Is your surname Marx?

Research the Marx family

Share your family tree and photos with the people you know and love

  • Build your family tree online
  • Share photos and videos
  • Smart Matching™ technology
  • Free!

Julius Henry Marx

Hebrew: ג'וליוס הנרי (גראוצ'ו) מרקס
Also Known As: "Groucho"
Birthdate:
Birthplace: New York, NY, United States
Death: August 19, 1977 (86)
Cedars Sinai Medical Center, Los Angeles, CA, United States (Pneumonia)
Place of Burial: Los Angeles, CA, United States
Immediate Family:

Son of Frenchie Marx and Minnie Marx
Ex-husband of Private; Ruth Johnson; Kay Marvis and Eden Hartford
Father of Private; Arthur Marx; Miriam R Allen; Private; Private and 2 others
Brother of Manfred Marx; Chico Marx; Harpo Marx; Gummo Marx and Zeppo Marx

Occupation: Comedian, Actor, Quiz Show Host, Singer, Commedian
Managed by: Private User
Last Updated:
view all 18

Immediate Family

About Groucho Marx

https://www.mentalfloss.com/article/30567/time-groucho-marx-did-cha...

As an entertainer and comedian, Groucho Marx remains a well-known figure some 30 years after his death. Marx's grease-paint bushy eyebrows and mustache, and trademark cigar, made him immediately recognizable, and he gained a reputation for smart ad-libs and cutting insults. While he came to fame on the stage and movie screen in the company of his brothers (the Marx Brothers), he also had a high-profile solo career, working in radio during the '30s and '40s, television during the '50 and '60s, and as a performer of one-man shows in the '70s.

He was born Julius Henry Marx on October 02, 1890 in New York City, the third-oldest son of "stage mama" Minnie Marx and Sam Marx (called "Frenchie" throughout his life because of his birthplace, Alsace-Lorraine). Although he dreamed of becoming a doctor, he dropped out of school at 12 to help support his family. In 1905, he began performing as a boy singer on the vaudeville stage, and later, with the help of his mother-manager, Minnie Marx, was joined by his brothers as the singing troupe the Four Nightingales. Later, the brothers developed into a successful comedy act, leading to several successful Broadway plays and, in the late '20s, movies like Animal Crackers. Marx initially adapted a German accent for his stage persona, but quickly switched to a fast-talking smart aleck when anti-German sentiment became prevalent on the eve of WW I. The popularity of his persona also helped him establish a career outside of his work with his brothers during the early '30s.

Through the many incarnations of their vaudeville act, the characters remained the same: Groucho, the mustached, cigar-chomping leader of the foursome, alternately dispensing humorous invectives and acting as exasperated straight man for his brothers' antics; Chico, the monumentally stupid, pun-happy Italian; Harpo, the non-speaking, whirling dervish; and Gummo (later replaced by Zeppo), the hopelessly lost straight man. During the run of their vaudeville sketch Home Again, Groucho was unable to find his prop mustache and rapidly painted one on with greasepaint -- which is how he would appear with his brothers ever afterward, despite efforts by certain film directors to make his hirsute adornment look realistic. After managing to offend several powerful vaudeville magnates, the Marx Brothers accepted work with a Broadway-bound "tab" show, I'll Say She Is. The play scored a surprise hit when it opened in 1924, and the brothers became the toast of Broadway. They followed this success with 1925's The Cocoanuts, in which playwrights George Kaufman and Morris Ryskind refined Groucho's character into the combination con man/perpetual wisecracker that he would portray until the team dissolved. The Cocoanuts was also the first time Groucho appeared with his future perennial foil and straight woman Margaret Dumont. Animal Crackers, which opened in 1928, cast Groucho as fraudulent African explorer Capt. Geoffrey T. Spaulding, and introduced his lifelong signature tune, the Bert Kalmar/Harry Ruby classic "Hooray for Captain Spaulding." Both Cocoanuts and Animal Crackers were made into early talkies, prompting Paramount to invite the Brothers to Hollywood for a group of comedies written specifically for the screen. Monkey Business (1931), Horse Feathers (1932), and Duck Soup (1933) are now acknowledged classics, but box-office receipts dropped off with each successive feature, and, by 1934, the Marx Brothers were considered washed up in Hollywood. Groucho was only mildly put out; professional inactivity gave him time to commiserate with the writers and novelists who comprised his circle of friends. He always considered himself a writer first and comedian second, and, over the years, published several witty books and articles. (He was gratified in the '60s when his letters to and from friends were installed in the Library of Congress -- quite an accomplishment for a man who never finished grade school.)

The Marx Brothers were given a second chance in movies by MGM producer Irving Thalberg, who lavished a great deal of time, money, and energy on what many consider the team's best film, A Night at the Opera (1935). The normally iconoclastic Groucho remained an admirer of Thalberg for the rest of his life, noting that he lost all interest in filmmaking after the producer died in 1936. The Marx Brothers continued making films until 1941, principally to bail out the eternally broke Chico. Retired again from films in 1941, Groucho kept busy with occasional radio guest star appearances and a stint with the Hollywood Victory Caravan. Despite his seeming insouciance, Groucho loved performing and was disheartened that none of his radio series in the mid-'40s were successful. (Nor was the Marx Brothers' 1946 comeback film A Night in Casablanca.) When producer/writer John Guedel approached him in 1947 to host a radio quiz show called You Bet Your Life, Groucho initially refused, not wanting another failure on his resume. But he accepted the job when assured that, instead of being confined to a banal script or his worn-out screen character, he could be himself, ad-libbing to his heart's content with the contestants. You Bet Your Life was a rousing success on both radio (1947-1956) and television (1950-1961 on NBC), winning high ratings and several Emmy awards in the process. Except for an occasional reunion with his brothers (the 1949 film Love Happy, the 1959 TV special The Incredible Jewel Robbery), Groucho became a solo performer for the remainder of his career.

During the '50s, Marx made occasional stage appearances in -Time for Elizabeth, a play he co-wrote with his friend Harry Kurnitz; this slight piece was committed to film as a 1964 installment of Bob Hope Presents the Chrysler Theatre, and in which the comedian looked ill at ease playing an everyman browbeaten by his boss. Working less frequently in the late '60s, Marx returned to the limelight in the early '70s when his old films were rediscovered by young antiestablishment types of the era, who revelled in his willingness to deflate authority and attack any and all sacred cows. By this time, Marx's health had been weakened by a stroke, but through the encouragement (some say prodding) of his secretary/companion Erin Fleming, he returned to active performing with TV guest appearances and a 1972 sold-out appearance at Carnegie Hall. And though he seemed very frail and aphasic in his latter-day performances, his fans couldn't get enough of him. In 1974, with Fleming at his side, Marx accepted a special Oscar. Ironically, it was the increasing influence of Fleming, which some observers insisted gave the octogenarian a new lease on life, that caused him the greatest amount of difficulty in his final years, resulting in the estrangement of his children and many of his oldest friends. In the midst of a heated battle between the Marx family and Fleming over the disposition of his estate, Groucho Marx died in 1977 at the age of 86.

Sources

"New York, New York City Births, 1846-1909," database, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:2WMY-TZT : 11 February 2018), Julius Henry Marx, 02 Oct 1890; citing Manhattan, New York, New York, United States, reference cn 29632 New York Municipal Archives, New York; FHL microfilm 1,322,235.

About Groucho Marx (עברית)

ג'וליוס הנרי (גראוצ'ו) מרקס - האחים מרקס

''''''(באנגלית: Marx Brothers) היו צוות קומי של אחים יהודים אמריקאים אשר הופיעו במחזות וודוויל, בקולנוע ובטלוויזיה בארצות הברית במאה ה-20. הצוות כלל מספר משתנה של חברים, אך בסוף דרכו, ומשזכה להצלחתו הגדולה, מבחינה מסחרית ואומנותית, התגבש לכלל שלישייה – גראוצ'ו – הציני, מעשן הסיגר בעל השפם והגבות המצוירים, הארפו האילם, המנגן בנבל, וצ'יקו בעל המבטא האיטלקי, המנגן בפסנתר.

בין 1926 ו-1957 יצרו האחים מספר סרטים בעלי סגנון ייחודי, אשר חרף עשרות השנים שחלפו מאז עשייתם עדיין יש בכוחם להצחיק את הצופה בן זמננו. בין הסרטים קלאסיקות כ"מרק ברווז", יצירה אנרכיסטית אנטי מלחמתית משנת 1933, "לילה בקזבלנקה" (1946) תשובתם של האחים לסרט "קזבלנקה", ו"לילה באופרה" (1935) הזכור בשל הסצנה בה דחסו האחים שלושה-עשר איש לתוך תא קטן בספינה, ואשר זכה לכך שאלבומה המצליח של להקת "קווין" יקרא על שמו. רבים, כוודי אלן, מצאו בסרטי האחים מרקס השראה ומשמעות, וג'ון לנון התבטא כי הוא "מרקסיסט לנוניסט" התומך בג'ון לנון ובאחים מרקס.

תוכן עניינים 1 האחים – רקע והתחלות 2 תקופת הוודוויל וברודוויי 3 הוליווד 3.1 תקופת פרמאונט 3.2 MGM ולאחריה 4 הקריירות הנפרדות 5 קישורים חיצוניים האחים – רקע והתחלות האחים מרקס נולדו למשפחה יהודית מגרמניה אשר היגרה לניו יורק. האחים כולם נולדו בניו יורק וגדלו באפר איסט סייד, תוך שהם סופגים השפעות של סביבת המהגרים האירים, הגרמנים והאיטלקים. האחים נולדו בין השנים 1887–1901. אח נוסף בשם מנפרד מת כתינוק בשנת 1885.

האחים היו:

צ'יקו (לאונרד), 1887–1961. הארפו (אדולף, ולאחר מכן ארתור), 1888–1964. גראוצ'ו (ג'וליוס הנרי), 1890–1977. גמו (מילטון), 1892–1977. זפו (הרברט) 1901–1979. משפחתם של האחים הייתה משפחה של אמנים, והוריהם עודדו את כשרונם מגיל מוקדם. הארפו היה מוכשר במיוחד, וידע לנגן כמעט בכל כלי נגינה, אך התמקד בנגינת הנבל, דבר שהביא לכינויו "הארפו" (Harp הוא נבל באנגלית). צ'יקו ניגן היטב בפסנתר וגראוצ'ו בגיטרה.

תקופת הוודוויל וברודוויי הקריירה של האחים החלה מעל בימת הוודוויל. דודם, אלברט שיינברג הופיע בתיאטרון הוודוויל כ"אל שין". בשנת 1905 הצטרף אליו גראוצ'ו כזמר, וב-1907 גראוצ'ו וגמו הקימו שלישייה בשם "שלושת הזמירים" עם זמרת בשם מייבל או'דונל. בשנה שלאחר מכן הצטרף הארפו כזמיר הרביעי. בשנת 1910 הצטרפה אמם של האחים ודודתם חנה, והשם שונה ל"ששת הקמיעות". ערב אחד, בעת הופעה בטקסס, הופרעה זמרתם של השישייה בשל התפרעותה של פרדה מחוץ לאולם, שהסבה את תשומת לב הקהל. מששב הקהל למקומו התקבל בשורה של גידופים ציניים על ידי גראוצ'ו. במקום להגיב בזעם, הגיב הקהל בצחוק. אז גילו האחים מרקס את הקסם שבקומדיה.

בתהליך איטי החלה הופעתם של האחים להתפתח מערב של זימרה המעורב בקטעי קישור קומיים, לקומדיה הכוללת קטעים מוזיקליים. תוכניתם הקומית הראשונה "כיף בבית הספר" הציגה את גראוצ'ו כמורה בעל מבטא גרמני, המנסה להשתלט על כיתה שכללה את הארפו, גמו, ומשנת 1912 גם את צ'יקו. עם הצטרפות ארצות הברית למלחמת העולם הראשונה עזב גמו את הצוות על מנת להלחם בטענה כי "כל דבר עדיף על חיי שחקן". זפו החליף אותו בשנים האחרונות של מופע הוודוויל, ערב הצלחתם והמעבר לברודוויי ולאולמות הקולנוע.

במהלך מלחמת העולם הראשונה סבלו האחים מן הרגשות האנטי-גרמניים ששררו בציבור, והמשפחה ניסתה להסתיר את שורשיה הגרמניים. הארפו שינה את שמו מאדולף לארתור, וגראוצ'ו נפטר מאישיותו ה"גרמנית" על הבמה. עתה התגבש הצוות לכלל "ארבעת האחים מרקס" והחל ליצור את סוג הקומדיה המיוחד להם, ואת אישיותם הבימתית. גראוצ'ו החל לצייר לעצמו שפם, וללכת בהליכתו המתנדנדת. הארפו החל ללבוש פאה נוכרית מתולתלת, נסע באופניים זעירים, והפסיק לדבר. צ'יקו אימץ לעצמו מבטא איטלקי מזויף, שאותו רכש בקרבות חבורות הילדים בשכונה שבה גדל. זפו, לעומתם, נותר "האיש הנורמלי", על אף שמחוץ לבמה היה הוא המצחיק מבין האחים, כאשר במשך השנים היה תפקידו להחליף את האחים במופע אם אחד מהם לא יכול היה להופיע, ולכן יכול להופיע בכל אחד מתפקידיהם.

את שמות הבמה שלהם קיבלו האחים מכותב המערכונים ארט פישר במהלך משחק פוקר בעת שהלהקה הייתה בדרכים. גרסאות שונות מסבירות את מקור השם גראוצ'ו במקורות שונים, לרבות דמות פופולרית מקומיקס שהיה נפוץ אז. הארפו קיבל את שמו בשל נגינת הנבל, וצ'יקו בשל רדיפת הנשים (צ'יקס, בסלנג המוני). גרסאות שונות קיימות לגבי מקורות שמם של גמו וזפו.

בשנות ה-20 הפך המופע של האחים מרקס לאחד הפופולריים בארצות הברית, והציג הומור שנון ומוזר, הלועג למוסדות כבית הספר, לחברה הגבוהה, ולצביעות האנושית. בנוסף לכך הם היו ידועים ביכולתם האלתורית הווירטואוזית בכלי נגינה שונים, וביכולתם לאלתר סצינות קומיות שנונות. צ'יקו היה לאמרגן הלהקה, וגראוצ'ו למנהל האמנותי. המופע של האחים הגיע לברודוויי בתחילה ברוויו מוזיקלי בשם "נגיד שהיא כן" (I'll Say She Is" 1924") ולאחר מכן בשתי קומדיות מוזיקליות "אגוזי הקוקוס" (1925) ו"אנימל קראקרס" (1928). המחזאי ג'ורג' ס. קאופמן עבד עם האחים על שתי ההצגות, וסייע להם לחדד את דמויותיהם הבימתיות.

הוליווד תקופת פרמאונט המופע של האחים מרקס צבר פופולריות בדיוק בעת שהוליווד ביצעה את המעבר מהסרט האילם לסרטי הקולנוע. האחים חתמו על הסכם עם אולפני פרמאונט וניסו את כוחם בקריירה קולנועית. שני הסרטים הראשונים שלהם "אגוזי הקוקוס" (1929) ו"אנימל קראקרס" (1930) היו מבוססים על ההצגות שהעלו האחים על הבמה. גם הופעתם הראשונה ברוויו המוזיקלי הפכה לסרט קצר שהוקרן בשנת 1931 בשם "הבית שבנו הצללים". סרטם הארוך השלישי "מאנקי ביזנס", היה הראשון שלא היה מבוסס על מחזה שהועלה על הבמה. "נוצות הסוס" (ידוע לעיתים כ"אחים מרקס באוניברסיטה") (1932) כלל לעג למערכת החינוך האמריקנית ולמשטר האיסור על שתיית משקאות חריפים שעמד אז בתוקף. הסרט היה להצלחתם הגדולה ביותר עד אז, והביא אותם עד לשער המגזין "טיים". סצנה זכורה מסרט זה, האופיינית לסגנון שפיתחו, כללה את הארפו השולף ממעילו הארוך פטיש מעץ, ולאחר מכן דג, חבל ארוך, עניבה, פוסטר של נערה בבגדיה התחתונים, כוס קפה חם, חרב, ונר הבוער משני קצותיו.

סרטם האחרון בפרמאונט "מרק ברווז" (1933) נחשב על ידי רבים ליצירת המופת שלהם. הסרט בוים על ידי במאי ידוע, לאו מקארי. הסרט הצליח פחות מסרטיהם הקודמים, אך היה בין ששת הסרטים הרווחיים ביותר בשנה שבה נוצר. הסרט הוא קומדיה העוסקת במדינה דמיונית בשם "פרידוניה" הנלחמת באויב בשם "סילבניה", ואשר גראוצ'ו (המכונה בסרט "רופוס ט. פיירפליי") ממונה לראש ממשלתה. הסרט כולל לעג מר ללאומנות, לקפיטליזם ולפשיזם, כמו גם סצינות קומיות קלאסיות ובלתי נשכחות כ"סצנת הראי", שבה מנסה הארפו לחקות את תנועותיו של גראוצ'ו על מנת לגרום לו להאמין שהוא עומד מול ראי, עד שצ'יקו, הלבוש כמותם, בכותונת לילה, נכנס לתמונה. הסצנה שוחזרה בעשרות קומדיות לאחר מכן. הסרט כלל התגרות, נועזת לתקופתה, בקוד המוסרי ההוליוודי המכונה "קוד הייז" אשר אסר, בין היתר, להראות גבר ואישה באותה המיטה. סצנה מפורסמת בסרט מראה נעלי גבר לצד המיטה, ולצדם נעלי אישה, ולאחר מכן פרסות סוס. כאשר המצלמה מגיעה אל המיטה עצמה מסתבר כי במיטה ישן הארפו לצד סוס. בסרט "חנה ואחיותיה" (1986) מבינה דמותו של וודי אלן את טעם החיים תוך צפייה בסצנה מן הסרט באולם הקולנוע. רבים חולקים עם אלן את הדעה בדבר חשיבותו של הסרט.

ברבים מסרטיהם בתקופת פרמאונט ולאחריה, שיחקה לצדם השחקנית מרגרט דומונט, אשר תפקידה היה לרוב אשת החברה הגבוהה, המשמשת כמטרה לחיזוריו המעשיים מאוד של גראוצ'ו (המונע בשל רדיפת כסף או כבוד) כמו גם לחיצי לעגו.

הסרט "מרק ברווז" היה סרטם האחרון של האחים באולפני פרמאונט, אותם עזבו עקב חילוקי דעות אמנותיים וכספיים. בשלב זה עזב זפו את הרביעייה, ונותרו בה גראוצ'ו, צ'יקו והארפו.

MGM ולאחריה שלושת האחים חתמו על הסכם עם אולפני MGM ולפי הצעת המפיק האגדי אירווינג ת'ולברג שינו את "הנוסחה" לפיה עבדו. שאר סרטיהם לא כללו את האנרכיה של הסרטים המוקדמים ואת הביקורת החברתית, אלא כללו עלילות רומנטיות השזורות בסצינות קומיות ומוזיקליות, כאשר מעתה התאנו האחים לדמויות "רשעים" בלבד. סרטים אלו נחשבים ירודים ברמתם מסרטי האחים בתקופת "פרמאונט".

הסרט הראשון בתקופה זו היה "לילה באופרה" (1935) סאטירה מתוחכמת על עולם האופרה, שבה מסייעים האחים לשני צעירים מאוהבים, זמר וזמרת אופרה, באמצעות הפיכת הפקה של האופרה "אל טרובאטורה" לכלל תוהו ובוהו. הסרט היה להצלחה גדולה, ובמשך שנים נחשב לסרטם הטוב ביותר, אם כי כיום הדעה הרווחת בקרב המבקרים מעדיפה את סרטי "פרמאונט". אחרי סרט זה הגיע "יום במרוצים" (1937), אשר במהלך הפקתו מת ת'ולברג באופן מפתיע, ולאחים אבד מליץ היושר שלהם באולפני MGM.

האחים ניסו את מזלם באולפני RKO בסרט בשם "שירות חדרים" בשנת 1938, ולאחר מכן שבו ל-MGM בשלושה סרטים "האחים מרקס בקרקס" (1939), "האחים מרקס במערב הפרוע" (1940) ו"החנות הגדולה" (1941). סרטים אלו לא הצליחו לחזור על הצלחת שני הסרטים הראשונים של האחים ב-MGM.

שני סרטיהם האחרונים של האחים כצוות קומי הופקו באולפני "יונייטד ארטיסטס" – "לילה בקזבלנקה" (1946) שהיה פרודיה על הלהיט הקולנועי משנת 1942 "קזבלנקה" ו"מאושרים באהבה" ("Love Happy") בשנת 1949.

מיתוס פופולרי מספר כי כאשר יצרו האחים את הסרט "לילה בקזבלנקה" איימו אולפני האחים וורנר לתבוע בגין השימוש במילה "קזבלנקה" אך נסוגו מן הרעיון כאשר איים עליהם גראוצ'ו בתביעה בגין השימוש במילה "האחים" בשם האולפן. האמת היא כי בעת הפקת "לילה בקזבלנקה" עמדו האולפנים בקשר על מנת לוודא כי לא יהיה קשר ברור בין העלילות, אלא בקו העלילה הכללי בלבד, ומכתביו של גראוצ'ו אל האולפנים נשלחו לצורך יחסי ציבור, מבלי שאיש שקל ברצינות הגשת תביעה.

"מאושרים באהבה" היה סרטם האחרון של האחים כצוות קומי קולנועי. לאחר מכן הופיעו האחים בסצינות נפרדות בסרט "סיפור המין האנושי" (1957) ולאחריו בסרט טלוויזיה בשם "שוד היהלומים שלא יאמן" בשנת 1959.

הקריירות הנפרדות משנת 1947 החלו האחים בפיתוח קריירות נפרדות. הארפו וצ'יקו הופיעו כצוות ובנפרד על במת התיאטרון, וגראוצ'ו החל קריירה כבדרן ברדיו ובטלוויזיה. בשנות ה-50 היה גראוצ'ו המנחה של חידון טלוויזיוני קומי בשם "אתה יכול להתערב על זה" ("You Bet Your Life") שנחשב לפורץ דרך בתחום השעשועונים הטלוויזיוניים. כן הופיעו האחים בנפרד במספר סרטים. בשנת 1959 פרסם גראוצ'ו את ספר זיכרונותיו "גראוצ'ו ואני" ובשנת 1964 פרסם ספר פרוזה בשם "זיכרונותיו של מאהב מדובלל" (Memoirs of a Mangy Lover), וב-1967 את "מכתבי גראוצ'ו" (The Groucho Letters).

בשנת 1970 סיפקו שניים מהאחים קולות לסרט מצויר בשם "הקומיקאים המטורפים" שהופק עבור אולפני הטלוויזיה ABC. "איחוד" זה היה הופעתם הפומבית האחרונה כצוות. צ'יקו והרפו כבר לא היו בין החיים, וזפו שימש בתפקידיהם.

קישורים חיצוניים מיזמי קרן ויקימדיה ויקיציטוט ציטוטים בוויקיציטוט: האחים מרקס ויקישיתוף תמונות ומדיה בוויקישיתוף: האחים מרקס Green globe.svg אתר האינטרנט הרשמי

של האחים מרקס

IMDB Logo 2016.svg האחים מרקס , במסד הנתונים הקולנועיים IMDb (באנגלית) Marx Brothers

(באנגלית)

Marx Brothers Blog

(באנגלית)

אלון גור אריה, הצחוק נשאר במשפחה , באתר ynet, 3 בנובמבר 2009 איש הכמעט: גמו וזפו מרקס (תוכניתם של עופר חזות ורועי אוניקובסקי) , גלי צה"ל, 18 ביוני 2012 https://he.wikipedia.org/wiki/%D7%94%D7%90%D7%97%D7%99%D7%9D_%D7%9E...

---------------------------------------- As an entertainer and comedian, Groucho Marx remains a well-known figure some 30 years after his death. Marx's

grease-paint bushy eyebrows and mustache, and trademark cigar, made him immediately recognizable, and he gained a reputation for smart ad-libs and cutting insults. While he came to fame on the stage and movie screen in the company of his brothers (the Marx Brothers), he also had a high-profile solo career, working in radio during the '30s and '40s, television during the '50 and '60s, and as a performer of one-man shows in the '70s.

He was born Julius Henry Marx on October 02, 1890 in New York City, the third-oldest son of "stage mama" Minnie Marx and Sam Marx (called "Frenchie" throughout his life because of his birthplace, Alsace-Lorraine). Although he dreamed of becoming a doctor, he dropped out of school at 12 to help support his family. In 1905, he began performing as a boy singer on the vaudeville stage, and later, with the help of his mother-manager, Minnie Marx, was joined by his brothers as the singing troupe the Four Nightingales. Later, the brothers developed into a successful comedy act, leading to several successful Broadway plays and, in the late '20s, movies like Animal Crackers. Marx initially adapted a German accent for his stage persona, but quickly switched to a fast-talking smart aleck when anti-German sentiment became prevalent on the eve of WW I. The popularity of his persona also helped him establish a career outside of his work with his brothers during the early '30s.

Through the many incarnations of their vaudeville act, the characters remained the same: Groucho, the mustached, cigar-chomping leader of the foursome, alternately dispensing humorous invectives and acting as exasperated straight man for his brothers' antics; Chico, the monumentally stupid, pun-happy Italian; Harpo, the non-speaking, whirling dervish; and Gummo (later replaced by Zeppo), the hopelessly lost straight man. During the run of their vaudeville sketch Home Again, Groucho was unable to find his prop mustache and rapidly painted one on with greasepaint -- which is how he would appear with his brothers ever afterward, despite efforts by certain film directors to make his hirsute adornment look realistic. After managing to offend several powerful vaudeville magnates, the Marx Brothers accepted work with a Broadway-bound "tab" show, I'll Say She Is. The play scored a surprise hit when it opened in 1924, and the brothers became the toast of Broadway. They followed this success with 1925's The Cocoanuts, in which playwrights George Kaufman and Morris Ryskind refined Groucho's character into the combination con man/perpetual wisecracker that he would portray until the team dissolved. The Cocoanuts was also the first time Groucho appeared with his future perennial foil and straight woman Margaret Dumont. Animal Crackers, which opened in 1928, cast Groucho as fraudulent African explorer Capt. Geoffrey T. Spaulding, and introduced his lifelong signature tune, the Bert Kalmar/Harry Ruby classic "Hooray for Captain Spaulding." Both Cocoanuts and Animal Crackers were made into early talkies, prompting Paramount to invite the Brothers to Hollywood for a group of comedies written specifically for the screen. Monkey Business (1931), Horse Feathers (1932), and Duck Soup (1933) are now acknowledged classics, but box-office receipts dropped off with each successive feature, and, by 1934, the Marx Brothers were considered washed up in Hollywood. Groucho was only mildly put out; professional inactivity gave him time to commiserate with the writers and novelists who comprised his circle of friends. He always considered himself a writer first and comedian second, and, over the years, published several witty books and articles. (He was gratified in the '60s when his letters to and from friends were installed in the Library of Congress -- quite an accomplishment for a man who never finished grade school.)

The Marx Brothers were given a second chance in movies by MGM producer Irving Thalberg, who lavished a great deal of time, money, and energy on what many consider the team's best film, A Night at the Opera (1935). The normally iconoclastic Groucho remained an admirer of Thalberg for the rest of his life, noting that he lost all interest in filmmaking after the producer died in 1936. The Marx Brothers continued making films until 1941, principally to bail out the eternally broke Chico. Retired again from films in 1941, Groucho kept busy with occasional radio guest star appearances and a stint with the Hollywood Victory Caravan. Despite his seeming insouciance, Groucho loved performing and was disheartened that none of his radio series in the mid-'40s were successful. (Nor was the Marx Brothers' 1946 comeback film A Night in Casablanca.) When producer/writer John Guedel approached him in 1947 to host a radio quiz show called You Bet Your Life, Groucho initially refused, not wanting another failure on his resume. But he accepted the job when assured that, instead of being confined to a banal script or his worn-out screen character, he could be himself, ad-libbing to his heart's content with the contestants. You Bet Your Life was a rousing success on both radio (1947-1956) and television (1950-1961 on NBC), winning high ratings and several Emmy awards in the process. Except for an occasional reunion with his brothers (the 1949 film Love Happy, the 1959 TV special The Incredible Jewel Robbery), Groucho became a solo performer for the remainder of his career.

During the '50s, Marx made occasional stage appearances in -Time for Elizabeth, a play he co-wrote with his friend Harry Kurnitz; this slight piece was committed to film as a 1964 installment of Bob Hope Presents the Chrysler Theatre, and in which the comedian looked ill at ease playing an everyman browbeaten by his boss. Working less frequently in the late '60s, Marx returned to the limelight in the early '70s when his old films were rediscovered by young antiestablishment types of the era, who revelled in his willingness to deflate authority and attack any and all sacred cows. By this time, Marx's health had been weakened by a stroke, but through the encouragement (some say prodding) of his secretary/companion Erin Fleming, he returned to active performing with TV guest appearances and a 1972 sold-out appearance at Carnegie Hall. And though he seemed very frail and aphasic in his latter-day performances, his fans couldn't get enough of him. In 1974, with Fleming at his side, Marx accepted a special Oscar. Ironically, it was the increasing influence of Fleming, which some observers insisted gave the octogenarian a new lease on life, that caused him the greatest amount of difficulty in his final years, resulting in the estrangement of his children and many of his oldest friends. In the midst of a heated battle between the Marx family and Fleming over the disposition of his estate, Groucho Marx died in 1977 at the age of 86.

Sources

"New York, New York City Births, 1846-1909," database, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:2WMY-TZT : 11 February 2018), Julius Henry Marx, 02 Oct 1890; citing Manhattan, New York, New York, United States, reference cn 29632 New York Municipal Archives, New York; FHL microfilm 1,322,235.

view all 22

Groucho Marx's Timeline

1890
October 2, 1890
New York, NY, United States
1900
1900
Age 9
Manhattan, New York, New York, United States
1900
Age 9
Manhattan, New York, New York, USA
1921
July 21, 1921
New York City, New York, United States
1927
May 19, 1927
New York, NY, United States