Robert Burdick, of Newport

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Robert Burdick, Sr.

Also Known As: "Robert /BURDICK/BURDETT/"
Birthdate:
Birthplace: England
Death: Died in Westerly, Washington, Rhode Island
Place of Burial: Westerly, Washington County, Rhode Island, USA
Immediate Family:

Husband of Ruth Burdick and Ruth Burdick
Father of Thomas Burdick; Thomas Burdick, Sr; Naomi Rogers; Tacy Maxson; Deborah Hubbard Crandall and 9 others

Occupation: Deputy representative to General Assembly 1680-83-85; bapt 1655 Westerly RI
Managed by: Private User
Last Updated:

About Robert Burdick, of Newport

1651- Settled first in Newport, RI, then later in Westerly, RI.

1680- Deputy to the Rhode Island General Assembly from Warwick, RI.

1683 and 1685- Deputy from Westerly, RI.

BURDICK

There is good reason to believe that the surname Burdick is identical with Burditt (also spelled Burdett, Burclette. etc.). The spelling Burdick is not given in English works on surnames, and like many American names it is probably a variation in spelling from the English Burdette, etc. We find William Burdick master of the ship "Hopewell" which brought many colonists to this country in 1635. In the early records the immigrant ancestor of the Burdick family had his name spelled Berdick. Burdick and Burdett. Robert Burdett, who may be related to Robert Burdick, of this sketch, was born in 1633, came to Maiden, Massachusetts, when a young man. The names of his children, Joseph, Thomas, Hannah, Mary, Sarah, and Ruth are similar to those of the Rhode Island family. The Burdett family in England is ancient and distinguished.

(I) Robert Burdick, the immigrant, was an early settler of Newport and Westerly, Rhode Island. He was baptized by Rev. Joseph Torrey, November 19, 1652, and was admitted a freeman in 1676. In 1660 a company of Newport men who bought of the Indians a tract at Misquamicut offered inducements to members who would settle. Massachusetts claimed jurisdiction over the territory, calling it Southerton. Burdick was one of the pioneers with Tobias Saunders and Joseph Clarke. These three were arrested by Walter Palmer, constable, November I, 1661, and soon afterward Burdick and Saunders were brought before Governor John Endicott, charged with forcible entry and intrusion into the bounds of Southerton in the Pequot country. Both declined to recognize the jurisdiction of Massachusetts, and were committed to prison, refusing to give bail, and after a year of imprisonment they were exchanged for prisoners taken by the Rhode Island authoities. King Charles II. decided the dispute in favor of Rhode Island. Burdick became one of the twenty-four incorporators of the town of Westerly, Rhode Island, and held various town offices. He took the oath of allegiance, May 17, 1671, and again September 17, 1676. He was deputy to the assembly in 1680-83-85. During King Philip's war his family returned to Newport and lived with Samuel Hubbard, but Burdick remained most of the time at Westerly. He made an agreement with his son-in-law, Joseph Crandall, to care for him the remainder of his life, in consideration of the homestead. His estate was divided by agreement, October 25, 1692.

He married, November 2, 1655, Ruth Hubbard, born January 11, 1640, died in 1691, daughter of Samuel and Tacy (Cooper) Hubbard. Her father was born in Mendelsham, county Suffolk, England, in 1610, son of James and Naomi (Cocke) Hubbard. James Hubbard's father was declared by Samuel Hubbard to be the Thomas Hubbard mentioned in Fox's "Book of Martyrs". Naomi Cocke was a daughter of Thomas Cocke, of Ipswich, England. In 1675 Samuel Hubbard wrote in his diary: "I have a Testament of my grandfather Cocke's, printed in 1549, which he hid in his bed-straw, lest it should be found and burned in Queen Mary's days." This Testament was given by Samuel Hubbard to his granddaughter, Naomi Burdick, who married Jonathan Rogers, and it is said that this Testament is now in the library of Alfred University, and known as the Rogers Bible. Samuel Hubbard came from England to Salem, Massachusetts, in October, 1633, and was in Watertown the next year. He was admitted a freeman, March 4, 1634, and joined the church about the same time. He removed to Windsor, where he married, January 4, 1636, Tacy Cooper. Hubbard removed to Springfield, May 10, 1639, and was one of the founders of the church and became a prominent citizen. He and his wife became Baptists and being threatened with imprisonment for their views while at Fairfield, Connecticut, they removed, October 2, 1648, to Rhode Island, arriving October 12, as recorded in Samuel's diary. He joined the Baptist church in Newport, November 3, 1648. Ruth Hubbard was "the first child on record at Springfield." Children of Robert and Ruth (Hubbard) Burdick: Robert, married Dorcas Lewis: Hubbard, married Hannah Maxson; Thomas, of whom further; Naomi, married Jonathan Rogers; Ruth, married John Phillips; Benjamin, married and had eight children; Samuel, married Mary Bliven; Tacy, married Joseph Maxson; Deborah, married Joseph Crandall.

NEW ENGLAND FAMILIES: GENEALOGICAL AND MEMORIAL:

A RECORD OF THE ACHIEVEMENTS OF HER PEOPLE IN THE MAKING

OF COMMONWEALTHS AND THE FOUNDING OF A NATION

(WILLIAM RICHARD CUTTER, A. M.)

http://books.google.com/books?id=e88UAAAAYAAJ

_________________________________________________


Note: The ancestry of Robert Burdick is undocumented to date. The above lineage, beginning with Robert's father is probably unsubstantiated

_____________

Robert Came to New England (Newport, RI) from England about1650. Supposedly, William Burdick was a shipmaster, who wassailing between England and New England about the time RobertBurdick immigrated, was the father of Robert.

Robert Burdick was admitted freeman 5/22/1655. Moved toWesterly, Washington Co., Rhode Island , before 1651.

Robert and Ruth (Hubbard) Burdick had 12 children.

9/25/1683, Samuel Hubbard, having returned to Newport, from ajourney to Rye, etc., detailed some events of the trip. Hesays, "At Westerly, the first day after the Sabbath, brotherBurdick buried a son." and among others there, were grandsonJohn Phillips and Ruth his wife, and Benjamin Burdick. "A verygreat burial, above twenty horses."

"Newport Seventh Day Baptist Trilogy"; by Ilou M. Sanford andDon A. Sanford; Heritage Books Inc.; 1998, p 87.

"Robert Burdick was baptised as a member of the First BaptistChurch of Newport on 11/16/1652 and represented the church inits struggle against the persecution of dissenters from theestablished church in Massachusetts. He and Tobias Saunderswere arrested in 1662 and sentenced to two years in Boston jailbut were eventually released in a prisoner exchange. He wasamong the earliest settlers of the Western section of RhodeIsland. He was listed as a member of the Newport Seventh DayBaptist Church in its 1692 record. He died Oct. 25, 1692."

___________

Ancestral File Number: 1N9G-SD

REFN: 3604

[williamDavis.FTW]

Admitted as a freeman in Newport, RI in 1655.

Baptised as a member of the First Baptist Church of Newport on 16

November 1652 and represented the church in its struggle against the

persecution of dissenters from the established church in Massachusetts.

He and Tobias Saunders were arrested in 1662 and sentenced to two years

in a Boston jail but were eventually released in a prisoner exchange. He

was among the earliest settlers of the western section of Rhode Island.

He was listed as a member of the Newport Seventh Day Baptist Church in

its 1692 record. (From "Newport Seventh Day Baptist Trilogy" by Ilou &

Don Sanford, 1998)

_____________

What is unique about the name "Burdick" is that it was only used by a single immigrant to the New World and appears in the official colonial records of Rhode Island and Massachusetts. That immigrant was Robert, aged 18, and he arrived in Newport, Rhode Island in 1651. His name was first officially recorded in 1655, only thirty years after the Pilgrims arrival.

Robert married a fifteen year old girl named Ruth Hubbard in the fall of 1655. Ruth had the distinction of being the first white child born in Agawam in the Massachusetts colony, a settlement that was later named Springfield. Ruth's father, Samuel, had come to Salem in 1633 and he was a bit of an individualist. He married his wife, Tasy Cooper, in January of 1636 after marching through the winter woods from Watertown, Mass. to become one of the founding families of Connecticut. Because of his Baptist views he sought refuge in the more religiously tolerant Rhode Island Colony in 1648. In December of 1671 he, his wife, his daughter, and a handful of others formed the Seventh Day Baptist Church of America.

he Burdicks are probably related to the Burdettes, Burdetts, and Burditts of England. William Burditt came to Virginia in 1615. George Burdett or Burditt arrived in Salem in 1633 and his descendants retained the spelling "Burditt." But by this date the Burdick/Burdette family already had a long history in England. The first "Burdets" arrived in England with William the Conqueror in 1066. Two brothers, Robert and Hugh, appear in the Roll of Battle Abbey and both appear in the Domesday Book as sub-tenants in Leichstershire. The family was granted an official Coat of Arms, issued by King William himself for loyalty. William Burdet, in 1223, was a member of the Crusades to the Holy Land in the time of Henry II. It appears that the name "Burdet" was an Anglicized version of the French "Bourdet." Before they came to England with the Normans they were Barons of Cuilly near Falaise in Normandy.

So young Robert and his younger wife settled down on a farm in what was to become Westerly, Rhode Island. Back then the colonies feuded quite regularly, trying to grab each others land. You guessed it, Robert and Ruth, along with a few other hardy settlers, planted roots right in the middle of a tract claimed by both Massachusetts and Rhode Island. In 1661 Massachusetts officials ambushed and arrested Robert and another farmer, Tobias Saunders. Robert and Tobias soon became the focus of a 17th Century Mexican Standoff. For two years Rhode Island tried to negotiate their release. So finally, the Rhode Island Swamp Yankees did the only reasonable thing left: they abducted two Massachusetts officials and a prisoner swap took place. Oh, and the land dispute? The big shots in England split the land between Connecticut and Rhode Island. Sorry Massachusetts! Robert's house happened to be on the Rhode Island side where Westerly is today. So that's why it's "Robert Burdick of Rhode Island" instead of "Robert Burdick of Connecticut."

When Robert and Ruth settled down they did so in a prolific fashion. Thomas, Naomi, Ruth, Deborah, Roger, Benjamin, Samuel, Tacy, Robert Jr., and Hubbard, to be specific. Their children were born between 1656 and 1676 with a discrete gap in the early 1660s when Robert was -- uh -- out of town. A final child, born in 1678, died as an infant which seemed to put an end to the kids. So all of us Burdicks can trace our pedigrees back to one of Robert's sons. For the first couple of generations the Burdicks were a population force to be reckoned with in southwest Rhode Island. In fact, my own grandfather kept the string going in the Westerly area until he left for Detroit in the 1920s.

The family has been well represented in military conflicts throughout the years. Burdicks fought in the Revolutionary War, the War of 1812, the Civil War, and every conflict of the 20th Century. Burdicks were a part of the westward expansion, homesteading in Kansas, the Dakotas, and everywhere in between. We've also done our part in the homogenization of late 20th Century America. You'll find Burdicks in every state and even a few in Canada. You'll even find a few places called "Burdick". We're everywhere. And we're all related.

source: http://www.burdickfamily.org/history.html

_____

Robert ("Immigrant Burdick") Came to New England (Newport, RI) from England about 1650. Supposedly, William Burdick was a shipmaster, who was sailing between England and New England about the time Robert Burdick immigrated. Robert Burdick was admitted freeman 5/22/1655. Moved to Westerly, Washington Co., Rhode Island, before 1651. Robert and Ruth (Hubbard) Burdick had 12 children.

9/25/1683, Samuel Hubbard, having returned to Newport, from a journey to Rye, etc., detailed some events of the trip. He says, "At Westerly, the first day after the Sabbath, brother Burdick buried a son." and among others there, were grandson John Phillips and Ruth his wife, and Benjamin Burdick. "A very great burial, above twenty horses."

'Newport Seventh Day Baptist Trilogy'; by Ilou M. Sanford and Don A. Sanford; Heritage Books Inc.; 1998, p 87. 'Robert Burdick was baptised as a member of the First Baptist Church of Newport on 11/16/1652 and represented the church in its struggle against the persecution of dissenters from the established church in Massachusetts. He and Tobias Saunders were arrested in 1662 and sentenced to two years in Boston jail but were eventually released in a prisoner exchange. He was among the earliest settlers of the Western section of Rhode Island. He was listed as a member of the Newport Seventh Day Baptist Church in its 1692 record. He died Oct. 25, 1692.'

The name "Burdick" is unique in America because only one single immigrant of that name came to the New World, Robert Burdick. He was an early settler of both Newport (ca 1651) and Westerly (ca 1661) , Rhode Island, his name was first recorded in official records in 1655, and was admitted as a freeman on 22 May 1655. He is listed as the founder of Misquamicut. Robert's farm was right in the center of a tract of land which was claimed by both Massachusetts and Rhode Island. On 1 November 1661, Robert and another farmer, Tobias Sanders were arrested by Walter Palmer, Constable, an official of Massachusetts for trespassing and forcible entry and were imprisoned at Boston until they paid a fine of 40 pounds. They refused to recognize the jurisdiction of Massachusetts and were jailed for a year until they were exchanged for prisoners which the "Swamp Yankees" held. (2 officials of Massachusetts) King Charles II settled in favor of Rhode Island and the English officials divided the land between Connecticut and Rhode Island, so Massachusetts' political maneuvers were wasted. Robert's land lay in Rhode Island. He was one of the 24 men who incorporated Westerleigh. He took the Oath of Allegiance on 17 May 1671 and again on 17 September 1676. He served in King Philip's War in 1675. He was deputy to the assembly in 1680, 1683, and 1685. His estate papers are dated 25 October 1692.

"Robert Burdick was baptised as a member of the First BaptistChurch of Newport on 11/16/1652 and represented the church in its struggle against the persecution of dissenters from the established church in Massachusetts. He and Tobias Saunders were arrested in 1662 and sentenced to two years in Boston jail but were eventually released in a prisoner exchange. He was among the earliest settlers of the Western section of Rhode Island. He was listed as a member of the Newport Seventh DayBaptist Church in its 1692 record. He died Oct. 25, 1692."

He came from England in 1651. He married Ruth Hubbard whose father, Samuel Hubbard, came from England in 1633. Robert Burdick, Tobias Saunders and Joseph Clarke, among others, settled in the Colony of Rhode Island, and declared the small portion of Rhode Island where they lived as a part of Mass. They were ordered to leave and refused so were arrested and taken to Boston and refused to give bail and remained in prison for two years until there was an exchange of prisoners as there was kidnapping on both sides. The King of England decided in favor of Conn., a third party, who later settled with Rhode Island who gave the disputed part to Rhode Island and the dispute was ended. Among the settlers who took allegiance to the King in Westerly on May 17, 1671 were listed as John Crandall, Tobias Saunders, Robert Came to New England (Newport, RI) from England about 1650. Supposedly, William Burdick was a shipmaster, who was sailing between England and New England about the time Robert Burdick immigrated, was the father of Robert. Robert Burdick was admitted freeman 5/22/1655. Moved to Westerly, Washington Co., Rhode Island , before 1651. Robert and Ruth (Hubbard) Burdick had 12 children. 9/25/1683, Samuel Hubbard, having returned to Newport, from a journey to Rye, etc., detailed some events of the trip. He says, 'At Westerly, the first day after the Sabbath, brother Burdick buried a son.' and among others there, were grandson John Phillips and Ruth his wife, and Benjamin Burdick. 'A very great burial, above twenty horses.' 'Newport Seventh Day Baptist Trilogy'; by Ilou M. Sanford and Don A. Sanford; Heritage Books Inc.; 1998, p 87. 'Robert Burdick was baptised as a member of the First Baptist Church of Newport on 11/16/1652 and represented the church in its struggle against the persecution of dissenters from the established church in Massachusetts. He and Tobias Saunders were arrested in 1662 and sentenced to two years in Boston jail but were eventually released in a prisoner exchange. He was among the earliest settlers of the Western section of Rhode Island. He was listed as a member of the Newport Seventh Day Baptist Church in its 1692 record. He died Oct. 25, 1692.'

Joseph Clarke, Robert Burdick, John Maxon, John Mackoone, ect. At the outbreak of the King Phillip's Indian war, Westerly was on the exposed frontier and he moved his family to Newport till the danger was over and then moved his family back. In 1692 he made an agreement with his Son-in-Law, Rev Joseph Crandall, to take care of him in his old age. The division of property etc. is listed on page 4 of " The Descendants of Robert Burdick " Much of this is condensed from NEW ENGLAND FAMILIES BY W.R.Cutter


Robert Burdick gained early notoriety during a land dispute between the colonies of Rhode Island and Massachusetts over a tract of land known as the Pequot Country -- land taken by the English colonists in the Pequot War of 1637 -- which is now situated, largely, within New London County, Connecticut. Boundary disputes had been going on for some time between Massachusetts and Connecticut over land within the Pequot Country, but the conflict in this instance was primarily between Massachusetts and Rhode Island. The dispute was centered upon a small settlement located in Pequot Country, between Mystic and Pawcatuck, which, in 1658 was named Southertown, and which, today is mostly contained within Stonington, Connecticut and a small part of Westerly, Rhode Island. In October 1658, the colony of Massachusetts laid claim to this settlement, declared it to be a plantation with the name of Southertown, annexed it to Suffolk County, Massachusetts, and appointed special commissioners and a constable to administer the new plantation.

SOURCE 1

The Families of Petersburgh, New York 1791-1991

"The Families of Petersburgh, New York 1791-1991", by

Hilda M. Allen 1991 Bennington, VT: "Robert Burdick was born in 1630 in

England. He was in Newport, Rhode Island in 1655 when he married Ruth

Hubbard. They had eleven children among them whose descendants were the

several Burdick families who migrated to eastern Rensselaer County."

SOURCE 2

Nebraska, The Land & the People, Vol. 3

Robert Burdick, one of seven Burdick brothers who came to America in 1661 and purchased a whole township of land in Rhode Island, now known as the town of Westerly. He was a deputy several times in the Rhode Island Colonial Assembly, an early member and deacon of the Seventh Day Baptist Church. He died early in 1692. As a result of a boundary dispute between Massachusetts and Rhode Island Robert Burdick and his brother-in-law, Rev. Joseph Clarke, Jr., and Tobias Saunders were arrested on their land in Westerly in November, 1661, and Burdick and Saunders were taken to Boston. At his trial Burdick stoutly upheld Rhode Island's charter right to Misquamicut (now Westerly), and he and Saunders submitted to over a year's imprisonment rather than, by payment of a fine of forty pounds, seem to concede Massachusetts authority over themselves and the region in which they had settled. Robert Burdick married, November 2, 1665, at Newport, Rhode Island, Ruth Hubbard, then fifteen years old. She was the first white child born in Spring-field Massachusetts.

SOURCE 3

The Descendants of Robert Burdick of Rhode Island

The Burdick family has a long and distinguished history. Much of what is known of the family comes from a remarkable book entitled

"The Descendants of Robert Burdick of Rhode Island"

that was compiled by Nellie Willard Johnson in 1937. The maniscripts of William Mansfield Burdick Harcourt, an earlier researcher, provided most of the information on the earlier generations. The book lists thousands of Burdicks throughout the country. Nearly every individual in the first nine generations is listed as are many from the later generations.

The book has been out of print for many years and many reside in libraries across the country. Occasionally an original copy will come up for sale, they are a real collector's item. Reprints are available. Visit the Burdick Store for more information.

While it is widely believed the original Burdick immigrant came from England, no definitive link has been made. The surname "Burdick" could be a variation of the original English family of "Burdette." Other English variations are "Burditt" and "Burdett." Another theory indicates that the family name originated in the Rhine region of Germany, where the name Burdick was recorded in 1563 and where Burdicks still live today. Research continues.

What is unique about the name "Burdick" is that it was only used by a single immigrant to the New World and appears in the official colonial records of Rhode Islandand Massachusetts. That immigrant was Robert, aged 18, and he arrived in Newport, Rhode Island in 1651. His name was first officially recorded in 1655, only thirty years after the Pilgrims arrival.

Robert married a fifteen year old girl named Ruth Hubbard in the fall of 1655. Ruth had the distinction of being the first white child born in Agawam in the Massachusetts colony, a settlement that was later named Springfield. Ruth's father, Samuel, had come to Salem in 1633 and he was a bit of an individualist. He married his wife, Tasy Cooper, in January of 1636 after marching through the winter woods from Watertown, Mass. to become one of the founding families of Connecticut. Because of his Baptist views he sought refuge in the more religiously tolerant Rhode Island Colony in 1648. In December of 1671 he, his wife, his daughter, and a handful of others formed the Seventh Day Baptist Church of America.

Well, back to the Burdicks. As I said, the Burdicks are probably related to the Burdettes, Burdetts, and Burditts of England. William Burditt came to Virginia in 1615. George Burdett or Burditt arrived in Salem in 1633 and his descendants retained the spelling "Burditt." But by this date the Burdick/Burdette family already had a long history in England. The first "Burdets" arrived in England with William the Conqueror in 1066. Two brothers, Robert and Hugh, appear in the Roll of Battle Abbey and both appear in the Domesday Book as sub-tenants in Leichstershire. The family was granted an official Coat of Arms, issued by King William himself for loyalty. William Burdet, in 1223, was a member of the Crusades to the Holy Land in the time of Henry II. It appears that the name "Burdet" was an Anglicized version of the French "Bourdet." Before they came to England with the Normans they were Barons of Cuilly near Falaise in Normandy.

So young Robert and his younger wife settled down on a farm in what was to become Westerly, Rhode Island. Back then the colonies feuded quite regularly, trying to grab each others land. You guessed it, Robert and Ruth, along with a few other hardy settlers, planted roots right in the middle of a tract claimed by both Massachusetts and Rhode Island. In 1661 Massachusetts officials ambushed and arrested Robert and another farmer, Tobias Saunders. Robert and Tobias soon became the focus of a 17th Century Mexican Standoff. For two years Rhode Island tried to negotiate their release. So finally, the Rhode Island Swamp Yankees did the only reasonable thing left: they abducted two Massachusetts officials and a prisoner swap took place. Oh, and the land dispute? The big shots in England split the land between Connecticut and Rhode Island. Sorry Massachusetts! Robert's house happened to be on the Rhode Island side where Westerly is today. So that's why it's "Robert Burdick of Rhode Island" instead of "Robert Burdick of Connecticut." At least I now know why I have a distrust of government -- it's genetic!

When Robert and Ruth settled down they did so in a prolific fashion. Thomas, Naomi, Ruth, Deborah, Roger, Benjamin, Samuel, Tacy, Robert Jr., and Hubbard, to be specific. Their children were born between 1656 and 1676 with a discrete gap in the early 1660s when Robert was -- uh -- out of town. A final child, born in 1678, died as an infant which seemed to put an end to the kids. So all of us Burdicks can trace our pedigrees back to one of Robert's sons. For the first couple of generations the Burdicks were a population force to be reckoned with in southwest Rhode Island. In fact, my own grandfather kept the string going in the Westerly area until he left for Detroit in the 1920s.

The family has been well represented in military conflicts throughout the years. Burdicks fought in the Revolutionary War, the War of 1812, the Civil War, and every conflict of the 20th Century. Burdicks were a part of the westward expansion, homesteading in Kansas, the Dakotas, and everywhere in between. We've also done our part in the homogenization of late 20th Century America. You'll find Burdicks in every state and even a few in Canada. You'll even find a few places called "Burdick". We're everywhere. And we're all related.

SOURCE 4

Immigrant to America

http://www.burdick-sullivanfamilyphotogallery.org/FamilyTree/RobertBurdickofRhodeIsland.htm

Wha t follows on was taken from "The Descendants of Robert Burdick of Rhode Island," by Nellie (Willard) Johnson, 1937. This monumental work traces an enormous number of descendants of Robert Burdick of Rhode Island, down to the tenth generation in some cases.

" There is good reason to believe that the surname Burdick is identical with Burditt (also spelled Burdett, Burdette, etc.). The spelling Burdick is not given in English words on surnames, and like many American names it is probably a variation in spelling from the English Burdette, etc." Savage, in his Genealogical Dictionary, says of the name: "Burdick or Burdict---This name is often confounded with Burditt."

Add to this the fact that the name of Robert , the emigrant ancestor, appears on the official records of Rhode Island and Massachusetts variously as Birdict, Berdick, Burdett, Burditt, Burdict, and Burdick (as will be shown later), and it seems reasonably certain that his ancestors are to be found among the ancient family of Burdetts in England.

The first Burdick of record in America was Robert Burdick, who was living at Newport, Rhode Island, in 1655. He came from England to Newport in 1651. He was married Nov. 2, 1655, to Ruth Hubbard. She was the first white child born at Agawam (now Springfield), Massachusetts, on January 11, 1640. Her father, Samuel Hubbard, came from England to Salem, Massachusetts, in 1633.

Robert Burdick was admitted as a "Freeman" of the Colony of Rhode Island on May 20, 1657.

In the westward expansion of the early New England Colonies, Robert Burdick, Tobias Sanders and Joseph Clarke all laid claim to a tract of land called the Pequot country. In October 1658, Massachusetts declared a small settlement which had been made there, to be a plantation with the name of Southertown (now Stonington), and annexed it to Suffolk County, Mass. Special commissioners and a constable were appointed to administer it (Mass. Recs., IV, 353). The Rhode Island Assembly, the next month, retaliated by warning all settlers in the disputed area that if they put their lands under another colonial government their holdings would be confiscated (R. I. Col. Recs., I, 401)." Meantime, the Narrangansett settlements (of Rhode Island) bought from the Indians, under the name of the Westerly Purchase, land - a part of which lay in Southertown - and began to settle it." Among the settlers were Robert Burdick, Tobias Sanders, and Joseph Clarke, farmers of Newport, and they soon found themselves in the thick of the fight between Massachusetts and Rhode Island.William Chesbrough testified before the General Court of Massachusetts, Sept. 30, 1661, that about the middle of September 1661, he was "occasioned to goe abroad upon his affaires, and understanding that divers persons, about thirty-six inhabitants of Road Island, were come into the bounds of Southertowne, to lay claime unto the lands...and to divide and lay out lotts in the same," whereupon he demanded "the reason of their intrusion into other men's rights; telling them those lands were within the bounds of Southertowne and appropriated to several persons." The reply came from the leader, Benedict Arnold. He "said, in way of answer many things impertinently, the sum whereof was, that they owned themselves to be the men that claimed the lands, and said they would keep possession, and that they would not try their title any where but in Road Island, or in England; and Arnold said that if any should attach him at Boston, her would lie in prison seven years before he would try the title there."The General Court then issued a Warrant, as follows:

WARRANT. To the Constable of Southertowne: "Whereas, We are informed of sundry rude fellows, that contrary to the peace of our soveraigne Lord the King, etc., of this Collony, have, in a riotous manner entered upon, and taken possession of the lands of sundry of our inhabitants in the bounds of your towne. These are to require you, in his Majesties name to apprehend all such persons, and safely convey them before some of the magistrates of this jurisdiction, to give acount of such their proceedings; and hereof you are to make a true returne under your hand and not faile. Dated 25, 8 month, 1661. "Signed by: Jo. Endicott, Gov'r., Ri. Bellingham, Dep. Gov'r., Daniel Gookin."

This Warrant was endorsed by the Constable: "According to the trust committed to me, I have arrested three men, viz: Tobias Saunders, Robert Burdett, and Joseph Clarke, which last upon extraordinary occasion was, by the Commissioners and constable, set at liberty. Dated 1st November, 1661. "William Palmer, Constable."

It developed later, that at the time of their arrest, the Rhode Island men "did lye in wait to intercept and seize ye Constable and Deputy, with such as came with them to prison as they returned, which they had donne, but they being gone to dinner missed them."

On Nov. 14, 1661, they were brought to trial before governor Endicott and his associates in Boston.

"Tobias Saunders and Robert Burdett being brought prisoners by virtue of a warrant from the Governor and magistrates for a forcible entry and intrusion into the bounds of Southertowne, in the Pequot country, upon severall men's properties granted to them by the General Court of this jurisdiction, who upon being examined by what authority or order they were there, Tobias Saunders answered, that the Court of Road Island gave liberty for certayne of their inhabitants to purchase lands of the Indians, and that these lands were purchased by them....Being asked whether they had understood that warning was given...to depart out of those lands, and out of the bounds of said towne, Tobias answered, that they had heard of such warning. Being asked why he did not desist, Tobias answered, that they looked upon the lands to be their right, and therefore they abode upon them."

" ROBERT BURDET being examined, acknowledged that he was upon the same land, and built a small house there, upon the lott layed out to him; and that he went upon this designe, upon the same grounds as are declared by Tobias Saunders."

"Tobias Saunders and ROBERT BURDETT being told that they must give security to the value of one hundred pounds a peece, to answer what shall be objected against them at the next General Court, otherwise to bee committed to prison, they refused to find security and were committed."

" WARRANT FOR COMMITTMENT: The Keeper of the prison of Boston. You are hereby required to take into your custody the bodyes of Tobias Saunders and Robert Burdett of Rhode Island, and them safely to keepe, untill they find sufficient security, to the value of one hundred pounds apiece, to answer at the next Generall Court, to be holden at Boston in May next, for forcible entry and deteyning of possession of lands belonging to the Colony of Massachusetts within the bounds of Southertowne in the Pequot country, to the endangering of men's lives contrary to the peace of our Sovereign Lord, the King. Signed by: John Endicott, Gov'r., Rich'd Bellingham, Daniel Gookin.

In a letter from the General Court of Massachusetts to Rhode Island is told the result of the trial in May.

Dated Boston 10, 3rd month, 1662: "You may hereby take notice, that two of your people namely Tobias Saunders and Robert Burditt, being long since taken on the place, and secured by us to answer their trespasse, we have now called them before this Court and find nothing from them to justify their proceedings. This Court hath therefore fined them 40 pounds for your offence...and they stand committed to prison till your fine be satisfied,...etc."The y were committed to Boston jail and kept there two years. Each colony sought to arrest citizens of the other. The two were at last released on being exchanged for two Massachusetts officials taken in retaliation by the Rhode Island authorities.From this sturdy, conscience-minded ancestor, Robert, sprang all the Burdicks who claim an early Rhode Island ancestry.

When Connecticut was granted a new charter, the disputed area of Southertowne (Stonington) was given to her, and Massachusetts retired from the race. Later a compromise was arrived at in England between Connecticut and Rhode Island, whereby the latter was awarded the area of Westerly, where Robert Burdick had built his house, and where he settled on being released by Massachusetts.He was in a list of free inhabitants of Westerly in May 1669. On May 17, 1671, he and others too the oath of allegiance to the king and to the Colony of Rhode Island. Among those who subscribed that day are many of the ancestors of later families of Burdicks: John Crandall, Tobiah Sanders, Joseph Clarke, Robert Burdick, John Maxson, Jefferey Champlin, Sr., John Lewis, George Lanphaere, Nicholas Cotterill, Jr., etc.---"all of which persons did promise to stand to their engagements to his Majestie, and this Colony"On the outbreak of King Philip's Indian War, Westerly was on the exposed frontier. He and his family, in July 1675, went to Newport, but subsequently returned to Westerly.For the years 1680, 1683, 1685, he was a deputy to the General Court of Rhode Island from Westerly. On May 17, 1691, he and his wife Ruth sold one hundred acres of land for ten pounds. March8, 1692, he made an agreement with his son-in-law, Joseph Crandall, by which the latter was to take care of his father-in-law and find him suitable meat, drink, washing, lodging, and apparel, etc., for life, in consideration of which Joseph Crandall was to have the dwelling house and land adjoining forever, and until Robert Burdick's death, to have also use of oxen, cart, two cows and eight swine, and then to be returned to be disposed of by will, except the cart and wheels.1692, Oct. 25. He having died without perfecting his will, an agreement was made by his sons and sons-in-law. What their father had disposed of by legacy to children was to stand, and what remained, to be divided into nine parts. To son-in-law John Phillips, one part. The other eight parts to go to daughters Naomi Rogers and Tacy Maxson, only his wearing apparel to be divided between his sons, Thomas, Benjamin, and Samuel. The lands of deceased that are undivided, to go to sons Samuel, Robert and Hubbard Burdick. To son Thomas, two oxen and a hog. To daughter Deborah Crandall, bed, warming pan, etc. To daughter Ruth Phillips, iron pot, a swine, etc. To son Benjamin, heifer, swine, and iron pot. To son Samuel, a heifer and swine. To son Robert , a cow. To son Hubbard, a cow. To daughter Naomi Rogers, a swine, etc. To daughter Tacy Maxson, a swine. Inventory, 2 oxen, 2 cows, 2 heifers, 6 swine, mare, wearing apparel, warming pan, pewter, etc.He was a seceder from the Baptist Church, joining the Seventh Day Baptists; and "many descendants held membership in the ancient and interesting old Sabbatarian Church."His death occurred in 1692, 25 October; and his wife died the year before. They were the progenitors of "the old Rhode Island Burdick family, which has been identified with the history of the Colony and the Commonwealth, respectively, for 250 and more years." "A glance over the records of the Colony and State shows that persons of the Burdick name have from the start to the present been intrusted with public offices of trust and honor in their communities and towns, and that the name has been continually worthily borne."---Copied from "Collections of the Rhode Island Historical Society," Vol. III, p. 117.

SOURCE 5

Robert "The Elder"

history of robert burdick

Added to ROBERT "the E BURDICK by brittanyhague on 7 Jul 2008

ID: I3364 Name: Robert BURDICK Given Name: Robert Surname: Burdick 1 2 Sex: M Change Date: 26 JUN 2007 Birth: BET 1630 AND 1633 in England Death: 25 OCT 1692 in Westerly, Kings Co., Rhode Island Religion: Seventh-day Baptist Note: Robert Came to New England (Newport, RI) from England about 1650. Supposedly, William Burdick was a shipmaster, who was sailing between England and New England about the time Robert Burdick immigrated, was the father of Robert. Robert Burdick was admitted freeman 5/22/1655. Moved to Westerly, Washington Co., Rhode Island , before 1651. Robert and Ruth (Hubbard) Burdick had 12 children. 9/25/1683, Samuel Hubbard, having returned to Newport, from a journey to Rye, etc., detailed some events of the trip. He says, 'At Westerly, the first day after the Sabbath, brother Burdick buried a son.' and among others there, were grandson John Phillips and Ruth his wife, and Benjamin Burdick. 'A very great burial, above twenty horses.' 'Newport Seventh Day Baptist Trilogy'; by Ilou M. Sanford and Don A. Sanford; Heritage Books Inc.; 1998, p 87. 'Robert Burdick was baptised as a member of the First Baptist Church of Newport on 11/16/1652 and represented the church in its struggle against the persecution of dissenters from the established church in Massachusetts. He and Tobias Saunders were arrested in 1662 and sentenced to two years in Boston jail but were eventually released in a prisoner exchange. He was among the earliest settlers of the Western section of Rhode Island. He was listed as a member of the Newport Seventh Day Baptist Church in its 1692 record. He died Oct. 25, 1692.'

SOURCE 6

Rensselaer County NY

"the families of petersburgh, ny 1791-1991 by hilda m allen

Added to ROBERT "the E BURDICK by brittanyhague on 12 Jul 2008

"The Families of Petersburgh, New York 1791-1991", by Hilda M. Allen 1991 Bennington, VT: "Robert Burdick was born in 1630 in England. He was in Newport, Rhode Island in 1655 when he married Ruth Hubbard. They had eleven children among them whose descendants were the several Burdick families who migrated to eastern Rensselaer County."

SOURCE 7

Robert Burdick

Robert and wife Ruth moved to Westerly RI 1 Nov 1661. He took the oath of fidelity 17 May 1671, went to New York on account of the Indian Wars of 1675, then later returned to Westerly. he and Tobias Saunders were arrested and charged with entering the bounds of Pequoit County. They were committed to prison becasue they refused to find security for appearance at general Court. Robert Burdick was deputy representative to the general Assembly, 1680-83-85. he and his wife sold 100 acres to John Maccoon for 10 pounds, march 8, 1691.


from: Davis The Settlers of Salem, West Virginia by Susie Davis Nicholson

SOURCE 8

The Burdick Family

According to "The Settlers of the Beekman Patent, Volume 1, Dutchess Co, NY" the Burdick family was one of the earliest settlers of the North Pawling area. Robert is listed on a leased farm in lot 6 quite early and several other branches came later. Robert is the emigrant ancestor of this family and is listed in Newport by 1651. (Cahpter 106, page 886)

SOURCE 9

Burdick

In 1655 his name was spelled Burdict and was entered among the last nine on "the Roule of ye freeman of the Colony (R.I. CR Vol 1, 299) Robert Burdick apparently had not admitted Freeman when the roule was compiled or his name was overlooked for the printed roulein the R.I. CR 1:302 for Newport was added with nine others after the Newport rule was completed. Was received May 22, 1655 at a meeting in Providence.

In 1660 a company was formed in Newport to buy from the Indian Sosa, a large parcel of land known as Misquamicut (later Westerly). The purchase was made in 1661. Robert Burdick, Tobias Saunders and Joseph Clarke were the first to come. Elder John Crandall, Elder on the Baptist Church in Newport came soon after.

From RECORDS OF THE COLONY OF RHODE ISLAND. In 1671 the courts at Westerly called Robert Burdick to see how he stood in loyalty. to his Majesty.

SOURCE 10

Rhode Island Records, Vol. II

He [Robert Burdick] was in a list of free inhabitants of Westerly in May,

1669.

On May 17, 1671, he and others took the oath of allegiance to the king and

to the Colony of Rhode Island. Among those who subscribed that day are

many of the ancestors of later families of Burdicks: John Crandall, Tobiah

Saunders, Joseph Clarke, ROBERT BURDICK, John Maxson, Jeffery Champlin,

Sr., John Lewis, George Lanpheare, Nicolas Cotterill, Jr., etc. -- "all of

which

persons did promise to stand to their engagements to his Majestie, and this

Colony." (Rhode Island Records, Vol. II, P. 388.)

SOURCE 11

The Burdick's of RI and CT

Robert Burdick, the immigrant ancestor of the Burdick family who came to Newport, Rhode Island from England in 1651. Robert Burdick was admitted a Freeman of Newport on May 22, 1655, and a Freeman of the Colony of Rhode Island on May 20, 1657. He married Ruth Hubbard, the first white child born at Agawam (now Springfield), Massachusetts on November 2, 1655.

                  Robert Burdick gained early notoriety during a land dispute between the colonies of Rhode Island and Massachusetts over a tract of land known as the Pequot Country -- land taken by the English colonists in the Pequot War of 1637 -- which is now situated, largely, within New London County, Connecticut. Boundary disputes had been going on for some time between Massachusetts and Connecticut over land within the Pequot Country, but the conflict in this instance was primarily between Massachusetts and Rhode Island. The dispute was centered upon a small settlement located in Pequot Country, between Mystic and Pawcatuck, which, in 1658 was named Southertown, and which, today is mostly contained within Stonington, Connecticut and a small part of Westerly, Rhode Island. In October 1658, the colony of Massachusetts laid claim to this settlement, declared it to be a plantation with the name of Southertown, annexed it to Suffolk County, Massachusetts, and appointed special commissioners and a constable to administer the new plantation.
                In the meantime, the colony of Rhode Island purchased land in a transaction known as the Westerly Purchase to add to its Narrangansett settlement. Included in the Westerly Purchase was some of the land within the boundaries of Southertown. A group of Rhode Islanders, including the Newport farmer, Robert Burdick, and his neighbors Tobias Saunders and Joseph Clarke, laid claim within the new settlement. In retaliation for the Massachusetts claim to Southertown, the Rhode Island Assembly sent out the warning to all settlers within the area of dispute that their land would be confiscated if they put it under the governance of another colonial government (e.g. Massachusetts).
               On September 30, 1661, William Cheseborough, an early settler of Southertown from Plymouth Colony, testified before the General Court of Massachusetts of his concern that some thirty-six inhabitants of Rhode Island had come into Southertown and had divided and laid out lots. The General Court of Massachusetts issued a warrant to apprehend the Rhode Island men who had settled in Southertown. A stand-off ensued, and Robert Burdick, Tobias Saunders and Joseph Clarke were arrested (although Joseph Clarke was "upon extraordinary occasion ... set at liberty.") For two years, the colony of Rhode Island attempted, unsuccessfully, to negotiate the release of Burdick and Saunders. As a last resort, Rhode Island authorities abducted two Massachusetts officials, who were then exchanged for the release of Robert Burdick and Tobias Saunders.
             The issuance of the Charter of Connecticut by King Charles II on April 25, 1662 fixed the eastern boundary of Connecticut at the Pawcatuck River. Southertown was situated within this boundary, and thus under the jurisdiction of Connecticut. Later, the British Crown settled the conflict by dividing the disputed land between Connecticut and Rhode Island. The land where Robert Burdick had settled was awarded to Rhode Island, and became part of the area known as Westerly. The land that was awarded to Connecticut became part of the area known as Stonington.
            After his release from prison, Robert Burdick settled on the same land he was taken from and inprisoned over. He and his wife, Ruth, had eleven children, nine of whom survived to adulthood and had children of their own. He served as a deputy to the General Court of Rhode Island from Westerly for the years 1680, 1683 and 1685, and he was one of the earliest members of the Seventh Day Baptist Church (the Sabbatarians).

SOURCES

   The Descendants of Robert Burdick of Rhode Island by Nellie Williard Johnson. The Syracuse Typesetting Co., Inc. Syracuse, N.Y., 1937.
   History of the Town of Stonington, County of New London, Connecticut, from its First Settlement in 1649 to 1900 by Richard Anson Wheeler. Press of the Day Publishing Company, New London, Connecticut, 1900.

SOURCE 12

Robert Burdick i

http://wc.rootsweb.ancestry.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=jonsaunders&id=I3364•ID: I3364

•Name: Robert BURDICK

•Given Name: Robert

•Surname: Burdick 1 2

•Sex: M

•Change Date: 26 JUN 2007

•Birth: BET 1630 AND 1633 in England

•Death: 25 OCT 1692 in Westerly, Kings Co., Rhode Island

•Religion: Seventh-day Baptist

•Note: Robert Came to New England (Newport, RI) from England about 1650. Supposedly, William Burdick was a shipmaster, who was sailing between England and New England about the time Robert Burdick immigrated, was the father of Robert. Robert Burdick was admitted freeman 5/22/1655. Moved to Westerly, Washington Co., Rhode Island , before 1651. Robert and Ruth (Hubbard) Burdick had 12 children. 9/25/1683, Samuel Hubbard, having returned to Newport, from a journey to Rye, etc., detailed some events of the trip. He says, 'At Westerly, the first day after the Sabbath, brother Burdick buried a son.' and among others there, were grandson John Phillips and Ruth his wife, and Benjamin Burdick. 'A very great burial, above twenty horses.' 'Newport Seventh Day Baptist Trilogy'; by Ilou M. Sanford and Don A. Sanford; Heritage Books Inc.; 1998, p 87. 'Robert Burdick was baptised as a member of the First Baptist Church of Newport on 11/16/1652 and represented the church in its struggle against the persecution of dissenters from the established church in Massachusetts. He and Tobias Saunders were arrested in 1662 and sentenced to two years in Boston jail but were eventually released in a prisoner exchange. He was among the earliest settlers of the Western section of Rhode Island. He was listed as a member of the Newport Seventh Day Baptist Church in its 1692 record. He died Oct. 25, 1692.'

Father: Samuel BURDICK b: BET 1597 AND 1602

Mother: Frances ST. LAWRENCE b: 1617

Marriage 1 Ruth HUBBARD b: 11 JAN 1639/40 in Springfield, Hampden Co., Massachusetts

   * Married: 02 NOV 1655 in Newport, Newport Co., Rhode Island

Children

  1. Thomas BURDICK b: 1656 in Newport, Newport Co., Rhode Island
  2. Hubbard BURDICK Sr. b: 1676 in Westerly, Kings Co., Rhode Island
  3. Infant BURDICK b: 1678 in Westerly, Kings Co., Rhode Island
  4. Naomi BURDICK b: 1657 in Newport, Newport Co., Rhode Island
  5. Ruth BURDICK b: 1660 in Newport, Newport Co., Rhode Island
  6. Deborah BURDICK b: 1662 in Misquamicutt, Kings Co., Rhode Island c: 11 APR 1685
  7. Roger BURDICK b: 1664 in Misquamicutt, Kings Co., Rhode Island
  8. Benjamin BURDICK b: 1666 in Misquamicutt, Kings Co., Rhode Island
  9. Tacy BURDICK b: 02 DEC 1667 in Misquamicutt, Kings Co., Rhode Island
 10. Samuel BURDICK Sr. b: ABT 1668 in Misquamicutt, Kings Co., Rhode Island
 11. Robert BURDICK b: 1674 in Westerly, Kings Co., Rhode Island

Sources:

  1. Title: The Descendants of Robert Burdick of Rhode Island
     Author: Nellie W. Johnson
     Publication: The Syracuse Typesetting Co., Syracuse, NY, 1937
     Page: 1-8
  2. Title: Newport Seventh Day Baptist Trilogy
     Author: Ilou M. Sanford and Don A. Sanford
     Publication: Heritage Books, Inc., Bowie, MD, 1998
     Page: 87 

SOURCE 13

Robert Elder Burdick (1630-1692)

http://www.geocities.com/heartland/river/7560/burdick.html

Robert Burdick came to Newport, Rhode Island from England in 1651. He was admitted a Freeman of Newport on May 22, 1655, and a Freeman of the Colony of Rhode Island on May 20, 1657. He married Ruth Hubbard, the first white child born at Agawam (now Springfield), Massachusetts on November 2, 1655.

                  Robert Burdick gained early notoriety during a land dispute between the colonies of Rhode Island and Massachusetts over a tract of land known as the Pequot Country -- land taken by the English colonists in the Pequot War of 1637 -- which is now situated, largely, within New London County, Connecticut. Boundary disputes had been going on for some time between Massachusetts and Connecticut over land within the Pequot Country, but the conflict in this instance was primarily between Massachusetts and Rhode Island. The dispute was centered upon a small settlement located in Pequot Country, between Mystic and Pawcatuck, which, in 1658 was named Southertown, and which, today is mostly contained within Stonington, Connecticut and a small part of Westerly, Rhode Island. In October 1658, the colony of Massachusetts laid claim to this settlement, declared it to be a plantation with the name of Southertown, annexed it to Suffolk County, Massachusetts, and appointed special commissioners and a constable to administer the new plantation.
                In the meantime, the colony of Rhode Island purchased land in a transaction known as the Westerly Purchase to add to its Narrangansett settlement. Included in the Westerly Purchase was some of the land within the boundaries of Southertown. A group of Rhode Islanders, including the Newport farmer, Robert Burdick, and his neighbors Tobias Saunders and Joseph Clarke, laid claim within the new settlement. In retaliation for the Massachusetts claim to Southertown, the Rhode Island Assembly sent out the warning to all settlers within the area of dispute that their land would be confiscated if they put it under the governance of another colonial government (e.g. Massachusetts).
               On September 30, 1661, William Cheseborough, an early settler of Southertown from Plymouth Colony, testified before the General Court of Massachusetts of his concern that some thirty-six inhabitants of Rhode Island had come into Southertown and had divided and laid out lots. The General Court of Massachusetts issued a warrant to apprehend the Rhode Island men who had settled in Southertown. A stand-off ensued, and Robert Burdick, Tobias Saunders and Joseph Clarke were arrested (although Joseph Clarke was "upon extraordinary occasion ... set at liberty.") For two years, the colony of Rhode Island attempted, unsuccessfully, to negotiate the release of Burdick and Saunders. As a last resort, Rhode Island authorities abducted two Massachusetts officials, who were then exchanged for the release of Robert Burdick and Tobias Saunders.
             The issuance of the Charter of Connecticut by King Charles II on April 25, 1662 fixed the eastern boundary of Connecticut at the Pawcatuck River. Southertown was situated within this boundary, and thus under the jurisdiction of Connecticut. Later, the British Crown settled the conflict by dividing the disputed land between Connecticut and Rhode Island. The land where Robert Burdick had settled was awarded to Rhode Island, and became part of the area known as Westerly. The land that was awarded to Connecticut became part of the area known as Stonington.
            After his release from prison, Robert Burdick settled on the same land he was taken from and inprisoned over. He and his wife, Ruth, had eleven children, nine of whom survived to adulthood and had children of their own. He served as a deputy to the General Court of Rhode Island from Westerly for the years 1680, 1683 and 1685, and he was one of the earliest members of the Seventh Day Baptist Church (the Sabbatarians).

SOURCE 14

Robert Burdick Immigrant

Immigrant to America Added by BrendaSanders1958 on 1 Apr 2008 What follows on was taken from "The Descendants of Robert Burdick of Rhode Island," by Nellie (Willard) Johnson, 1937. This monumental work traces an enormous number of descendants of Robert Burdick of Rhode Island, down to the tenth generation in some cases." There is good reason to believe that the surname Burdick is identical with Burditt (also spelled Burdett, Burdette, etc.). The spelling Burdick is not given in English words on surnames, and like many American names it is probably a variation in spelling from the English Burdette, etc." Savage, in his Genealogical Dictionary, says of the name: "Burdick or Burdict---This name is often confounded with Burditt." Add to this the fact that the name of Robert , the emigrant ancestor, appears on the official records of Rhode Island and Massachusetts variously as Birdict, Berdick, Burdett, Burditt, Burdict, and Burdick (as will be shown later), and it seems reasonably certain that his ancestors are to be found among the ancient family of Burdetts in England. The first Burdick of record in America was Robert Burdick, who was living at Newport, Rhode Island, in 1655. He came from England to Newport in 1651. He was married Nov. 2, 1655, to Ruth Hubbard. She was the first white child born at Agawam (now Springfield), Massachusetts, on January 11, 1640. Her father, Samuel Hubbard, came from England to Salem, Massachusetts, in 1633. Robert Burdick was admitted as a "Freeman" of the Colony of Rhode Island on May 20, 1657. In the westward expansion of the early New England Colonies, Robert Burdick, Tobias Sanders and Joseph Clarke all laid claim to a tract of land called the Pequot country. In October 1658, Massachusetts declared a small settlement which had been made there, to be a plantation with the name of Southertown (now Stonington), and annexed it to Suffolk County, Mass. Special commissioners and a constable were appointed to administer it (Mass. Recs., IV, 353). The Rhode Island Assembly, the next month, retaliated by warning all settlers in the disputed area that if they put their lands under another colonial government their holdings would be confiscated (R. I. Col. Recs., I, 401)."Meantime, the Narrangansett settlements (of Rhode Island) bought from the Indians, under the name of the Westerly Purchase, land - a part of which lay in Southertown - and began to settle it." Among the settlers were Robert Burdick, Tobias Sanders, and Joseph Clarke, farmers of Newport, and they soon found themselves in the thick of the fight between Massachusetts and Rhode Island.William Chesbrough testified before the General Court of Massachusetts, Sept. 30, 1661, that about the middle of September 1661, he was "occasioned to goe abroad upon his affaires, and understanding that divers persons, about thirty-six inhabitants of Road Island, were come into the bounds of Southertowne, to lay claime unto the lands...and to divide and lay out lotts in the same," whereupon he demanded "the reason of their intrusion into other men's rights; telling them those lands were within the bounds of Southertowne and appropriated to several persons." The reply came from the leader, Benedict Arnold. He "said, in way of answer many things impertinently, the sum whereof was, that they owned themselves to be the men that claimed the lands, and said they would keep possession, and that they would not try their title any where but in Road Island, or in England; and Arnold said that if any should attach him at Boston, her would lie in prison seven years before he would try the title there."T he General Court then issued a Warrant, as follows:

WARRANT. To the Constable of Southertowne: "Whereas, We are informed of sundry rude fellows, that contrary to the peace of our soveraigne Lord the King, etc., of this Collony, have, in a riotous manner entered upon, and taken possession of the lands of sundry of our inhabitants in the bounds of your towne. These are to require you, in his Majesties name to apprehend all such persons, and safely convey them before some of the magistrates of this jurisdiction, to give acount of such their proceedings; and hereof you are to make a true returne under your hand and not faile. Dated 25, 8 month, 1661. "Signed by: Jo. Endicott, Gov'r., Ri. Bellingham, Dep. Gov'r., Daniel Gookin." This Warrant was endorsed by the Constable: "According to the trust committed to me, I have arrested three men, viz: Tobias Saunders, Robert Burdett, and Joseph Clarke, which last upon extraordinary occasion was, by the Commissioners and constable, set at liberty. Dated 1st November, 1661. "William Palmer, Constable." It developed later, that at the time of their arrest, the Rhode Island men "did lye in wait to intercept and seize ye Constable and Deputy, with such as came with them to prison as they returned, which they had donne, but they being gone to dinner missed them." On Nov. 14, 1661, they were brought to trial before governor Endicott and his associates in Boston.

" Tobias Saunders and Robert Burdett being brought prisoners by virtue of a warrant from the Governor and magistrates for a forcible entry and intrusion into the bounds of Southertowne, in the Pequot country, upon severall men's properties granted to them by the General Court of this jurisdiction, who upon being examined by what authority or order they were there, Tobias Saunders answered, that the Court of Road Island gave liberty for certayne of their inhabitants to purchase lands of the Indians, and that these lands were purchased by them....Being asked whether they had understood that warning was given...to depart out of those lands, and out of the bounds of said towne, Tobias answered, that they had heard of such warning. Being asked why he did not desist, Tobias answered, that they looked upon the lands to be their right, and therefore they abode upon them."" ROBERT BURDET being examined, acknowledged that he was upon the same land, and built a small house there, upon the lott layed out to him; and that he went upon this designe, upon the same grounds as are declared by Tobias Saunders." "Tobias Saunders and ROBERT BURDETT being told that they must give security to the value of one hundred pounds a peece, to answer what shall be objected against them at the next General Court, otherwise to bee committed to prison, they refused to find security and were committed."" WARRANT FOR COMMITTMENT: The Keeper of the prison of Boston. You are hereby required to take into your custody the bodyes of Tobias Saunders and Robert Burdett of Rhode Island, and them safely to keepe, untill they find sufficient security, to the value of one hundred pounds apiece, to answer at the next Generall Court, to be holden at Boston in May next, for forcible entry and deteyning of possession of lands belonging to the Colony of Massachusetts within the bounds of Southertowne in the Pequot country, to the endangering of men's lives contrary to the peace of our Sovereign Lord, the King. Signed by: John Endicott, Gov'r., Rich'd Bellingham, Daniel Gookin. In a letter from the General Court of Massachusetts to Rhode Island is told the result of the trial in May. Dated Boston 10, 3rd month, 1662: "You may hereby take notice, that two of your people namely Tobias Saunders and Robert Burditt, being long since taken on the place, and secured by us to answer their trespasse, we have now called them before this Court and find nothing from them to justify their proceedings. This Court hath therefore fined them 40 pounds for your offence...and they stand committed to prison till your fine be satisfied,...etc."They were committed to Boston jail and kept there two years. Each colony sought to arrest citizens of the other. The two were at last released on being exchanged for two Massachusetts officials taken in retaliation by the Rhode Island authorities.From this sturdy, conscience-minded ancestor, Robert, sprang all the Burdicks who claim an early Rhode Island ancestry. When Connecticut was granted a new charter, the disputed area of Southertowne (Stonington) was given to her, and Massachusetts retired from the race. Later a compromise was arrived at in England between Connecticut and Rhode Island, whereby the latter was awarded the area of Westerly, where Robert Burdick had built his house, and where he settled on being released by Massachusetts.He was in a list of free inhabitants of Westerly in May 1669. On May 17, 1671, he and others too the oath of allegiance to the king and to the Colony of Rhode Island. Among those who subscribed that day are many of the ancestors of later families of Burdicks: John Crandall, Tobiah Sanders, Joseph Clarke, Robert Burdick, John Maxson, Jefferey Champlin, Sr., John Lewis, George Lanphaere, Nicholas Cotterill, Jr., etc.---"all of which persons did promise to stand to their engagements to his Majestie, and this Colony"On the outbreak of King Philip's Indian War, Westerly was on the exposed frontier. He and his family, in July 1675, went to Newport, but subsequently returned to Westerly.For the years 1680, 1683, 1685, he was a deputy to the General Court of Rhode Island from Westerly. On May 17, 1691, he and his wife Ruth sold one hundred acres of land for ten pounds. March8, 1692, he made an agreement with his son-in-law, Joseph Crandall, by which the latter was to take care of his father-in-law and find him suitable meat, drink, washing, lodging, and apparel, etc., for life, in consideration of which Joseph Crandall was to have the dwelling house and land adjoining forever, and until Robert Burdick's death, to have also use of oxen, cart, two cows and eight swine, and then to be returned to be disposed of by will, except the cart and wheels.1692, Oct. 25. He having died without perfecting his will, an agreement was made by his sons and sons-in-law. What their father had disposed of by legacy to children was to stand, and what remained, to be divided into nine parts. To son-in-law John Phillips, one part. The other eight parts to go to daughters Naomi Rogers and Tacy Maxson, only his wearing apparel to be divided between his sons, Thomas, Benjamin, and Samuel. The lands of deceased that are undivided, to go to sons Samuel, Robert and Hubbard Burdick. To son Thomas, two oxen and a hog. To daughter Deborah Crandall, bed, warming pan, etc. To daughter Ruth Phillips, iron pot, a swine, etc. To son Benjamin, heifer, swine, and iron pot. To son Samuel, a heifer and swine. To son Robert , a cow. To son Hubbard, a cow. To daughter Naomi Rogers, a swine, etc. To daughter Tacy Maxson, a swine. Inventory, 2 oxen, 2 cows, 2 heifers, 6 swine, mare, wearing apparel, warming pan, pewter, etc.He was a seceder from the Baptist Church, joining the Seventh Day Baptists; and "many descendants held membership in the ancient and interesting old Sabbatarian Church."His death occurred in 1692, 25 October; and his wife died the year before. They were the progenitors of "the old Rhode Island Burdick family, which has been identified with the history of the Colony and the Commonwealth, respectively, for 250 and more years." "A glance over the records of the Colony and State shows that persons of the Burdick name have from the start to the present been intrusted with public offices of trust and honor in their communities and towns, and that the name has been continually worthily borne."---Copied from "Collections of the Rhode Island Historical Society," Vol. III, p. 117. The Descendants of Robert Burdick of Rhode Island Added by angelinaserafina on 1 Dec 2008

The Burdick family has a long and distinguished history. Much of what is known of the family comes from a remarkable book entitled

"The Descendants of Robert Burdick of Rhode Island"

that was compiled by Nellie Willard Johnson in 1937. The maniscripts of William Mansfield Burdick Harcourt, an earlier researcher, provided most of the information on the earlier generations. The book lists thousands of Burdicks throughout the country. Nearly every individual in the first nine generations is listed as are many from the later generations. The book has been out of print for many years and many reside in libraries across the country. Occasionally an original copy will come up for sale, they are a real collector's item. Reprints are available. Visit the Burdick Store for more information.Wh ile it is widely believed the original Burdick immigrant came from England, no definitive link has been made. The surname "Burdick" could be a variation of the original English family of "Burdette." Other English variations are "Burditt" and "Burdett." Another theory indicates that the family name originated in the Rhine region of Germany, where the name Burdick was recorded in 1563 and where Burdicks still live today. Research continues.What is unique about the name "Burdick" is that it was only used by a single immigrant to the New World and appears in the official colonial records of Rhode Islandand Massachusetts. That immigrant was Robert, aged 18, and he arrived in Newport, Rhode Island in 1651. His name was first officially recorded in 1655, only thirty years after the Pilgrims arrival.Robert married a fifteen year old girl named Ruth Hubbard in the fall of 1655. Ruth had the distinction of being the first white child born in Agawam in the Massachusetts colony, a settlement that was later named Springfield. Ruth's father, Samuel, had come to Salem in 1633 and he was a bit of an individualist. He married his wife, Tasy Cooper, in January of 1636 after marching through the winter woods from Watertown, Mass. to become one of the founding families of Connecticut. Because of his Baptist views he sought refuge in the more religiously tolerant Rhode Island Colony in 1648. In December of 1671 he, his wife, his daughter, and a handful of others formed the Seventh Day Baptist Church of America.Well, back to the Burdicks. As I said, the Burdicks are probably related to the Burdettes, Burdetts, and Burditts of England. William Burditt came to Virginia in 1615. George Burdett or Burditt arrived in Salem in 1633 and his descendants retained the spelling "Burditt." But by this date the Burdick/Burdette family already had a long history in England. The first "Burdets" arrived in England with William the Conqueror in 1066. Two brothers, Robert and Hugh, appear in the Roll of Battle Abbey and both appear in the Domesday Book as sub-tenants in Leichstershire. The family was granted an official Coat of Arms, issued by King William himself for loyalty. William Burdet, in 1223, was a member of the Crusades to the Holy Land in the time of Henry II. It appears that the name "Burdet" was an Anglicized version of the French "Bourdet." Before they came to England with the Normans they were Barons of Cuilly near Falaise in Normandy.So young Robert and his younger wife settled down on a farm in what was to become Westerly, Rhode Island. Back then the colonies feuded quite regularly, trying to grab each others land. You guessed it, Robert and Ruth, along with a few other hardy settlers, planted roots right in the middle of a tract claimed by both Massachusetts and Rhode Island. In 1661 Massachusetts officials ambushed and arrested Robert and another farmer, Tobias Saunders. Robert and Tobias soon became the focus of a 17th Century Mexican Standoff. For two years Rhode Island tried to negotiate their release. So finally, the Rhode Island Swamp Yankees did the only reasonable thing left: they abducted two Massachusetts officials and a prisoner swap took place. Oh, and the land dispute? The big shots in England split the land between Connecticut and Rhode Island. Sorry Massachusetts! Robert's house happened to be on the Rhode Island side where Westerly is today. So that's why it's "Robert Burdick of Rhode Island" instead of "Robert Burdick of Connecticut." At least I now know why I have a distrust of government -- it's genetic!When Robert and Ruth settled down they did so in a prolific fashion. Thomas, Naomi, Ruth, Deborah, Roger, Benjamin, Samuel, Tacy, Robert Jr., and Hubbard, to be specific. Their children were born between 1656 and 1676 with a discrete gap in the early 1660s when Robert was -- uh -- out of town. A final child, born in 1678, died as an infant which seemed to put an end to the kids. So all of us Burdicks can trace our pedigrees back to one of Robert's sons. For the first couple of generations the Burdicks were a population force to be reckoned with in southwest Rhode Island. In fact, my own grandfather kept the string going in the Westerly area until he left for Detroit in the 1920s.The family has been well represented in military conflicts throughout the years. Burdicks fought in the Revolutionary War, the War of 1812, the Civil War, and every conflict of the 20th Century. Burdicks were a part of the westward expansion, homesteading in Kansas, the Dakotas, and everywhere in between. We've also done our part in the homogenization of late 20th Century America. You'll find Burdicks in every state and even a few in Canada. You'll even find a few places called "Burdick". We're everywhere. And we're all related. Additional information about this story

SOURCE 15

The Burdicts of RI and CT

The Burdicksof Rhode Island and Connecticut

                  My Burdick ancestry begins with my maternal grandmother, Bertha Melissa Burdick, who was a ninth generation descendant of Robert Burdick, the immigrant ancestor of the Burdick family who came to Newport, Rhode Island from England in 1651. Robert Burdick was admitted a Freeman of Newport on May 22, 1655, and a Freeman of the Colony of Rhode Island on May 20, 1657. He married Ruth Hubbard, the first white child born at Agawam (now Springfield), Massachusetts on November 2, 1655.
                      Robert Burdick gained early notoriety during a land dispute between the colonies of Rhode Island and Massachusetts over a tract of land known as the Pequot Country -- land taken by the English colonists in the Pequot War of 1637 -- which is now situated, largely, within New London County, Connecticut. Boundary disputes had been going on for some time between Massachusetts and Connecticut over land within the Pequot Country, but the conflict in this instance was primarily between Massachusetts and Rhode Island. The dispute was centered upon a small settlement located in Pequot Country, between Mystic and Pawcatuck, which, in 1658 was named Southertown, and which, today is mostly contained within Stonington, Connecticut and a small part of Westerly, Rhode Island. In October 1658, the colony of Massachusetts laid claim to this settlement, declared it to be a plantation with the name of Southertown, annexed it to Suffolk County, Massachusetts, and appointed special commissioners and a constable to administer the new plantation.
                    In the meantime, the colony of Rhode Island purchased land in a transaction known as the Westerly Purchase to add to its Narrangansett settlement. Included in the Westerly Purchase was some of the land within the boundaries of Southertown. A group of Rhode Islanders, including the Newport farmer, Robert Burdick, and his neighbors Tobias Saunders and Joseph Clarke, laid claim within the new settlement. In retaliation for the Massachusetts claim to Southertown, the Rhode Island Assembly sent out the warning to all settlers within the area of dispute that their land would be confiscated if they put it under the governance of another colonial government (e.g. Massachusetts).
                   On September 30, 1661, William Cheseborough, an early settler of Southertown from Plymouth Colony, testified before the General Court of Massachusetts of his concern that some thirty-six inhabitants of Rhode Island had come into Southertown and had divided and laid out lots. The General Court of Massachusetts issued a warrant to apprehend the Rhode Island men who had settled in Southertown. A stand-off ensued, and Robert Burdick, Tobias Saunders and Joseph Clarke were arrested (although Joseph Clarke was "upon extraordinary occasion ... set at liberty.") For two years, the colony of Rhode Island attempted, unsuccessfully, to negotiate the release of Burdick and Saunders. As a last resort, Rhode Island authorities abducted two Massachusetts officials, who were then exchanged for the release of Robert Burdick and Tobias Saunders.
                 The issuance of the Charter of Connecticut by King Charles II on April 25, 1662 fixed the eastern boundary of Connecticut at the Pawcatuck River. Southertown was situated within this boundary, and thus under the jurisdiction of Connecticut. Later, the British Crown settled the conflict by dividing the disputed land between Connecticut and Rhode Island. The land where Robert Burdick had settled was awarded to Rhode Island, and became part of the area known as Westerly. The land that was awarded to Connecticut became part of the area known as Stonington.
                After his release from prison, Robert Burdick settled on the same land he was taken from and inprisoned over. He and his wife, Ruth, had eleven children, nine of whom survived to adulthood and had children of their own. He served as a deputy to the General Court of Rhode Island from Westerly for the years 1680, 1683 and 1685, and he was one of the earliest members of the Seventh Day Baptist Church (the Sabbatarians).
                  My two lines of descent from Robert and Ruth (Hubbard) Burdick, down to my maternal grandmother, is as follows:

Line One

1 Robert BURDICK 1633 - Aft. 1704 + Ruth HUBBARD 1639/40 -

2 Samuel BURDICK Abt. 1668 - 1756 + Mary FOSTER 1675 - 1768

3 Thomas BURDICK Abt. 1699 - Aft. 1761 + Dorothy MAXSON 1703 - 1740-1748

4 Stephen BURDICK Abt. 1736 - Aft. 1807 + Mary CHURCH Abt. 1742 - 1832

5 [2] Joel BURDICK Abt. 1763 - 1828 + [1] Sarah CRANDALL 1767 - 1863

6 Rowland BURDICK 1789 - Aft. 1870 + Lydia GEER 1792 - 1851

7 Abel BURDICK 1836 - 1926 + Susan M. PHILLIPS 1846 - 1917

8 Frank R. BURDICK 1885 - 1960 + Sarah H. CLARK 1884 - 1955

9 Bertha M. BURDICK 1912 - 1976

Line Two

1 Robert BURDICK 1633 - Aft. 1704 + Ruth HUBBARD 1639/40 -

2[3] Deborah H. BURDICK Abt. 1662 - ? + [4] Rev. Joseph CRANDALL Abt. 1661 - 1737

3Joseph CRANDALL 1684 - 1749/50 + Ann LANGWORTHY Abt. 1690 - 1773

4 Benjamin CRANDALL 1736 - 1793 + Alice KENYON 1736 - 1836

5 [1] Sarah CRANDALL 1767 - 1863 + [2] Joel BURDICK Abt. 1763 - 18286

Rowland BURDICK 1789 - Aft. 1870 + Lydia GEER 1792 - 1851

7 Abel BURDICK 1836 - 1926 + Susan M. PHILLIPS 1846 - 1917

8 Frank R. BURDICK 1885 - 1960 + Sarah H. CLARK 1884 - 1955

9 Bertha M. BURDICK 1912 - 1976


       Most of the links on this table are not yet active, but they will be soon. This page is a work in progress and I update it frequently. Make sure to come back and visit, and when you do, click on your "refresh" button to make sure you recieve the most up-to-date information. Thanks!

Frank Rowland Burdick & Sarah Hannah Clark of Canterbury and Waterford, CT.

Abel Burdick & Susan M. Phillips of Griswold and Hampton, ConnecticutRowland Burdick & Lydia Geer of Hopkinton, Rhode Island and Griswold, ConnecticutJoel Burdick & Sarah Crandall of Hopkinton, Rhode IslandStephen Burdick & Mary Church of Hopkinton, Rhode Island (and Clifford. PA.)Thomas Burdick & Dorothy Maxson of Westerly, Rhode IslandSamuel Burdick & Mary Foster of Westerly, Rhode IslandDeborah Burdick & Rev. Joseph Crandall of Westerly, Rhode Island (second line)Robert Burdick & Ruth Hubbard of Westerly, Rhode Island


SOURCES

   The Descendants of Robert Burdick of Rhode Island by Nellie Williard Johnson. The Syracuse Typesetting Co., Inc. Syracuse, N.Y., 1937.
   History of the Town of Stonington, County of New London, Connecticut, from its First Settlement in 1649 to 1900 by Richard Anson Wheeler. Press of the Day Publishing Company, New London, Connecticut, 1900.

SOURCE 16

Robert Burdick - from The Descendants of Robert Burdick - by Nellie JOhnson

Names of those who may have been his relatives appear very early in Colonial records. A WILLIAM BURDITT, aged 25 years, came to Virginia in the "Susan" in 1615. GEORGE BURDITT or BURDETT came from Yarmouth, Norfolk, England, where he by popular election had preached two years, and resided for a time at Salem, Mass. WILLIAM BURDICK was master of the ship "Hopewell" which brought many colonists to this country in 1635. A ROBERT BURDITT, who may have been related to the Robert above, was born in England in 1633, came to New England when a young man, and settled in Malden, Mass. There he married, November 1653, Hannah Winter. The names of his children are similar to those of the Rhode Island family, being Hannah, Mary, Joseph, Thomas, Ruth. He died June 16, 1667. His descendants retained the spelling of Burditt. The first BURDICK of record in America was ROBERT BURDICK, who was living at Newport, RI in 1655. He came from England to Newport in 1651. He was married Nov. 2, 1655 to Ruth Hubbard, the first white child born at Agawam (now Springfield), Mass., Jan. 11, 1640. Her father, Samuel Hubbard, came from England to Salem, Mass, in 1633. Robert BERDICK and Tobia Sanders were admitted as Freemen of Newport, May 22, 1655. Robert Birdict (1656), Tobia Sanders, and Joseph Clarke were all living at Newport in 1655. Robert Burdick was admitted a Freeman of the Colony of Rhode Island , May 20, 1657. In the westward expansion of the early New England Colonies, the three of them laid claim to a tract of land called the Pequot country. In October 1658, Massachusetts declared a small settlement which had been made there, to be a plantation with the name of Southertown (now Stonington), and annexed it to Suffolk County, Mass. Special commissioners and a constable were app0ointed to administer it (Mass. Recs., IV, 353). The Rhode Island Assembly, the next month, retaliated by warning all settlers in the disputed area that if they put their lands under another colonial government their holdings would be confiscated (R. I. Col. Recs., I, 401)." Meantime, the Narrangansett settlements (of Rhode Island) bought from the Indians, under the name of the Westerly Purchase, land a part of which lay in Southertown, and began to settle it." Among the settlers were Robert Burdick, Tobias Saunders, and Joseph Clarke, farmers of Newport, and they soon found themselves in the thick of the fight between Massachusetts and Rhode Island. William Chesbrough testified before the General Court of Massachusetts, Sept. 30, 1661, that about the middle of September 1661, he was "occasioned to goe abroad upon his affaires, and understanding that divers persons, about thirty-six inhabitants of Road Island, were come into the bounds of Southertowne, to lay claime unto the lands...and to divide and lay out lotts in the same," whereupon he demanded "the reason of their intrusion into other men's rights; telling them those lands were within the bounds of Southertowne and appropriated to several persons." The reply came from the leader, Benedict Arnold. He "said, in way of answer many things impertinently, the sum whereof was, that they owned themselves to be the men that claimed the lands, and said they would keep possession, and that they would not try their title any where but in Road Island, or in England; and Arnold said that if any should attach him at Boston, her would lie in prison seven years before he would try the title there." The General Court then issued a Warrant, as follows: WARRANT. To the Constable of Southertowne: "Whereas, We are informed of sundry rude fellows, that contrary to the peace of our soveraigne Lord the King, etc., of this Collony, have, in a riotous manner entered upon, and taken possession of the lands of sundry of our inhabitants in the bounds of your towne. These are to require you, in his Majesties name to apprehend all such persons, and safely convey them before some of the magistrates of this jurisdiction, to give acount of such their proceedings; and hereof you are to make a true returne under your hand and not faile. Dated 25, 8 month, 1661. "Signed by: Jo. Endicott, Gov'r., Ri. Bellingham, Dep. Gov'r., Daniel Gookin." This Warrant was endorsed by the Constable: "According to the trust committed to me, I have arrested three men, viz: Tobias Saunders, ROBERT BURDETT, and Joseph Clarke, which last upon extraordinary occasion was, by the Commissioners and constable, set at liberty. Dated 1st November, 1661. "William Palmer, Constable." It developed later, that at the time of their arrest, the Rhode Island men "did lye in wait to intercept and seize ye Constable and Deputy, with such as came with them to prison as they returned, which they had donne, but they being gone to dinner missed them." On Nov. 14, 1661, they were brought to trial before governor Endicott and his associates in Boston." Tobias Saunders and ROBERT BURDETT being brought prisoners by virtue of a warrant from the Governor and magistrates for a forcible entry and intrusion into the bounds of Southertowne, in the Pequot country, upon severall men's properties granted to them by the General Court of this jurisdiction, who upon being examined by what authority or order they were there, Tobias Saunders answered, that the Court of Road Island gave liberty for certayne of their inhabitants to purchase lands of the Indians, and that these lands were purchased by them....Being asked whether they had understood that warning was given...to depart out of those lands, and out of the bounds of said towne, Tobias answered, that they had heard of such warning. Being asked why he did not desist, Tobias answered, that they looked upon the lands to be their right, and therefore they abode upon them."" ROBERT BURDET being examined, acknowledged that he was upon the same land, and built a small house there, upon the lott layed out to him; and that he went upon this designe, upon the same grounds as are declared by Tobias Saunders."" Tobias Saunders and ROBERT BURDETT being told that they must give security to the value of one hundred pounds a peece, to answer what shall be objected against them at the next General Court, otherwise to bee committed to prison, they refused to find security and were committed."" WARRANT FOR COMMITTMENT: The Keeper of the prison of Boston. You are hereby required to take into your custody the bodyes of Tobias Saunders and ROBERT BURDETT of Rhode Island, and them safely to keepe, untill they find sufficient security, to the value of one hundred pounds apiece, to answer at the next Generall Court, to be holden at Boston in May next, for forcible entry and deteyning of possession of lands belonging to the Colony of Massachusetts within the bounds of Southertowne in the Pequot country, to the endangering of men's lives contrary to the peace of our Sovereign Lord, the King. Signed by: John Endicott, Gov'r., Rich'd Bellingham, Daniel Gookin. In a letter from the General Court of Massachusetts to Rhode Island is told the result of the trial in May. Dated Boston 10, 3rd month, 1662: "You may hereby take notice, that two of your people namely Tobias Saunders and ROBERT BURDITT, being long since taken on the place, and secured by us to answer their trespasse, we have now called them before this Court and find nothing from them to justify their proceedings. This Court hath therefore fined them 40 pounds for your offence...and they stand committed to prison till your fine be satisfied,...etc." They were committed to Boston jail and kept there two years. Each colony sought to arrest citizens of the other. The two were at last released on being exchanged for two Massachusetts officials taken in retaliation by the Rhode Island authorities. From this sturdy, conscience-minded ancestor, Robert, sprang all the Burdicks who claim an early Rhode Island ancestry. When Connecticut was granted a new charter, the disputed area of Southertowne (Stonington) was given to her, and Massachusetts retired from the race. Later a compromise was arrived at in England between Connecticut and Rhode Island, whereby the latter was awarded the area of Westerly, where Robert Burdick had built his house, and where he settled on being released by Massachusetts. He was in a list of free inhabitants of Westerly in May 1669. On May 17, 1671, he and others too the oath of allegiance to the king and to the Colony of Rhode Island. Among those who subscribed that day are many of the ancestors of later families of Burdicks: John Crandall, Tobiah Sanders, Joseph Clarke, ROBERT BURDICK, John Maxson, Jefferey Champlin, Sr., John Lewis, George Lanphaere, Nicholas Cotterill, Jr., etc.---"all of which persons did promise to stand to their engagements to his Majestie, and this Colony" On the outbreak of King Philip's Indian War, Westerly was on the exposed frontier. He and his family, in July, 1675, went to Newport, but subsequently returned to Westerly. For the years 1680, 1683, 1685, he was a deputy to the General Court of Rhode Island from Westerly. On May 17, 1691, he and his wife Ruth sold one hundred acres of land for ten pounds. March8, 1692, he made an agreement with his son-in-law, Joseph Crandall, by which the latter was to take care of his father-in-law and find him suitable meat, drink, washing, lodging, and apparel, etc., for life, in consideration of which Joseph Crandall was to have the dwelling house and land adjoining forever, and until Robert Burdick's death, to have also use of oxen, cart, two cows and eight swine, and then to be returned to be disposed of by will, except the cart and wheels. 1692, Oct. 25. He having died without perfecting his will, an agreement was made by his sons and sons-in-law. What their father had disposed of by legacy to children was to stand, and what remained, to be divided into nine parts. To son-in-law John Phillips, one part. The other eight parts to go to daughters Naomi Rogers and Tacy Maxson, only his wearing apparel to be divided between his sons, Thomas, Benjamin, and Samuel. The lands of deceased that are undivided, to go to sons Samuel, Robert and Hubbard Burdick. To son Thomas, two oxen and a hog. To daughter Deborah Crandall, bed, warming pan, etc. To daughter Ruth Phillips, iron pot, a swine, etc. To son Benjamin, heifer, swine, and iron pot. To son Samuel, a heifer and swine. To son Robert , a cow. To son Hubbard, a cow. To daughter Naomi Rogers, a swine, etc. To daughter Tacy Maxson, a swine. Inventory, 2 oxen, 2 cows, 2 heifers, 6 swine, mare, wearing apparel, warming pan, pewter, etc. He was a seceder from the Baptist Church, joining the Seventh Day Baptists; and "many descendants held membership in the ancient and interesting old Sabbatarian Church." His death occurred in 1692, 25 October; and his wife died the year before. They were the progenitors of "the old Rhode Island Burdick family, which has been identified with the history of the Colony and the Commonwealth, respectively, for 250 and more years." "A glance over the records of the Colony and State shows that persons of the Burdick name have from the start to the present been intrusted with public offices of trust and honor in their communities and towns, and that the name has been continually worthily borne."---Copied from "Collections of the Rhode Island Historical Society," Vol. III, p. 117. The following letter was written from Westerly, August 4, 1666, by Mrs. Ruth Burdick to her father, Samuel Hubbard, at Newport:" Most loving and dear father and mother, my duty with my husband and children presenter unto you with all my dear friends. My longing and desire is to hear from you, how your hearts are borne up above these troubles which are come upon us and are coming as we fear; for we have the rumors of war, and that almost every day. Even now we have heard from your Island by some Indians, who declared unto us that the French have done some mischief upon the coast, and we have heard that 1200 Frenchmen have joined with the Mohawks to clear the land both of English and of Indians. But I trust in the Lord, if such a thing be intended, that he will not suffer such a thing to be. My desire and prayer to God is, that he will be pleased to fulfil his promise to us, that is, that as in the world we shall have troubles, so in him we shall have peace. The Lord of comfort, comfort your and our hearts, and give us peace in believing and joy in the Holy Ghost. Oh that the Lord would be pleased to fill our hearts with his good spirit, that we may be carried above all these things! And that we may remember his saying, 'When ye see these things come to pass, lift up your heads, knowing that our redemption draws nigh.' Then if these be the certain sign of our Lord's return, let us mind his command, that is, pray always that ye may be counted worthy to escape all these things, and to stand before the son of man. Let us have boldness to come unto him in the new and living way which he has prepared for us. Through grace I find the Lord doth bear up the spirits of his in this place, in some comfortable measure to be looking above these things, the Lord increase it more and more unto the day of his appearing, which I hope is at hand. Dear father and mother, the Lord hath been pleased to give us here many sweet and comfortable days of refreshing, which is great cause of thankfulness, and my desire is that we may highly prize it, and you with us give the Lord praise for his benefit. I pray remember my love to all my dear friends with you in fellowship. Sister Sanders desires to be remember to you all, so doth sister Clarke. Your loving daughter, to my power. "RUTH BURDICK" Robert Burdick was married November 2, 1655, at Newport, R. I., to Ruth Hubbard, then 15 years old. She was the first white child born in Springfield, MA. Her father, Samuel Hubbard, was one of the founders, at Newport, December 23, 1671, of the Seventh Day Baptist Church. He was born in 1610, at Mendelsham, Suffolk County, England, and was the son of James and Naomi (Cocke) Hubbard, daughter of Thomas Cocke of Ipswitch. His grandfather, Thomas Hubbard, was burned at the stake, May 26, 1555, in Essex County, England, for refusing to recant his Protestantism. His fate is related in Fox's "Book of Martyrs" (Book III, Chap. 14), under the name of Thomas Higbed. Samuel Hubbard came in 1633 to Salem, MA. At Windsor, CN, January 4, 1636, by Mr. Ludlow, he married Tasy Cooper. They were both in the party that marched through the wilderness in the hard winter of 1635 from Watertown, MA, to become the founders of Connecticut. On account of persecution for expressing Baptist views, Mr. Hubbard finally, in 1648, sought refuge in Rhode Island. In 1664 he was appointed General Solicitor of the Colony. December 23, 1668, with his wife, one daughter, and four other persons he formed the first Seventh Day Baptist Church in America. He died between 1688 and 1692 and his wife after 1697, but no trace of their burial places have been found. Tasy (Cooper) Hubbard, the mother of Robert Burdick's wife, was, in 1664, the first convert in America to the doctrine that no authority existed or could exist for altering God's decree establishing the seventh day as the Sabbath by the substitution of another day. She came to Dorchester, June 9, 1634, from England and was 28 years old when married (Hist. of Windsor, Conn.). From the Literary Diary of Ezra Stiles, Vol. 3, p.82: "A singular gravestone:" Ebenezer" Samuel Hubbard aged 10 of May 78 yeres Old Tase Hubbard aged the 27 Sep 79 yeres and 7 mons 4 Jen Maryed 51 Yeres 1688 14 Vpsal 4. God have given us 7 children 4 ded 3 living Ruth Burdick 11, 1 ded, 10 living Rachael Langworthy had 10 children 3 ded 7 living. Bethiah Clark 9 Living Great Grandchildren Naomi B Rogers 1 ded 4 alyfe Ruth B Phillips 1 ded 4 alyfe Judah C Maxson Thomas Burdick" I took this inscription off a gravestone in a family burying place on Baptist Berkleys White Hall farm on Rh. Isld, about A. D. 1763. Collector Robinson bought the Lease about 1765 and demolished the gravestones and put them into a wall: so that all is lost. From a loose paper which I, wrote in 1763 I now copy here. This Samuel Hubbard was a Baptist Teacher, settled at Newport about 1648 and made this Eben. 1688. Intricate as it seems, more is contained on this stone than can be given in other words in so small a space. I think 1688 must be a year common to Four dates. I should suppose the stone erected Sep 27, 1688, when the wife was aged 79 and 7 mo., and Mr. Hubbard was aged 78 on May 10 that year and on 4 Jany they had been married 51 years. The 14 Vpsal 4 is the 145th Psalm and the 4th verse---'One generation shall praise thy works to another.' The B and C, I think a beautiful way of expressing lineal Descents. Thus Naomi B Rogers, I take to be Naomi Burdick who married Rogers---so Judah C Maxson was the Daughter of Bethiah Clark and it will be read Judah Clark Maxson."

SOURCE 17

Robert Comes to Newport, RI, difficult times

http://wc.rootsweb.ancestry.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=jonsaunders&id=I3364

Robert Came to New England (Newport, RI) from England about 1650. Supposedly, William Burdick was a shipmaster, who was sailing between England and New England about the time Robert Burdick immigrated, was the father of Robert. Robert Burdick was admitted freeman 5/22/1655. Moved to Westerly, Washington Co., Rhode Island , before 1651. Robert and Ruth (Hubbard) Burdick had 12 children. 9/25/1683, Samuel Hubbard, having returned to Newport, from a journey to Rye, etc., detailed some events of the trip. He says, 'At Westerly, the first day after the Sabbath, brother Burdick buried a son.' and among others there, were grandson John Phillips and Ruth his wife, and Benjamin Burdick. 'A very great burial, above twenty horses.' 'Newport Seventh Day Baptist Trilogy'; by Ilou M. Sanford and Don A. Sanford; Heritage Books Inc.; 1998, p 87. 'Robert Burdick was baptised as a member of the First Baptist Church of Newport on 11/16/1652 and represented the church in its struggle against the persecution of dissenters from the established church in Massachusetts. He and Tobias Saunders were arrested in 1662 and sentenced to two years in Boston jail but were eventually released in a prisoner exchange. He was among the earliest settlers of the Western section of Rhode Island. He was listed as a member of the Newport Seventh Day Baptist Church in its 1692 record. He died Oct. 25, 1692.'

SOURCE 18

The Burdick family has a long and distinguished history. Much of what is known of the family comes from a remarkable book entitled

"The Descendants of Robert Burdick of Rhode Island"

that was compiled by Nellie Willard Johnson in 1937. The maniscripts of William Mansfield Burdick Harcourt, an earlier researcher, provided most of the information on the earlier generations. The book lists thousands of Burdicks throughout the country. Nearly every individual in the first nine generations is listed as are many from the later generations.

While it is widely believed the original Burdick immigrant came from England, no definitive link has been made. The surname "Burdick" could be a variation of the original English family of "Burdette." Other English variations are "Burditt" and "Burdett." Another theory indicates that the family name originated in the Rhine region of Germany, where the name Burdick was recorded in 1563 and where Burdicks still live today. Research continues.

What is unique about the name "Burdick" is that it was only used by a single immigrant to the New World and appears in the official colonial records of Rhode Island and Massachusetts. That immigrant was Robert, aged 18, and he arrived in Newport, Rhode Island in 1651. His name was first officially recorded in 1655, only thirty years after the Pilgrims arrival.

Robert married a fifteen year old girl named Ruth Hubbard in the fall of 1655. Ruth had the distinction of being the first white child born in Agawam in the Massachusetts colony, a settlement that was later named Springfield. Ruth's father, Samuel, had come to Salem in 1633 and he was a bit of an individualist. He married his wife, Tasy Cooper, in January of 1636 after marching through the winter woods from Watertown, Mass. to become one of the founding families of Connecticut. Because of his Baptist views he sought refuge in the more religiously tolerant Rhode Island Colony in 1648. In December of 1671 he, his wife, his daughter, and a handful of others formed the Seventh Day Baptist Church of America.

The Burdicks are probably related to the Burdettes, Burdetts, and Burditts of England. William Burditt came to Virginia in 1615. George Burdett or Burditt arrived in Salem in 1633 and his descendants retained the spelling "Burditt." But by this date the Burdick/Burdette family already had a long history in England. The first "Burdets" arrived in England with William the Conqueror in 1066. Two brothers, Robert and Hugh, appear in the Roll of Battle Abbey and both appear in the Domesday Book as sub-tenants in Leicestershire,. The family was granted an official Coat of Arms, issued by King William himself for loyalty. William Burdet, in 1223, was a member of the Crusades to the Holy Land in the time of Henry II. It appears that the name "Burdet" was an Anglicized version of the French "Bourdet." Before they came to England with the Normans they were Barons of Cuilly near Falaise in Normandy.

So young Robert and his younger wife settled down on a farm in what was to become Westerly, Rhode Island. Back then the colonies feuded quite regularly, trying to grab each others land. You guessed it, Robert and Ruth, along with a few other hardy settlers, planted roots right in the middle of a tract claimed by both Massachusetts and Rhode Island. In 1661 Massachusetts officials ambushed and arrested Robert and another farmer, Tobias Saunders. Robert and Tobias soon became the focus of a 17th Century Mexican Standoff. For two years Rhode Island tried to negotiate their release. So finally, the Rhode Island Swamp Yankees did the only reasonable thing left: they abducted two Massachusetts officials and a prisoner swap took place. Oh, and the land dispute? The big shots in England split the land between Connecticut and Rhode Island. Sorry Massachusetts! Robert's house happened to be on the Rhode Island side where Westerly is today. So that's why it's "Robert Burdick of Rhode Island" instead of "Robert Burdick of Connecticut." At least I now know why I have a distrust of government -- it's genetic!

When Robert and Ruth settled down they did so in a prolific fashion. Thomas, Naomi, Ruth, Deborah, Roger, Benjamin, Samuel, Tacy, Robert Jr., and Hubbard, to be specific. Their children were born between 1656 and 1676 with a discrete gap in the early 1660s when Robert was -- uh -- out of town. A final child, born in 1678, died as an infant which seemed to put an end to the kids. So all of us Burdicks can trace our pedigrees back to one of Robert's sons. For the first couple of generations the Burdicks were a population force to be reckoned with in southwest Rhode Island. In fact, my own grandfather kept the string going in the Westerly area until he left for Detroit in the 1920s.

The family has been well represented in military conflicts throughout the years. Burdicks fought in the Revolutionary War, the War of 1812, the Civil War, and every conflict of the 20th Century. Burdicks were a part of the westward expansion, homesteading in Kansas, the Dakotas, and everywhere in between. We've also done our part in the homogenization of late 20th Century America. You'll find Burdicks in every state and even a few in Canada. You'll even find a few places called "Burdick". We're everywhere. And we're all related.


Lived in RI in May 15, 1667

Came to Newport RI in 1651

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Robert Burdick, of Newport's Timeline

1630
November 19, 1630
Newport, Newport, Rhode Island, USA
1630
England
1651
1651
Age 21
Arrived in the New World (18 years old)
1652
November 19, 1652
Age 22
Newport, Newport County, Rhode Island
November 19, 1652
Age 22
Newport, Newport, Rhode Island
November 19, 1652
Age 22
Newport, Newport, Rhode Island
November 19, 1652
Age 22
Portsmouth, Rhode Island
November 19, 1652
Age 22
Newport, Newport Co., RI
November 19, 1652
Age 22
Newport,Newport,Rhode Island