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Edward Archdale

Birthdate:
Birthplace: Darsham, Suffolk, England
Death: 1641 (36-37)
Immediate Family:

Son of John Archdale and Frances Archdale
Husband of Angel Archdale
Father of William Archdale
Brother of Mary Adams; Ven. John Archdale; Lettice Norris and Unknown Archdale

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About Edward Archdale

m. a daughter of — Donellan, esq. of Croghan, in the county of Roscommon, and had an only son, John. vicar of Luske from 1679 to 1690, in which latter year he lost his life. He Wedded Elizabeth, daughter and heir of John Bernard, esq. of Drumin, and by her (who m. secondly, the Rev. Thomas King, prebendary of Swords) had a daughter, Frances, and three sons, viz. 1. JOHN, ofDrumin,who d. in 1703, leaving a posthumous son, who d. unm. 2. William, of Dublin, who m. Henrietta, daughter of the Rev. Henry Goune, and had (with three daughters, the eldest m. to William Preston, esq.) two sons, Menvva', rector ofSlane, b. in 1723, author of the Monasticou Hibernicum, and editor of Lodge’s Peerage. Henry. 3. Bernard. John Archdale d. in 1621, and was s. by his son, EDWARD ARCHDALE, esq. who espoused Angel, daughter of Sir Paul Gore (ancestor of the Gores, Earls of Ross, &c.), and had issue. During his time the castle' which his father had erected was taken and burned by the rebels under Sir Phelim O'Neil, in October, 1641, and but two children of a numerous family survived. One, a daughter, who was absent and married; the other, an infant son, WILLIAM, preserved by the fidelity of his nurse, an Irish Roman Catholic, which WILLIAM Aucnmuz, esq. after succeeding to the estates, m. Elizabeth, daughter of Henry Mervyn, esq. of Omagh Castle and Trillic, both in the county of Tyrone, and had two sons and a daughter, viz. 1. MERVYN, his heir. n. EDWARD, heir to his brother. Ill. ANGEL. He was s. by his elder son, Angel Gore is the daughter of Sir Paul Gore and Isabella Wickliffe. She was born abt 1600. Edward Archdale is traditionally supposed to have been amongst the party of Protestant gentry of County Fermanagh, whom Rory Maguire had planned to murder, whilst they were enjoying his hospitality at Crevinish Castle. The intention of Maguire, and the other rebels at Crevinish, was to fall upon the party after dinner, when they had drunk plenty of wine, and massacre them all. The plot was, however, frustrated by a timely warning whispered by a serving man named Coughlin, who thus enabled the guests to make their escape. It is certain, at least, that Edward Archdale was in possession of the family estates at the time of Sir Phelim O'Neill's rebellion in 1641, when the old Castle of Archdale was destroyed by the rebels under Rory Maguire, and all the owner's children are said to have perished, except the boy William. Tradition relates that nine Archdale children perished in the Castle, and that the youngest child was saved by his nurse. [Memoirs, p13] Despite a tradition to the contrary, it is probable that Edward Archdale did not survive the 1641 Rebellion ; as there is no trace of him in the family papers or other records after 1641, and it is certain that he did not reach an old age. He married Angel, second daughter of Sir Paul Gore, 1st Baronet, of Manor Gore, by whom he had his son and successor, William. EDWARD ARCHDALE, the eldest son of John Archdale and Frances Honings, was baptised at Darsham on April 15th 1604, and succeeded to the Fermanagh estates on his father’s death in 1621. By an Inquisition taken at Enniskillen on the last day of February 1623-4, before Sir Paul Gore, Captain Atkinson and others, it appears that there were nine Irish tenants on the Archdale estate of Tallanagh.² Edward Archdale had not long been in possession of his lands, when a dispute arose with Sir Leonard Blennerhasset¹ concerning the ownership of the island of Crevinishaughey, which had been included in the Archdale patent. In the Inquisition held at Enniskillen on April 27th 1629, it was stated that “ the moyetie of the island of Crevenish Aghie or Crevenish Killegh, or greater part thereof, is withhoulden from the said proportion [Tallanagh] and incroached upon by, Leonard Blennerhasaett Esq., or his assigns, these four years past, and the same doth still withhould and keep back from the said proportion, pretended to be church land.” Eventually, Edward Archdale obtained a re-grant of his two proportions on December 22nd 1629, though the Crown Rent was doubled.² On September 5th 1637, Edward Archdale leased to his brother John the farm of Drumgarragh and other lands in Fermanagh, in consideration of the payment of £200 and the yearly rent of £6. The payment of this £200 has been provided for by their father’s will. All the rights to this farm were redeemed by Edward’s son nearly thirty years later.³ By agreement, dated November 16th 1639, Edward Archdale and James Mervyn, elder brother of Sir Audley, became jointly bound to one Gilbert Rawson in the sum of £130, for which the latter obtained a judgment in the Court of Common Pleas. In 1641, Edward Archdale and other parishioners of Derryvullen presented a petition to the House of Commons against Sir John Dunbar, though the nature of the petition is not stated in the Journals. The matter was referred on July 30th to the Committee of Grievances. Edward Archdale is traditionally supposed to have been amoungst the party of Protestant gentry of County Fermanagh, whom Rory Maguire had planned to murder, whilst they were enjoying his hospitality at Crevinish Castle. The intention of Maguire, and the other rebels at Crevinish, was to fall upon the party after dinner, when they had drunk plenty of wine, and massacre them all. The plot was, however, frustrated by a timely warning whispered by a serving man named Coughlin, who thus enabled the guests to make their escape.4 It is certain, at least, that Edward Archdale was in possession of the family estates at the time of Sir Phelim O’Neill’s rebellion in 1641, when the old Castle of Archdale was destroyed by the rebels under Rory Maguire, and all the owner’s children are said to have perished, except the boy William. Tradition relates that nine Archdale children perished in the Castle, and that the youngest child was saved by his nurse.5 Rory had married Deborah, Lady Blennerhasset, and had established himself at Crevinish. Thence he came forth on his campaign of “ murther ” and pillage. It was afterwards stated, in a deposition Bryan Maguire, that the flames of Lisnarick were to be the signal for the rising in that part of the country, and also that Archdalestown was pillaged by the rebels. Sir John Temple, in his History of the Irish Rebellion (page 83) says : “ Within the county Fermanagh, multitudes were presently killed in cold blood ; some taken at the plough, others as they sate peaceably in their own houses, others traveling upon the ways, all without any manner of provocation by them given—suddenly surprised and unexpectedly cut off. At the Castle of Lisgool, within that country, above 150 men, women and children, almost all consumed by fire. At the Castle of Monaeh, near 100 British there, slain all together. And the same bloody company of Rebels were no sooner admitted into the castle of Tullah [Tully], which was delivered up into the hands of Roury Mac-Guire, upon composition, and faithful promises of fair quarter, but that within the very court they began to strip the people and most 14 cruelly put them to the sword, murdering them all without mercy. At Lissenskeagh they hanged or otherwise killed above 100 persons, most of them of the Scotch nation ; for after once they had the English in their power, they spared none of them, but used all the Scots with as much cruelty as they did the English. This county was very well planted by the British undertakers, and all of them and their Tennants, in a very short space, after a most horrible manner, quite destroyed or utterly banished from their habitations.” Castle Archdale was, however, rebuilt and inhabited for nearly fifty years. Despite a tradition to the contrary, it is probable that Edward Archdale did not survive the Rebellion ; as there is no trace of him in the family papers or other records after 1641, and it is certain that he did not reach an old age. He married Angel, second daughter of Sir Paul Gore, 1st Baronet, of Manor Gore, by whom he had his son and successor.

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Edward Archdale's Timeline

1604
April 15, 1604
Darsham, Suffolk, England
April 1604
Darsham, Suffolk, England
1641
1641
1641
Age 36