John Edmund Penn, signer of the "Declaration of Independence"

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John Edmund Penn

Birthdate:
Birthplace: Port Royal, Caroline, Virginia
Death: Died in Townsville: 'Island Creek', Granville, North Carolina, United States
Place of Burial: Guilford Battle Ground, Greensboro, North Carolina, United States
Immediate Family:

Son of Moses Penn and Catherine Penn
Husband of Susannah Penn
Father of Lucy Taylor (Penn) and William Penn
Brother of Ann Penn and Edmund Penn

Occupation: Lawyer
Managed by: Private User
Last Updated:
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Immediate Family

About John Edmund Penn, signer of the "Declaration of Independence"

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/John_Penn_(Continental_Congress)

John Penn (May 17, 1741 – September 14, 1788) was a signer of both the United States Declaration of Independence and the Articles of Confederation as a representative of North Carolina. Contents [hide] 1 Early life 1.1 Relations 2 Political career 3 Legacy 4 References 5 External links [edit]Early life

Penn was born near Port Royal in Caroline County, Virginia, an only child of Moses Penn and Catherine [Taylor] Penn. He attended at common school for only two years as his father did not consider education to be important.[citation needed] At age 18, after his father's death, Penn privately read law with his uncle, Edmund Pendleton. He became a lawyer in Virginia in 1762. In 1774, Penn moved to the Williamsboro, North Carolina area, where he practiced law. [edit]Relations On July 28, 1763, Penn married Susannah Lyne. The couple had two[1] children. Their daughter, Lucy, married John Taylor of Caroline, a political leader from Virginia. [edit]Political career

Penn was elected to the North Carolina Provincial Congress and elected by that body to the Continental Congress in 1775, serving until 1780. For the 1776 signing of the Declaration of Independence, he was part of the North Carolina delegation that included Joseph Hewes and William Hooper. In 1777, Penn was one of the state's signers of the Articles of Confederation. Penn also served on the Board of War until 1780, when he retired to once again practice law. He served as receiver of taxes for North Carolina in 1784. When Penn died in 1788, he was buried on his estate near Island Creek, in Granville County. Penn was re-interred in Guilford Courthouse National Military Park in 1894, alongside fellow congressional delegate, Hooper. [edit]Legacy

The naval ship USS John Penn was named in his honor.[2] An historical highway marker honoring Penn was the first one erected by the State of North Carolina (January 10, 1936)[3] [edit]References

^ DSDI 1776 ^ USS John Penn (AP-51/APA-23), Dictionary of American Naval Fighting Ships, Office of the Chief of Naval Operations, Naval History Division, Washington ^ North Carolina Highway Historical Marker Program [edit]External links

Biography by Rev. Charles A. Goodrich, 1856 Biography and portrait at USHistory.org John Penn (Continental Congress) at Find a Grave Historical Highway Marker in North Carolina

===

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/John_Penn_(delegate)_

John Penn (May 17, 1741 – September 14, 1788), was a signer of the United States Declaration of Independence as a representative of North Carolina along with Joseph Hewes and William Hooper. Penn was distantly related to William Penn, founder of Pennsylvania.

He was born near Port Royal in Caroline County, Virginia to Moses Penn and Catherine Taylor, and educated at home with only a couple years of formal schooling. At age 18, after his father's death, he studied law privately with his relative Edmund Pendleton. He became a lawyer in Virginia in 1762, and, in 1774, moved to near Williamsboro in Granville County, North Carolina where he also practiced law. (Williamsboro is now part of Vance County, which was partitioned from Granville following the Civil War.)

On July 28, 1763, he married Susannah Lyne. The couple had three children: William who never married and Lucy who married John Taylor of Caroline, another fatherless relative trained in the law by Edmund Pendleton.

He was elected to the North Carolina Provincial Congress and elected by that body to the Continental Congress in 1775 until 1780. He also served on the Board of War until 1780, when he retired to the practice of law. In 1777, he was one of the North Carolina signers of the Articles of Confederation. He was receiver of taxes for North Carolina in 1784. Upon his death in 1788, he was buried on his estate near Island Creek in Granville County but he was reinterred in Guilford Courthouse National Military Park in 1894 alongside fellow delegate William Hooper.

The naval ship USS John Penn was named in his honor.


SIGNED the DECLARATION of INDEPENDENCE

  1. ID: I13539
  2. Name: John PENN 1
  3. Sex: M
  4. Reference Number: P13539
  5. Note:
   [Atchison.FTW]
   Signer of Declaration of Independence

Father: Moses PENN

Mother: Catherine TAYLOR b: 30 DEC 1719

Marriage 1 Susannah LYNNE

Sources:

  1. Title: Chenoweth.FTW
     Repository:
     Media: Electronic
     Text: Date of Import: Jul 24, 2000 

up-dated 31 july 2008 Pam Reg Lib CH JRTM

  * Yates Publishing. U.S. and International Marriage Records, 1560-1900 
  * Han Co Hist Soc Bull 1969 - 1987 v. 1 p. 158 Wickham, Lois

re Lucy, who inherited land from her un-married brother, Wm: 12 Sept 1802 deed. part of Hornequarter, in King Wm Co, from John Nelson, son of Thomas, and also Hanover Quarter - which is deeded to Lucy's son Edmund Taylor.

          ................................................

buried near Island Creek, remains moved in 1894 to Guilford Battle Ground,

He was a lawyer;  signer of the Declaration of Independence representing the Virginia Colony.
          ................................................
 *  http://genforum.genealogy.com/penn/messages/1869.html 
          ..................................................
 *  John Penn, 1741-1788, one of the signers of the Declaration of Independence and the head of North Carolina's powerful Board of War, 1780-1781.

John Penn (May 17 </wiki/May_17>, 1741 </wiki/1741>–September 14 </wiki/September_14>, 1788 </wiki/1788>), was a signer of the United States </wiki/United_States> Declaration of Independence </wiki/United_States_Declaration_of_Independence> as a representative of North Carolina </wiki/North_Carolina>. Penn was distantly related to William Penn </wiki/William_Penn>, founder of Pennsylvania.

In the galaxy of stars which scintillate in the firmament of Caroline's history, there is no luminary which burns with greater brilliance or with steadier flame than that which represents JOHN PENN, patriot, statesman and signer of the Declaration of Independence.

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1. Birth: May 17, 1741 Death: Sep. 14, 1788

Signer of the Declaration of Independence from North Carolina. Born in Virginia, he studied law under his cousin, Edmund Pendleton, a lawyer who was also a leading Virginia patriotic leader. When he was 21, he received his license to practice law. He practiced successfully for about twelve years in Virginia, but in 1774, he moved to North Carolina, where he became a Revolutionary patriot leader as well as set up a law practice. He married Susannah Lyme, with whom he would have three children. In 1775, he was elected to be a delegate to the Second Continental Congress, serving from 1775 to 1780. Initially, he favored reconciliation with Great Britain, but when he realized that it would not happen, he came out for independence. While serving in Congress, Penn would have an argument over political issues with Henry Laurens of South Carolina, who was President of the Congress from late 1777 to late 1778, and Laurens challenged Penn to a duel. Neither man really wanted to fight a duel, but they could not find a way to back down either. Living at the same boardinghouse, the two men would often eat breakfast together, including the day of their duel. While crossing an empty lot together, while on their way to the dueling place, they came to a large muddy spot. Penn helped Laurens across, as Laurens was much older, and as he helped his old friend across, they both realized that the duel was foolish, quickly apologized to each other, and ended the discussion as friends. In 1780, Penn left Congress to return to his law practice at home in Granville County NC where he died in 1788, at the age of 48. He was buried at his homesite, but was exhumed and re-intered at Guilford Battle Grounds near Greensboro in 1894.

(bio by: Kit and Morgan Benson) 

Family links:

Parents:
 Moses Penn (1712 - 1759)
 Catherine Taylor Penn (1719 - 1759)

Spouse:
 Susannah Lyne (1743 - ____)*

Children:
 Infant Child Penn*
 Lucy M Penn (1766 - 1831)*
  • Calculated relationship

Burial: Guilford Courthouse National Military Park Greensboro Guilford County North Carolina, USA


Edit Virtual Cemetery info [?]


Maintained by: Find A Grave Record added: Apr 26, 1998 Find A Grave Memorial# 2779 http://www.findagrave.com/cgi-bin/fg.cgi?page=gr&GRid=2779 ------------------------------------------------------------- 2. Birth: May 17, 1740 Port Royal Caroline County Virginia, USA Death: Sep. 14, 1788 Granville County North Carolina, USA

John Penn was a Signer of the Declaration of Independence. When his father died he went to live with his uncle Edmund Pendleton (a lawyer in Bowling Green Virginia) there he studied and became a sucessfull lawyer. He was admitted to the bar in 1762. At the age of 33 he removed to Williamsboro Granville County North Carolina. The next year he was chosen by the citizens of Granville to represent them in the Provincial Congress which met in Hillsborough Aug 1775. There he was elected to succeed Richard Caswell as a delegate to the Continental Congress at Philadelphia.1775-1780.He spent most of the war years in Philadelphia serving in Congress. He returned to Granville and died on September 14 1788 on his farm. Their is nothing left of the home but a sunken crader in the ground. The family cemetery is finced in and a path leads to the slave cemetery marked only by field stones.

In 1894 his grave was moved and he reinterred at Guilford Court House in Greesboro, North Carolina. His grave is marked with a monument 20 foot tall.


Family links:

Spouse:
 Susannah Lyne (1743 - ____)

Inscription: Original Grave


Burial: John Penn Cemetery Stovall Granville County North Carolina, USA


Edit Virtual Cemetery info [?]


Created by: Kenneth Fawcett Record added: Feb 04, 2012 Find A Grave Memorial# 84481663 http://www.findagrave.com/cgi-bin/fg.cgi?page=gr&GRid=84481663

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John Edmund Penn, signer of the "Declaration of Independence"'s Timeline

1741
May 17, 1741
Port Royal, Caroline, Virginia
1762
1762
- 1774
Age 20
Virginia, United States
1766
1766
Age 24
Caroline, Virginia, United States
1774
1774
Age 32
Williamsboro, North Carolina, United States
1775
1775
Age 33
1775
- 1780
Age 33
United States
1788
September 14, 1788
Age 47
Townsville: 'Island Creek', Granville, North Carolina, United States
1788
Age 46
Guilford Battle Ground, Greensboro, North Carolina, United States