Eva of Leinster, Countess Of Stirgoil

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Aoife (Aoife) MacMurrough, Countess of Ireland

Gaelic: Aoife Ní Diarmait, Countess of Ireland
Also Known As: "Countess of Ireland", "Aoife of Leinster", "Aoife Ni Diarmait", "Aoife Rua", "Red Eva", "Princess", "Lady", "Countess", "Eva of Leinster", "Aoife", "Aoife "Eve" ni Murchadha", "Countess of Stirgoil", "Red Eva (Irish: Aoife Rua)", "Eva"
Birthdate:
Birthplace: Kingdom of Leinster, Ireland
Death: August 26, 1188 (43)
Waterford, Waterford City, County Waterford, Ireland
Place of Burial: Kilkenny, County Kilkenny, Ireland
Immediate Family:

Daughter of Dermot II MacMurrough, King of Leinster and Mor O'Toole
Wife of Richard "Strongbow" de Clare, 2nd Earl of Pembroke
Mother of Isabel de Clare, heiress of Pembroke; Gilbert FitzRichard de Strigoil, 3rd Earl Pembroke and Joan de Clare
Sister of Urlachan MacMurrough; Donal Kavanagh MacMurrough, King of Leinster; Conchobar / Connor mac Diarmata or mac Dermot; St. Lawrence O'Toole and Art Mac Murrough Mac Diarmuid
Half sister of Enna mac Diarmata or mac Dermot and Domnall Caemanach mac Murchada

Occupation: Countess of Pembroke, Countess Of Ireland, Princess of Leinster, Countess of Ireland, comtesse d'Irlande Comtesse d'Irlande
Managed by: Private User
Last Updated:

About Eva of Leinster, Countess Of Stirgoil

"A Serendipitous Discovery at Tintern Abbey", by Catherine Armstrong, states Aoife was buried at Tintern Abbey.
[http://www.castlewales.com/mac_mur.html]


[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Aoife_of_Leinster]

Aoife MacMurrough (1145–1188, Irish: Aoife Ní Diarmait), also known by later historians as Eva of Leinster, was the daughter of Dermot MacMurrough (Irish: Diarmait MacMurchada), King of Leinster, and his wife Mor O'Toole (c.1114-1191). Aoife conducted battles on behalf of her husband and is sometimes known as Red Eva (Irish: Aoife Rua).

Marriage

On 29 August 1170, following the Norman invasion of Ireland that her father had requested, she married Richard de Clare, 2nd Earl of Pembroke, better known as Strongbow, in Christchurch Cathedral, Waterford. Strongbow was the leader of the Norman invasion force. Aoife had been promised to Strongbow by her father who had visited England to ask for an invasion army. He was not allowed to give his daughter away, as under Early Irish Law, Aoife had the choice of whom she married. But Aoife had to agreed to an arranged marriage.

Under Anglo-Norman law, this gave Strongbow succession rights to the Kingdom of Leinster. Under Irish Breton law, the marriage gave her a life interest only, after which any land would normally revert to male cousins; but Breton law also recognised a transfer of "swordland" following a conquest.

Aoife conducted battles on behalf of her husband and is sometimes known as Red Eva (Irish: Aoife Rua). She had two sons with her husband Richard de Clare, and within several generations her descendants included much of the nobility of northwestern Europe, including Richard,1st Earl of Cornwall who was elected King of the Romans in 1257.

Through other lines she is the ancestor of the Scottish Kings Robert the Bruce (and his descendants) and John Balliol, and of Irish magnates such as the Earls of Kildare, Ormond and Desmond.

Aoife is also the ancestor of many Kings of England by a number of lines of descent, such as that of her granddaughter Eva Marshal, whose daughter Maude married Roger de Mortimer. They are ancestors of the Kings of England from Edward IV onwards (with the exception of Henry VII). Another line of descent is that of a daughter of Maude, Katherine Mortimer, married Thomas de Beauchamp 11th Earl of Warwick, and they were ancestors of the Earls of Warwick and also of the Edward IV and most subsequent Kings of England.

When Richard "Strongbow" de Clare, died, King Henry II took his lands into royal hands, with William fitz Audelin as administrator in Ireland and Aoife holding dower rights, and possibily the lordship of Striguil, until as late as 1185/86. Strongbow's daughter and heir, Isabel, was protected by Henry II; one of Henry's last acts was to promise Isabel and all of her father's lands to William Marshal in 1189.

A life-size statue of her sits at Carrickfergus Castle, with a plaque describing her as "thinking of home."

Children :

Isabel de Clare, 4th Countess of Pembroke (1172-1240) m. Aug 1189, Sir William Marshal, 1st Earl of Pembroke, Lord Marshal, son of John Fitz Gilbert, Marshal (Marechal) of England, and Sibylla of Salisbury.

Gilbert de Striguil (Chepstow), 3rd Earl of Pembroke (1173-1185) Inherited title from father but died as a minor. The title then went to his sister's husband on marriage.

Joan de Clare (1175 -?) m. Godfrey Gamage, son of William De Gamages and Elizabeth De Miners.



[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Aoife_MacMurrough]

Aoife MacMurrough (1145–1188, Irish: Aoife Ní Diarmait), also known by later historians as Eva of Leinster, was the daughter of Dermot MacMurrough (Irish: Diarmait MacMurchada), King of Leinster, and his wife Mor O'Toole (c.1114-1191).

Marriage

On 29 August 1170, following the Norman invasion of Ireland that her father had requested, she married Richard de Clare, 2nd Earl of Pembroke, better known as Strongbow, the leader of the Norman invasion force, in Christchurch Cathedral, Waterford. She had been promised to Strongbow by her father who had visited England to ask for an invasion army. He was not allowed to give his daughter away, as under Early Irish Law Aoife had the choice of whom she married, but she had to agree to an arranged marriage.[clarification needed]

Under Anglo-Norman law, this gave Strongbow succession rights to the Kingdom of Leinster. Under Irish Breton law, the marriage gave her a life interest only, after which any land would normally revert to male cousins; but Breton law also recognised a transfer of "swordland" following a conquest. Aoife conducted battles on behalf of her husband and is sometimes known as Red Eva (Irish: Aoife Rua). She had two sons with her husband Richard de Clare, and within several generations her descendants included much of the nobility of northwestern Europe, including Robert the Bruce and Richard, 1st Earl of Cornwall who was elected King of the Romans in 1257.[2]

A life-size statue of her sits at Carrickfergus Castle, with a plaque describing her as "thinking of home."

Aoife is the ancestor of many Kings of England by a number of lines of descent, such as that of her granddaughter Eva Marshal, whose daughter Maude married Roger de Mortimer. They are ancestors of the Kings of England from Edward IV onwards (with the exception of Henry VII). Another line of descent is that of a daughter of Maude, Katherine Mortimer, married Thomas de Beauchamp 11th Earl of Warwick, and they were ancestors of the Earls of Warwick and also of the Edward IV and most subsequent Kings of England.

Through further lines she is the ancestor of the Scottish Kings Robert the Bruce (and his descendants) and John Balliol, and of Irish magnates such as the Earls of Kildare, Ormond and Desmond.



Aoife MacMurrough (1145 – 1188, Irish: Aoife Ní Diarmait), also known as Aoife of Leinster, was the daughter of Dermot MacMurrough (Irish: Diarmait MacMurchada), King of Leinster, and his wife More O'Toole (c.1114-1191). On 29 August 1170, following the Norman invasion of Ireland that her father had requested, she married Richard de Clare, 2nd Earl of Pembroke, better known as Strongbow, the leader of the Norman invasion force, in Christchurch Cathedral, Waterford. Under Anglo-Norman law, this gave Strongbow succession rights to the Kingdom of Leinster. Under Irish Brehon law, the marriage gave him no such rights. Aoife conducted battles on behalf of her husband and is sometimes known as Red Eva (Irish: Aoife Rua).



On 29 August 1170, following the Norman invasion of Ireland that her father had requested, Aoife MacMurrough (in Irish: Aoife Ní Diarmait), also known as Aoife of Leinster, or Eva MacMurrough, married Richard de Clare, 2nd Earl of Pembroke, better known as Strongbow, the leader of the Norman invasion force, in Christchurch Cathedral, Waterford. Under Anglo-Norman law, this gave Strongbow succession rights to the Kingdom of Leinster. Under Irish Brehon law, the marriage gave her a life interest only, after which any land would normally revert to male cousins; but Brehon law also recognized a transfer of "swordland" following a conquest. Aoife conducted battles on behalf of her husband and is sometimes known as Red Eva (Irish: Aoife Rua).

See http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Aoife_of_Leinster for more information.



Eva MacMorrough was born on 1145 in Leinster Ireland to Dermot MacMorrough, King of Leinster and More' (Moira?) O'Toole MacMorrough. Eva married Richard FitzGilbert De Clare, Earl of Pembroke on August 29, 1170 in Christ Church Cathedral, Waterford, County Waterford, Ireland. They had 3 children: Isabel De Clare, Countess of Pembroke; Gilbert de Striguil, 3rd Earl of Pembroke; and Joan De Clare. Eva passed away on 1188 in Ireland.

Eva MacMorrough De Clare, Countess of Pembroke is my 28th great grandmother.

NOTE:

Aoife MacMurrough (c.1145–1188, Irish: Aoife Ní Diarmait), also known by later historians as Eva of Leinster, was the daughter of Dermot MacMurrough (c.1110-1171) (Irish: Diarmait MacMurchada), King of Leinster, and his wife Mor O'Toole (c.1114-1191).

On the 29 August 1170, following the Norman invasion of Ireland that her father had requested, she married Richard de Clare, 2nd Earl of Pembroke, better known as Strongbow, the leader of the Norman invasion force, in Reginald's Tower in Waterford. She had been promised to Strongbow by her father who had visited England to ask for an invasion army. He was not allowed to give his daughter away, as under Early Irish Law Aoife had the choice of whom she married, but she had to agree to an arranged marriage.[clarification needed]

Under Anglo-Norman law, this gave Strongbow succession rights to the Kingdom of Leinster. Under Irish Brehon law, the marriage gave her a life interest only, after which any land would normally revert to male cousins; but Brehon law also recognised a transfer of "swordland" following a conquest. Aoife conducted battles on behalf of her husband and is sometimes known as Red Eva (Irish: Aoife Rua).

She had two sons and a daughter with her husband Richard de Clare, and via their daughter, Isabel de Clare, within a few generations their descendants included much of the nobility of Europe including all the monarchs of Scotland since Robert I (1274-1329) and all those of England, Great Britain and the United Kingdom since Henry IV (1367-1413); and, apart from Anne of Cleves, all the queen consorts of Henry VIII.

Sources: O Croinin, Daibhi (1995) Early Medieval Ireland 400-1200 London: Longman Press; p. 281 Salmonson, Jessica Amanda.(1991) The Encyclopedia of Amazons. Paragon House. Page 160. ISBN 1-55778-420-5 Weis, Frederick Lewis Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America Before 1700, Lines: 66-26, 175-7, 261-30

SOURCES:

Aoife MacMurrough, She also known as Aoife of Leinster. She was the daughter of Dermot MacMurrough King of Leinster, and his wife Mor O'Toole. On 29 August 1170, following the Norman invasion of Ireland that her father had requested, she married Richard de Clare, 2nd Earl of Pembroke, better known as Strongbow, the leader of the Norman invasion force, in Christchurch Cathedral, Waterford.

She had been promised to Strongbow by her father who had visited England to ask for an invasion army. He was not allowed to give his daughter away, as under Early Irish Law Aoife had the choice of whom she married, but she had to agree to an arranged marriage .
Under Anglo-Norman law, this gave Strongbow succession rights to the Kingdom of Leinster. Under Irish Brehon law, the marriage gave her a life interest only, after which any land would normally revert to male cousins; but Brehon law also recognised a transfer of "swordland" following a conquest. Aoife conducted battles on behalf of her husband and is sometimes known as Red Eva (Irish: Aoife Rua). She had two sons with her husband Richard de Clare the first son she named after her late father, Dermott MacMurrough, King of Leinster. and a daughter Isabel who married William Marshal 1st Earl of Pembroke A life-size statue of her sits at Carrickfergus Castle, with a plaque describing her as "thinking of home."



Aoife MacMurrough (c.1145–1188, Irish: Aoife Ní Diarmait), also known by later historians as Eva of Leinster, was the daughter of Dermot MacMurrough (c.1110-1171) (Irish: Diarmait MacMurchada), King of Leinster, and his wife Mor O'Toole (c.1114-1191).

Marriage and rights

On the 29 August 1170, following the Norman invasion of Ireland that her father had requested, she married Richard de Clare, 2nd Earl of Pembroke, better known as Strongbow, the leader of the Norman invasion force, in Reginald's Tower in Waterford. She had been promised to Strongbow by her father who had visited England to ask for an invasion army. He was not allowed to give his daughter away, as under Early Irish Law Aoife had the choice of whom she married, but she had to agree to an arranged marriage, that is, to select from a list of suitable suitors.

Under Anglo-Norman law, this gave Strongbow succession rights to the Kingdom of Leinster. Under Irish Brehon law, the marriage gave her a life interest only, after which any land would normally revert to male cousins; but Brehon law also recognised a transfer of "swordland" following a conquest. Aoife conducted battles on behalf of her husband and is sometimes known as Red Eva (Irish: Aoife Rua).

She had two sons and a daughter with her husband Richard de Clare, and via their daughter, Isabel de Clare, within a few generations their descendants included much of the nobility of Europe including all the monarchs of Scotland since Robert I (1274-1329) and all those of England, Great Britain and the United Kingdom since Henry IV (1367-1413); and, apart from Anne of Cleves, all the queen consorts of Henry VIII.



Aoife MacMurrough (1145–1188, Irish: Aoife Ní Diarmait), also known by later historians as Eva of Leinster, was the daughter of Dermot MacMurrough (Irish: Diarmait MacMurchada), King of Leinster, and his wife Mor O'Toole (c.1114-1191). Aoife conducted battles on behalf of her husband and is sometimes known as Red Eva (Irish: Aoife Rua).

Marriage

On 29 August 1170, following the Norman invasion of Ireland that her father had requested, she married Richard de Clare, 2nd Earl of Pembroke, better known as Strongbow, in Christchurch Cathedral, Waterford. Strongbow was the leader of the Norman invasion force. Aoife had been promised to Strongbow by her father who had visited England to ask for an invasion army. He was not allowed to give his daughter away, as under Early Irish Law, Aoife had the choice of whom she married. But Aoife had to agree to an arranged marriage.

Under Anglo-Norman law, this gave Strongbow succession rights to the Kingdom of Leinster. Under Irish Brehon law, the marriage gave her a life interest only, after which any land would normally revert to male cousins; but Brehon law also recognised a transfer of "swordland" following a conquest.

Aoife conducted battles on behalf of her husband and is sometimes known as Red Eva (Irish: Aoife Rua). She had two sons with her husband Richard de Clare, and within several generations her descendants included much of the nobility of northwestern Europe, including Richard,1st Earl of Cornwall who was elected King of the Romans in 1257.

Through other lines she is the ancestor of the Scottish Kings Robert the Bruce (and his descendants) and John Balliol, and of Irish magnates such as the Earls of Kildare, Ormond and Desmond.

Aoife is also the ancestor of many Kings of England by a number of lines of descent, such as that of her granddaughter Eva Marshal, whose daughter Maude married Roger de Mortimer. They are ancestors of the Kings of England from Edward IV onwards (with the exception of Henry VII). Another line of descent is that of a daughter of Maude, Katherine Mortimer, married Thomas de Beauchamp 11th Earl of Warwick, and they were ancestors of the Earls of Warwick and also of the Edward IV and most subsequent Kings of England.

When Richard "Strongbow" de Clare, died, King Henry II took his lands into royal hands, with William fitz Audelin as administrator in Ireland and Aoife holding dower rights, and possibily the lordship of Striguil, until as late as 1185/86. Strongbow's daughter and heir, Isabel, was protected by Henry II; one of Henry's last acts was to promise Isabel and all of her father's lands to William Marshal in 1189.

A life-size statue of her sits at Carrickfergus Castle, with a plaque describing her as "thinking of home."

Children :

Isabel de Clare, 4th Countess of Pembroke (1172-1240) m. Aug 1189, Sir William Marshal, 1st Earl of Pembroke, Lord Marshal, son of John Fitz Gilbert, Marshal (Marechal) of England, and Sibylla of Salisbury.

Gilbert de Striguil (Chepstow), 3rd Earl of Pembroke (1173-1185) Inherited title from father but died as a minor. The title then went to his sister's husband on marriage.

Joan de Clare (1175 -?) m. Godfrey Gamage, son of William De Gamages and Elizabeth De Miners.


http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Aoife_MacMurrough

Aoife MacMurrough (1145–1188, Irish: Aoife Ní Diarmait), also known by later historians as Eva of Leinster, was the daughter of Dermot MacMurrough (Irish: Diarmait MacMurchada), King of Leinster, and his wife Mor O'Toole (c.1114-1191).

Marriage

On 29 August 1170, following the Norman invasion of Ireland that her father had requested, she married Richard de Clare, 2nd Earl of Pembroke, better known as Strongbow, the leader of the Norman invasion force, in Christchurch Cathedral, Waterford. She had been promised to Strongbow by her father who had visited England to ask for an invasion army. He was not allowed to give his daughter away, as under Early Irish Law Aoife had the choice of whom she married, but she had to agree to an arranged marriage.[clarification needed]

Under Anglo-Norman law, this gave Strongbow succession rights to the Kingdom of Leinster. Under Irish Brehon law, the marriage gave her a life interest only, after which any land would normally revert to male cousins; but Brehon law also recognised a transfer of "swordland" following a conquest. Aoife conducted battles on behalf of her husband and is sometimes known as Red Eva (Irish: Aoife Rua). She had two sons with her husband Richard de Clare, and within several generations her descendants included much of the nobility of northwestern Europe, including Robert the Bruce and Richard, 1st Earl of Cornwall who was elected King of the Romans in 1257.[2]

A life-size statue of her sits at Carrickfergus Castle, with a plaque describing her as "thinking of home."

Aoife is the ancestor of many Kings of England by a number of lines of descent, such as that of her granddaughter Eva Marshal, whose daughter Maude married Roger de Mortimer. They are ancestors of the Kings of England from Edward IV onwards (with the exception of Henry VII). Another line of descent is that of a daughter of Maude, Katherine Mortimer, married Thomas de Beauchamp 11th Earl of Warwick, and they were ancestors of the Earls of Warwick and also of the Edward IV and most subsequent Kings of England.

Through further lines she is the ancestor of the Scottish Kings Robert the Bruce (and his descendants) and John Balliol, and of Irish magnates such as the Earls of Kildare, Ormond and Desmond.


Aoife MacMurrough (1145 – 1188, Irish: Aoife Ní Diarmait), also known as Aoife of Leinster, was the daughter of Dermot MacMurrough (Irish: Diarmait MacMurchada), King of Leinster, and his wife More O'Toole (c.1114-1191). On 29 August 1170, following the Norman invasion of Ireland that her father had requested, she married Richard de Clare, 2nd Earl of Pembroke, better known as Strongbow, the leader of the Norman invasion force, in Christchurch Cathedral, Waterford. Under Anglo-Norman law, this gave Strongbow succession rights to the Kingdom of Leinster. Under Irish Brehon law, the marriage gave him no such rights. Aoife conducted battles on behalf of her husband and is sometimes known as Red Eva (Irish: Aoife Rua). -------------------- On 29 August 1170, following the Norman invasion of Ireland that her father had requested, Aoife MacMurrough (in Irish: Aoife Ní Diarmait), also known as Aoife of Leinster, or Eva MacMurrough, married Richard de Clare, 2nd Earl of Pembroke, better known as Strongbow, the leader of the Norman invasion force, in Christchurch Cathedral, Waterford. Under Anglo-Norman law, this gave Strongbow succession rights to the Kingdom of Leinster. Under Irish Brehon law, the marriage gave her a life interest only, after which any land would normally revert to male cousins; but Brehon law also recognized a transfer of "swordland" following a conquest. Aoife conducted battles on behalf of her husband and is sometimes known as Red Eva (Irish: Aoife Rua).

See http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Aoife_of_Leinster for more information. -------------------- Eva MacMorrough was born on 1145 in Leinster Ireland to Dermot MacMorrough, King of Leinster and More' (Moira?) O'Toole MacMorrough. Eva married Richard FitzGilbert De Clare, Earl of Pembroke on August 29, 1170 in Christ Church Cathedral, Waterford, County Waterford, Ireland. They had 3 children: Isabel De Clare, Countess of Pembroke; Gilbert de Striguil, 3rd Earl of Pembroke; and Joan De Clare. Eva passed away on 1188 in Ireland.

Eva MacMorrough De Clare, Countess of Pembroke is my 28th great grandmother.

NOTE:

Aoife MacMurrough (c.1145–1188, Irish: Aoife Ní Diarmait), also known by later historians as Eva of Leinster, was the daughter of Dermot MacMurrough (c.1110-1171) (Irish: Diarmait MacMurchada), King of Leinster, and his wife Mor O'Toole (c.1114-1191).

On the 29 August 1170, following the Norman invasion of Ireland that her father had requested, she married Richard de Clare, 2nd Earl of Pembroke, better known as Strongbow, the leader of the Norman invasion force, in Reginald's Tower in Waterford. She had been promised to Strongbow by her father who had visited England to ask for an invasion army. He was not allowed to give his daughter away, as under Early Irish Law Aoife had the choice of whom she married, but she had to agree to an arranged marriage.[clarification needed]

Under Anglo-Norman law, this gave Strongbow succession rights to the Kingdom of Leinster. Under Irish Brehon law, the marriage gave her a life interest only, after which any land would normally revert to male cousins; but Brehon law also recognised a transfer of "swordland" following a conquest. Aoife conducted battles on behalf of her husband and is sometimes known as Red Eva (Irish: Aoife Rua).

She had two sons and a daughter with her husband Richard de Clare, and via their daughter, Isabel de Clare, within a few generations their descendants included much of the nobility of Europe including all the monarchs of Scotland since Robert I (1274-1329) and all those of England, Great Britain and the United Kingdom since Henry IV (1367-1413); and, apart from Anne of Cleves, all the queen consorts of Henry VIII.

Sources: O Croinin, Daibhi (1995) Early Medieval Ireland 400-1200 London: Longman Press; p. 281 Salmonson, Jessica Amanda.(1991) The Encyclopedia of Amazons. Paragon House. Page 160. ISBN 1-55778-420-5 Weis, Frederick Lewis Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America Before 1700, Lines: 66-26, 175-7, 261-30

SOURCES:

1. [http://wc.rootsweb.ancestry.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=gonefishi...] 2. [http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Aoife_MacMurrough] c.rootsweb.ancestry.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=mjr6387&id=I56374


Aoife MacMurrough, She also known as Aoife of Leinster. She was the daughter of Dermot MacMurrough King of Leinster, and his wife Mor O'Toole. On 29 August 1170, following the Norman invasion of Ireland that her father had requested, she married Richard de Clare, 2nd Earl of Pembroke, better known as Strongbow, the leader of the Norman invasion force, in Christchurch Cathedral, Waterford.

She had been promised to Strongbow by her father who had visited England to ask for an invasion army. He was not allowed to give his daughter away, as under Early Irish Law Aoife had the choice of whom she married, but she had to agree to an arranged marriage . Under Anglo-Norman law, this gave Strongbow succession rights to the Kingdom of Leinster. Under Irish Brehon law, the marriage gave her a life interest only, after which any land would normally revert to male cousins; but Brehon law also recognised a transfer of "swordland" following a conquest. Aoife conducted battles on behalf of her husband and is sometimes known as Red Eva (Irish: Aoife Rua). She had two sons with her husband Richard de Clare the first son she named after her late father, Dermott MacMurrough, King of Leinster. and a daughter Isabel who married William Marshal 1st Earl of Pembroke A life-size statue of her sits at Carrickfergus Castle, with a plaque describing her as "thinking of home." -------------------- Aoife MacMurrough (c.1145–1188, Irish: Aoife Ní Diarmait), also known by later historians as Eva of Leinster, was the daughter of Dermot MacMurrough (c.1110-1171) (Irish: Diarmait MacMurchada), King of Leinster, and his wife Mor O'Toole (c.1114-1191).

Marriage and rights

On the 29 August 1170, following the Norman invasion of Ireland that her father had requested, she married Richard de Clare, 2nd Earl of Pembroke, better known as Strongbow, the leader of the Norman invasion force, in Reginald's Tower in Waterford. She had been promised to Strongbow by her father who had visited England to ask for an invasion army. He was not allowed to give his daughter away, as under Early Irish Law Aoife had the choice of whom she married, but she had to agree to an arranged marriage, that is, to select from a list of suitable suitors.

Under Anglo-Norman law, this gave Strongbow succession rights to the Kingdom of Leinster. Under Irish Brehon law, the marriage gave her a life interest only, after which any land would normally revert to male cousins; but Brehon law also recognised a transfer of "swordland" following a conquest. Aoife conducted battles on behalf of her husband and is sometimes known as Red Eva (Irish: Aoife Rua).

She had two sons and a daughter with her husband Richard de Clare, and via their daughter, Isabel de Clare, within a few generations their descendants included much of the nobility of Europe including all the monarchs of Scotland since Robert I (1274-1329) and all those of England, Great Britain and the United Kingdom since Henry IV (1367-1413); and, apart from Anne of Cleves, all the queen consorts of Henry VIII.



DONCHAD, son of MURCHAD King of Leinster & his wife --- (-1115). King of Leinster. The Annals of Tigernach (Continuation) record that “the son of Murchad, son of Diarmait, son of Máel na mbó” won a battle in 1114[689]. The Annals of Tigernach (Continuation) record that “Donnchad son of Murchad king of Leinster” was killed in battle by “Domnall son of Murchertach Húa Bríáin” in 1115[690]. m ---. The name of Donchad´s wife is not known. Donchad & his wife had one child:

1. ENNA (-1126). King of Leinster. The Annals of Tigernach (Continuation) record that “Toirdelbach son of Ruaidri king of Ireland” gave “the kingship of the Foreigners to the king of Leinster” in 1125[691]. The Annals of Tigernach (Continuation) record that “Enna son of Donnchad son of Murchad king of Leinster” died in 1126, after which “Toirdelbach Húa Conchobair king of Ireland” was made king of Leinster, unsuccessfully challenged by “Cormac Mac Carthaig king of Desmond”[692]. m ---. The name of Enna´s wife is not known. Enna & his wife had one child:

a) DIARMAIT (-Fermanagh 1 May 1171). King of Leinster. The Annales Cambriæ record that "Diermit rex filius Murcath" was expelled from Ireland by his people and went to the English king, recording in later passages that he returned to Ireland and built "castellum Carrec iuxta Wisefordiam" in 1170, and died in 1172[693]. "Diarmicius Rex Lageniensium" donated "terram…Balidubgaill" to All Saints Dublin by undated charter witnessed by "…Enna filio meo…"[694]. The Annals of Tigernach (Continuation) record that Henry II King of England arrived in Ireland in 1171, went to Dublin where he received “the kingship of Leinster and of the men of Meath, Brefne, Oriel and Ulster”[695]. The Expugnatio Hibernica records the death "apud Fernas circa kal Mai" of "Dermitius Murchardi filius" [in 1171][696]. m MOR, daughter of ---]. The primary source which confirms her marriage has not yet been identified. Mistress: (1152) DERBFORGAILL, wife of TIERNAN O'Rourke King of Breifny, daughter of MURCHAD O'Malaghlin King of Meath & his wife ---. The Expugnatio Hibernica records that "Dermitius…Murchardi filius Langeniensium princeps" eloped with "Ororicio…Medensium rege…uxor ipsius Omachlachelini filia" [in 1152][697]. The Annals of Tigernach (Continuation) record that “Diarmait Mac Murchada king of Leinster forcibly carried off out of Meath the wife of Húa Ruairc…Derb-forgaill daughter of Murchad with her wealth” in 1152, adding in a later passage that she “came again to Húa Ruairc by flight from Leinster” in 1153[698]. Diarmait & his wife had two children:

i) [Eva of Leinster, Countess Of Stirgoil AOIFE] [Eva] (-after 1189). The Annales Cambriæ record that "Ricardus comes de Striguil" invaded Ireland in 1171 and married "filiam Diermit regis"[699]. The Expugnatio Hibernica records the marriage of "filia…Dermitii, Eva" and Earl Richard[700]. She was styled Countess of Ireland in 1185, but Countess of Strigoil in 1186[701]. m (Waterford [26 Aug 1171]) RICHARD de Clare "Strongbow" Earl of Pembroke, son of GILBERT de Clare "Strongbow" Earl of Pembroke & his wife Isabel de Beaumont ([1130]-Dublin 20 Apr 1176, bur Dublin, Holy Trinity). In [1168] he promised Dermot King of Leinster to help him recover his kingdom in return for the hand of his daughter and eventual succession to the crown. He landed near Waterford 23 Aug 1170, and marched to Dublin. He acceded to the demand of King Henry II to surrender his Irish conquests to him and was granted Leinster in fee[702].
ii) URLACHAN . The primary source which confirms her parentage and marriage has not yet been identified. m DONOUGH [Donald] More King of Thomond, son of TADHG King of Thomond & his wife --- (-1194).
Dermot had three illegitimate children by unknown mistresses:
iii) ENNA (-1168 or after). "Diarmicius Rex Lageniensium" donated "terram…Balidubgaill" to All Saints Dublin by undated charter witnessed by "…Enna filio meo…"[703]. The Expugnatio Hibernica records that "Ossiriæ princeps Duvenaldus" [Dounchad [Donough] Lord of Ossory] blinded "Dermitio…filium eiusdem primogenitum"[704]. The Annals of Tigernach (Continuation) record that “Enna Mac Murchada crownprince of Leinster” was blinded in 1168 by “Donnchad Mac Gilla Pátraic king of Ossory”[705].
iv) CONNOR (-1170). The Expugnatio Hibernica records that "Dermitio" gave "filium suum Chuchurum" as hostage to Roderic of Connaught [in 1169][706]. The Expugnatio Hibernica records that Roderic killed Dermot's son [in 1170][707].
v) DOMNALL Caemanach (-killed 1175). The Annals of Ulster record the death in 1175 of "Domnall Caemanach son of Diarmaid Mac Murchadha king of Leinster…[slain]”[708].
*Charles Cawley's Medieval Lands: IRELAND

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Eva of Leinster, Countess Of Stirgoil's Timeline

1145
April 26, 1145
Kingdom of Leinster, Ireland
1172
1172
Pembroke, Pembrokeshire, Wales
1173
1173
Pembroke, Dyfed, Wales (United Kingdom)
1175
1175
Pembroke, Pembrokeshire, Wales, United Kingdom
1188
August 26, 1188
Age 43
Waterford, Waterford City, County Waterford, Ireland
August 26, 1188
Age 43
Kilkenny Castle, Kilkenny, County Kilkenny, Ireland