Saint Gondolfus, bishop of Tongres

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Gondolfus, évêque de Tongres

Also Known As: "Gondulf", "Gondolfus", "Gondon", "Gundulfus", "Gundulphus", "of Soissons", "of Maastricht", "of Tongeren", "Bishop of Tongres"
Birthdate:
Birthplace: Aquitaine, France
Death: July 06, 607 (57-66)
Arrondissement of Tongeren, Limburg, Vlaams Gewest, Belgium
Immediate Family:

Son of Mundéric, lord of Vitry-en-Perthois and Arthémia of Geneva
Husband of Palatina de Troyes
Father of Theutbald of Metz
Brother of Bodegisel I

Occupation: Governor of Marseilles (581), Count of Soissons, Mayor of the Palace to Theibert I, Bishop of Tongres (545-599), Ambassadeur à Byzance, Comte de Soisson, evêque de Tongres, Comte de Soissons Maire du Palais de Neustrie, évêque de Tongres (Bishop)
Managed by: Sveneric Rosell
Last Updated:

About Saint Gondolfus, bishop of Tongres

Saint Gondulphus of Maastricht (also Gondolfus, Gundulfus, Gondulf, Gondon; born c. 524, died c. 6 July 607) was the Bishop of Tongres and Bishop of Maastricht in the sixth century.

His predecessor, Monulphus (Monulf), transferred the seat of the bishopric from Tongeren to Maastricht, which thenceforth was the actual residence of the bishops of Tongeren. However, the official title of the Bishop of Tongeren, episcopus Tungrorum, was retained until the eleventh century, even when the episcopal see had been transferred by Lambert of Maastricht from Maastricht to Liège.

Bishop Gondulphus is a somewhat enigmatic figure indeed, one is inclined to question whether he be not identical with Monulphus. But the two saints must nevertheless be distinguished. Monulphus must have occupied the See of Tongeren until the end of the sixth or the beginning of the seventh century, while a Bishop of Maastricht named Betulphus was present at the Council of Paris in 614. Gondulphus, then, would be inserted between Monulphus and Betulphus, at least if this Betulphus must not be identified with Gondulphus on the grounds that the case is analogous to that of the episcopal list of Mainz, where Bertulfus and Crotoldus must be reckoned identical. Furthermore, the episcopal lists of the eleventh and twelfth centuries, whose value is, however, not very great, ignore the historically attested Betulphus, and make Gondulphus the immediate successor of Monulphus. The biographies of Gondulphus, which are handed down to us from the Middle Ages, are merely an extract from the Vita Servatii of the priest Jocundus. They are quite without value and are full of legends. If they are to be believed, Gondulphus endeavoured to rebuild the town of Tongeren, which had been destroyed by the barbarian invasions. But heaven opposed his scheme, and miraculously manifested its desire to the saint. Furious wolves fell upon the pagan colonists of this region, and devoured them before the eyes of the horrified bishop. Thus has legend quite obscured the authentic history of St. Gondulphus, the fact of his episcopacy at Maastricht being the only one that is authentic. According to local tradition he occupied the episcopal see for seven years and died about 607. This last statement does not tally with his presence at Paris in 614, if he is to be considered identical with the Betulphus who assisted at that council. In any case he was buried in the nave of the church of Saint-Servais at Maastricht, which had been magnificently restored by his predecessor, St. Monulphus.

The bodies of Monulphus and Gondulphus were solemnly exhumed in 1039 by the Bishops Nithard of Liège and Gerard of Florennes, Bishop of Cambrai. An epitaph commemorating this event was afterwards misinterpreted, and gave rise to a legend according to which the two saints arose from their tomb in 1039 in order to assist at the dedication of the church of Aachen (Aix-la-Chapelle), and at the conclusion of the ceremony returned to their tomb to resume their eternal sleep.

Together with St. Monulphus, St. Gondulphus is secondary patron of the city and church of Maastricht. His feast is kept on 16 July or 17 June.[citation needed] The commemoration of the exhumation of 1039 is celebrated in August.

St. Gondulphus is known to have been married to Palatina de Troyes, they had a son named Baudgise D'Aquitaine II, who became Duke of Aquitaine, France.[


St. Gondolfus of Tongres (545 - 599) was born in 545 in Aquitaine, France. He was the younger son of Munderic, Lord of Vitry and Arthemia of Perthois. He married Palatina of Troyes around 562 and they had a son, Bodegisel II.

As a son of Munderic, a Prince of Cologne, Gondolfus was the younger son and therefore not able to rule unless his older brother Bodegisel I (a.k.a. Bodegeisel), were to meet an untimely death. Instead Gondolfus was coronated as the Bishop of Tongres in Gaul, a very prestigious and lofty position. He died in Bourges in 599.

Gondolfus's only known son, Bodegisel II became the Governor of Aquitaine.

Gondolfus has been canonized as a Catholic Saint and has a feast day of June 17.

His name can be found spelled as "Saint Gundulphus" in many catholic references.

Gondolfus married Palatina of Troyes (b. 547 C.E.) and they had a son they named after Gondolfus' older brother, Bodegisel II "Dux" (a.k.a. Bodegeisel II) (ca. 565 C.E.- ca. 610 C.E.)

http://www.nationmaster.com/encyclopedia/St.-Gondolfus

http://www.newadvent.org/cathen/06633a.htm

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gondulphus_of_Tongeren


Saint Gondoule Governor of Marseilles, Mayor of the Palace, and Bishop of Tongres

Male, (524 - 6 July 607)

Saint Gondoule Governor of Marseilles, Mayor of the Palace, and Bishop of Tongres|b. 524\nd. 6 Jul 607|p34594.htm|Munderic of Vitry-en-Perthois|b. a 500\nd. 532|p30542.htm|Arthemia||p30543.htm|Cloderic "the Perricide" King of Cologne|d. 509|p30544.htm|a k. o. S. C.||p30545.htm|Florentinus Bishop of Geneva|d. a 513|p34598.htm|Artemia||p34599.htm|

    Saint Gondoule Governor of Marseilles, Mayor of the Palace, and Bishop of Tongres was born in 524.2,3 He was the son of Munderic of Vitry-en-Perthois and Arthemia.1,2,3 His name was also spelt "Gondolfus."1 Gondoule married unknown.2 Saint Gondoule Governor of Marseilles, Mayor of the Palace, and Bishop of Tongres served in 581 as Governor of Marseilles. He was later Mayor of the Palace to Thiebert II.2,3 He accepted holy orders in 599, and was made Bishop of Tongres.2 He died on Monday, 6 July 607 at age 83 years.2,3 

Charts

Ancestry of Edward III

Child of Saint Gondoule Governor of Marseilles, Mayor of the Palace, and Bishop of Tongres and unknown

Bodegisel II Governor of Aquitaine+ ( - 588)1,2

Citations

Stuart, Roderick W. Royalty for Commoners, The Complete Known Lineage of John of Gaunt, Son of Edward III, King of England, and Queen Philippa. Fourth Edition. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 2002.

Moriarty, G. Andrews. "The Origin of the Carolingians", The New England Historical and Genealogical Register volume XCVIII (October 1944).

Sewell Genealogy Site. Online http://www3.sympatico.ca/robert.sewell/sitemapweb.html

http://www.genealogy.theroyfamily.com/p34594.htm


Occupation: Bishop of Tongres


D: Aft. 599

General Notes

  1. Note: St. Gondolfus [son of Munderic], Bishop of Tongres, consecrated 599 (brother of Bodegeisel I). He was almost certainly father of Bodegeisel II (gen. 7), not Bodegeisel I as shown in earlier editions. [Ancestral Roots]
  2. Note: Title: Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists, 7th Edition, by Frederick Lewis Weis, additions by Walter Lee Shippard Jr., 1999
  3. Note: Page: 190-6
  4. Note: Text: probably long after 599

Gondulfus or Gondolfus (Gondulphus) is sometimes referred to as Gandalf (Gandalph)--no relationship with the wizard of Middle Earth.

Bishop Gondulfus is a somewhat enigmatic figure indeed, one is inclined to question whether he be not identical with Monulphus. But the two saints must nevertheless be distinguished. Monulphus must have occupied the See of Tongeren until the end of the sixth or the beginning of the seventh century, while a Bishop of Maastricht named Betulphus was present at the Council of Paris in 614. Gondulfus, then, would be inserted between Monulphus and Betulphus, at least if this Betulphus must not be identified with Gondulfus on the grounds that the case is analogous to that of the episcopal list of Mainz, where Bertulfus and Crotoldus must be reckoned identical. Furthermore, the episcopal lists of the eleventh and twelfth centuries, whose value is, however, not very great, ignore the historically attested Betulphus, and make Gondulfus the immediate successor of Monulphus. The biographies of Gondulfus, which are handed down to us from the Middle Ages, are merely an extract from the Vita Servatii of the priest Jocundus. They are quite without value and are full of legends. If they are to be believed, Gondulfus endeavoured to rebuild the town of Tongeren, which had been destroyed by the barbarian invasions. But heaven opposed his scheme, and miraculously manifested its desire to the saint. Furious wolves fell upon the pagan colonists of this region, and devoured them before the eyes of the horrified bishop. Thus has legend quite obscured the authentic history of St. Gondulfus, the fact of his episcopacy at Maastricht being the only one that is authentic. According to local tradition he occupied the episcopal see for seven years and died about 607. This last statement does not tally with his presence at Paris in 614, if he is to be considered identical with the Betulphus who assisted at that council. In any case he was buried in the nave of the church of Saint-Servais at Maastricht, which had been magnificently restored by his predecessor, St. Monulphus.

The bodies of Monulphus and Gondulfus were solemnly exhumed in 1039 by the Bishops Nithard of Liège and Gérard of Cambrai. An epitaph commemorating this event was afterwards misinterpreted, and gave rise to a legend according to which the two saints arose from their tomb in 1039 in order to assist at the dedication of the church of Aachen (Aix-la-Chapelle), and at the conclusion of the ceremony returned to their tomb to resume their eternal sleep.

Together with St. Monulphus, St. Gondulfus is secondary patron of the city and church of Maastricht. His feast is kept on 16 July or 17 June. The commemoration of the exhumation of 1039 is celebrated in August.

See http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gondulphus_of_Tongeren for more information.

Gondolfus is another possible father of Bodegisel II, whose father is registered in this program's tree as Bodegisel I, the other husband of Gondolfus's wife, Palatina of Troyes. Goindolfus and Bodegisel I were brothers.


Laurel Logan

Sept 7, 2008

from http://armidalesoftware.com/issue/full/Thaler_105_main.html

SAINT GONDOLFUS (Munderic5, Cloderic the Parricide of COLOGNE4, Siegbert the Lame3, Childebert2, Clovis the Riparian1), son of Munderic and Arthemia _____, was born before 599, and died between 599 and 679.

Consecrated Bishop of Tongres 599. He, not Bodegisel I, was almost certainly the father of Bodegisel II.

Child:

i. BODEGISEL II7; m. ODA.

--Laurel Logan


Suffix : Biskop av Tongres
St. Gondolfus of Tongres (545 - 599) was born in 545 in Aquitaine, France. He was the younger son to Munderic, Lord of Vitry and Arthemia of Perthois. He married Palatina of Troyes and they had a son named Borogiso II of Aquitaine.

As a son of Munderic, a Prince of Cologne, Gondolfus was the younger son and therefor not able to rule unless his older brother Borogiso I, were to meet an untimely death. Instead Gondolfus was coronated as the Bishop of Tongres in Gaul, a very prestigious and lofty position. He died in Bourges in 599.

Gondolfus's only known son, Borogiso II became the Governor of Aquitaine.

Gondolfus has been cannonized as a Catholic Saint and has a feast day of June 17th.

His name can be found spelled as "Saint Gundulphus" in many catholic references.

Biography by; Shanna Landgrave, Descendent of St. Gundulphus and Palatina of Troyes


Consecrated 599. Was Brother of Bodegeisel I. He was the father of Bodegeisel II.
http://www.our-royal-titled-noble-and-commoner-ancestors.com/p843.htm#i25318

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Saint Gondolfus, bishop of Tongres's Timeline

545
545
Aquitaine, France
599
599
Age 54
607
July 6, 607
Age 62
Arrondissement of Tongeren, Limburg, Vlaams Gewest, Belgium
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