Major General Joseph B. Kershaw (CSA)

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Major General Joseph B. Kershaw (CSA)'s Geni Profile

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Joseph Brevard Kershaw

Birthdate:
Birthplace: Camden, Kershaw County, South Carolina, United States
Death: April 12, 1894 (72)
Camden, Kershaw County, South Carolina, United States
Place of Burial: Camden, Kershaw County, South Carolina, United States
Immediate Family:

Son of John Kershaw, US Congress and Harriett Kershaw
Husband of Lucretia Kershaw
Father of John Kershaw; Mary Martin Shannon; Charlotte Kershaw; Josephine Serre deLoach and Harriet DuBose Lang
Brother of Mary Riley Young and Henriette Serre Kershaw

Occupation: lawyer and legislator, lawyer, judge, and a Confederate general in the American Civil War.
Managed by: Private User
Last Updated:

About Major General Joseph B. Kershaw (CSA)

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Joseph_Brevard_Kershaw

Joseph Brevard Kershaw (January 5, 1822 – April 13, 1894) was a lawyer, judge, and a Confederate general in the American Civil War.

Early life

Kershaw was born at Camden, South Carolina, admitted to the bar in 1843, and was a member of the South Carolina Senate from 1852 to 1856.

Civil War

At the start of the Civil War Kershaw commanded the 2nd South Carolina Volunteer Infantry regiment and took part in the First Battle of Bull Run. He was commissioned brigadier general on February 13, 1862, and commanded a brigade in Robert E. Lee's Army of Northern Virginia during the Peninsula Campaign, at the close of which he continued with Lee and took part in the Northern Virginia Campaign and Maryland Campaign. Towards the end of the Battle of Fredericksburg, he succeeded Brig. Gen. T. R. R. Cobb, upon the latter's death, and repulsed the last two attacks made by the Federals on Marye's Heights.

The next year he was engaged in the Battle of Gettysburg and then was transferred with Lt. Gen. James Longstreet's corps to the West, where he took part in the charge that destroyed the Federal right wing at Chickamauga. After the relief of Knoxville and Longstreet's return to Virginia, he commanded a division in the battles of the Wilderness, Spotsylvania Court House, and Cold Harbor, and was engaged in the Shenandoah campaign of 1864 against Maj. Gen. Philip Sheridan. After the evacuation of Richmond, his troops formed part of Lt. Gen. Richard S. Ewell's corps, which was captured at the Battle of Sayler's Creek, April 6, 1865.

Postbellum career

At the close of the war he returned to South Carolina and in 1865 was chosen president of the State Senate. He was judge of the Circuit Court from 1877 to 1893. In 1894 he was appointed postmaster of Camden, an office that he held until his death in the same year. He died in Camden and is buried there in the Quaker Cemetery.


Joseph Brevard Kershaw (January 5, 1822 – April 13, 1894) was a lawyer, judge, and a Confederate general in the American Civil War.

Early life

Kershaw was born at Camden, South Carolina, admitted to the bar in 1843, and was a member of the South Carolina Senate from 1852 to 1856. Kershaw saw battle during the Mexican-American War, but fell dangerously sick and was permitted to return home. Civil War

At the start of the Civil War Kershaw commanded the 2nd South Carolina Volunteer Infantry regiment and took part in the First Battle of Bull Run. The 2nd South Carolina was present at Morris Island during the Fort Sumter incident. He was commissioned brigadier general on February 13, 1862, and commanded a brigade in Robert E. Lee's Army of Northern Virginia during the Peninsula Campaign, at the close of which he continued with Lee and took part in the Northern Virginia Campaign and Maryland Campaign. Towards the end of the Battle of Fredericksburg, he succeeded Brig. Gen. T. R. R. Cobb, upon the latter's death, and repulsed the last two attacks made by the Federals on Marye's Heights.

The next year he was engaged in the Battle of Gettysburg and then was transferred with Lt. Gen. James Longstreet's corps to the West, where he took part in the charge that destroyed the Federal right wing at Chickamauga. After the relief of McLaws following the battle of Knoxville Kershaw was given the command of the division. When Longstreet returned to Virginia, he commanded a division in the battles of the Wilderness, Spotsylvania Court House, and Cold Harbor, and was engaged in the Shenandoah campaign of 1864 against Maj. Gen. Philip Sheridan. After the evacuation of Richmond, his troops formed part of Lt. Gen. Richard S. Ewell's corps, which was captured at the Battle of Sayler's Creek, April 6, 1865. Postbellum career

At the close of the war he returned to South Carolina and in 1865 was chosen president of the State Senate. He was judge of the Circuit Court from 1877 to 1893. In 1894 he was appointed postmaster of Camden, an office that he held until his death in the same year. He died in Camden and is buried there in the Quaker Cemetery.[1]

Civil War Major General, a third generation South Carolinian. Kershaw County in South Carolina was named for his family. His maternal grandfather served on Francis Marion's staff. His father was mayor of Camden, a Judge, Legislator, and a member of Congress. He joined the Palmetto Regiment in the Mexican War and was elected First Lieutenant in the DeKalb Rifle Guards. He contracted a fever and returned home to Camden a very sick man. He resigned his commission and his wife, Lucretia Douglas Kershaw, nursed him back to health. He was elected to the State Legislature in 1852 and 1854. He became active in the Militia in 1859 and participated in the Charleston Convention which led to South Carolina seceding from the Union. He was in Charleston on Morris Island during the siege of Fort Sumter. He organized the 2nd South Carolina Regiment and was named its Colonel in 1861. His Regiment was sent to Virginia and assigned to General Milledge L. Bonham. They fought on Henry House Hill at First Manassas and played a major role in breaking the Union lines and chasing the Yankees back to Washington. After General Bonham resigned, he was appointed Brigadier General. His unit fought at Williamsburg, Savage Station, Malvern Hill, and Antietam. He was at Fredericksburg and took over command after the death of General Thomas Cobb. His Regiment was at Chancellorsville and Gettysburg where he was at the Rose Farm and Peach Orchard under General Lafayette McLaws. After General McLaws was transferred, he took command of the Division. He was at the Wilderness, Spotsylvania, Shenandoah Valley at Hupp's Hill and Cedar Creek, and Petersburg. He was one of six Generals captured at Saylor's Creek three days before General Robert E. Lee surrendered at Appomattox. He was taken to General Custer and shared blankets with Custer before being sent to a prison camp at Fort Warren in Boston Harbor. He never forgot Custer's kindness to him. He was released in August, 1865. He returned to Camden where he resumed his legal career, was a Judge, elected to the State Senate in 1865, and chosen President of the Senate. After his health began to fail, he was appointed Postmaster of Camden, South Carolina, a position he held until his death. (bio by: [fg.cgi?page=mr&MRid=5502422" target="_blank Janet Greentree)] Maintained by: Find A Grave Record added: Apr 10, 2000

Find A Grave Memorial# 9082

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Major General Joseph B. Kershaw (CSA)'s Timeline

1822
January 5, 1822
Camden, Kershaw County, South Carolina, United States
1847
January 3, 1847
1848
April 23, 1848
Camden, Kershaw County, South Carolina, United States
1850
October 14, 1850
1851
April 17, 1851
1867
April 8, 1867
Camden, Kershaw County, South Carolina, United States
1894
April 12, 1894
Age 72
Camden, Kershaw County, South Carolina, United States
April 12, 1894
Age 72
Camden, Kershaw County, South Carolina, United States