Joshua E. Tyner, I

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Joshua E. Tyner, I

Birthdate:
Birthplace: Wilkes County, Georgia, United States
Death: December 26, 1838 (71)
Franklin County, Illinois, United States
Place of Burial: De Soto, Illinois, United States
Immediate Family:

Son of William Richard Tyner, Sr and Elizabeth Jane Tyner
Husband of Winifred Priscilla Tyner
Father of Priscilla A Russell and Joshua Tyner Jr.
Brother of Elijah Tyner; Samuel Tyner; Mary Manack Riley; Tamar Hunt; Benskin Tyner and 2 others
Half brother of Elizabeth Lyles Boatright; Frances McGuire; Abigail Crittenden; Richard Tyner; Agnes Crump and 2 others

Occupation: Private and Indian Spy Wilkes Co, Ga. Revolutionary War
Managed by: Harold Schertner
Last Updated:

About Joshua E. Tyner, I

Winifred Teasley, daughter of Lucy Hunt and John Teasley, was born on 4 December 1775, in Bute (= Franklin) County, N.C. She and her parents moved to Wilkes County, Ga., sometime between 1778 and 1 October 1787 (Ref. 7,13). On 24 January 1793 Winifred married Joshua Tyner, a Revolutionary War veteran who was born 21 July 1767 in Wilkes County, Ga. He was a son of Richard Tyner (ca. 1740-24 September 1824) and an unknown first wife who was killed by Indians. Joshua, his brother Noah (who married Winifred's sister Priscilla), and his sister Tamar (future wife of Moses Hunt) were among those who survived the Indian raid. The Joshua Tyner family moved to Robertson County, Tenn., about 1801 and to Illinois in 1816. The youngest of the 14, or maybe 15, Tyner children was born in Illinois.

Joshua and Winifred were pioneers in that part of Franklin County, now known as Williamson County. The first permanent settlement, a stockade, was built in 1810 to protect the early settlers from the few remaining Shawnees. By 1816 wagon trains, following the old buffalo trails and crossing the Ohio River by ferry, were bringing settlers from Kentucky and Tennessee into southern Illinois. Joshua, Winifred, and their children accompanied the four Spiller brothers and other Robertson County neighbors who traveled north in the 1816 wagon train. They settled in the Eight-Mile Prairie, a level expanse covered with grass as tall as a man's head and rimmed with low trees and, beyond them, with tall forests. Here Joshua Tyner, William Lindsay, and Jasper Crain built their cabins. Samuel Talley Russell and his brother-in-law William Campbell also came to this fertile prairie in 1816. The following year Sam, the eldest son of Philip Russell and Elizabeth Stewart (see Ref. 28), went back to Tennessee to bring up the rest of the family and a herd of cattle. Philip Russell's other sons who came to Eight-Mile Prairie were James Stewart, William Washington, and Philip Jefferson. The William Campbell family soon moved on to search for a new frontier in Wisconsin, but Philip Russell and his sons did not. 
The Tyners and the Russells were among the approximately 40,000 citizens living within the State of Illinois when it was established in 1818. Three of the Russell sons--Sam, Jim, and Jeff--married daughters of Joshua and Winifred Tyner. The young couples settled near their parents, the well-defined trail past Philip Russell's door became a stage road, and the neighborhood soon became known as Russell Corners. Today, the site of the original homestead is in the Crab Orchard Lake area between Marion and Carbondale, Ill. 
Joshua Tyner's Revolutionary War pension application (Ref. 34), filed in Franklin County, ILL., on 28 June 1833, indicates that he enlisted at the age of 15. Joshua died 26 December 1838 in Franklin County. Winifred died on 27 March 1842, by which time Williamson County had been formed from Franklin. [Adapted from materials submitted by Harold E. Schertner 

Joshua Tyner (30344668) was the son of Richard Tyner and Eliza Jane Tyner, who was killed in an Indian attack. He was then reared by his stepmother, Agnes. "The legend is that Joshua was buried in an Indian-style mound by the Big Muddy River in Blairsville, Ill. In 1930, a state highway crew building a new bridge there unearthed a suspected Indian burial site. But the remains were never identified. They were reburied in an unmarked grave that is lost to history. Joshua and his brother, Noah, married sisters Winifred and Priscilla Teasley. Together they left Georgia between 1800 and the fall of 1801, according to family historians, moving to Tennessee's northern border with Kentucky. The area where Joshua and Noah went had been settled by whites 20 years earlier. Joshua identified himself as white to census takers in both the 1820 and 1830 Illinois censuses. He later wrote an account of fighting Indians in Georgia as part of the Revolutionary War army. Joshua was part Cherokee Indian, but in those days, being Indian was looked down upon. On Sept. 3, 1832, shortly after his 65th birthday, Joshua applied for a federal pension based on his military service. In court testimony, Joshua said he was a private and enlisted as a spy, "ranging the frontier against the hostile Indians." Joshua received his pension, $71.66 annually." Inscription: Rev War records died in Indian camp near big Muddy Bridge


Note: Thanks to Dale Allen for additional info

Joshua Tyner (30344668) was the son of Richard Tyner and Eliza Jane Tyner, who was killed in an Indian attack. He was then reared by his stepmother, Agnes. "The legend is that Joshua was buried in an Indian-style mound by the Big Muddy River in Blairsville, Ill. In 1930, a state highway crew building a new bridge there unearthed a suspected Indian burial site. But the remains were never identified. They were reburied in an unmarked grave that is lost to history. Joshua and his brother, Noah, married sisters Winifred and Priscilla Teasley. Together they left Georgia between 1800 and the fall of 1801, according to family historians, moving to Tennessee's northern border with Kentucky. The area where Joshua and Noah went had been settled by whites 20 years earlier. Joshua identified himself as white to census takers in both the 1820 and 1830 Illinois censuses. He later wrote an account of fighting Indians in Georgia as part of the Revolutionary War army. Joshua was part Cherokee Indian, but in those days, being Indian was looked down upon. On Sept. 3, 1832, shortly after his 65th birthday, Joshua applied for a federal pension based on his military service. In court testimony, Joshua said he was a private and enlisted as a spy, "ranging the frontier against the hostile Indians." Joshua received his pension, $71.66 annually."

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Joshua E. Tyner, I's Timeline

1767
July 21, 1767
Wilkes County, Georgia, United States
1805
April 9, 1805
1806
December 13, 1806
Montgomery, Tennessee, United States
1838
December 26, 1838
Age 71
Franklin County, Illinois, United States
December 26, 1838
Age 71
De Soto, Illinois, United States