeley family, to create line of attack which extends from Elbury Hill (now Elbury park) to Bund's Hill near the Ketch Inn, a distance of some two and a half miles. Parliamentary troops already established on Red Hill and in Perry Wood. Lieutenant General Fleetwood positions at Powick near the Teme bridge. Meanwhile General Lambert arrives up river to the Teme confluence with the Severn with boats to build a bridge across the Teme.

August 31st.

Cromwell orders guns to be placed on Red Hill and in Perry Wood and to fire on Worcester as a distraction while boat bridge is being constructed. Major Knox leads his Scots regiment up Red Hill to try and quiet the guns and another sortie is led to Bunds Hill. Knox runs into General Fairfaxs regiment and falls into a trap. The sortie to Bunds Hill is similarly indisposed. This was due to a Worcester spy named Guise who learnt of the sorties and reported them to Cromwell's armies. He was later caught, tried and hanged.

September 2nd.

Lambert finishes boat bridge across River Teme. Plans laid to attack the Scots for the next day. Lambert returns to regiment at Upton upon Severn.

September 3rd.

The Duke of Hamilton is in charge of Fort Royal with the main body of Scots, Lord Rothes has a strong detachment on the Castle Mound, the whole of the Scots Brigade of horse is positioned on Pitchcroft under the command of General Leslie. General Montgomery heads the Scots on the Powick Hams with Keiths brigade on Powick Bridge where Prince Rupert defeated Fiennes in 1642 (the first official civil war battle). Piscottys Highlanders are stationed near the bridge of boats at the Temes mouth with Dalziels brigade in reserve at Wickfield on the high ground overlooking the Teme Bridge.

General Lambert, with Dean, marches from Upton in the early morning to Powick. A small skirmish takes place (see Powick church tower for evidence). The Scots are driven back to the bridge which is held by Keith. Lambert manages to cross the Teme via the boat bridge but is repulsed by Piscotty and his Highlanders. Again Lambert attacks and this time he is more successful driving the driving the Scots slowly back towards Worcester. This, in turn, forces Keith to abandon his Bridge stance or risk being cut off on his left flank. Lambert and Dean owe their success to Cromwell receiving news of the Royalist stance and sending three Brigades across the boat bridge to attack from the west side of the Teme. Leslie is still positioned on Pichcroft with his Brigade of Horse refusing to budge and go to the aid of Piscotty and Keith. Piscotty escapes into Worcester through St.Johns but Keith is taken prisoner by Dean.

Meanwhile, back in Worcester, Charles is atop the cathedral tower watching progress. He then quickly moves into evasive action and marches a troop of horse and foot up the London Road towards Red Hill and the Parliamentary positions. The Duke of Hamilton is similarly disposed but, leading a column of his own regiment, goes up to Perry Wood, disposes of some musketeers hiding behind hedge along the lane, charges on the canon and captures them. Charles attack to Red Hill was also successful in driving the Parliamentary line further back up the hill. Again, if Leslie had moved his horse and consolidated the general push by the Royalists then history may well have been changed.

The Parliament troops rally again and force another attack. Cromwell hears of the lack of support and rushes his three brigades back from supporting Lambert and inspires his men to fight on against the Scots. Hamilton is running out of powder and shot. All along the Parliament lines the Scots are falling back. One last attempt by Hamilton results in own his fatal wounding. Cromwell advances quickly taking the advantage. Sir Alexander Forbes is struck down from his command of the Fort Royal and the Kings Standard is torn down.

Meanwhile, the rest of Cromwells men make good between Fort Royal and Sidbury Gate taking not only the Scots flank but now their rear. Cromwell orders the Fort Royal guns to be turned on Worcester while his men fall on the easy prey of the now disordered Scots fugitives who are struggling to get through the narrow Sidbury Gate. Cut off, they are easily cut down in the mass slaughter (to be compared with Charles father at Naseby and his great Uncle at Culloden) which takes place around Sidbury and up Red Hill.

Throughout all of this Charles is still outside the city walls trying vainly to rally his troops from the entrance to the Commandery. An attack from a Parliament horseman almost altered the whole course of history but misses in his attempt to cut Charles down. One, William Bagnall, sees the Kings plight and drives an ox cart between the Commandery entrance and the city walls stopping the horseman and allowing Charles to affect an escape. He makes for his quarters in the Corn Market but not before Fleetwood attacks across the river bridge, up Broad Street into Mealcheapen Street thus cutting off the Scots rear to the west and the Bridge Gate. The Forgate to the north had been built up, Cromwell is in control of Sidbury to the south and the Friars Gate was already in control by the victorious Parliament troop.

The only exit left now is St.Martins Gate which adjoins Charles' quarters. The Lord Wilmott finds a horse and brings it to the rear entrance of what is now the Swan With Two Nicks Inn. Colonel Corbett with his troopers affect entry though the front of the house leaving Charles to only just make his escape through St.Martins Gate, along a lane to Barbourne Bridge, across the river and onto the Kidderminster Road heading north.

But that, my friend, is another story.

Footnotes:

William Guise, the man responsible for informing Cromwell of the surprise attack to his RedHill position by 1500 Royalist soldiers, was hanged from the sign of the Golden Cross Inn along Broad Street the next day. However, Cromwell rewarded his widow with the sum of £200, a large sum at the time, with an annuity of the same amount. Seven years later to the day, namely September 3rd 1658, Cromwell died leading to the Royalist story and legend that Cromwell sold his soul to the devil in Pirie Wood for a victory and seven years of his life.

London Road was constructed in the 18th century as a turnpike road. The ancient medieval road lays to the south and can be traced most of the way by a line of two adjacent parallel lanes running from Cromwell Avenue and into Blake Street and follows the natural gradient of the hill. Two large cuttings were made to ease the hilly gradient for the coaches to and from London. The first was at Wheatsheaf Hill, so called after an inn of the same name half way up the hill, and cut through part of the defences of the old Fort Royal. The second is at Red Hill and cut through the southern tip of Perry Wood. Pirie Brook flowed down from the tip of Pirie Wood and because it once crossed the road is now channelled below the road through a pipe.

The references to Pirie Wood suggest that Perry Wood is a derivative name.

The Battle of Worcester : September 3rd 1651 at Powick Hams and Fort Royal

Alan James Magnus, Worcester Militia & Earl of Loudoun's

For further reading try 'Cromwell's Crowning Mercy' by Malcolm Atkin

1

Event: placed in the stocks after a domestic dispute Misc 1664 Ipswich, Essex, MA U. S. A. 5 1

Event: fined for making love to the woman who later became his wife Misc 1660 Essex County, MA U. S. A. 1

Marriage 1 Faith BRIDGES b: 1645 in Rowley, Essex, MA U. S. A.

Married: ABT 1664 in Boxford, Essex, MA U. S. A.

Note:

from TORREY:

BLACK, Daniel & [Faith BRIDGES]; by 1664, by 1665; Boxford/ Topsfield {Boxford Hist. 49; Sv. 1:189; Framingham Hist. 194; Deerfield 88; Essex Ant. 9:187; 12:26; York Hist. 1:276; Cummings 8; Gen Mag. 3:34; Reg. 8:252; 10:370; Bridges Anc. 2}

The first we know of him is from Essex court records, where we find that: "1660, September, Daniel Blake is fined 5 pounds, and respited for 4 pounds, conditionally, for making love to Edmund Bridge's daughter, without her parent's consent." This daughter was Faith Bridges, who he afterward married. It does not appear that he owned land in Boxford, he did own a small tract in Topsfield in 1663, near Boxford, Fish Brook. In 1664, he complains of his wife. Daniel and his wife, Faith were condemned to set in stocks for domestic disturbances. They were instructed not to miscall each other while so confined. Afterward, he was to treat her properly and she was not to be seen in the company of other men. The stocks were probably located in or near the meeting house green in Ipswich, MA.

6 7 8 4 9 10 11 1 12 13 14

Children

James BLACK b: MAY 1669 in Boxford, Essex, MA U. S. A.
Josiah BLACK b: SEP 1676 in Boxford, Essex, MA U. S. A.

Sources:

Abbrev: EA (Essex Antiquarian)

Title:

The ESSEX ANTIQUARIAN

Edited by Sidney Perley and George Francis Dow, The Essex Antiquarian

The Essex Antiquarian was published from 1897 to 1909 by Sidney Perley and George Francis Dow, both noted Essex County Genealogists and Historians. The purpose and accomplishments of the Antiquarian are best described in the words of Perley and Dow, as published in the final edition Vol. 13, No. 4, October 1909:

"The Essex Antiquarian was purposed to fill a want. It was designed to be a leader in scientific historical research; and to present copies or abstracts of records and compilations in an exhaustive and systematic manner, so that as far as the publication extended further investigation along those lines would be needless. Repeated examinations of records tend to their destruction, and thousands of dollars have been spent locally upon the same records for the same purpose by various persons who were ignorant of costly examinations made by others. This purpose, if prosecuted, would preserve the records and make further expenditure of money and labor unnecessary. This has been the particular reason of the appearance of the genealogies in alphabetical order, the gravestone inscriptions, abstracts of the Salem and Ipswich quarterly court records and files, old Norfolk county records, all wills in the order of their probate, Essex Gazette notes, abstracts of titles to land, etc., as shown in Salem, Haverhill, Ipswich and Marblehead in 1700, and in Georgetown and Topsfield in 1800. During the thirteen years of its existence there have been published in The Essex Antiquarian genealogies of all families from Abbe to Brown; all gravestone inscriptions dated prior to the year 1800 in Amesbury, Andover, Beverly, Boxford, Bradford, Danvers, Essex, Georgetown, Gloucester, Groveland, Hamilton, Haverhill and Ipswich; all wills proved in the county prior to June, 1666; the record of the Essex County Revolutionary soldiers and sailors alphabetically to Brown; abstracts of the old Norfolk records to 1675; Salem and Ipswich quarterly court records and files to 1659; and abstracts of all records in the first ten volumes of the Suffolk county registry of deeds relating to Essex county persons and property, where parties resided or property was located in Essex county, covering the period prior to 1678." (Salem, MA: The Essex Antiquarian, 1897 [Reprinted Lecanto, FL: Essex Books www.essexbooks.com, 1999])

http://www.newenglandancestors.org/research/Database/Essex_antiquarian/default.asp

Text:

Repository:

Name: New England Historic Genealogical Society

Boston, MA 02116

U. S. A.

Repository:

Name: Patrick McDonald Personal Library

Dural, NSW 2158

AUSTRALIA

Page: Vol. 9, p. 187 and Vol. 12, p. 26

Abbrev: -- Black Families of New England Online

Title:

The Black Families in New England

Darryl Rowles

http://freepages.genealogy.rootsweb.com/~drowles/black/r0000001.htm#i1

http://members.tripod.com/D_Rowles/

Abbrev: NEHGR

Title:

The New England Historical and Genealogical Register

New England Historical and Genealogical Register (Boston, MA: New England Historical and Genealogical Society)

The NEHGR or "Register" is the oldest and best known genealogical publication in North America. It focuses primarily on the genealogy of New England and the northeastern United States.

Repository:

Name: New England Historic Genealogical Society

Boston, MA 02116

U. S. A.

Text: Vol. 1, p. 378 (1847) "Scotch Prisoners Sent to Massachusetts in 1652"

Abbrev: Torrey's New England Marriages

Title:

New England Marriages Prior To 1700

Clarence Almon Torrey, New England Marriages Prior To 1700 (Baltimore, MD: Genealogical Publishing Company, Inc., 1985)

Repository:

Name: New England Historic Genealogical Society

Boston, MA 02116

U. S. A.

Repository:

Name: Patrick McDonald Personal Library

Dural, NSW 2158

AUSTRALIA

Abbrev: NEHGR

Title:

The New England Historical and Genealogical Register

New England Historical and Genealogical Register (Boston, MA: New England Historical and Genealogical Society)

The NEHGR or "Register" is the oldest and best known genealogical publication in North America. It focuses primarily on the genealogy of New England and the northeastern United States.

Repository:

Name: New England Historic Genealogical Society

Boston, MA 02116

U. S. A.

Text: Vol. 6, p. 243 (1852) "Early Settlers of Essex and Old Norfolk"

Abbrev: GM

Title:

GREAT MIGRATION BEGINS and GREAT MIGRATION Project

Robert Charles Anderson, The Great Migration Begins: Immigrants to New England, 1620-1633 [database online] Provo, UT: Ancestry.com, 2000.

Original data: Robert Charles Anderson. The Great Migration Begins: Immigrants to New England, 1620-1633, vols. 1-3. (Boston, MA: New England Historic Genealogical Society, 1995)

Repository:

Name: New England Historic Genealogical Society

Boston, MA 02116

U. S. A.

Repository:

Name: Patrick McDonald Personal Library

Dural, NSW 2158

AUSTRALIA

Page: p. 391

Abbrev: Savage's Dictionary

Title:

A Genealogical Dictionary of the First Settlers of New England, Showing Three Generations of Those who Came before May, 1692, on the Basis of Farmer's Register

James Savage; compiled by O. P. Dexter, A Genealogical Dictionary of the First Settlers of New England, Showing Three Generations of Those who Came before May, 1692, on the Basis of Farmer's Register

(The best known and most frequently used genealogical dictionary.This monumental work gives the name of every settler who came to New England before 1692, regardless of his rank, station in life or fortune. Traces the descendants of each person, giving dates of marriage and death, dates of birth, marriage and death of his children, and the birth dates and names of his grandchildren, thus recording the beginning of the third generation in New England. Binding is 4 vols. 2,541 pp.) Library of Congress Catalog Card No. 65-18541

(Boston: 1860-1862

Reprinted with "Genealogical Notes and Errata," excerpted from The New England Historical and Genealogical Register, Vol. XXVII, No. 2, April, 1873, pp. 135-139, And A Genealogical Cross Index of the Four Volumes of the Genealogical Dictionary of James Savage, by O. P. Dexter, 1884.

Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc. Baltimore,

1965,1969,1977,1981,1986, 1990)

Repository:

Name: New England Historic Genealogical Society

Boston, MA 02116

U. S. A.

Repository:

Name: Patrick McDonald Personal Library

Dural, NSW 2158

AUSTRALIA

Page: Vol. 1, p. 189

Abbrev: NEHGR

Title:

The New England Historical and Genealogical Register

New England Historical and Genealogical Register (Boston, MA: New England Historical and Genealogical Society)

The NEHGR or "Register" is the oldest and best known genealogical publication in North America. It focuses primarily on the genealogy of New England and the northeastern United States.

Repository:

Name: New England Historic Genealogical Society

Boston, MA 02116

U. S. A.

Page: Vol. 8, p. 252 (1854) "Pedigree of Bridges"

Abbrev: Bridges Anc. (1960)

Title: Samuel Willard Bridges, Bridges Genealogy including Britton, DeNike (Boston, MA: George H. Ellis & Company, 1960)

Repository:

Name: New England Historic Genealogical Society

Boston, MA 02116

U. S. A.

Page: p. 2

Abbrev: NEHGR

Title:

The New England Historical and Genealogical Register

New England Historical and Genealogical Register (Boston, MA: New England Historical and Genealogical Society)

The NEHGR or "Register" is the oldest and best known genealogical publication in North America. It focuses primarily on the genealogy of New England and the northeastern United States.

Repository:

Name: New England Historic Genealogical Society

Boston, MA 02116

U. S. A.

Page: Vol. 10, p. 370

Abbrev: York, ME History (Banks)

Title:

History of York, ME

Dr. Charles Edward Banks, HISTORY OF YORK, Successively Known as Bristol (1632), Agamenticus (1641), Gorgeana (1642) & York (1652) With contributions on topography and land titles by Angevine W. Gowen, C.E.; sketches by the author (Boston, MA: Calkins Press,1931-5 [republished Portsmouth, NH: 1997])

Repository:

Name: New England Historic Genealogical Society

Boston, MA 02116

U. S. A.

Page: Vol. 1, p. 276

Abbrev: Boxford, MA History

Title: Sydney Perley, The History of Boxford, Essex County, Massachusetts [NEHGS Library] (Boxford, MA: 1880)

Repository:

Name: New England Historic Genealogical Society

Boston, MA 02116

U. S. A.

Page: p. 49

Abbrev: Deerfield, MA History

Title: George Sheldon, History of Deerfield, Mass., 2 vols. vol. 2, part 2 (Deerfield, MA: 1896)

Repository:

Name: New England Historic Genealogical Society

Boston, MA 02116

U. S. A.

Page: p. 88

Abbrev: Framingham, MA History (1847)

Title: William Barry, A History of Framingham, Mass. including the Plantation, From 1640 to the Present Time with an Appendix (Boston, MA: James Munroe and Company, 1847)

Repository:

Name: New England Historic Genealogical Society

Boston, MA 02116

U. S. A.

Page: p. 194


view all 13

Daniel Black's Timeline

1628
1628
Dunbar, East Lothian, Scotland
1665
October 21, 1665
Topsfield, Essex County, Massachusetts, United States
1667
August 24, 1667
Boxford, Essex, Massachusetts Bay Colony
1669
May 4, 1669
Boxford, Essex County, Massachusetts
1670
September 1670
Boxford, Essex County, Massachusetts, United States
1671
March 10, 1671
Boxford, Essex County, Massachusetts, United States
1672
July 28, 1672
Boxford, Essex County, Massachusetts, United States
1674
February 6, 1674
Boxford, Essex County, Massachusetts, United States
1676
September 1676
Boxford, Essex County, Massachusetts, United States