Is your surname Behar?

Research the Behar family

Share your family tree and photos with the people you know and love

  • Build your family tree online
  • Share photos and videos
  • Smart Matching™ technology
  • Free!

George Behar

Hebrew: ג'ורג' באהר (בלייק), Russian: Джордж
Also Known As: "George Blake"
Birthdate:
Birthplace: Rotterdam, Government of Rotterdam, South Holland, The Netherlands
Death: December 26, 2020 (98)
Moscova, gorod Moskva, Russian Federation
Immediate Family:

Son of Albert William Behar and Catharine Geetrui Behar/Blake
Brother of Private and Private

Occupation: in verzet, spion [artikel Z & Z NRC 10-11-2012], spy
Managed by: Diederik Mooij
Last Updated:
view all

Immediate Family

About George Behar

in verzet, spion [artikel Z & Z NRC 10-11-2012]


https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/George_Blake

George Blake

' (born George Behar on 11 November 1922) is a former British spy who worked as a double agent for the Soviet Union. He became a Communist and decided to work for the KGB while a prisoner during the Korean War. Discovered in 1961 and sentenced to 42 years in prison, he escaped from Wormwood Scrubs prison in 1966 and fled to the Soviet Union. He was not one of the Cambridge Five spies, although he associated with Donald Maclean and Kim Philby after reaching the Soviet Union.

Early life

Blake was born in Rotterdam in the Netherlands in 1922, the son of a Protestant Dutch mother, and an Egyptian Jewish father who was a naturalised British subject. He was named George after King George V of the United Kingdom. His father, Albert Behar, served in the British Army in the First World War. While he received the Meritorious Service Medal, he embellished his war service when recounting it to his wife and children, and also concealed his Jewish background up until his death. The Behars lived a comfortable existence in the Netherlands until Albert's death in 1936. The thirteen-year-old Blake was sent to live with relatives in Egypt, where he continued his education at the English School in Cairo.

While in Cairo, he was close to his cousin Henri Curiel, who was later to become a leader of the Communist Democratic Movement for National Liberation. In 1991, Blake said that his encounter with Curiel, who was a decade older and already a Marxist, shaped his views in later life.

When the Second World War broke out, Blake was back in the Netherlands. In 1940, Germany invaded and quickly defeated the Dutch military. Blake was interned but released because he was only 17. He joined the Dutch resistance as a courier. In 1942, he escaped from the Netherlands and travelled to Britain via Belgium, France, Spain, and Gibraltar, reaching London in January 1943. There, he was reunited with his mother and his sisters, who had fled at the start of the war. In 1943, his mother decided to change the family name from Behar to Blake.

Espionage activities

After he reached Britain, Blake joined the Royal Navy as a sub-lieutenant before being recruited by the Secret Intelligence Service (MI6) in 1944. For the rest of the war, Blake was employed in the Dutch Section. He intended to marry an MI6 secretary, Iris Peake, but her family prevented the marriage because of Blake's Jewish background and the relationship ended. In 1946 he was posted to Hamburg and put in charge of the interrogation of German U-boat captains. Following a crash-course in Russian at Cambridge University in 1947 and 1948, he was posted to the British Legation in Seoul, South Korea, under Vyvyan Holt. He arrived on 6 November 1948. Under cover as a vice-consul, Blake's mission was to gather intelligence on Communist North Korea, Communist China, and the Soviet Far East.

The Korean War broke out on 25 June 1950 and Seoul was quickly captured by the advancing Korean People's Army of the North. After Britain entered the war on the side of the South, Blake and the other British diplomats were taken prisoner. As the tide of the war turned, Blake and the others were taken north, first to Pyongyang and then to the Yalu River. After seeing the bombing of North Korea, and after reading the works of Karl Marx and others during his three-year detention, he became a communist.

At a secret meeting arranged with his guards, he volunteered to work for the Soviet Union's spy service, the KGB. In an interview Blake was once asked, "Is there one incident that triggered your decision to effectively change sides?", to which Blake responded, "It was the relentless bombing of small Korean villages by enormous American flying fortresses. Women and children and old people, because the young men were in the army. We might have been victims ourselves. It made me feel ashamed of belonging to these overpowering, technically superior countries fighting against what seemed to me defenceless people. I felt I was on the wrong side ... that it would be better for humanity if the Communist system prevailed, that it would put an end to war".

Blake returning from Korea in 1953

Following his release in 1953, Blake returned to Britain as a hero, landing at RAF Abingdon. In October 1954, he married MI6 secretary Gillian Allan in St Mark's Church (North Audley Street) in London. In 1955, he was sent by MI6 to work as a case officer in Berlin, where his task was to recruit Soviet officers as double agents. He informed his KGB contacts of the details of British and American operations. This included Operation Gold, in which a tunnel into East Berlin was used to tap telephone lines used by the Soviet military.

Until Blake's treachery was discovered, this operation had been hailed as a resounding success. It is claimed that in the course of nine years he betrayed details of some forty MI6 agents to the KGB, destroying most of MI6's operations in Eastern Europe, though this remains unsubstantiated. Blake later said of this, "I don't know what I handed over because it was so much". In 1959 Blake became aware of a Central Intelligence Agency mole inside GRU, and was thus instrumental in exposing P. S. Popov, who was executed in 1960.

Discovery and conviction

In 1961, Blake fell under suspicion after revelations by Polish defector Michael Goleniewski and others. He was arrested when he arrived in London after being summoned from Lebanon, where he was enrolled at the Middle East Centre for Arabic Studies (MECAS). Under interrogation, Blake hotly denied he was tortured or blackmailed by the North Koreans. Without thinking what he was saying, he stated that he had switched sides voluntarily. He then gave his MI6 interrogators a full confession.

The maximum sentence for any one offence under section 1 of the Official Secrets Act 1911 is 14 years, but his activities were divided into five time periods charged as five offences and, in May 1961 after an in camera trial at the Old Bailey, he was sentenced to the maximum term of 14 years consecutively on each of three counts of spying for a potential enemy and 14 years concurrently on both the two remaining counts – a total of 42 years imprisonment – by the Lord Chief Justice, Lord Parker of Waddington. This sentence was reported by newspapers to represent one year for each of the agents who were killed when he betrayed them, although this is dubious. It was the longest sentence (excluding life terms) ever handed down by a British court, until Nezar Hindawi was sentenced to 45 years for the attempted bombing of an El Al jet.

Escape from prison

Five years later, on 22 October 1966, Blake escaped from Wormwood Scrubs prison with the assistance of three men whom he had met in jail: Sean Bourke and two anti-nuclear campaigners, Michael Randle and Pat Pottle. The escape was masterminded by Bourke, who originally approached Randle only for financial help with the escape. Randle became more involved and suggested they bring Pottle in on the plan as well, as he had suggested springing Blake to Randle in 1962 when they were both still in prison. Their motives for helping Blake to escape were their belief that the 42-year sentence was "inhuman" and because of a personal liking of Blake.

Bourke had smuggled a walkie-talkie to Blake to communicate with him whilst in jail. It was decided that Blake would break a window at the end of the corridor where his cell was located. Then between 6 and 7 pm, whilst most of the other inmates and guards were at the weekly film showing, Blake could climb through the window, slide down a porch and get to the perimeter wall, where Bourke would throw a rope ladder made of knitting needles over the wall so that Blake could climb over and they would then drive off to the safe house. During the escape, Blake fractured his wrist jumping from the perimeter wall, but apart from that it all went according to plan.

After the escape, it became apparent that the safe house Bourke had organised was not suitable, as it was a bedsit that was cleaned by the landlady once a week. Blake then spent several days moving between Randle and Pottle's friends' houses; after this, Blake and Bourke moved in with Pottle, staying with him while preparing to get through customs and escape to the Soviet Union.

Moscow

Blake fled to the USSR via East Germany. He was divorced by his wife, with whom he had three children, and started a new life. In 1990, he published his autobiography No Other Choice. The book's British publisher had paid him about £60,000 before the government intervened to stop him profiting from sales. He later filed a complaint charging the British government with human rights violation for taking nine years to decide on his case and was awarded £5,000 in compensation by the European Court of Human Rights. In 1991, Blake testified by video recording when Randle and Pottle were put on trial for aiding his escape. They were acquitted. In an interview with NBC News in 1991, Blake said he regretted the deaths of the agents he had betrayed.

In late 2007, Blake was awarded the Order of Friendship on his 85th birthday by Vladimir Putin. Blake's later book, Transparent Walls (2006), as reported by the daily Vzglyad ("The View"). Sergei Lebedev, the director of the Foreign Intelligence Service (SVR) of the Russian Federation, wrote in the book’s foreword that despite the book being devoted to the past, it is about the present as well. He also wrote that Blake, the 85-year-old colonel of Foreign Intelligence, "still takes an active role in the affairs of the secret service."

In 2012, he celebrated his 90th birthday, still living in Moscow on a KGB pension. His eyesight was failing and he claimed to be "virtually blind". He remained a committed Marxist–Leninist. Blake denied being a traitor, insisting that he had never felt British: "To betray, you first have to belong. I never belonged".

Five years later, Blake remained committed to Russia and to communism. In a November 2017 statement, he claimed that its spies now have "the difficult and critical mission" of saving the world "in a situation when the danger of nuclear war and the resulting self-destruction of humankind again have been put on the agenda by irresponsible politicians. It's a true battle between good and evil".

In popular culture

The book Running Blind (1970), by Desmond Bagley, features a character named Slade, who is a double agent based on Blake. The Slade character re-appears in Bagley's follow-up novel The Freedom Trap (1971), which features a prison break that echos Blake's own escape from Wormwood Scrubs prison in 1966. In 1973, The Freedom Trap was made into a film entitled The Mackintosh Man.

Blake appears as a character in the 1990 novel by Ian McEwan, The Innocent.

The play Cell Mates (1995) by Simon Gray is about Blake and Sean Bourke. The original production starred Stephen Fry as Blake and Rik Mayall as Bourke. The production was thrown into turmoil when Fry walked out following a bad review.

After the Break (2002), a radio play by Ian Curteis, centred on the uncomfortable relationship between Blake and Bourke after they had both fled to Moscow.

Blake's story appears in the 1982 novel Shadow of Shadows by Ted Allbeury.

Alfred Hitchcock planned to make a film, The Short Night, based on Blake, but died before doing so.

In 2015, BBC Storyville made a documentary about Blake at the age of 92, which included two interviews with Blake himself. The film was entitled Storyville: Masterspy of Moscow- George Blake.


https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/George_Blake

About George Behar (עברית)

ג'ורג' בלייק

' (באנגלית: George Blake; נולד עם שם המשפחה בהאר ב-11 בנובמבר 1922) הוא איש מודיעין בריטי שפעל בשירות הסובייטים.

ביוגרפיה ג'ורג בלייק נולד בהולנד בשנת 1922. אביו היה יהודי ספרדי שהתיישב במצרים ונלחם בשורות הצבא הבריטי בזמן מלחמת העולם הראשונה ואמו הולנדית פרוטסטנטית. אביו נפטר כשהיה בן 12 ובלייק נשלח לגור עם דודו במצרים שם פגש לראשונה את האידאולוגיה הקומוניסטית. כאשר היה בביקור בהולנד פרצה מלחמת העולם השנייה ובלייק היה פעיל במחתרת ההולנדית בעת הכיבוש הנאצי.

בשנת 1942 נמלט בלייק לבריטניה והצטרף לחיל הים הבריטי, בו הגיע לדרגת קצונה. כדובר מספר שפות נמצא מתאים לעסוק בפעילות מודיעין שכללה החדרת סוכנים להולנד.

בתום המלחמה גויס בלייק לשירות הריגול הבריטי ה-MI6 ונשלח לגרמניה המערבית לשם הקמת רשת סוכנים שתפעל בגרמניה המזרחית.

בשנת 1950, עם פרוץ מלחמת קוריאה נשלח בלייק לקוריאה ובאותה שנה נפל בשבי הצפון קוריאנים. בשלוש שנות שביו עבר ככל הנראה שטיפת מוח וגויס למודיעין הסובייטי. לימים יטען כי שוכנע בשבי בצדקת הקומוניזם.

בלייק שוחרר מן השבי בשנת 1953 וחזר לבריטניה, בה נערכה לו קבלת פני גיבור. בלייק שב לשרת במודיעין הבריטי (בניגוד לכלל המקובל בשירותי המודיעין כי פדויי שבי מהווים סיכון ביטחוני). בשובו לשירות הוצב במחלקה שעסקה בהאזנה לשיחות הטלפון של הדיפלומטים הסובייטיים בבריטניה.

בשנת 1955 הוצב בלייק בברלין כשמשימתו הייתה לגייס סוכנים מבין קציני הצבא הסובייטי. בכל אותה עת פעל בלייק למעשה בשירותו של המודיעין הסובייטי וחשף בפני הסובייטים את זהותם של מאות סוכנים בריטיים שפעלו בגרמניה.

בשנת 1959 חזר בלייק ללונדון והוצב למחלקה שתפקידה היה לגייס, לשירותו של המודיעין הבריטי, אנשי עסקים שנהגו לבקר בברית המועצות לצורכי עסקיהם וכן לגייס סוכנים מבין הדיפלומטים הסובייטיים בבריטניה. קצין מודיעין פולני, שערק למערב באותה שנה, מסר ל-CIA מידע על סוכנים סובייטיים הפועלים בבריטניה. שרות הריגול הנגדי הבריטי ה-MI5 בדק את המידע והביא למעצרם של מספר מרגלים סובייטיים ובכללם בלייק.

בלייק הועמד לדין באשמת ריגול והואשם כי הביא למותם של 42 סוכני ה-MI6. בלייק הורשע בשנת 1961 ונדון ל-42 שנות מאסר.

בשנת 1966 נמלט בלייק מבית הכלא. הסברה הייתה כי הסובייטים חילצו אותו בעזרת מסוק, אולם האמת כפי שנתבררה לאחר מכן הייתה שונה; בלייק נמלט מן הכלא בטפסו על חומת הכלא, בעזרת חבל שהושלך אליו מבחוץ על ידי 3 פעילי שלום בריטיים, פט פוטל, מייקל ראנדל ושון בואורק. השלושה החנו מכונית מסחרית ליד חומת הכלא וזרקו סולם חבלים אל מעבר לחומה. בה בעת פרץ בלייק את סורגי תאו ועבר את החומה בטפסו על הסולם והוברח מן המקום במכוניתם של השלושה.

בשנת 1989 פירסמו פוטל ורנדל את סיפור הבריחה בספרם "The escape of George Blake". לדבריהם עשו את המעשה מתוך אמונה שעונשו של בלייק היה מוגזם. לפי השקפתם לא היה מקום לעונש כה חמור והטלת העונש הייתה, להבנתם, מעשה צבוע ביחס לאדם שתפקידו היה לשכנע אנשי מודיעין מברית המועצות ומן הגוש המזרחי לעשות את מה שבלייק עשה לבסוף - להעביר מידע לצד שכנגד.

לאחר בריחתו מן הכלא נמלט בלייק מבריטניה והגיע לברית המועצות דרך מזרח ברלין. בהגיעו למוסקבה הוענק לו אות לנין. להכחשת העובדה שבגד בבריטניה טען בלייק כי מעולם לא ראה עצמו כבריטי.

בשנת 2000 פרסם בלייק בבריטניה את האוטוביוגרפיה שלו בשם "No Other Choice", אך בית הלורדים פסק, לבקשת התובע הכללי הבריטי, כי לא ישולמו לבלייק תגמולים עבור ספרו, מאחר שהחוק הבריטי מונע מפושעים להפיק רווחים מפשעיהם. בפסיקה זו נשללו מבלייק תגמולים בסך 90,000 לירות שטרלינג, לאחר שכבר שולמה לו מקדמה בסך 50,000 לירות שטרלינג.

בשנת 2002 נחגג במוסקבה יום הולדתו ה-80 של בלייק, דבר שזכה לכיסוי נרחב בטלוויזיה הרוסית. בהזדמנות זו הצהיר בלייק כי "השנים שביליתי ברוסיה היו המאושרות בשנות חיי". ב-2007 הוענק לבלייק אות כבוד מטעם נשיא רוסיה ולדימיר פוטין.

נכון לשנת 2019 מתגורר בלייק במוסקבה כגמלאי של ה-ק.ג.ב., ועודו מחזיק בדעות מרקסיסטיות-לניניסטיות.

בספרות ג'ורג בלייק מופיע בשמו כדמות משנית בספרו של איאן מקיואן "התמים", שעלילתו מתרחשת בברלין באמצע שנות ה-50 של המאה ה-20. בלייק הוא הדמות הממשית היחידה בספר זה, שכל יתר דמויותיו בדיוניות. גיבור הספר, לנרד מרנהם, מתגורר ברחוב פלטאנֶנאָלֶה 26 בברלין, קומה מעל דירתו של בלייק (זו הייתה כתובתו האמיתית של בלייק בברלין). https://he.wikipedia.org/wiki/%D7%92%27%D7%95%D7%A8%D7%92%27_%D7%91...

--------------------------------------------------

in verzet, spion [artikel Z & Z NRC 10-11-2012]


https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/George_Blake

George Blake (born George Behar on 11 November 1922) is a former British spy who worked as a double agent for the Soviet Union. He became a Communist and decided to work for the KGB while a prisoner during the Korean War. Discovered in 1961 and sentenced to 42 years in prison, he escaped from Wormwood Scrubs prison in 1966 and fled to the Soviet Union. He was not one of the Cambridge Five spies, although he associated with Donald Maclean and Kim Philby after reaching the Soviet Union.

Early life

Blake was born in Rotterdam in the Netherlands in 1922, the son of a Protestant Dutch mother, and an Egyptian Jewish father who was a naturalised British subject. He was named George after King George V of the United Kingdom. His father, Albert Behar, served in the British Army in the First World War. While he received the Meritorious Service Medal, he embellished his war service when recounting it to his wife and children, and also concealed his Jewish background up until his death. The Behars lived a comfortable existence in the Netherlands until Albert's death in 1936. The thirteen-year-old Blake was sent to live with relatives in Egypt, where he continued his education at the English School in Cairo.

While in Cairo, he was close to his cousin Henri Curiel, who was later to become a leader of the Communist Democratic Movement for National Liberation. In 1991, Blake said that his encounter with Curiel, who was a decade older and already a Marxist, shaped his views in later life.

When the Second World War broke out, Blake was back in the Netherlands. In 1940, Germany invaded and quickly defeated the Dutch military. Blake was interned but released because he was only 17. He joined the Dutch resistance as a courier. In 1942, he escaped from the Netherlands and travelled to Britain via Belgium, France, Spain, and Gibraltar, reaching London in January 1943. There, he was reunited with his mother and his sisters, who had fled at the start of the war. In 1943, his mother decided to change the family name from Behar to Blake.

Espionage activities

After he reached Britain, Blake joined the Royal Navy as a sub-lieutenant before being recruited by the Secret Intelligence Service (MI6) in 1944. For the rest of the war, Blake was employed in the Dutch Section. He intended to marry an MI6 secretary, Iris Peake, but her family prevented the marriage because of Blake's Jewish background and the relationship ended. In 1946 he was posted to Hamburg and put in charge of the interrogation of German U-boat captains. Following a crash-course in Russian at Cambridge University in 1947 and 1948, he was posted to the British Legation in Seoul, South Korea, under Vyvyan Holt. He arrived on 6 November 1948. Under cover as a vice-consul, Blake's mission was to gather intelligence on Communist North Korea, Communist China, and the Soviet Far East.

The Korean War broke out on 25 June 1950 and Seoul was quickly captured by the advancing Korean People's Army of the North. After Britain entered the war on the side of the South, Blake and the other British diplomats were taken prisoner. As the tide of the war turned, Blake and the others were taken north, first to Pyongyang and then to the Yalu River. After seeing the bombing of North Korea, and after reading the works of Karl Marx and others during his three-year detention, he became a communist.

At a secret meeting arranged with his guards, he volunteered to work for the Soviet Union's spy service, the KGB. In an interview Blake was once asked, "Is there one incident that triggered your decision to effectively change sides?", to which Blake responded, "It was the relentless bombing of small Korean villages by enormous American flying fortresses. Women and children and old people, because the young men were in the army. We might have been victims ourselves. It made me feel ashamed of belonging to these overpowering, technically superior countries fighting against what seemed to me defenceless people. I felt I was on the wrong side ... that it would be better for humanity if the Communist system prevailed, that it would put an end to war".

Blake returning from Korea in 1953

Following his release in 1953, Blake returned to Britain as a hero, landing at RAF Abingdon. In October 1954, he married MI6 secretary Gillian Allan in St Mark's Church (North Audley Street) in London. In 1955, he was sent by MI6 to work as a case officer in Berlin, where his task was to recruit Soviet officers as double agents. He informed his KGB contacts of the details of British and American operations. This included Operation Gold, in which a tunnel into East Berlin was used to tap telephone lines used by the Soviet military.

Until Blake's treachery was discovered, this operation had been hailed as a resounding success. It is claimed that in the course of nine years he betrayed details of some forty MI6 agents to the KGB, destroying most of MI6's operations in Eastern Europe, though this remains unsubstantiated. Blake later said of this, "I don't know what I handed over because it was so much". In 1959 Blake became aware of a Central Intelligence Agency mole inside GRU, and was thus instrumental in exposing P. S. Popov, who was executed in 1960.

Discovery and conviction

In 1961, Blake fell under suspicion after revelations by Polish defector Michael Goleniewski and others. He was arrested when he arrived in London after being summoned from Lebanon, where he was enrolled at the Middle East Centre for Arabic Studies (MECAS). Under interrogation, Blake hotly denied he was tortured or blackmailed by the North Koreans. Without thinking what he was saying, he stated that he had switched sides voluntarily. He then gave his MI6 interrogators a full confession.

The maximum sentence for any one offence under section 1 of the Official Secrets Act 1911 is 14 years, but his activities were divided into five time periods charged as five offences and, in May 1961 after an in camera trial at the Old Bailey, he was sentenced to the maximum term of 14 years consecutively on each of three counts of spying for a potential enemy and 14 years concurrently on both the two remaining counts – a total of 42 years imprisonment – by the Lord Chief Justice, Lord Parker of Waddington. This sentence was reported by newspapers to represent one year for each of the agents who were killed when he betrayed them, although this is dubious. It was the longest sentence (excluding life terms) ever handed down by a British court, until Nezar Hindawi was sentenced to 45 years for the attempted bombing of an El Al jet.

Escape from prison

Five years later, on 22 October 1966, Blake escaped from Wormwood Scrubs prison with the assistance of three men whom he had met in jail: Sean Bourke and two anti-nuclear campaigners, Michael Randle and Pat Pottle. The escape was masterminded by Bourke, who originally approached Randle only for financial help with the escape. Randle became more involved and suggested they bring Pottle in on the plan as well, as he had suggested springing Blake to Randle in 1962 when they were both still in prison. Their motives for helping Blake to escape were their belief that the 42-year sentence was "inhuman" and because of a personal liking of Blake.

Bourke had smuggled a walkie-talkie to Blake to communicate with him whilst in jail. It was decided that Blake would break a window at the end of the corridor where his cell was located. Then between 6 and 7 pm, whilst most of the other inmates and guards were at the weekly film showing, Blake could climb through the window, slide down a porch and get to the perimeter wall, where Bourke would throw a rope ladder made of knitting needles over the wall so that Blake could climb over and they would then drive off to the safe house. During the escape, Blake fractured his wrist jumping from the perimeter wall, but apart from that it all went according to plan.

After the escape, it became apparent that the safe house Bourke had organised was not suitable, as it was a bedsit that was cleaned by the landlady once a week. Blake then spent several days moving between Randle and Pottle's friends' houses; after this, Blake and Bourke moved in with Pottle, staying with him while preparing to get through customs and escape to the Soviet Union.

Moscow

Blake fled to the USSR via East Germany. He was divorced by his wife, with whom he had three children, and started a new life. In 1990, he published his autobiography No Other Choice. The book's British publisher had paid him about £60,000 before the government intervened to stop him profiting from sales. He later filed a complaint charging the British government with human rights violation for taking nine years to decide on his case and was awarded £5,000 in compensation by the European Court of Human Rights. In 1991, Blake testified by video recording when Randle and Pottle were put on trial for aiding his escape. They were acquitted. In an interview with NBC News in 1991, Blake said he regretted the deaths of the agents he had betrayed.

In late 2007, Blake was awarded the Order of Friendship on his 85th birthday by Vladimir Putin. Blake's later book, Transparent Walls (2006), as reported by the daily Vzglyad ("The View"). Sergei Lebedev, the director of the Foreign Intelligence Service (SVR) of the Russian Federation, wrote in the book’s foreword that despite the book being devoted to the past, it is about the present as well. He also wrote that Blake, the 85-year-old colonel of Foreign Intelligence, "still takes an active role in the affairs of the secret service."

In 2012, he celebrated his 90th birthday, still living in Moscow on a KGB pension. His eyesight was failing and he claimed to be "virtually blind". He remained a committed Marxist–Leninist. Blake denied being a traitor, insisting that he had never felt British: "To betray, you first have to belong. I never belonged".

Five years later, Blake remained committed to Russia and to communism. In a November 2017 statement, he claimed that its spies now have "the difficult and critical mission" of saving the world "in a situation when the danger of nuclear war and the resulting self-destruction of humankind again have been put on the agenda by irresponsible politicians. It's a true battle between good and evil".

In popular culture

The book Running Blind (1970), by Desmond Bagley, features a character named Slade, who is a double agent based on Blake. The Slade character re-appears in Bagley's follow-up novel The Freedom Trap (1971), which features a prison break that echos Blake's own escape from Wormwood Scrubs prison in 1966. In 1973, The Freedom Trap was made into a film entitled The Mackintosh Man.

Blake appears as a character in the 1990 novel by Ian McEwan, The Innocent.

The play Cell Mates (1995) by Simon Gray is about Blake and Sean Bourke. The original production starred Stephen Fry as Blake and Rik Mayall as Bourke. The production was thrown into turmoil when Fry walked out following a bad review.

After the Break (2002), a radio play by Ian Curteis, centred on the uncomfortable relationship between Blake and Bourke after they had both fled to Moscow.

Blake's story appears in the 1982 novel Shadow of Shadows by Ted Allbeury.

Alfred Hitchcock planned to make a film, The Short Night, based on Blake, but died before doing so.

In 2015, BBC Storyville made a documentary about Blake at the age of 92, which included two interviews with Blake himself. The film was entitled Storyville: Masterspy of Moscow- George Blake.

О Георгии Ивановиче Бехтере (русский)

Джордж Блейк (англ. George Blake, имя при рождении — George Behar, как сотрудник ИМЭМО — Георгий Иванович Бехтер; 11 ноября 1922, Роттердам — 26 декабря 2020, Москва) — офицер MI6, по собственным убеждениям перешёл на сторону советской разведки. После разоблачения приговорён в Великобритании к 42 годам тюремного заключения, бежал из тюрьмы. Жил в Москве, преподавал в Академии СВР. Воинское звание — полковник КГБ СССР

Джордж Бехар родился в Роттердаме в семье голландки и египтянина еврейского происхождения. Джордж активно участвовал в нидерландском Сопротивлении и затем работал на Управление специальных операций. После Второй мировой войны Блейк поступил на службу MI6 и вербовал агентов для британских спецслужб в Восточной Европе.

По заданию MI6 Блейк был направлен в Корею и работал в британском посольстве в Сеуле под началом Вивиана Холта. По его воспоминаниям, непосредственная близость военных действий и жестокость обращения с мирным населением заставили его усомниться в правильности своих убеждений. После разделения Кореи Блейк оказался в плену в Северной Корее. Три года, проведённых в Северной Корее, превратили его в убеждённого коммуниста. Высказывалось предположение, что в Корее Блейк подвергся промывке мозгов, хотя он настаивал, что пришёл к коммунистическим убеждениям добровольно. После своего освобождения Блейк выглядел совершенно здоровым. Лондон направил его в качестве двойного агента в Берлин, где он фактически работал как тройной агент. Он передал в СССР огромное количество информации об агентах MI6, завербованных им в Восточной Европе, а также, в частности, о тайном секретном туннеле под границей между Западным и Восточным Берлином (см. также Берлинский тоннель).

В 1959 году Блейк был предан польским разведчиком-перебежчиком Михалом Голеневским, перешедшим на сторону ЦРУ. В 1961 году по решению закрытого суда Джордж Блейк был приговорён к 42 годам заключения, по одному году за каждого из погибших агентов, как говорилось в некоторых газетах. После бомбиста Незира Хиндави, приговорённого к 45 годам заключения, это самый длительный срок лишения свободы за всю историю британского судопроизводства.

Проведя пять лет в заключении, Блейк осознавал, что у него нет никаких шансов выйти на свободу через обмен агентами. В 1965 году[2] он организовал свой побег из тюрьмы Уормвуд-Скрабс с помощью заключённых[%D0%B8%D1%81%D1%82%D0%BE%D1%87%D0%BD%D0%B8%D0%BA не указан 107 дней] Пэта Поттла, Майкла Рэндла и Шона Бёрка. Финансировал побег известный английский режиссёр Тони Ричардсон[3]. Поттл и Рэндл были активистами движения против ядерного оружия в Великобритании, а Бёрк — активистом ИРА. Поттл, по его собственному высказыванию, считал приговор за государственную измену Блейка «отложенным смертным приговором».

Готовя побег Блейка, Поттл пронес в тюрьму рацию, которыми в то время ещё не были оснащены ни полиция, ни администрация тюрьмы. Незаметно для охранников Блейк общался из камеры со своими освободителями по рации. Дождливым воскресеньем 22 октября 1966 года, когда его сокамерники вместе с охранниками смотрели кино, Блейк незаметно вылез из окна и с рацией в руках ожидал у тюремной стены, пока с другой стороны Поттл не перекинул ему через семиметровую стену самодельную верёвочную лестницу. Забравшись на стену, Блейк спрыгнул на землю с другой стороны, поранив лицо и кисть руки. Поттл отвёз Блейка, находившегося в полуобморочном состоянии, в укрытие, а затем привёз для него врача.

Рэндл тайно перевёз Блейка через Ла-Манш в тайнике в фургоне, где также находилась семья Рэндла, ночным паромом в Бельгию и дальше до границы ГДР, где Блейк в одиночку перешёл на территорию ГДР. По некоторым данным, совершенно случайно на этом участке границы в это время находился работавший с ним ранее советский офицер. Блейк был перевезён в СССР, развёлся со своей женой, с которой у него было трое детей, и начал новую жизнь.

В 1990 году Джордж Блейк опубликовал автобиографию «Иного выбора нет». Блейк живёт в Москве на пенсию сотрудника КГБ и остаётся убеждённым коммунистом. Он отвергает обвинения в предательстве и настаивает на том, что никогда и не чувствовал себя британцем: «Чтобы совершить предательство, нужно сначала чувствовать свою принадлежность. Я никогда не чувствовал своей принадлежности». «Мне не в чем оправдываться… Я помогал тем, кто идёт в авангарде прогресса!», — отмечал он[4].

В 2006 году частично выиграл в Европейском суде по правам человека дело против Великобритании о затянувшемся рассмотрении дела о гонораре за издание автобиографии.[5]

Лауреат Премии Службы внешней разведки Российской Федерации (2007) за автобиографию «Прозрачные стены».

11 ноября 2012 года с 90-летием Блейка поздравил В. Путин. В телеграмме Президента РФ говорится, что Блейк всегда успешно решал поставленные перед ним задачи[2].

В канун своего 95-летия Блейк выступил с обращением, в котором подчеркнул, что сделал верный выбор в жизни. Сотрудникам российской разведки предстоит спасать мир в условиях новой угрозы ядерной войны, отметил он, поскольку эта угроза «вновь поставлена безответственными политиками на повестку дня». Он напомнил об угрозе мирового терроризма. «Идёт настоящая война Добра со Злом. И я верю в вас, в ваше бескорыстное и самоотверженное служение нашему общему делу, в ваш профессионализм. Верю в окончательную победу над подлым врагом. Эта вера дает мне жизненные силы»[6].

11 ноября 2020 года Владимир Путин поздравил советского разведчика и бывшего офицера британской MI6 Джорджа Блейка с 98-летием[7].

Скончался 26 декабря 2020 года от внезапной остановки сердца. Похоронен с воинскими почестями на аллее героев Троекуровского кладбища 30.12.2020

view all

George Behar's Timeline

1922
November 11, 1922
Rotterdam, Government of Rotterdam, South Holland, The Netherlands
2020
December 26, 2020
Age 98
Moscova, gorod Moskva, Russian Federation