Gérard IV, duke of Upper Lorraine

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Gérard IV "le Grand" d'Alsace, duc de Haute Lorraine

Also Known As: "Gerard", "Gerhard", "van de Elzas", "van Elzas-Lotharingen", "von Lothringen", "d'Alsace", "Gérard Ier le Grand", "Duke of Alsace", "'le Grand'", "and 'Gerard Duke of Lorraine'"
Birthdate: (50)
Birthplace: Lorraine, France
Death: April 14, 1070 (46-54)
Remiremont, Lorraine, France (Suspected poisoning)
Place of Burial: Remiremont, Lotharingen, Frankrijk
Immediate Family:

Son of Gerhard von Bouzonville, graf von Metz and Gisèle von Metz, comtesse d'Alsace
Husband of Duchessa Hedwige di Namur
Father of Theodoric II "the Valiant", duke of Lorraine; Gérard I de Lorraine, comte de Vaudémont; Beatrix of Lorraine and Gisela d'Alsace
Brother of Adalbert II Longwy, Comte de Haute-Lorraine and Adelheid de Metz

Occupation: Herr av Châtenois och från 1048 Hertig av Lothringen, hertog van Oberlatharingen, Duke (Hertog), Duke of Lorraine
Managed by: James Fred Patin, Jr.
Last Updated:

About Gérard IV, duke of Upper Lorraine

(Gérard le Grand) Alias: Gérard de Lorraine , Gérard d'Alsace Titles: comte de Châtenois , duc de Lorraine et de Haute-Lorraine (1048-1070), comte de Metz (Gérard V, 1047-1070)


http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/LORRAINE.htm

GERARD, son of GERHARD Graf [von Metz] & his wife Gisela --- (-Remiremont [14 Apr] or 11 Aug [1070]). The Notitiæ Fundationis Monasterii Bosonis-Villæ names (in order) "Adalbertus, Gerhardus, Cuonradus, Adalbero, Beatrix, Cuono, Huoda abbatissa, Azelinus, Ida, Adeleth" as children of "Gerhardus comes [et] Gisela"[2]. In an earlier passage, the same source names "Odelrico comite et Gerhardo duce" as sons and successors of "Gerhardus comes marchio [et] cum uxore sua Gisela"[3]. Comte de Metz, Comte de Châtenois. Emperor Heinrich III appointed him as GERARD Duke of Upper Lotharingia after his brother was killed in battle in Nov 1048. "Gerardus…Lothariensium dux" donated property to Echternach abbey by charter dated 11 Apr 1067 which names "uxoris mea Hadvidis filiique nostre Theoderici…patris mei Gerhardi matrisque meæ Gislæ"[4]. According to the 14th century chronicle of Jean de Bayon, Duke Gérard was poisoned[5]. The Obituaire de Saint-Mansuy records the death "11 Aug" of "Gerardus dux"[6].

m HEDWIG de Namur, daughter of ALBERT I Comte de Namur & his wife Ermengardis of Lower Lotharingia [Carolingian] ([1005/10]-28 Jan [1080]). The Genealogica ex Stirpe Sancti Arnulfi names "Hadewidem et Emmam de Los" as the two daughters of "Ermengardis [filiæ Karoli ducis]" and as mother of "Theodericum ducem et Gerardum comitem fratres"[7]. It is likely that Hedwig was born during that latter part of the married life of her parents, given her own death in [1080] and her father's death before 1010. The Liber Memoriales of Remiremont records the donation of "Haduydis ducissa…consentientibus filiis suis duce Teoderico atque comite Girardo"[8]. "Hadewidis ductrix" founded the abbey of Châtenois by charter dated to after 1075, confirmed "post obitum ductricis Hadewidis" by "dux Theodericus filius eius"[9].

Duke Gérard & his wife had four children:

1. THIERRY de Lorraine (-30 Dec 1115). The Notitiæ Fundationis Monasterii Bosonis-Villæ records the succession of "dux Theodericus puer parvulus Gerhardi ducis filius"[10], although, considering the estimated birth date range of his mother, Thierry must have been adult when his father died. He succeeded his father in 1070 as THIERRY II Duke of Lorraine, opposed by his brother to whom he ceded territories which became the county of Vaudémont in Apr 1073 after waging war for two years. Weakened by this conflict, Louis Comte de Mousson claimed the title duke from Duke Thierry. "Hadewidis ductrix" founded the abbey of Châtenois by charter dated to after 1075, confirmed "post obitum ductricis Hadewidis" by "dux Theodericus filius eius"[11]. During the investiture crisis, Duke Thierry supported Emperor Heinrich IV who enabled him to take control of Metz after expelling Hermann Bishop of Metz[12]. Emperor Heinrich V granted him the title "Marquis" in [1114][13]. The Obituaire de Saint-Mansuy records the death "30 Dec" of "Theodoricus dux"[14]. m firstly ([1080]) as her second husband, HEDWIG von Formbach, widow of GERHARD von Süpplingenburg Graf im Harzgau, daughter of FRIEDRICH Graf von Formbach & his wife Gertrud von Hadmersleben (-[1090/93]). According to Poull, Duke Thierry unsuccessfully petitioned the Pope in early 1079 to marry Agnès d'Aquitaine, widow of Pierre Comte de Savoie, which if correct means that his first marriage inevitably took place after this[15]. m secondly (Han-sur-Lesse 15 Aug 1095) as her second husband, GERTRUDE de Flandre, widow of HENRI III Comte de Louvain, daughter of ROBERT I "Friso" Count of Flanders & his wife Gertrud of Saxony [Billung] (-[1115/26]). Her parentage and both her marriages are deduced from the Cartulaire de Saint-Bertin in which is named "Gertrude filia Roberti Frisonis, vidua Henrici Bruselensis" mother of "Theodericum" who is in turn named "filium Theoderici ducis de Helsath"[16]. The Genealogica Comitum Flandriæ Bertiniana specifies that "Robertus comes cognomento Frisio" had three daughters "tercia Theoderico comiti Alsatie [nupsit]"[17].

2. GERARD de Lorraine (-1108, bur Belval). The Genealogica ex Stirpe Sancti Arnulfi names "Theodericum ducem et Gerardum comitem fratres" sons of "Hadewidem [filiam Ermengardis]"[32]. He opposed his brother's sole succession in 1071, waged war for two years, the dispute being settled when his brother ceded him the Saintois and other territories, which became the County of Vaudémont, 14 Apr 1073[33].

- COMTES de VAUDEMONT.

3. GISELE de Lorraine (-after [1114]). The primary source which confirms her parentage has not yet been identified. Abbess of Remiremont and Saint-Pierre at Metz 1070/1114.

4. BEATRIX de Lorraine (-[1116/17]). "Stephanus comes Burgundie et dominus de Treva" donated property to Cluny by charter dated [1100] in which he refers to his wife as "filia ducis Lotharingie" but does not name her[34]. The primary source which names her has not yet been identified. m ([1085/90]) ETIENNE I Comte de Mâcon, son of GUILLAUME I "le Grand" Comte Palatin de Bourgogne & his wife Etiennette --- (-murdered Ascalon 27 May 1102).


http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/LOTHARINGIAN%20(UPPER)%20NOBILITY.htm

GERHARD (-Remiremont [14 Apr] or 11 Aug [1070]). The Notitiæ Fundationis Monasterii Bosonis-Villæ names (in order) "Adalbertus, Gerhardus, Cuonradus, Adalbero, Beatrix, Cuono, Huoda abbatissa, Azelinus, Ida, Adeleth" as children of "Gerhardus comes [et] Gisela"[516]. In an earlier passage, the same source names "Odelrico comite et Gerhardo duce" as sons and successors of "Gerhardus comes marchio [et] cum uxore sua Gisela"[517]. Graf von Metz. Emperor Heinrich III appointed him as GERARD Duke of Upper Lotharingia after his brother was killed in battle in Nov 1048.

Under DUKES of LORRAINE. [http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/LORRAINE.htm#Gerarddied1070B]

GERARD, son of GERHARD Graf [von Metz] & his wife Gisela --- (-Remiremont [14 Apr] or 11 Aug [1070]). The Notitiæ Fundationis Monasterii Bosonis-Villæ names (in order) "Adalbertus, Gerhardus, Cuonradus, Adalbero, Beatrix, Cuono, Huoda abbatissa, Azelinus, Ida, Adeleth" as children of "Gerhardus comes [et] Gisela"[2]. In an earlier passage, the same source names "Odelrico comite et Gerhardo duce" as sons and successors of "Gerhardus comes marchio [et] cum uxore sua Gisela"[3]. Comte de Metz, Comte de Châtenois. Emperor Heinrich III appointed him as GERARD Duke of Upper Lotharingia after his brother was killed in battle in Nov 1048. "Gerardus…Lothariensium dux" donated property to Echternach abbey by charter dated 11 Apr 1067 which names "uxoris mea Hadvidis filiique nostre Theoderici…patris mei Gerhardi matrisque meæ Gislæ"[4]. According to the 14th century chronicle of Jean de Bayon, Duke Gérard was poisoned[5]. The Obituaire de Saint-Mansuy records the death "11 Aug" of "Gerardus dux"[6].

m HEDWIG de Namur, daughter of ALBERT I Comte de Namur & his wife Ermengardis of Lower Lotharingia [Carolingian] ([1005/10]-28 Jan [1080]). The Genealogica ex Stirpe Sancti Arnulfi names "Hadewidem et Emmam de Los" as the two daughters of "Ermengardis [filiæ Karoli ducis]" and as mother of "Theodericum ducem et Gerardum comitem fratres"[7]. It is likely that Hedwig was born during that latter part of the married life of her parents, given her own death in [1080] and her father's death before 1010. The Liber Memoriales of Remiremont records the donation of "Haduydis ducissa…consentientibus filiis suis duce Teoderico atque comite Girardo"[8]. "Hadewidis ductrix" founded the abbey of Châtenois by charter dated to after 1075, confirmed "post obitum ductricis Hadewidis" by "dux Theodericus filius eius"[9].

Duke Gérard & his wife had four children:

1. THIERRY de Lorraine (-30 Dec 1115). The Notitiæ Fundationis Monasterii Bosonis-Villæ records the succession of "dux Theodericus puer parvulus Gerhardi ducis filius"[10], although, considering the estimated birth date range of his mother, Thierry must have been adult when his father died. He succeeded his father in 1070 as THIERRY II Duke of Lorraine, opposed by his brother to whom he ceded territories which became the county of Vaudémont in Apr 1073 after waging war for two years. Weakened by this conflict, Louis Comte de Mousson claimed the title duke from Duke Thierry. "Hadewidis ductrix" founded the abbey of Châtenois by charter dated to after 1075, confirmed "post obitum ductricis Hadewidis" by "dux Theodericus filius eius"[11]. During the investiture crisis, Duke Thierry supported Emperor Heinrich IV who enabled him to take control of Metz after expelling Hermann Bishop of Metz[12]. Emperor Heinrich V granted him the title "Marquis" in [1114][13]. The Obituaire de Saint-Mansuy records the death "30 Dec" of "Theodoricus dux"[14]. m firstly ([1080]) as her second husband, HEDWIG von Formbach, widow of GERHARD von Süpplingenburg Graf im Harzgau, daughter of FRIEDRICH Graf von Formbach & his wife Gertrud von Hadmersleben (-[1090/93]). According to Poull, Duke Thierry unsuccessfully petitioned the Pope in early 1079 to marry Agnès d'Aquitaine, widow of Pierre Comte de Savoie, which if correct means that his first marriage inevitably took place after this[15]. m secondly (Han-sur-Lesse 15 Aug 1095) as her second husband, GERTRUDE de Flandre, widow of HENRI III Comte de Louvain, daughter of ROBERT I "Friso" Count of Flanders & his wife Gertrud of Saxony [Billung] (-[1115/26]). Her parentage and both her marriages are deduced from the Cartulaire de Saint-Bertin in which is named "Gertrude filia Roberti Frisonis, vidua Henrici Bruselensis" mother of "Theodericum" who is in turn named "filium Theoderici ducis de Helsath"[16]. The Genealogica Comitum Flandriæ Bertiniana specifies that "Robertus comes cognomento Frisio" had three daughters "tercia Theoderico comiti Alsatie [nupsit]"[17].

2. GERARD de Lorraine (-1108, bur Belval). The Genealogica ex Stirpe Sancti Arnulfi names "Theodericum ducem et Gerardum comitem fratres" sons of "Hadewidem [filiam Ermengardis]"[32]. He opposed his brother's sole succession in 1071, waged war for two years, the dispute being settled when his brother ceded him the Saintois and other territories, which became the County of Vaudémont, 14 Apr 1073[33].

- COMTES de VAUDEMONT.

3. GISELE de Lorraine (-after [1114]). The primary source which confirms her parentage has not yet been identified. Abbess of Remiremont and Saint-Pierre at Metz 1070/1114.

4. BEATRIX de Lorraine (-[1116/17]). "Stephanus comes Burgundie et dominus de Treva" donated property to Cluny by charter dated [1100] in which he refers to his wife as "filia ducis Lotharingie" but does not name her[34]. The primary source which names her has not yet been identified. m ([1085/90]) ETIENNE I Comte de Mâcon, son of GUILLAUME I "le Grand" Comte Palatin de Bourgogne & his wife Etiennette --- (-murdered Ascalon 27 May 1102).

 

Från Wikipedia, den fria encyklopedin

Gerard IV, hertig av Alsace (ca. 1030 -- April 14, 1070) Var Count of Metz och CHATENOIS från 1047/1048, när hans bror Duke Adalbert avgick dem till honom på att bli Duke of Upper Lorraine. På Adalbert död nästa år, blev Gerard hertigen och var så fram till sin död. I samtida dokument kallas han Gerard Alsace (efter hans familjär hemland), Gerard av Chatenoy (efter en uråldrig slott nära Neufchâteau), Eller Gerard av Flandern (efter sin hustrus hemland). Hans namn stavas Gérard in Franska och Gerhard in Tyska.

Han var andre son till Gerard de Bouzonville, Greve av Metz, Och Gisela, eventuellt en dotter Thierry I, Duke of Upper Lorraine. Henry III, tysk-romersk kejsareInvesterade Adalbert med Lorraine i 1047 efter att konfiskera den från Godfrey III. Godfrey inte tillbaka, dock, och dödade Adalbert i strid. Henry skänkte därefter den på Gerard, men den avsatte hertigen fortsatte att röra. Godfrey hade stöd av en fraktion av adeln som inte vill ha en stark hand vid hertigens rodret och Gerard fängslades. Gerard, hade dock stöd av förnämsta av hans biskopar, Som Toul, Bruno av Eguisheim-Dagsburg (senare helgonförklarad Leo IX), Som upphandlas hans befrielsen 1049. Kejsaren gav honom trupper för att bistå honom i hans kamp, för rebellerna hade stöd av vissa inslag i kyrkan. Gerard själv kvar, som hans bror hade, trogen till slutet på den kejserliga dynasti och hans ättlingar skulle förbli så bra även i Hohenstaufen år.

Hans allians med kyrkan regelbundet men obeständig och han grundade Moyenmoutier Abbey, Saint-Mihiel AbbeyOch Remiremont Abbey. Den förstnämnda var till klostret Kardinal Humbert av Silva Candida, Som bannlyste den patriark av Konstantinopel, Michael I Cerularius, År 1054, vilket fällning av Great Schism, Och den senare var hans sista viloplats.

På 18 juni 1053, Gerard och prins Rudolf av Benevento ledde påvlig och Swabian trupper i striden på uppdrag av påven Leo. Detta var Slaget vid Civitate och det var en katastrofal förlust för påven. Hans fiende, NormansUnder Humphrey av Hauteville och Richard av AversaBesegrade hans allierade och intog hans person, tar honom till fånga i Benevento. Gerard, men återvände till Lorraine.

Bland hans andra byggprojekt, var att slottet PrényI mitten av hertigdömet, början av huvudstaden, Nancy. Han dog Remiremont när han försökte döda en revolt. Förgiftning var misstänkt. Datumet för hans död är antingen 14 April eller 11 augusti.

Han var gift med Hedvig av Namur (eller i Flandern), dotter till Albert I, greve av NamurOch Ermengarde, dotter till Karl, hertig av Nedre Lorraine. Detta äktenskap hjälpte lappa ihop relationer med samtliga baroner. De fick följande fråga:

Thierry II (c.1055-1115), efterträdare i Lorraine

Gerard (1057-1108), greve av Vaudémont

Beatrice, gifte sig Stefan I, greve av Burgund, MâconOch Vienne

Gisela, abbedissa Remiremont

Han var stamfader raden av hertigen som styrde Lorraine fram till 1755.


Gerard (c. 1030 – April 14, 1070) was the count of Metz and Chatenois from 1047, when his brother Duke Adalbert resigned them to him on becoming the duke of Lorraine. On Adalbert's death the next year, Gerard became duke and was so until his death. In contemporary documents, he is called Gerard of Alsace (after his familial homeland), Gerard of Chatenoy (after an ancestral castle near Neufchâteau), or Gerard of Flanders (after his wife's homeland). His name is spelled Gérard in French and Gerhard in German.

He was the second son of Gerard de Bouzonville, count of Metz, and Gisela, possible a daughter of Thierry I, Duke of Upper Lorraine. Henry III, Holy Roman Emperor, invested Adalbert with Lorraine in 1047 after confiscating it from Godfrey III. Godfrey did not back down, however, and killed Adalbert in battle. Henry subsequently bestowed it on Gerard, but the deposed duke continued to stir. Godfrey had the support of a faction of the noblesse who did not want a strong hand at the ducal helm and Gerard was imprisoned. Gerard, however, had the support of the chiefest of his bishops, that of Toul, Bruno of Eguisheim-Dagsburg (later the sainted Pope Leo IX), who procured his liberation in 1049. The emperor gave him troops to assist him in his fight, for the rebels had the support of some elements in the church. Gerard himself remained, as his brother had, faithful to the end to the imperial dynasty and his descendants would remain so as well even into the Hohenstaufen years.

His alliance with the church was regular but inconstant and he founded Moyenmoutier Abbey, Saint-Mihiel Abbey, and Remiremont Abbey. The former was the abbey of Cardinal Humbert of Silva Candida, who excommunicated the patriarch of Constantinople, Michael I Cerularius, in 1054, thus precipitating the Great Schism, and the latter was his own final resting place.

On 18 June 1053, Gerard and Prince Rudolf of Benevento led papal and Swabian troops into battle on behalf of Pope Leo. This was the Battle of Civitate and it was a disastrous loss for the pope. His enemy, the Normans, under Humphrey of Hauteville and Richard of Aversa, defeated his allies and captured his person, taking him prisoner in Benevento. Gerard, however, returned to Lorraine.

Among his other construction projects, was that of the castle of Prény, in the centre of the duchy, the beginnings of the capital city, Nancy. He died at Remiremont while trying to kill a revolt. Poisoning was suspected. The date of his death is either 14 April or 11 August.

He was married to Hedwige of Namur (or of Flanders), daughter of Albert II, Count of Namur, and Regilinda of Verdun. This marriage helped patch up relations with the baronage. They had the following issue:

Thierry II (c.1055-1115), successor in Lorraine

Gerard (1057-1108), count of Vaudémont

Beatrice, married Stephen I, Count of Burgundy, Mâcon, and Vienne

Gisela, abbess of Remiremont

He was the progenitor the line of duke which ruled Lorraine until 1755.


http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gerard,_Duke_of_Lorraine


Gerard, Duke of Lorraine

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Gerard IV, Duke of Alsace (ca. 1030 – April 14, 1070) was the count of Metz and Chatenois from 1047/1048, when his brother Duke Adalbert resigned them to him on becoming the Duke of Upper Lorraine. On Adalbert's death the next year, Gerard became duke and was so until his death. In contemporary documents, he is called Gerard of Alsace (after his familial homeland), Gerard of Chatenoy (after an ancestral castle near Neufchâteau), or Gerard of Flanders (after his wife's homeland). His name is spelled Gérard in French and Gerhard in German.[1]

He was the second son of Gerard de Bouzonville, count of Metz, and Gisela, possible a daughter of Thierry I, Duke of Upper Lorraine. Henry III, Holy Roman Emperor, invested Adalbert with Lorraine in 1047 after confiscating it from Godfrey III. Godfrey did not back down, however, and killed Adalbert in battle. Henry subsequently bestowed it on Gerard, but the deposed duke continued to stir. Godfrey had the support of a faction of the noblesse who did not want a strong hand at the ducal helm and Gerard was imprisoned. Gerard, however, had the support of the chiefest of his bishops, that of Toul, Bruno of Eguisheim-Dagsburg (later the sainted Pope Leo IX), who procured his liberation in 1049. The emperor gave him troops to assist him in his fight, for the rebels had the support of some elements in the church. Gerard himself remained, as his brother had, faithful to the end to the imperial dynasty and his descendants would remain so as well even into the Hohenstaufen years.

His alliance with the church was regular but inconstant and he founded Moyenmoutier Abbey, Saint-Mihiel Abbey, and Remiremont Abbey. The former was the abbey of Cardinal Humbert of Silva Candida, who excommunicated the patriarch of Constantinople, Michael I Cerularius, in 1054, thus precipitating the Great Schism, and the latter was his own final resting place.

On 18 June 1053, Gerard and Prince Rudolf of Benevento led papal and Swabian troops into battle on behalf of Pope Leo. This was the Battle of Civitate and it was a disastrous loss for the pope. His enemy, the Normans, under Humphrey of Hauteville and Richard of Aversa, defeated his allies and captured his person, taking him prisoner in Benevento. Gerard, however, returned to Lorraine.

Among his other construction projects, was that of the castle of Prény, in the centre of the duchy, the beginnings of the capital city, Nancy. He died at Remiremont while trying to kill a revolt. Poisoning was suspected. The date of his death is either 14 April or 11 August.

He was married to Hedwige of Namur (or of Flanders), daughter of Albert I, Count of Namur, and Ermengarde, daughter of Charles, Duke of Lower Lorraine. This marriage helped patch up relations with the baronage. They had the following issue:

Thierry II (c.1055-1115), successor in Lorraine

Gerard (1057-1108), count of Vaudémont

Beatrice, married Stephen I, Count of Burgundy, Mâcon, and Vienne

Gisela, abbess of Remiremont

He was the progenitor the line of duke which ruled Lorraine until 1755.

[edit]See also

Dukes of Lorraine family tree

[edit]References

^ http://genealogy.euweb.cz/lorraine/lorraine11.html

Gerhard IV of Lorraine

1010 - 1070

Birth 1010 Alsace, France

Gender Male

Died 04 Apr 1070 Remiremont, Vosges, Lorraine, France

Person ID I2231 Our Family Tree | rb

Last Modified 17 Mar 2008 12:31:10


Father Gerhard II of Metz, b. 988, Metz, Moselle, Lorraine, France

Mother Gisela of Alsace, b. 990, Lorraine, France

Family ID F2878 Group Sheet


Family Hedwig of Namur

Children

1. Gerard I of Vaudemont, b. 1057


Gerard, Duke of Lorraine

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Gerard IV, Duke of Alsace (c. 1030 – April 14, 1070) was the count of Metz and Chatenois from 1047/1048, when his brother Duke Adalbert resigned them to him on becoming the Duke of Upper Lorraine. On Adalbert's death the next year, Gerard became duke and was so until his death. In contemporary documents, he is called Gerard of Alsace (after his familial homeland), Gerard of Chatenoy (after an ancestral castle near Neufchâteau), or Gerard of Flanders (after his wife's homeland). His name is spelled Gérard in French and Gerhard in German.[1]

He was the second son of Gerard de Bouzonville, count of Metz, and Gisela, possible a daughter of Thierry I, Duke of Upper Lorraine. Henry III, Holy Roman Emperor, invested Adalbert with Lorraine in 1047 after confiscating it from Godfrey III. Godfrey did not back down, however, and killed Adalbert in battle. Henry subsequently bestowed it on Gerard, but the deposed duke continued to stir. Godfrey had the support of a faction of the noblesse who did not want a strong hand at the ducal helm and Gerard was imprisoned. Gerard, however, had the support of the chiefest of his bishops, that of Toul, Bruno of Eguisheim-Dagsburg (later the sainted Pope Leo IX), who procured his liberation in 1049. The emperor gave him troops to assist him in his fight, for the rebels had the support of some elements in the church. Gerard himself remained, as his brother had, faithful to the end to the imperial dynasty and his descendants would remain so as well even into the Hohenstaufen years.

His alliance with the church was regular but inconstant and he founded Moyenmoutier Abbey, Saint-Mihiel Abbey, and Remiremont Abbey. The former was the abbey of Cardinal Humbert of Silva Candida, who excommunicated the patriarch of Constantinople, Michael I Cerularius, in 1054, thus precipitating the Great Schism, and the latter was his own final resting place.

On 18 June 1053, Gerard and Prince Rudolf of Benevento led papal and Swabian troops into battle on behalf of Pope Leo. This was the Battle of Civitate and it was a disastrous loss for the pope. His enemy, the Normans, under Humphrey of Hauteville and Richard of Aversa, defeated his allies and captured his person, taking him prisoner in Benevento. Gerard, however, returned to Lorraine.

Among his other construction projects, was that of the castle of Prény, in the centre of the duchy, the beginnings of the capital city, Nancy. He died at Remiremont while trying to kill a revolt. Poisoning was suspected. The date of his death is either 14 April or 11 August.

He was married to Hedwige of Namur (or of Flanders), daughter of Albert I, Count of Namur, and Ermengarde, daughter of Charles, Duke of Lower Lorraine. This marriage helped patch up relations with the baronage. They had the following issue:

Thierry II (c.1055-1115), successor in Lorraine

Gerard (1057-1108), count of Vaudémont

Beatrice, married Stephen I, Count of Burgundy, Mâcon, and Vienne

Gisela, abbess of Remiremont

He was the progenitor the line of duke which ruled Lorraine until 1755.


http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gerard,_Duke_of_Lorraine

Gerard, Duke of Lorraine

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Jump to: navigation, search

Gerard IV, Duke of Alsace (ca. 1030 – April 14, 1070) was the count of Metz and Chatenois from 1047/1048, when his brother Duke Adalbert resigned them to him on becoming the Duke of Upper Lorraine. On Adalbert's death the next year, Gerard became duke and was so until his death. In contemporary documents, he is called Gerard of Alsace (after his familial homeland), Gerard of Chatenoy (after an ancestral castle near Neufchâteau), or Gerard of Flanders (after his wife's homeland). His name is spelled Gérard in French and Gerhard in German.[1]

He was the second son of Gerard de Bouzonville, count of Metz, and Gisela, possibly a daughter of Thierry I, Duke of Upper Lorraine. Henry III, Holy Roman Emperor, invested Adalbert with Lorraine in 1047 after confiscating it from Godfrey III. Godfrey did not back down, however, and killed Adalbert in battle. Henry subsequently bestowed it on Gerard, but the deposed duke continued to stir. Godfrey had the support of a faction of the noblesse who did not want a strong hand at the ducal helm and Gerard was imprisoned. Gerard, however, had the support of the chiefest of his bishops, that of Toul, Bruno of Eguisheim-Dagsburg (later the sainted Pope Leo IX), who procured his liberation in 1049. The emperor gave him troops to assist him in his fight, for the rebels had the support of some elements in the church. Gerard himself remained, as his brother had, faithful to the end to the imperial dynasty and his descendants would remain so as well even into the Hohenstaufen years.

His alliance with the church was regular but inconstant and he founded Moyenmoutier Abbey, Saint-Mihiel Abbey, and Remiremont Abbey. The former was the abbey of Cardinal Humbert of Silva Candida, who excommunicated the patriarch of Constantinople, Michael I Cerularius, in 1054, thus precipitating the Great Schism, and the latter was his own final resting place.

On 18 June 1053, Gerard and Prince Rudolf of Benevento led papal and Swabian troops into battle on behalf of Pope Leo. This was the Battle of Civitate and it was a disastrous loss for the pope. His enemy, the Normans, under Humphrey of Hauteville and Richard of Aversa, defeated his allies and captured his person, taking him prisoner in Benevento. Gerard, however, returned to Lorraine.

Among his other construction projects, was that of the castle of Prény, in the centre of the duchy, the beginnings of the capital city, Nancy. He died at Remiremont while trying to kill a revolt. Poisoning was suspected. The date of his death is either 14 April or 11 August.

He was married to Hedwige of Namur (or of Flanders), daughter of Albert I, Count of Namur, and Ermengarde, daughter of Charles, Duke of Lower Lorraine. This marriage helped patch up relations with the baronage. They had the following issue:

   * Thierry II (c.1055-1115), successor in Lorraine
   * Gerard (1057-1108), count of Vaudémont
   * Beatrice, married Stephen I, Count of Burgundy, Mâcon, and Vienne
   * Gisela, abbess of Remiremont

He was the progenitor the line of duke which ruled Lorraine until 1755.

[edit] See also

   * Dukes of Lorraine family tree

[edit] References

  1. ^ http://genealogy.euweb.cz/lorraine/lorraine11.html

Preceded by

Adalbert Duke of Lorraine

1048–1070 Succeeded by

Thierry II

This page was last modified on 16 May 2010 at 16:22.


Gerard (c. 1030 – April 14, 1070) was the count of Metz and Chatenois from 1047, when his brother Duke Adalbert resigned them to him on becoming the duke of Lorraine. On Adalbert's death the next year, Gerard became duke and was so until his death. In contemporary documents, he is called Gerard of Alsace (after his familial homeland), Gerard of Chatenoy (after an ancestral castle near Neufchâteau), or Gerard of Flanders (after his wife's homeland). His name is spelled Gérard in French and Gerhard in German.

He was the second son of Gerard de Bouzonville, count of Metz, and Gisela, possible a daughter of Thierry I, Duke of Upper Lorraine. Henry III, Holy Roman Emperor, invested Adalbert with Lorraine in 1047 after confiscating it from Godfrey III. Godfrey did not back down, however, and killed Adalbert in battle. Henry subsequently bestowed it on Gerard, but the deposed duke continued to stir. Godfrey had the support of a faction of the noblesse who did not want a strong hand at the ducal helm and Gerard was imprisoned. Gerard, however, had the support of the chiefest of his bishops, that of Toul, Bruno of Eguisheim-Dagsburg (later the sainted Pope Leo IX), who procured his liberation in 1049. The emperor gave him troops to assist him in his fight, for the rebels had the support of some elements in the church. Gerard himself remained, as his brother had, faithful to the end to the imperial dynasty and his descendants would remain so as well even into the Hohenstaufen years.

His alliance with the church was regular but inconstant and he founded Moyenmoutier Abbey, Saint-Mihiel Abbey, and Remiremont Abbey. The former was the abbey of Cardinal Humbert of Silva Candida, who excommunicated the patriarch of Constantinople, Michael I Cerularius, in 1054, thus precipitating the Great Schism, and the latter was his own final resting place.

On 18 June 1053, Gerard and Prince Rudolf of Benevento led papal and Swabian troops into battle on behalf of Pope Leo. This was the Battle of Civitate and it was a disastrous loss for the pope. His enemy, the Normans, under Humphrey of Hauteville and Richard of Aversa, defeated his allies and captured his person, taking him prisoner in Benevento. Gerard, however, returned to Lorraine.

Among his other construction projects, was that of the castle of Prény, in the centre of the duchy, the beginnings of the capital city, Nancy. He died at Remiremont while trying to kill a revolt. Poisoning was suspected. The date of his death is either 14 April or 11 August.

He was married to Hedwige of Namur (or of Flanders), daughter of Albert II, Count of Namur, and Regilinda of Verdun. This marriage helped patch up relations with the baronage. They had the following issue:

Thierry II (c.1055-1115), successor in Lorraine

Gerard (1057-1108), count of Vaudémont

Beatrice, married Stephen I, Count of Burgundy, Mâcon, and Vienne

Gisela, abbess of Remiremont

He was the progenitor the line of duke which ruled Lorraine until 1755.



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Gérard IV, duke of Upper Lorraine's Timeline

1020
1020
Lorraine, France
1044
March 6, 1044
Age 24
Herzogtum Lotharingen, Heiliges Römisches Reich (within present France)
1057
1057
Age 37
Vaudemont, Meurthe-et-Moselle, France
1059
1059
Age 39
Lorraine, France
1067
1067
Age 47
Vaudemont, Meurthe-et-Moselle, France
1070
April 14, 1070
Age 50
Remiremont, Lorraine, France
????
Remiremont, Lotharingen, Frankrijk