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Robert Hooke

Birthdate:
Birthplace: Freshwater, UK
Death: Died in London,,,England
Immediate Family:

Son of John Hooke(s) or Hooks and Cecellie Hooks
Father of Nancemond John Hooks
Brother of John Hooke

Managed by: Private User
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About Robert Hooke

Wikipedia Biographical Summary:

"...Robert Hooke ( 28 July [O.S. 18 July] 1635 – 3 March 1703) was an English natural philosopher, architect and polymath.

His adult life comprised three distinct periods: as a scientific inquirer lacking money; achieving great wealth and standing through his reputation for hard work and scrupulous honesty following the great fire of 1666, but eventually becoming ill and party to jealous intellectual disputes. These issues may have contributed to his relative historical obscurity.

He was at one time simultaneously the curator of experiments of the Royal Society and a member of its council, Gresham Professor of Geometry and a Surveyor to the City of London after the Great Fire of London, in which capacity he appears to have performed more than half of all the surveys after the fire. He was also an important architect of his time – though few of his buildings now survive and some of those are generally misattributed – and was instrumental in devising a set of planning controls for London whose influence remains today. Allan Chapman has characterised him as "England's Leonardo".[1]

Robert Gunther's Early Science in Oxford, a history of science in Oxford during the Protectorate, Restoration and Age of Enlightenment, devotes five of its fourteen volumes to Hooke.

Hooke studied at Wadham College during the Protectorate where he became one of a tightly knit group of ardent Royalists led by John Wilkins. Here he was employed as an assistant to Thomas Willis and to Robert Boyle, for whom he built the vacuum pumps used in Boyle's gas law experiments. He built some of the earliest Gregorian telescopes and observed the rotations of Mars and Jupiter. In 1665 he inspired the use of microscopes for scientific exploration with his book, Micrographia. Based on his microscopic observations of fossils, Hooke was an early proponent of biological evolution.[2][3] He investigated the phenomenon of refraction, deducing the wave theory of light, and was the first to suggest that matter expands when heated and that air is made of small particles separated by relatively large distances. He performed pioneering work in the field of surveying and map-making and was involved in the work that led to the first modern plan-form map, though his plan for London on a grid system was rejected in favour of rebuilding along the existing routes. He also came near to an experimental proof that gravity follows an inverse square law, and hypothesised that such a relation governs the motions of the planets, an idea which was subsequently developed by Isaac Newton.[4] Much of Hooke's scientific work was conducted in his capacity as curator of experiments of the Royal Society, a post he held from 1662, or as part of the household of Robert Boyle..."

"...Much of what is known of Hooke's early life comes from an autobiography that he commenced in 1696 but never completed. Richard Waller mentions it in his introduction to The Posthumous Works of Robert Hooke, M.D. S.R.S., printed in 1705. The work of Waller, along with John Ward's Lives of the Gresham Professors and John Aubrey's Brief Lives, form the major near-contemporaneous biographical accounts of Hooke.

Early life Robert Hooke was born in 1635 in Freshwater on the Isle of Wight to John Hooke and Cecily Gyles. Robert was the last of four children, two boys and two girls, and there was an age difference of seven years between him and the next youngest. Their father John was a Church of England priest, the curate of Freshwater's Church of All Saints, and his two brothers (Robert's uncles) were also ministers. Robert Hooke was expected to succeed in his education and join the Church. John Hooke also was in charge of a local school, and so was able to teach Robert, at least partly at home perhaps due to the boy's frail health. He was a Royalist and almost certainly a member of a group who went to pay their respects to Charles I when he escaped to the Isle of Wight. Robert, too, grew up to be a staunch monarchist...."

SOURCE: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Robert_Hooke


http://nl.wikipedia.org/wiki/Robert_Hooke Robert Hooke (Isle of Wight, 18 juli 1635 – Londen, 3 maart 1703) was een Engels sterrenkundige, natuurkundige en architect. Hij is voornamelijk bekend door zijn wet van Hooke, die het verband aangeeft tussen de kracht op een lichaam en de vervorming van dat lichaam. Hooke was een begenadigd uitvinder en bracht ons zowel de spiraalveer als de fotografische iris. Hij introduceerde de term 'cel' in de biologie na zijn microscopische waarnemingen van kurkweefsel. Hij was een tijdgenoot van de architect Christopher Wren met wie hij samenwerkte aan de heropbouw van Londen na de Grote brand van Londen, en eeuwig rivaal van Isaac Newton. Toch bereikte hij nooit de roem van die laatste.

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Robert Hooke's Timeline

1635
July 18, 1635
Freshwater, UK
1670
1670
Age 34
England
1703
March 3, 1703
Age 67
London,,,England