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Job Bunting

Birthdate:
Birthplace: Matlack, Derby, England
Death: Died in Bucks Co., Pennsylvania
Immediate Family:

Son of Anthony Bunting, Quaker and Ellen Barker
Husband of Sarah Bunting, 1st Wife and Rachel Bunting Cowgill, 2nd Wife
Father of Lydia Bunting; Caroline Bunting; Rebecca Wildman; Samuel Bunting, -I 5; Sarah Bunting, Died Young and 3 others
Brother of William Bunting, 4; John Bunting, 4; Mary Clark; Samuel I Bunting, 4; Susanna Bullivant and 1 other

Managed by: Private User
Last Updated:

About Job Bunting

Job came to America in 1682 and selected New Jersey as his home. This was a primitive land where the inhabitants were primarily native Indians. The territory was recently recovered from the Dutch, who claimed and governed it during their war with the English and French. Now, the Crown divided the territory in two parts, East and West Jersey. East jersey was a melting pot constantly proving itself difficult for English rule. West Jersey, however, seemed to have no government at all. Compared with the other colonies it was democratic, had a humane clemency in its laws and permitted full freedom of religion: owed in no small part to William Penn and the Quakers.

Job followed elder brothers Sameul and John, who came earlier in 1682 with the Thomas Foulk family. The Foulks and the Buntings were neighbors in England. Samuel came as Thomas Foulk's carpenter, John as his mason. Both married daughters of his. All were Quakers, with brother Sameul being a minister of the Chesterfield Monthly Meeting. The purchase of Pennsylvania in 1681 by William Penn changed everything. A 'Train" of ships arrived an settlements were established in this new land across the Delaware River from West Jersey. Job and first wife Sarah joined in 1684, moving from Burlington, West Jersey to Middletown Township, Bucks County, Pennsylvania. He established himself early, and in 1684 he registered his cattle brand with Phineas Pemberton. In moving to Pennsylvania Job and Sara moved to a land that could not count 500 white settlers three years before when purchased by Penn. Penn himself did not come to America until 1682. The chief town of the province upon Job and Sarah's arrival was established at the confluence of the Delaware and Schuylkill rivers, and named Philadelphia. At the opening of 1684 this town had but 150 dwellings.

By 1685 there were 7000 settlers in Pennsylvania, 1/2 Englishmen and other 1/2 of various nationalities. Most were Quaker. Settlers lived, including no doubt Job and his family, initially in cave dwelling, dug out from mounds of earth, until a traditional home could be built. Indians were, unlike in the other provinces, little problem. The Quaker way of life and that of the indigenous Delaware was compatible, and conferences were held to assure the good-will between both. This would later change as the tide of emigration overtook Indian lands in the middle of the next century.

Her first child Lydia was born in December of 1686. She died, however eight months after her birth. Second child Caroline came in September of 168, but his time it was wife Sarah who did not survive. Sarah Perkins died 8 days after the birth of her daughter. Job was now alone with daughter Caroline in unsettled territory. It would be 1 1/2 years before he would remarry.

In the 2nd mo, 1689, Job announced his intentions to take Rachel Baker as his wife at the Falls MM. He was not a Falls MM member, and the meeting ordered him to bring a certificate of clearness from his own meeting in Jersey. Rachel, whose family were Falls MM members, however, was not so "clear". The women of the Falls MM reported that a Joseph Clowes "pretends to claim promises from Rachell. This however, was itself cleared by the following month, and as Job had a certificated of clearness from his own MM, the two were granted leave to complete the marriage. Job and Rachel were married on April 27 1689, at the Middletown Monthly Meeting of the Friends. Both were originally born in England, both were Quakers , and now both found themselves in the new land of Pennsylvania.. Job came to the marriage with a daughter from his first marriage: for Rachel this was her first marriage.

deed to land

BUCKS CO., PA, DEED BOOK A-1, PP. 370-2.

Deed: Henry Baker to Job Bunting, 1692

To all People before whom these presents shall come Know ye that Henry Baker of the County of Bucks and Province of Pennsylvania Yeoman for and in consideration of the sum of thirty five pounds current mony of the aforesaid Province in hand paid and secured to be paid by Job Bunting of the aforesaid County and Province Carpenter and son in law to the said Henry Baker the receipt whereof the said Henry Baker doth hereby acknowledge and thereof doth acquit and discharge the said Job Bunting his heirs Executors and administrators forever he the said Henry Baker hath granted aliened bargained sold enfeoffed and confirmed and by these presents doth absolutely give grant bargain sell enfeoff and confirm to the said Job Bunting his heirs and assigns certain lands lying and being in Newtown in the aforesaid County of Bucks Beginning at a corner marked tree standing at the head of the Town Lot rear the land of William Buckman thence by a line of Marked trees fifty five rods and three quarters of rod to a corner marked tree thence by the side of the said Buckmans Town Lot by a line of marked trees South and by East one hundred forty five rods to a corner marked tree thence West and by South fifty five rods and three quarters of a rod to a corner marked tree thence West and by North by a line of marked trees twenty rods to a corner marked tree thence West twenty one degrees Southerly two hundred and ninety rods to a corner marked tree standing by Neshaminy Creek side thence up the several courses of the said Creek to a corner marked tree standing in the aforesaid Buckmans line thence along the said line East four degrees Northerly 154 poles to a corner marked tree being the place of Beginning. As also one piece of meadow land Beginning at a corner tree in the line of Thomas Constables land thence by a line of marked trees West forty degrees Northerly eighty six rods to a corner marked tree thence by a line of marked trees South seventeen degrees Westerly seventy eight rods to a corner marked tree standing by Neshaminy Creek side aforesaid thence down the several courses of the said Creek to a corner marked tree standing in the aforesaid Constables line thence by the said line North five degrees Easterly forty two pole to a corner marked tree being the place of Beginning Which said Meadow land contains and is laid out for twenty six acres and the other parcel of land first mentioned contains and is laid out for two hundred twenty and two acres The whole of both parcels being laid out for two hundred forty eight acres of land which said land is part of a tract of land granted to the said Henry Baker by a Deed from John Rowland executed the eight day of the tenth Month one thousand six hundred ninety and one and all the estate right title interest use posession property claim and demand whatsoever of him the said Henry Baker of in and to the same premises. To Have and To Hold the said two hundred twenty and two acres of land and the said twenty six acres of meadow land and premisses with the appurtenances and improvements thereon and every part and parcel of the same to the said Job Bunting his heirs and assigns to the only use and behoof of the said Job Bunting his heirs and assigns forever At or under the quit rents due or to become due to the Chief Lord of the soil of the said land and premises And the said Henry Baker doth covenant promise and grant for himself and his heirs that they the said two hundred forty eight acres of land and premises to him the said Job Bunting and his heirs and against all other persons claiming and to claim by from or under him them or any of them or by his or their or any of their means privity procurement or consent shall and will warrant and by these presents forever defend And that the said Henry Baker hath not done acted nor suffered any act matter cause or thing whatsoever whereby the said granted premises or any part thereof is or can shall or may be by any means lawfully impeached In witness whereof the said Henry Baker hath hereunto put his hand and seal the eighth day of the fourth month being the fourth year of the Reign of William and Mary King and Queen of England &c and twelfth year of the Proprietorys Government one thousand six hundred ninety and two. Henry Baker (seal) Sealed and Delivered in the presence of us

Samuel Beakes Edmond Lovett Abraham Cox

the mark A of

(the place of the County seal) The 15 day of the Seventh Month one thousand six hundred ninety and two the within Conveyance was by the within named Henry Baker acknowledged and delivered in open Court in the County of Bucks unto the within named Job Bunting.

Certified under my hand and seal of the County Phineas Pemberton Cl. Com.

Recorded the 21 day 7th month 1692.

NOTES

The deed is acknowledged in the Court of Common Pleas at the session of the "14th day of the 7th month, 1692," at pp. 170, 267, Colonial Society, BUCKS CO. COURTS, which states:

A deed in fee of 248 acres of land dated the 8th day of the 4th month 1692 was acknowledged & delivered by Henry Baker grantor to Job Bunting grantee

Bunting Family History

Rowland, Baker, Bunting, Wilson, & Twining

"The 500 acres of Thomas Rowland, extending from Newtown creek to Neshaminy, probably included the ground the Presbyterian church stands upon. It was owned by Henry Baker in 1691, who conveyed 248 acres to Job Bunting in June 1692, and in October 1697 the remainder, 252 acres, to Stephen Wilson. In 1695 Bunting conveyed his acres to Stephen Twining, and in 1698 Wilson did the same, and Twining now owned Thomas Rowland's whole tract. In 1757 part or the whole of this land was in the possession of Benjamin Twining. In 1702 Stephen Twining owned 690 acres in Newtown, which John Cutler surveyed March 10th. " from: http://files.usgwarchives.net/pa/bucks/history/local/davis/davis15.txt''

view all 12

Job Bunting's Timeline

1660
June 10, 1660
Matlack, Derby, England
1686
December 15, 1686
Age 26
Bucks County, Pennsylvania, United States
1687
September 1687
Age 27
Bucks County, Pennsylvania, United States
1690
January 22, 1690
Age 29
Middletown Township,Bucks County,Pennsylvania
1692
October 25, 1692
Age 32
Bucks County, PA
1694
March 26, 1694
Age 33
Middletown, Dauphin County, Pennsylvania, United States
1696
March 22, 1696
Age 35
Middletown, Dauphin County, Pennsylvania, United States
1698
November 4, 1698
Age 38
Middletown, Dauphin County, Pennsylvania, United States