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Robert Drouin

French: Robert
Also Known As: "Drouin", "Drouyn", "Droin"
Birthdate:
Birthplace: St-Barthélemy, Le Pin-la-Garenne, Orne, France
Death: June 01, 1617 (51)
Saint-Barthélémy, Le Pin-la-Garenne, Perche, France
Place of Burial: Le Pin-la-Garenne, Orne, Normandie, France
Immediate Family:

Son of Robert Drouin and Vincente Drouin (Rouelle)
Husband of Marie Dubois
Father of Jacques Drouin; Jean Drouin; Michel Drouin; Jacqueline Drouin; Roberte Drouin and 5 others
Brother of Antoine Drouin
Half brother of Robert Drouin

Occupation: tuilier ~ tilemaker
Managed by: Gisèle J.M. Fiola
Last Updated:

About Robert Drouin

http://www.oocities.org/raydrouin@rogers.com/drouin1.htm HISTORY OF THE DROUIN AND VILLAGE OF PIN-LA-GARENNE THE DROUIN OF NORTH AMERICA

LES DROUIN D'AMERIQUE

DROUIN SURNAME


The first item of this short story is that for the majority of the Drouin of North America, there is only one original descendant, his name was Robert Drouin and he came from Pin-la-Garenne (Perche) France. He arrived in Quebec City in 1634. The surname Drouin, was spelled in different way in the church records of 1597 onward: Drouin, Drouyn and Droyn. Of course in their trek across North America, the Drouin name took on different forms, depending on the way the census or church people spelled it. In Detroit it became Derouin and in Louisiana DeRouen or Derouen.

PIN-LA-GARENNE (THE EARLY HISTORY) (1)


Le premier document authentique concernant la paroisse du Pin est une charte contenue dans l'abondant cartulaire de Marmoutier abbaye situee pres de Tours, dont le monastere de Saint-Martin-du-Vieux-Belleme etait une succursale. Cet acte anterieur a 1064 a officialise la donation par le chevalier dit Gautier, du Pin de la moitie de l'eglise aux moines de Saint Martin. La Pelonniere attache au Pin servait de chateau au seigneur, ainsi qu'a l'hebergement des soldats. (The first official document concerning the parish of Pin was a chart contain in the records of the Abbey of Marmoutier situated near Tours, of which the monastery of Saint Martin-du-Vieux-Belleme was a branch. This chart from before 1064, confirmed the donation of half the church to the monks of Saint Martin by the "Chevalier dit Gauthier" of the Pin. La Peloniere attached to the Pin served as the castle for the "Seigneur" as well as barracks for the soldiers.


The official records of Pin were started 1595, and it is very difficult to find the origin of the Drouin family prior to that time. Local records indicated that in the years 1551 onward lived in Pin two adults Drouin: Jehan and Pierre. Thus for these two as well as others born prior to 1595, there just is not any records of birth, etc. However, we know of one Jeanne Drouin who married a Barthelemy Moyne (LeMoyne), whose children were born prior to 1595. Jeanne must have been at least the second generation in Le Pin, if we take it that Jehan and Pierre were the first. How many others from these two formed the second generation we do not know. (2)

First/Second/Third generations FIRST GENERATION SECOND GENERATION THIRD GENERATION Jehan (mention is made of him in the municipality records in 1551/1552/1553 Jeanne Plus many others. Jeanne and her husband died and their wills read 2/12/1612 Oudard/Michelle/Antoine/ Genevieve/Julian/Jeanne/ Yves and Robert. Pierre (as above in 1555) None known at this time We do not know who the fathers of the above were It is more than likely that Drouin's inhabited the area for many year prior to 1550, possibly in the early part of 1500. However, from church records we know that in 1606, there were several others, either brothers/sisters or relatives: Oudard (m) Perrine Chemineau: children=Pierre, Rose, Jeanne, et Marguerite; Yves (m) Antoinette Chemineau: children=Perrine; Antoine (m) Francoise Geslain; Genevieve.(source for this are the parish record held in Mortagne).

For a translation of the origin of the surname Drouin in France, as well as some information on the number,whereabouts and famous Drouin in French history see the Table Drouin Origin below. This was translated by your editor and passed on to us Drouin by Mrs Yvette Chevet of Touraine in France. Mrs Chevet has indicated that the major part of this information was first published by a local regional paper called "La Nouvelle Republique du Centre et Ouest" under the signature of "Odile Mergnac" . We are grateful for this information from our French correspondants..


Robert who was born in 1565, died around February 1617. He was a tile maker (la tuile de couverture). Most of the Drouin seemed to have been involved in this profession. i.e. brothers and cousins. (The husband of Jeanne, Barthelemy Moyne was also a title maker. ) Robert lived in a house outside the Pin (3/4 km on the way to Belleme), which also served as a factory for the tile making. The house and factory were called "La Tuilerie", and it is still known by that name today (1996). It remained in the Drouin family until 1890 when it was sold to the "Duplessi" family, whose descendants still live in the house. (3)


Robert Drouin the tile maker was married to Marie Dubois, and they had ten children, one of which was also named Robert, the direct ancestor of all the North American Drouin, Derouin,DeRouen, etc. who can trace their ancestors to Quebec. He was known in the Pin as, Robert "Le Canadian". Robert was not only a tile maker but appear to also have been a tax collector for the municipality, collecting tax on land, buildings, etc.


Robert le canadian's father and mother (Robert and Marie Dubois), had, as indicated ten children: Jehan born in 1597; Michel (b)7 Feb l600; Jacqueline (b) l8 May 1601; Roberte (b)l7 Jun 1602; Robert born l603 died 1606; Barthelami (b) 24 Aug 1603; Roze (b) 14 Dec 1605; Robert (le canadian) (b) 6 Aug 1607; Hilaire (b) 23 Feb 1610; Marie (b) 5 Dec 1611). (4)

As indicated in the following account of Robert (le canadian), which from now on will be known as Robert, left via the port of Dieppe in 1634.

NOTES (1) The source for most of the information on Pin La Garenne comes from a small publication, completed by Michel Ganivet, a local historian. It is called Cahiers Percherons(l976)(49/50) and a special edition published in 1974.

(2) La Famille Drouin au Perche par Madame Pierre Montagne, published by La Revue, Sainte-Anne de Beaupre (1985). 
(3) On 27 June l983, four descendants of Robert Drouin met in Pin-la-Garenne: Roger Drouin of Ottawa, his son Jean-Francois, Joseph Derouin of La Crosse, Wisconsin, and Capt Raymond Drouin of Canadian Forces Base Baden-Soellingen in Germany. 
(4) Dictionnaire Nationale des Can. Francais. (Info compiled by Mormon Salt Lake City). 

Listed below is a short history of Robert Drouin's life from his departure from France, his arrival in Canada and subsequent travel, lodgings, home and marriages until his death in May 1685. Information from this short story was taken from an unknown donor, and from other sources. Should a person recognize some of it as their material, please contact me and I will be glad to give credit to its author.

Robert Drouin

Those who live in the Saint Lawrence River valley, in the United States or in the Canadian Provinces, under the name Drouin, Drouyn, Derouin, DeRouen, Droin and even Drovin, and who can trace their ancestor to Quebec, are descended from one unique source, Robert Drouin and Marie Chappelier.

Our ancestor was born in the parish of Saint-Barthelemy, in a small town of no distinction, Pin-la-Garenne, a community in the Department of the Orne, District of Mortagne, Canton of Pervencheres, in the ancient and honorable Province of Perche. He was baptized on 6 August 1607, the son of Robert and Marie Dubois. He grew to manhood in the same house, which still exists: the Tuileries. There is no relationship between this small modest stone house and the royal playhouse at Versailles, except the name, derived from the ornamental tile and brick used to decorate the walls and chimneys of homes of that period. It was there that Robert Drouin learned the abc's of his trade.

In 1634, Seigneur Robert Giffard recruited many Percherons for the unknown life in Canada. Among these were the families Cloutier, Boucher, Giroux and others. A year later, in 163 5, Robert Drouin joined with Francois Aubert, Philippe Amyot, Jean Cote and Martin Grouvel, who left from the port of Dieppe in their turn, to go out to the colony. The conditions of employment which Robert accepted were undoubtedly established the year before by Robert Giffard and Zacharie Cloutier before their departure.

Robert Drouin disembarked at Quebec in the summer of 1635. According to the historian Benjamin Sulte, he was among the first to clear land in New France. Be that as it may, we find him living on the seigneurie of Giffard, in the home of Zacharie Cloutier, making bricks. He contributed materially to the building of the houses and out buildings of those first settlers who needed to expand and find accommodation elsewhere.

As the friendship between the 29-year old Robert and the Cloutier family grew stronger, he sought the hand in marriage of the 10-year-old daughter of his emplover. Anne Cloutier was born in Perche in January of 1626, the daughter of Zacharie and Xainte Dupont. Thus, did notary Jean Guvon come to prepare the first contract of marriage in Canada. It was done in the house of Seigneur Giffard before the principals concerned and a number of witnesses. The marriage was to take place as soon as possible; however, the newlyweds were to continue to live in the Cloutier home for a period of three years, and the bride, agreed to be "conseillee" by her parents. In this expression one may observe the prudence of the parents who indicated the desire that their child not be confronted with marital responsibilities too soon.

Their marriage was celebrated on 12 July 1637, in the church of Notre-Dame de Quebec, but their first child, Agnes, did not come into the world until January of 1641, after those three years of parental surveillance.

MASTER BRICKMAKER

Robert knew the art of brickmaking. A contract from Notary Piraude, dated  25 March 1640, tells us that ancestor Drouin sold 7000 bricks to the nursing order of the Dames Hospitalieres. He contracted to deliver them about the 15th of the following June, "on the shore of the river near Beauport just opposite the workvard" for a price of "two poinsons of wheat." A poinson is a measure of volume, equivalent to 39 Canadian gallons.
On 14 October 1645, Robert promised to "lease to Grouvel 200 bricks." During this period our man was already busy with many other activities: He made planks, dry-docked the  launch of Grouvel and sowed the fields of his friends. In spite of all this, Robert never  abandoned his brickmaking. As proof, on 27 July 1682, on the occasion of the marriage of Etienne, the father invited the son to come around in his spare time to "make some bricks." The boy would get to keep half the profits.

A COLONIST AT CHATEAU-RICHER

In 1641, the surveyor Jean Bourdon drew up a map of the Beaupre Coast, on which we find the land of Robert Drouin. It was situated between the properties of Jacques Boissel and Claude Etienne, to the west of Riviere-aux-Chiens. By that tirne, Robert  had cleared a plot of land and put a small cabin on it: The couple must have established a home at Beauport. In 1642, Robert and some people of Beauport were accused of having plotted to kill James Bourguignon, who sued them in the Criminal Court of Quebec. The affair was not prosecuted. On 17 April 1646, a land grant was made by Oliver Le Tardif in favor of Drouin and signed by the Notary Morel. This land was 6 arpents of frontage by 126 in depth.
The Drouin had three daughters: Agnes, who died in 1641, Genevieve and Jeanne. The former had Jean Gagnon for a godfather and had been privately baptized by Mathurin Gagnon, family friends who lived at Chateau-Richer. Jeanne was baptized on 5 February 1647 by Father Jean Le Sueur, "in the house of Robert Drouin" at Riviere-aux-Chpens.
A sad event occurred in 1648! Anne Cloutier died at la Chandeleur and was buried at Quebec on 4 February.   The Jesuit Journal tells us about the arrival of the body at the Hospital of Quebec, where vespers were said before the interment. The question arises: How did they transport the body from Chateau-Richer to Quebec in the dead of winter? This Anne Cloutier a native of Perches had arrived in Canada on the 4th of June 1634, exactly l00  years to the day after Jacques Cartier.
Robert left the area. He gave his in-laws temporary custody of his two orphan daughters. Genevieve and Jeanne. He rented his land to Julien Perreault, who agreed to allow an arpent of land to return to nature each year, but to take good care of the two cows, the heifer, the ox and the four pigs.

A SECOND MARRiAGE

The next year, on 26 November 1649, Robert penned his mark to the bottom line of his second marriage contract.  Marie Chappelier, widow of Pierre Petit, a native of Compte Robert-en-Brie, daughter of Jean and Marguerite Dodier, accepted him as her husband. Drouin promised to "take a residence close to Quebec." The following Monday, on 29 November, the religious ceremony took place at Quebec. The marriage contract, perhaps a bit complicated was adjusted on 25 July 1664.

CAP-DE-LA-MADELEINE

Marie Chappelier had a cousin, one Robert Hache, a clerk in a store in Quebec in 1649 who was present at the signing of her marriage contract. This Jesuit layman had lived at Trois-Rivieres. Could it have been he who gave his cousin the idea of going to live at the Cap? The Drouin's had a little daughter, Marie, who was baptized at Trois-Rivieres in the autumn of 1650.
Old Zacharie Cloutier did not trust stepmother Chappelier. "He feared that the said children were mistreated by this new woman. '' He took custody of his two grandchildren during the time his son-in-law lived at Trois-Rivieres.
On 6 June 1651, the Jesuits granted a plot of land to the Drouin couple.   This grant of 2 "arpents" in frontage on the river, to a depth of 20 arpents, was located on the clift, between the properties of Jean Lanqueteau and Jean Poisson. While Robert was busy brickmaking, the fur trade did not leave him indifferent. He was seen selling a certain quantity of pelts at the Trois-Rivieres market. He may have received them in payment for bricks. On 18 September 1650, Marie, their first child, was baptized at this second home of the Drouins; but by January of 1652, they were back in Quebec, where Nicholas was born. On 1 February 1652, son Nicholas was baptized in a private ceremony at Quebec. The boy had already been conditionally baptized on 8 January by Nicholas Giffard .

SUBURBS OF QUEBEC

On 24 March 1623, according to a contract made by Notary Audouart, we are told that the Drouins lived " on the farm of the Jesuit Fathers, called Notre-Dame de Bon Secours." Father Jean De Laplace, S.J., granted him a concession of land of 3 arpents in frontage by 20 deep. It was close by Jacques Badeau, at Notre-Dame-des-Anges, located between Beauport and Quebec. Reading between the line, we might assume that wife Marie had a holy horror of living in isolation in the country.

RIVIERE-AUX-CHIENS

Father Paul Rageneau, S.J., on 27 December 1655, at the home of Etienne Racine, a resident of Sainte-Anne-de-Beaupre. baptized , Marguerite Drouin. Thus, we see that the family had returned to the Riviere-aux-Chiens, no doubt back to the land of 1641. But their return to Sainte-Anne was not all that happy. The Cloutier's did not like Marie Chappelier, so, out of concern for their granddaughters Genevieve and Jeanne, they were able to obtain permanent custody. These two daughters of Anne Cloutier would be, during the life of their father, and even after his death, the center of judicial litigation aimed at protecting their right to the community property due from their father and natural mother.

On 27 July 1656, according to notary Audouart, Robert was living on the Beaupre Coast; we  see that he had to pay 150 livres to Marie Crevel, widow of Robert Caron. Two years later 25 October, Robert was living at Beaupre where he certified that he owed 24 livres to Simon Denis. The same year, he made another declaration of debt of 18 livres to Jean Juchereau. 
Robert and Marie loved their children very much and did all they could to help them, especially on the occasions of their marriages. For instance, when daughter Marie married, they gave her a milk cow, some clothing, some linens and dishes plus 100 livres in cash. The Drouins also boarded Genevieve and Marguerite with the Ursuline nuns at Quebec.
In 1667, Robert owned 6 head of cattle and 10 arpents of cleared land. He sold a half arpent of his river frontage in 1668 to Francois Lacroix for 100 livres. The next year he granted a slice off the back section of his land, 2 arpents, 3.5 perches, to Francois Branliac.   Enough land remained for his sons Nicholas and Etienne. In 1681, Robert Drouin was still cultivating 20 arpents of land. On 4 October of that year, he accepted the 14-year-old Charles Galarneau, for a 3-year indenture.

THE DROUIN FAMILY AND SAINTE-ANNE

The good Sainte-Anne did something special to recognize the faith of the founding family Drouin.
Nicolas, the 12-year-old son of Robert, "being afflicted by a falling sickness ) epilepsy) who was in danger of dying in the fire or in the water, often fell down as if dead wherever he found himself,  vowed to Saint Anne and started a novena in her honor. . . and recovered his health on the feast day of Sainte-Anne, 26 July 1662. His recovery was complete. "He continued all the years with his parents to give thanks to Sainte-Anne on her feast day, at the church of the "petit cap."
Marie Chappelier had eight children. From various sources we now know  that, of all these children,  Nicholas and Etienne were the only ones to have perpetuated the name of their father. They married two sisters, Marie and Catherine Loignan, daughters of Pierre and Francoise Roussins originally from Tourouvre in Perche; therefore the Drouin family is doubly attached to this ancient province. The other children allied themselves as follows: Marie to Nicholas Lebel; Marguerite to Jean Gagnon and to Antoine Darde; Catherine to Michel Roulois and to Guillaume Simin.
In 1664, Madame Drouin made an offering of a livre to the church of Sainte-Anne. That same year an unfortunate event hit the farnily rather hard. Their daughter Marie, married in November 1662 to Nicholas Lebel, drowned at Riviere-aux-Chiens, coming to Sainte-Anne to hear the Holy mass... . and with the intention of making her devotions." She was buried at Chateau-Richer on 2 May 1664.

LEST WE FORGET

Robert Drouin at age 77, father of eleven children, died at the end of  May 1685 " after having received the sacraments of penance, holy eucharist and extreme unction." Father Guillaume Gauthier presided at the funeral on the first of June, an inventory was made of his possessions by the Notary Etienne Jacob. It took three days, the 11th, 16th, and 17th, to  complete.
His widow, Marie Chappelier, is without a doubt that wornan listed at the Hospital of Quebec under the name of Marie Chapeliez who died on 15 March 1697. She was buried three days later.
Genevieve and Jeanne, the children of the first marriage, married Romain Trepagny and 

Pierre Maheux. Etienne and Nicolas Drouin took care that there were many descendants.

"Je Me Souviens" is not only the motto of the Province of Quebec, it is also the motto that every family from these early settlers should adopt in order to keep alive the memory of those pioneers who made this country what it is.

A composite picture of Robert ---courtesy of the books "No Ancetres" by Gerard Lebel, C Ss R. The composite pictures from these books (Nos Ancetres) were taken from the English collection "Our French-Canadian Ancestors, vol 2 (1984), completed by Thomas J. Laforest and Weathers his much talented artist.


Table Drouin Origin As sent to us by Mrs Yvette Chevet (Drouin), this information first published in "La Nouvelle Republique du Centre et Ouest" under the signature of "Odile Mergnac". The Origin of the word "Drouin" is German, "Drogo" who signifies to go to war with guile. It is also the name of the bird in the LaFontaine story of "Le Renard". She estimates that there are approximately 7400 Drouin in France today, with the four Departments where they are more numerous being: La Sarthe, Paris, La Loire-Atlantique and Meurthe-et-Moselle. Some of the more famous Drouin in France were: Florent Drouin dit Le Viel died around 1609 was the master engineer for the Duc de Lorraine. As such he must have worked on the "Tour du Palais de Nancy", and was helped by his son Florent dit Le Jeune, who was an architect and sculptor. Jean Jacques Drouin who had married Francoise Jeanne Elisabeth Gaultier (1720-1803) became (through I understand his wife's extracurucular activities with the right people) master of ballets at the "Comedie Francaise". Francois Drouin (1752-1794) merchant, farmer, notary, and a lawyer had his head cut off under the revolution for having participated against it. Also Noel Drouin, a marchant from Orleans, lost his head during the same time. He had been held at the Luxembourg jail. Other Drouin, rear-admiral Jean Auguste Leon Henri Drouin born in 1842 at "ile Maurice; Jean-Claude Drouin (1742-1826) mayor of Luneville for many years; writer Daniel Drouin, Sieur de Bel-Endroict, born in Vienne around 1550; Edme Alphone dit Edmond Drouin (1838-1904) specialist in oriental culture; Vincent Denis Drouin (1660-1722) Surgeon in Chief of the French army. In Touraine, there were several small "Seigneurs" amonst them, Leonor Drouin Mayor of Tours. Finally there is the "Dictionnaire Etymologique des noms de famille" which translated is the French dictionnary on origin of Family name. In this dictionary available by clicking as indicated in the "Dictionnaire" it says that the Name Drouin seem more often in the West of France and Lorraine, is a name of German origin, from Droue,.with variation into Drouineau, Drouineaud, Drouineault, Drouinot and Drouain. Thus the German origin is certainly confirmed and the proximity to Lorraine of a large group of related names to Droue, also help us inditify the source as Germanic. Agains many thanks to our French correspondants for this most interesting history of the Drouin in France. Inserted on 11 September 1999/Sep 2000 For research on more Drouin of North American, please see my new web page at: home page

This page was first completed sometimes in 1995, and published on this page in February1998. As indicated the information on Pin-la-Garenne and the early Drouin were taken from the publication at note (1) and (2) above. To reproduce these, permission should be requested from their authors. However, the page was reproduced and put together by your editor.(Ray Drouin)

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

This page Copyright ® 1998 Ray Drouin drouin@travel-net.com 1 This Page is an outdated, user-generated website brought to you by an archive.It was mirrored from Geocities at the end of October, 2009. For any questions concerning this page try to contact the respective author. (To report any malicious content send the URL to oocities(at gmail dot com). For question about the archive visit: OoCities.org.[x][x] [x]close

https://gw.geneanet.org/philou51?lang=fr&pz=marion+renee+evelyne+si...

•Né le 12 juillet 1565 - Le Pin-la-Garenne, 61329, Orne, Basse-Normandie, France •Décédé le 1er juin 1617 - Le Pin-la-Garenne, 61329, Orne, Basse-Normandie, France , à l’âge de 51 ans •Tuilier et Briquetier puis Cultivateur, Ou N M et D à MORTAGNE ??

http://larryvoyer.com/genealogy/getperson.php?personID=I58611&tree=...


Robert appeared to have had an extensive family around Pin-La-Garenne. Edouard

who married (1) Antoinette Mesnager: Pierre, Rose Jeanne (2) Perrine Chemineau;

Jacques, Mathurin, Marguerite (3) Barbe Brouard. I guess this Edouard was the

marrying kind.

Jeanne Drouin married Barthelemy Moine (Le Moine)=Michel who was treasurer of

the church at Pin, and married Jeanne Chastaigner= Barthelemy who married Marie

Roux. This Barthelemy also went to Canada and was Robert (Le canadian)'s

witness to his marriage to Anne Cloutier.

Antoine dit Taillis married Francoise Geslain and lived in "Beler" at St Martin

vieux Belleme.

Genevieve likely spinster.


Du Pin-La-Garenne, Perche


http://freepages.genealogy.rootsweb.ancestry.com/~mainegenie/DROUIN...

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1. ROBERT- b.c.1577 Pin la Garenne, Mortagne, Perche m.c.1595 MARIE DUBOIS

Issue-

· Jean- bpt. 29 May 1597 Mortagne · Michel- bpt. 7 Feb. 1600 Mortagne · Jacqueline- bpt. 18 May 1601 Mortagne · Roberte- bpt. 17 June 1602 Mortagne · Barthelemi- bpt. 24 Aug. 1603 Mortagne · Rose- bpt. 4 Dec. 1605 Mortagne · 2I. ROBERT- bpt. 6 Aug. 1607 Mortagne, Perche, m.1. 12 July 1637 Quebec, ANNE CLOUTIER (bpt. 19 Jan. 1626 St. Jean de Mortagne, Perche, bur. 5 Feb. 1648 Quebec), 2. 29 Nov. 1649 Marie Chapelier, bur. 1 June 1685 Chateau Richer · Hilaire- bpt. 6 Feb. 1610 St. Barthelemi, Mortagne · Marie- bpt. 5 Dec. 1611 Mortagne 2I. ROBERT (ROBERT 1) bpt. 6 Aug. 1607 Mortagne, Perche m.1. 12 July 1637 Quebec, ANNE CLOUTIER (bpt. 19 Jan. 1626 St. Jean de Mortagne, Perche, bur. 5 Feb. 1648 Quebec), d. of Zacharie Cloutier and Sainte Dupont 2. 29 Nov. 1649 Marie Chapelier bur. 1 June 1685 Chateau Richer

Aoust 1607 Le 6e jour du dit mois et an fut baptisé robert fils de robert droyn et de Marie du boys, les parrains Robert Roy et Thomas Leguy la marainne Jehanne fille de Denys moyne par moy subzsigné Thibault

Robert was born in the parish of Saint-Barthelemy in a small town of no distinction, Pin-la-Garenne, a Community in the Department of the Orne, District of Mortagne, Canton of Pervencheres in the ancient and honorable Province of Perche. He was baptized on August 6, 1607, the son of Robert and Marie Dubois and grew up in a stone house, which still exists, the Tuileries. There is no relationship between this small modest stone house and the royal playhouse at Versailles exept the name; derived from the ornamental tile and brick used to decorate the walls and chimneys of homes of that period. The current owners are delighted to have descendants of Robert come to visit and they will have you sign their guest book.

"The Tuileries" Before and After Renovations

In 1634, Seigneur Robert Giffard recruited many Percherons for the unknown life in Canada. Among these were the families of Cloutier, Boucher, Giroux and others. A year later, in 1635, Robert Drouin joined with François Aubert, Philippe Amyot, Jean Côté and Mathurin Grouvel who left from the port of Dieppe and sailed out to the colony. The conditions of employment, which Robert accepted, were undoubtedly established the year before by Robert Giffard and Zacharie Cloutier before their departure.

Robert Drouin disembarked at Québec in the summer of 1635. According to the historian Benjamin Sulte, he was among the first to clear land in New France. We find him living in Giffard's seigneurie, in the home of Zacharie Cloutier, making bricks. He contributed to the building of houses and out buildings of those first settlers who could not live indefinitely in the makeshift shelters near the manor house of the seigneur.

As the friendship of the 29 year old Robert and the Cloutier family grew stronger, he sought the hand in marriage of the 10 year old daughter of his employer. Anne Cloutier was born in Perche on 19 Jan. 1626. She was the daughter of Zacharie and Sainte Dupont. The Notary Jean Guyon came to write the first marriage contract in Canada. It was done in the house of Seigneur Giffard before the principals concerned and a number of witnesses. The marriage was to take place as soon as possible, however, the newlyweds were to continue to live in the Cloutier home for a period of three years and the bride agreed to be "conseillee " by her parents. In this expression, one may observe the prudence of the parents who indicated the desire that their child not be confronted with marital responsibilities too soon.

Their marriage was celebrated, on 12 July 1637, in the church of Notre-Dame de Québec but, their first child, Agnes, was not born until January 25, 1641, well after those years of parental surveillance.

A contract from Notary Piraude, dated 25 Mar. 1640, tells us that Robert sold 7000 bricks to the nursing order of the Dames Hospitalieres. He contracted to deliver them about the 15th of the following June "on the shore of the river near Beauport just opposite his workyard " for a price of "two poinsons of wheat." A poinson is a measure of volume, equivalent to 39 Imperial gallons.

On 14 Oct. 1645, Robert promised to "lease to Grouvel 200 bricks." During this period, Robert was always busy with many other activities. He made planks, dry-docked the launch of Grouvel and sowed the fields of his friends. In spite of all this, Robert never abandoned his trade as a brickmaker. As proof, on 27 July 1682, on the occasion of his son's Etienne's marriage, he invited Etienne to come around in his spare time to "make some bricks." The boy would get to keep half the profits.

In 1641, the surveyor, Jean Bourdon, drew a map of the Beaupré Coast on which we can locate the land of Robert Drouin. It was situated between the properties of Jacques Boissel and Claude Estienne, to the west of Rivière-aux-Chiens. By that time, Robert had cleared a plot of land and put a small cabin on it. The couple must also have established a home at Beauport. In 1642, Robert and some people of Beauport were accused of having plotted to kill Jacques Bourguignon, who sued them in the Criminal Court of Québec. The affair was not prosecuted. On 17 Apr. 1646, a land grant was made by Olivier Le Tardif in favor of Drouin and signed by Notary Morel. This land was 6 arpents of frontage by 126 in depth.

The Drouins had daughters. Agnes, who died in 1641, Geneviève and Jeanne. Genevieve had Jean Gagnon for a godfather and had been privately baptized by Mathurin Gagnon, family friends, who lived at Château-Richer.

In 1648 Anne Cloutier died at Chandeleur and was buried at Québec on 4 Feb. The Jesuit Journal tells us about the arrival of the body at the Hospital of Québec, where vespers were said before the interment. The question arises: how did they transport the body from Château-Richer to Québec in the dead of winter? This Anne Cloutier who was a native of Mortagne, in Perche, had arrived in Canada on the 4th of June 1634, exactly 100 years, to the day, after Jacques Cartier.

Robert then decided to leave the area. He gave his in-laws temporary custody of his two orphan daughters, Geneviève and Jeanne. He rented his land to Julien Perrault, who agreed to allow an arpent of land to return to nature each year but to take good care of the two cows, the heifer, the ox and the four pigs.

On 26 Nov. 1649 Robert signed his second marriage contract with Marie Chapelier, widow of Pierre Petit, a native of Compte-Robert-en-Brie, and daughter of Jean and Marguerite Dodier. Drouin promised to "take a residence close to Quebec." The following Monday, on 29 Nov., the ceremony took place at Notre Dame de Québec. The marriage contract was a bit complicated and was subsequently adjusted on 25 July 1664.

Marie Chapelier had a cousin, one Robert Hache, a clerk in a store in Québec in 1649, who was present at the signing of her marriage contract. This Jesuit layman had lived at Trois-Rivières. Could it have been he, who gave his cousin the idea of going to live at the Cap de la Madeleine? The Drouins had a daughter, Marie, who was baptized at Trois-Rivières in the autumn of 1650. Old Zacharie Cloutier did not trust stepmother Chapelier, "He feared that the said children were mistreated by this new woman." Therefore, he took custody of his two grandchildren during the time his son-in-law lived at Trois-Rivières.

On June 6, 1651, the Jesuits granted a plot of land to the Drouin couple, not far from that of Sebastien Dodier, a relative of Marie Chapelier. This grant of 2 arpents in frontage on the river to a depth of 20 arpents was located on the Cap between the properties of Jean Lanqueteau and Jean Poisson.

While Robert was busy making bricks he also dabbled in the fur trade. He was seen selling a certain quantity of pelts at the Trois-Rivières market. He may have received them in payment for bricks. On 18 Sept. 1650, Marie, their first child, was baptized at this second home of the Drouins but, by January of 1652, they were back in Québec where Nicolas was baptized in a private ceremony at Québec. The boy had already been conditionally baptized on January 8 by Nicolas Giffard.

Father Paul Ragueneau, S.J., baptized Marguerite Drouin on 27 Dec. 1655 at the home of Étienne Racine, a resident of Sainte-Anne-de-Beaupré. Thus, we see that the family had returned to the Rivière-aux-Chiens, no doubt back to the land of 1641. But their return to Sainte-Anne parish was not all happy. The Cloutiers did not like Marie Chapelier so, out of concern for their granddaughters, Geneviève and Jeanne, they were able to obtain permanent custody.

Robert and Marie loved their children very much and did all they could to help them, especially on the occasion of their marriages. For instance, when daughter Marie married, they gave her a milk cow, some clothing, some linens and dishes, plus 100 livres in cash. The Drouins also boarded Geneviève and Marguerite with the Ursuline nuns at Québec.

In 1667, Robert owned 6 head of cattle and 10 arpents of cleared land. He sold a half arpent of his river frontage in 1668 to François Lacroix for 100 livres. The next year, he granted a slice off the back section of his land, 2 arpents, 3.5 perches, to Francois Branliac. Enough land still remained for his sons, Nicolas and Étienne. In 1681, Robert Drouin was yet himself cultivating 20 arpents of land. On October 4 of that year, he accepted the 14 year old Charles Balarneau for a three year indenture.

The good Sainte-Anne did something special to recognize the faith of the founding Drouin family. Nicolas, Robert's 12 year old son, "being afflicted by a falling sickness (epilepsy), and who was in danger of dying in a fire or in the water and who often fell down as if dead wherever he found himself, vowed to Sainte-Anne and started a novena in her honor ... and (as a result) recovered his health," on the feast of Sainte-Anne, July 26, 1662. His recovery was complete. "He continued all the years with his parents, to give thanks to Sainte-Anne, on her feast day, at the church of the little cape."

Drouin Homestead- Riviere de Chien

In 1664, Madame Drouin made an offering of a livre to the church of Sainte-Anne. That same year their daughter, Marie, married, on November 28, 1662 at Château-Richer to Nicolas Lebel, son of Clement and Françoise Lagnel, drowned at Rivière-aux-Chiens " coming to Sainte-Anne to hear the Holy Mass ... and with the intention of making her devotions." She was buried at Château-Richer on May 2, 1664.

Robert Drouin at age 77, father of fourteen children, died, on 1 June 1685, at Château-Richer " after having received the sacraments of penance, holy eucharist and extreme unction." Father Guillaume Gauthier presided at the funeral. On the 11, 16 and 17th of June, an inventory was made of his possessions, by the Notary Étienne Jacob. An inventory of his estate revealed goods worth 732 livres. However, after deducting 8 livres for funeral costs, 15 for the church at Château-Richer, 9 livres for the cost of the inventory, 65 livres of dower and 266 livres for half of the selling price of the house (which went to Marie), there was only 152 livres to divide among five inheritors, who brought many suits and appeals before the courts dealing with the inheritance. But Robert Drouin's real legacy is in his contribution to the French-Canadian race. It is almost impossible to trace any French-Canadian genealogy without encountering Robert Drouin among the earliest ancestors. That would seem... to be his greatest claim to fame.

His widow, Marie Chapelier, is without a doubt, the woman listed at the Hôtel-Dieu Québec under the name of Marie Chapeliez. She died, on 15 Mar. 1697 at the Hôtel-Dieu and was buried three days later.

Issue- First three children by Anne, last eight by Marie · I. Agnes- bpt. 21 Jan., bur. 8 Nov. 1641 Quebec · II. Genevieve- bpt. 19 Oct. 1643 Quebec, m. 24 Apr. 1656 Notre Dame de Quebec (contract 27 Feb.- Notarie Badeau), Romain Trepagnier (bpt. 19 Apr. 1627 St. Pierre de Muchedent, Dieppe, Normandie, bur. 21 Mar. 1702 Chateau Richer), bur. 4 Oct. 1710 Chateau Richer · 3III. JEANNE- bpt. 2 May 1647 Quebec (Jeanne was baptized by Father Jean Le Sueur, "in the house of Robert Drouin" at Rivière-aux-Chiens), m. 10 Nov. 1659 Quebec, PIERRE MAHEU (bpt. 23 Dec. 1630 Mortagne, Perche, bur. 3 May 1717 Notre Dame de la Misericorde, Beauport), bur. 23 June 1732 Beauport · IV. Marie- bpt. 18 Sept. 1650 Trois Rivieres, m. 28 Nov. 1662 Chateau Richer (contract 27 Nov.- Notary Aubert), Nicolas Lebel (m.2. 2 Apr. 1665 Chateau Richer, Therese Migneault (bpt. 15 Sept. 1651 Quebec, m.2. 6 Feb. 1679 Beaupre, Rene Ouellet (b.c.1635 Paris, m.1. 8 Mary 1666 Quebec, Anne Rivet (b.c.1642 Alencon, Normandie, bur. 7 Apr. 1675 Chateau Richer), bur. 15 Jan. 1722 La Pocatiere), bur. 5 Dec. 1728 Kamouraska) , d.s.p., bur. 2 May 1664 Chateau Richer. Poor Marie drowned in the Riviere des Chiens on her way to Ste. Anne's to pray. · V. Nicolas- bpt. 1 Feb. 1652 Quebec, m. 6 Nov. 1674 Quebec (contract 31 Oct.- Notarie Becquet), Marie Loignon (bur. 12 Sept. 1717 Ste. Famille, IO), bur. 5 Oct. 1723 Ste. Famille, IO · VI. Pierre- bpt. 1 Nov. 1653 Quebec, d.c.1666 · VII. Marguerite- bpt. 27 Dec. 1655 Quebec, m.1. 26 Oct. 1670 Chateau Richer (contract 25 Nov.- Notarie Auber), Jean Gagnon (bpt. 5 Feb. 1648 Quebec, bur. 7 Dec. 1687 Chateau Richer), 2. 19 Apr. 1689 Chateau Richer, Antoine Darde (b.c.1640 Tourraine), bur. 2 June 1692 Chateau Richer · VIII. Etienne- m.1. 3 Nov. 1682 Ste. Famille, I.O. (contract 27 July 1682- Notarie Duquet), Marie Catherine Loignon (bpt. 27 Mar. 1669 Ste. Famille, IO, bur. 13 Mar. 1703 Chateau Richer), 2. 13 Apr. 1711 Ste. Anne de Beaupre (contract 10 Apr.- Notarie Vachon), Jeanne Barrette (m.1. 21 Jan. 1688 Beaupre, Martin Poulin (bpt. 17 Oct. 1648 Quebec, bur. 16 Jan. 1710 Beaupre)), bur. 19 Sept. 1732 Ste. Famille, IO. · IX. Catherine- bpt. 5 Jan. 1660 Quebec, m.1. 24 Nov. 1676 Chateau Richer (contract 20 Oct.- Notarie Vachon), Michel Roulois (bpt. 5 Jan. 1655 Quebec, bur. 16 Feb. 1686 Chateau Richer), 2. 17 Nov. 1688 Chateau Richer, Guillaume Simon (bpt. 23 Sept. 1664 Quebec, bur. 16 Mar. 1712 Chateau Richer), bur. 26 Mar. 1734 Chateau Richer · X. Jean Baptiste- bpt. 14 Feb. 1662 Chateau Richer, d. before 1681 · XI. Marie Madeleine- bpt. 27 Nov. 1664 Chateau Richer, bur. 3 Feb. 1665 Chateau Richer Ref:

Parish registers for Chateau Richer, Ste. Anne de Beaupre, Ste. Famille, Beauport, Kamourska, Notre Dame de Quebec Dictionary of Canadian Biography- Honorious Provost- vol 1. p. 281 Our French-Canadian Ancestors- Thomas J. Laforest- Vol. 2, Ch. 9-P. 77

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Robert Drouin's Timeline

1565
July 12, 1565
St-Barthélemy, Le Pin-la-Garenne, Orne, France
July 12, 1565
Le Pin-la-Garenne, Orne, Normandie, France
1595
1595
1597
May 29, 1597
Pin-la-Garenne, France
1600
February 7, 1600
Pin La Garenne, France
1601
May 18, 1601
Pin La Garenne, France
1602
June 17, 1602
Pin La Garenne, France
1603
August 24, 1603
Pin La Garenne, France
1605
November 30, 1605
Pin La Garenne, France