Rebecca Ann Boone

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Rebecca Ann Boone (Bryan)

Also Known As: "Becky"
Birthdate:
Birthplace: Winchester, Frederick County, Virginia, Colonial America
Death: March 18, 1813 (74)
Femme Osage Creek, Defiance, St. Charles County, Missouri, United States
Place of Burial: Marthasville, Warren County, Missouri, United States
Immediate Family:

Daughter of Joseph H. Bryan and Hester Bryan
Wife of Col. Daniel Boone
Mother of James Bryan Boone; Susanna Hays; Jemima Callaway; Lavina Bryan Scholl; Rebecca Goe and 9 others
Sister of Martha L. Boone
Half sister of Jeremiah Hampton; Eve Durham (Bryan); Mary Maria Howard; Susannah Haggins (Bryan); Joseph Bryan, II and 8 others

Occupation: Rebecca assumed Daniel was dead in Cherokee Uprising and began a relationship with his brother Edward; Boone was understanding and did not blame Rebecca. Boone raised Jemima as his own and favorite child., ?
Managed by: Pam Wilson (on hiatus)
Last Updated:

About Rebecca Ann Boone

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rebecca_Bryan_Boone

Rebecca (Bryan) Boone (June 9, 1739 – March 18, 1813) was an American pioneer and the wife of famed frontiersman Daniel Boone.

She was born near Winchester, Virginia. Her parents were Joseph Bryan and Hester (Simpson) Hampton. Later Joseph remarried Alice (or Ayiee) Linville Bryan who raised her. Rebecca married Daniel Boone 14 Aug 1756 in Yadkin River, NC at the age of 17. She was brought up as a Friend or Quaker.

Her grandfather, Morgan Bryan of Irish and Welsh background(b.1671 in Denmark; d.3 Apr 1763 in Yadkin River, Rowan, North Carolina) , immigrated to the United States from Denmark for religious reasons when his parents died. He and his brother took the mares his father had left them with them to the United States. Thee settled in North Carolina and Morgan was buried in 1763 in Mocksville, Rowan Co., NC, Joppa Cem.

One of Rebecca's daughter's name was Susannah Boone, who got married to William Hays and their child was Susannah Hays.

Another son, James, was 17 years old and on the trail to Kentucky when an Indian named Big Jim, whom the family had befriended, tortured him to death with a tomahawk, along with Henry Russell, son of William Russell.

Her son Israel was killed while fighting beside his father in Kentucky during the Battle of Blue Licks, one of the last skirmishes of the Revolutionary War.

The World War II Liberty ship SS Rebecca Boone was named in her honor.



http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rebecca_Boone

http://shs.umsystem.edu/famousmissourians/explorers/dboone/rboone.html

Rebecca Boone was the wife of famous frontiersman, Daniel Boone. Rebecca married Daniel Boone on August 14, 1756, at the age of 13. Daniel was a neighbor in the Yadkin Valley. The couple initially lived in a cabin on his father's farm. They eventually had nine or ten children.

In 1759, a conflict erupted between British colonists and Cherokee Indians, their former allies in the French and Indian War. After the Yadkin Valley was raided by Cherokees, many families, including the Boones, fled to Culpeper County, Virginia. Boone served in the North Carolina militia during this "Cherokee Uprising", and his hunting expeditions deep into Cherokee territory beyond the Blue Ridge Mountains separated him from his wife for about two years. According to one story, Boone was gone for so long that Rebecca assumed he was dead, and began a relationship with his brother Edward ("Ned"), giving birth to daughter Jemima in 1762. (Edward was married to Rebecca's sister Martha Bryan).

Upon Daniel's return, the story goes, Rebecca reproved him saying, "You'd had better have stayed home and got it yourself." Boone was understanding and did not blame Rebecca. Whatever the truth of the tale, Daniel raised Jemima as his own and favorite child. Boone's early biographers knew this story, but did not publish it.

Daniel and Rebecca Boone’s Children:

-James (1757-1773) – killed by Native Americans at Cumberland Gap while accompanying Daniel Boone as he tried to lead a group of settlers into Kentucky.

-Israel (1759-1782) – killed in Kentucky during the Battle of Blue Licks, one of the last skirmishes of the Revolutionary War.

-Susannah (1760-1800) – married William Hayes in 1775

-Jemima (1762-1829) – married Flanders Callaway

-Levina (1766-1802) – married Joseph Scholl around 1785

-Rebecca (1768-1805) – married Philip Goe

-Daniel Morgan (1769-1839) – married Sarah Griffin Lewis in 1800

-Jesse Bryan (1773-1820) – married Chloe Van Bibber

-William (1775-1775) – died in infancy

-Nathan (1781-1856) – married Olive Van Bibber in 1799

See notes under Rebecca's husband Daniel Boone


-------------------- Daniel BOONE made his first foray into Kentucky in 1767, but he did not move his family to Kentucky until 1775, making his wife, Rebecca (BRYAN) BOONE, the first European woman to settle in the region of Virginia that became the State of Kentucky in 1792.
-------------------- Listed on Wikipedia: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rebecca_Boone

Rebecca Ann (Bryan) Boone (January 9, 1739 – March 18, 1813) was an American pioneer and the wife of famed frontiersman Daniel Boone. No contemporary portrait of her exists, but people who knew her said that when she met her future husband she was nearly as tall as he and very attractive with black hair and dark eyes.[1]

She was born near Winchester, Virginia. Her father was Joseph Bryan, Sr. but there is no clear documentation as to her birth mother. Some say her mother, Hester Hampton, died in childbirth, and that Alice (or Aylee) Linville, Bryan's second wife, raised her. (more...)

-------------------- DAR ID:  35404 V36 Pl 50 also 38294
-------------------- She died at Jemima's home in Missouri, but was buried in Frankfort Cemetery in Kentucky.  Rebecca Ann was a tall brunettte.  Her father was Joseph Bryan and mother was Aylee. Her grandfather was Morgan Bryan and they were Welsh Quakers

Picture of Added by DENNISINMO Advertisement

Rebecca Ann Bryan Boone BIRTH 9 Jan 1739 Winchester, Frederick County, Virginia, USA DEATH 18 Mar 1813 (aged 74) Defiance, St. Charles County, Missouri, USA BURIAL* Old Bryan Farm Cemetery *–This is the original burial site Marthasville, Warren County, Missouri, USA Show Map MEMORIAL ID 117667110 · View Source

MEMORIAL PHOTOS 2 FLOWERS 59 Early American Pioneer. She is best remembered as the wife of famed American pioneer and frontiersman Daniel Boone. While no actual portrait of her exists when she was living, people who knew her said that when she met her future husband, she was nearly his height and very attractive with black hair and dark eyes. Born Rebecca Ann Bryan, at the age of 10 she moved with her Quaker grandparents, Morgan and Martha Bryan, to the Yadkin River Valley in the backwoods of North Carolina where she met and courted Daniel Boone in 1753 and married him three years later at the age of 17. This union would product ten children. Additionally, she took in her new husband's two young orphan nephews, who lived with them in North Carolina until the family left for Kentucky in 1773. Without any formal education, she was reputed to be an experienced community midwife, the family doctor, leather tanner, sharpshooter, and linen-maker, resourceful and independent in the isolated wilderness areas that she and her large, combined family often found themselves. In the autumn of 1773, she came through the Cumberland Gap with her family and fifty others under the leadership of William Russell, though they were turned back by the violent resistance by Native Americans to British colonization west of the Allegheny Mountains. In 1775 her husband brought the family to the Kentucky River where, on behalf of the Transylvania Company, he and Richard Henderson laid out Fort Boonesborough. In May 1778 she left Kentucky under a cloud of rumors that her husband, who had been capture by the Chilicothe Shawnee Native American tribe, had turned Tory. She returned to her parents' settlement in North Carolina with five of her children, leaving behind her daughter Jemima who by then had married. In June 1778 her husband escaped his captors and returned to his family in North Carolina and finally convinced her to leave again for Kentucky, this time with nearly 100 of their relatives. They departed in September 1779, the largest emigration to date to travel through the Cumberland Gap. By late October 1779, they reached Fort Boonesborough but conditions were so bad that they left on Christmas Day, during what Kentuckians later called the "Hard Winter," to found a new settlement, Boone's Station, with 15 to 20 families on Boone's Creek about six miles northwest (near what is now Athens, Kentucky). By the following spring, she and her husband moved to a cabin several miles southwest on Marble Creek. In 1781 she lived in a double cabin with five of her children still living at home, the six children of her widowed uncle James Bryan, as well as her daughter Susannah with her husband, and with 2 to 3 children of their own, a household of almost 20 people. In 1783 she and her family moved where for the next few years she assisted her husband in creating a landing site at the mouth of Limestone Creek for flatboats coming down the Ohio River from Fort Pitt in Pennsylvania. They lived in a cabin built out of an old boat (on what is now Front Street in Maysville, Kentucky) and she ran the tavern kitchen and oversaw the seven slaves they owned. In 1787 he husband was elected to the Virginia legislature as Bourbon County's representative, and she moved with him to Richmond, Virginia and their youngest child, leaving the tavern in the hands of their daughter Rebecca and husband Philip Goe. In 1788 they moved to Point Pleasant (now in West Virginia) in the Kanawha Valley, settling on the south side of the river almost opposite the mouth of Campbell's Creek. In 1799 they followed their youngest son Nathan to Spain's Alta Louisiana (Upper Louisiana, now Missouri, about 45 miles west/northwest of Saint Louis) in the Femme Osage Valley. She died there after a brief illness at the age of 74 in the home of her daughter Jemima Boone Callaway and was interred at the nearby Old Bryan Family Cemetery, on the bank of Tuque Creek near Marthasville, Missouri. In 1845 her remains, along with her husband's (reportedly) were disinterred and reburied in Frankfort, Kentucky.

Bio by: William Bjornstad

https://www.findagrave.com/memorial/117667110/rebecca-ann-boone


GEDCOM Source

@R1200143497@ U.S., Find A Grave Index, 1600s-Current Ancestry.com Ancestry.com Operations, Inc. 1,60525::0

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1,60525::58918392

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@R1200143497@ U.S., Sons of the American Revolution Membership Applications, 1889-1970 Ancestry.com Ancestry.com Operations, Inc. Sons of the American Revolution Membership Applications, 1889-1970 1,2204::0

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1,2204::996386

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@R1200143497@ North America, Family Histories, 1500-2000 Ancestry.com Ancestry.com Operations, Inc. 1,61157::0

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Book Title: Samuel Moody Grubbs, a descendant of the Boone Family 1,61157::481089

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@R1200143497@ Family Data Collection - Individual Records Edmund West, comp. Ancestry.com Operations Inc 1,4725::0

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Birth year: 1738; Birth city: Winchester; Birth state: VA 1,4725::352508

GEDCOM Source

@R1200143497@ U.S., Find A Grave Index, 1600s-Current Ancestry.com Ancestry.com Operations, Inc. 1,60525::0

GEDCOM Source

1,60525::58918392

GEDCOM Source

@R1200143497@ U.S., Find A Grave Index, 1600s-Current Ancestry.com Ancestry.com Operations, Inc. 1,60525::0

GEDCOM Source

1,60525::58918392

GEDCOM Source

@R1200143497@ U.S., Find A Grave Index, 1600s-Current Ancestry.com Ancestry.com Operations, Inc. 1,60525::0

GEDCOM Source

1,60525::58918392

GEDCOM Source

@R1200143497@ U.S., Sons of the American Revolution Membership Applications, 1889-1970 Ancestry.com Ancestry.com Operations, Inc. Sons of the American Revolution Membership Applications, 1889-1970 1,2204::0

GEDCOM Source

1,2204::996386

GEDCOM Source

@R1200143497@ North America, Family Histories, 1500-2000 Ancestry.com Ancestry.com Operations, Inc. 1,61157::0

GEDCOM Source

Book Title: Samuel Moody Grubbs, a descendant of the Boone Family 1,61157::481089

GEDCOM Source

@R1200143497@ Family Data Collection - Individual Records Edmund West, comp. Ancestry.com Operations Inc 1,4725::0

GEDCOM Source

Birth year: 1738; Birth city: Winchester; Birth state: VA 1,4725::352508

GEDCOM Source

@R1200143497@ U.S., Find A Grave Index, 1600s-Current Ancestry.com Ancestry.com Operations, Inc. 1,60525::0

GEDCOM Source

1,60525::58918392

GEDCOM Source

@R1200143497@ U.S., Sons of the American Revolution Membership Applications, 1889-1970 Ancestry.com Ancestry.com Operations, Inc. Sons of the American Revolution Membership Applications, 1889-1970 1,2204::0

GEDCOM Source

1,2204::996386

GEDCOM Source

@R1200143497@ North America, Family Histories, 1500-2000 Ancestry.com Ancestry.com Operations, Inc. 1,61157::0

GEDCOM Source

Book Title: Samuel Moody Grubbs, a descendant of the Boone Family 1,61157::481089

GEDCOM Source

@R1200143497@ Ancestry Family Trees Online publication - Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com. Original data: Family Tree files submitted by Ancestry members.

GEDCOM Source

Ancestry Family Tree http://trees.ancestry.com/pt/AMTCitationRedir.aspx?tid=102876544&pi...


GEDCOM Note

<p>[29819.ged]</p><p><p></p></p><p><p>Rebecca's body was removed to Franfort, Kentucky in 1845 along with what was supposed to be the remains of Daniel Boone. Evidence indicates that Daniel bones still remain in Missouri. Rebecca was originally buried in the David Bryan Cemetery, Marthaville, Warren Co. MO.</p><p><p>[34041.ged.FTW]</p></p><p><p></p></p><p><p>Rebecca's Body was removed to Franfort Kentucky in 1845 along with what was</p><p>supposed to be the remains of Daniel Boone. Evidence indicates that Daniels bones still remain in Missouri. Rebecca was originally buried in the David Bryan Cemetery, Marthaville, Warren Co., Missouri.

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Rebecca Ann Boone's Timeline

1739
January 9, 1739
Winchester, Frederick County, Virginia, Colonial America
1757
May 3, 1757
Bear's Creek, Yadkin, North Carolina
1759
January 25, 1759
Bear Creek, Yadkin County, NC
1760
November 2, 1760
Yadkin Valley, Rowan County, Province of North Carolina, Colonial America
1762
October 4, 1762
Yadkin River, Rowan County, North Carolina, Colonial America
1766
March 23, 1766
Sugar Creek, Rowan County, North Carolina, British Colonial America
1768
May 26, 1768
Yadkin River, Rowan County, Province of North Carolina, Colonial America
1769
December 23, 1769
Wilkes, Davidson County, North Carolina, Colonial America
1772
May 13, 1772
Freehold Township, Monmouth County, New Jersey, Colonial America