Sir William de Baguley, Knight

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Sir William de Baguley

Also Known As: "William de Baggiley", "William de Bagalay", "Ralph de Baguley", "Ralph de Bagaly"
Birthdate:
Birthplace: Bucklow (Baguley), Cheshire, England
Death: after circa 1332
Cheadle, Stockport, Cheshire, England
Immediate Family:

Son of Ralph (Rafe) de Baguley, Sir and Roesia de Baguley
Husband of Clementia de Chedle
Father of Geoffrey de Baguley and Isabel Danyers
Brother of Hamon (V) de Baguley; Robert de Baguley and John Baguley, Knight

Occupation: Knight
Managed by: Private User
Last Updated:

About Sir William de Baguley, Knight

Sir William de Baguley (Baggiley) Coat of Arms: Incorporate the Triple Crowns and Chevron of the de Corona family with the Azure Lozenges of the de Baguley family. ____________________________________________________

◦HONOURS: Knighted. (Thomas, Golden Grove MS, book 21 p. 179)

PROPERTY: Lord of Baggiley {Baguley, Cheshire}. (Thomas, Golden Grove MS, book 21 p. 179)
PROPERTY: "Sir William Baggiley was lord of Baggiley 13 Edw. II. 1319 and John Baggiley his son made a feofment of the mannors of Baggiley in Cheshire, and of his mannors of Hyde and Leveshulme in Lancashire, unto sir John Legh of Booths, nigh Knotsford, covenanting that sir John shall settle them on the said John Baggiley and the heirs males of his body; and for default of such, then to settle the mannor of Hyde on sir John Hyde and his heirs; and to settle the mannors of Baggiley and Leveshulme upon William, John, and Geffrey, sons of the said sir John Legh, and to the heirs males of their bodies, in order one after another; the remainder to Thomas, son of Richard Massy; then to John, son of Robert Legh; then to William, son of Piers Legh; the to Robert, son of Robert Massy of Kelsall." (Ormerod, The History of the County Palatine and City of Chester, vol. 1 pt. 2 p. 550).

Sir William Baggiley's effigy is kept near the effigy of Sir Hamon de Masci VI in St. Mary the Virgin in Bowden, Chesire. http://hangingwithdeadguys.wordpress.com/2013/01/01/william-de-baggily-c-1330/

For a brief review of the effigy's relationship to Bigelows, he was Sir William, son of Ralph de Baguley, who in turn was son of Richard, lord of Baguley in 1243.

Sir William Baggiley was Lord of Baggiley 13 Edward II [1319]. He may have died before his son became Mayor of Baggiley for the first time in 1370.

"* He may not have started life with that name and it is very likely that he was a younger brother or possibly the child of Hamon IV de Massey, and assumed the name of Baggily along with the estates" as was the Norman custom of the time - http://hangingwithdeadguys.wordpress.com/tag/effigy/

In the reign of Edward II, Sir William de Baguley was made Lord of Baguley.  Sire William built Baguley Hall around 1320 and was Lord of the Manor until his death.  At the time of his death, he also owned a manor at Hyde and another at Levenshulme in Lancashire, plus an inn called The Ryle Thorn in Baguley.  His son John Biggiley, born around 1290 and died around 1356, as well as his daughter Isabel succeeded him as joint heirs of his property.  Isabel married Sir John Leigh(Legh) of Booths, a widower.  Their eldest son William inherited Baguley.  The manor remained in the Leigh (Legh) family until the late seventeenth century, when the line terminated in Edward Leigh (Legh).  He had married Elinour Tatton of Wythenshawe Hall and although they had three daughters, there was no son to succeed him.
     An effigy of Sire William is housed in Sr. Mary’s Church, Bowden Parish, Cheshrie.  Not far from the old Baguley Hall.  Originally there was a Baguley coat of arms with an orange background, however, it is understood that this coat of arms was demolished when the property of John Baguley was made over to Sir John Leigh(Legh) of Booths near Knutsford around 1353.
The third manor, that of Baguley, which formed part of the parish of Bowdon, came into the hands of the Baguley family from the Masseys certainly by the early thirteen century.  They took their name from the place.  They retained it till the year 1355 when John, the son of Sir William de Baguley, granted his manors there and at Hyde and Levenshulme to John Legh of Booths near Knutsford, who married Isabel, daughter of Sir William and sister of John.  The Baguley’s became a family of importance in the late twelfth and early centuries, being witnesses of many important charters, e.g. in Northendon and Stockport.  A charter of 1316 confirms the ownership by William de Baguley of land in Wythenshawe lying in Middle Eye near the land of William Mascy.  As we have seen in 1318, Nicholas de Eton, Lord of Stockport, granted Ruyul (perhaps near Ryle Thorn or Royal Thorn) and Alveley Hay (now Haveley Hey) to Sir William de Baguley and his heirs.  The Baggeleghs were among the wealthy lay families owning the Cheshire salt mines.  A Thomas de Baguley fought for King Edward at the battle of Poitiers and later from Knutsford pleaded for more recognition of his services.  It is probable that Sir William built the great Baguley Hall, the most important building in our area, at the period of the greatest eminence of the family in the early fourteenth century in the style of the times. (Smithhills Hall at Bolton is a close parallel) Using timber, so tradition says, from Lyme Park, with the owners of which, the Leghs, he was connected by marriage.  This hall is the earliest and most massive of the three medieval manor houses in the area.  Ormerod gives a list of the members of the Legh family who held the manor until the seventeenth century.  It finally passed into the hands of the Tattons in 1825 when all three manors for the first time came into common ownership.

Source:http://bigelowsociety.com/rod2005/baguley6.htm

An effigy of Sir William is housed in St. Mary's Church, Bowden Parish, Cheshire. Not far from the old Baguley Hall. Originally there was a Baggiley (Baguley) coat of arms vis: The losenges were asure on an orange background. It is understood that this coat of anns was demolished when the property of John Baggiley (Baguley), Baguley Hall was made over to Sir John Leigh of Booths near Knutsford around 1353.

In medieval times Bowdon had a distinguished array of tombs. Many described by Rangle Holme have vanished entirely, whilst those spared are somewhat ill at ease in their new home. The modern church was built in 1856-1860. Although dreadfully mutilated, one of the most interesting is the free stone effigy of a knight, Sir William Baguley known to be living in 1319 which after many vicissitudes again reposes in its original home in Bowdon Parish Church. Although broken away at the knees it must when complete have been a figure of extraordinary size. The knight's head rests upon a cushion, his hands clasped in prayer, holding what is evidently intended for a heart. The figure is clothed in a suit of chain mail, but has not been carved on the stone, but applied in gesso, traces of which may be seen beneath the paint, of which many coats in verying colors have been applied in the past. The chief interest in the figure is centered upon the garment worn over the mail, namely a gambeson quilted in straight folds below the waist. This garment was generally worn over a woolen shirt and beneath the suit of mail to soften the discomfort and ease the weight of the armour. The gambeson reaches to the knees, being gathered in at the waist by a broad belt from which depends a short sword lying in front of the figure towards the left side. The left arm is protected by a shield emblazoned with three lozenges, two lozenges being repeated on the upper part of the gambeson, being the arms of Baguley. The face of the effigy has entirely perished.

In 1314 before being knighted, he is mentioned at Matley by Earwaker in a transaction with his son William.

===

Sir William de BAGULEY Knight [Parents] 1, 2, 3 was born 1290 in Baguley, Cheshire, England. He died 1324/1325 in Baguley, Cheshire, England. William married Clemence de CHEDLE on 1319 in Cheadle, Cheshire, England.

Clemence de CHEDLE [Parents] 1, 2, 3 was born 1298 in Cheadle, Cheshire, England. She married Sir William de BAGULEY Knight on 1319 in Cheadle, Cheshire, England.

Other marriages:

MOLYNEUX, John de Knight

They had the following children:

  F i Isabel de BAGULEY was born 1320 and died 1370. 
  M ii Sir John de BAGULEY Knight 1 was born 1323 in Baguley, Cheshire, England. He died 1356 in Baguley, Cheshire, England. 

Sources

  1. 713 George Ormerod, The History of the County Palatine and City of Chester, Second Edition, Revised and Enlarged by Thomas Helsby, Published in 1882, London, England, by George Routledge and Sons, Volumes I-III on CD purchased from the Family History Society of Cheshire found on their website at www.fhsc.org.uk , the page numbers are given on individual webpages.
  2. 718 Compiled from Historical Documents and Family Papers and edited by George Francis Savage-Armstong, The Ancient and Noble Family of the Savages of the Ards, London, 1888, Marcus Ward & Co., found on Google Books .

Links

For a brief review of the effigy's relationship to Bigelows, he was Sir William, son of Ralph de Baguley, who in turn was son of Richard, lord of Baguley in 1243.

"* He may not have started life with that name and it is very likely that he was a younger brother or possibly the child of Hamon IV de Massey, and assumed the name of Baggily along with the estates" as was the Norman custom of the time - http://hangingwithdeadguys.wordpress.com/tag/effigy/

In the reign of Edward II, Sir William de Baguley was made Lord of Baguley.  Sire William built Baguley Hall around 1320 and was Lord of the Manor until his death.  At the time of his death, he also owned a manor at Hyde and another at Levenshulme in Lancashire, plus an inn called The Ryle Thorn in Baguley.  His son John Biggiley, born around 1290 and died around 1356, as well as his daughter Isabel succeeded him as joint heirs of his property.  Isabel married Sir John Leigh(Legh) of Booths, a widower.  Their eldest son William inherited Baguley.  The manor remained in the Leigh (Legh) family until the late seventeenth century, when the line terminated in Edward Leigh (Legh).  He had married Elinour Tatton of Wythenshawe Hall and although they had three daughters, there was no son to succeed him.
     An effigy of Sire William is housed in Sr. Mary’s Church, Bowden Parish, Cheshrie.  Not far from the old Baguley Hall.  Originally there was a Baguley coat of arms with an orange background, however, it is understood that this coat of arms was demolished when the property of John Baguley was made over to Sir John Leigh(Legh) of Booths near Knutsford around 1353.
The third manor, that of Baguley, which formed part of the parish of Bowdon, came into the hands of the Baguley family from the Masseys certainly by the early thirteen century.  They took their name from the place.  They retained it till the year 1355 when John, the son of Sir William de Baguley, granted his manors there and at Hyde and Levenshulme to John Legh of Booths near Knutsford, who married Isabel, daughter of Sir William and sister of John.  The Baguley’s became a family of importance in the late twelfth and early centuries, being witnesses of many important charters, e.g. in Northendon and Stockport.  A charter of 1316 confirms the ownership by William de Baguley of land in Wythenshawe lying in Middle Eye near the land of William Mascy.  As we have seen in 1318, Nicholas de Eton, Lord of Stockport, granted Ruyul (perhaps near Ryle Thorn or Royal Thorn) and Alveley Hay (now Haveley Hey) to Sir William de Baguley and his heirs.  The Baggeleghs were among the wealthy lay families owning the Cheshire salt mines.  A Thomas de Baguley fought for King Edward at the battle of Poitiers and later from Knutsford pleaded for more recognition of his services.  It is probable that Sir William built the great Baguley Hall, the most important building in our area, at the period of the greatest eminence of the family in the early fourteenth century in the style of the times. (Smithhills Hall at Bolton is a close parallel) Using timber, so tradition says, from Lyme Park, with the owners of which, the Leghs, he was connected by marriage.  This hall is the earliest and most massive of the three medieval manor houses in the area.  Ormerod gives a list of the members of the Legh family who held the manor until the seventeenth century.  It finally passed into the hands of the Tattons in 1825 when all three manors for the first time came into common ownership.

Source:http://bigelowsociety.com/rod2005/baguley6.htm

An effigy of Sir William is housed in St. Mary's Church, Bowden Parish, Cheshire. Not far from the old Baguley Hall. Originally there was a Baggiley (Baguley) coat of arms vis: The losenges were asure on an orange background. It is understood that this coat of anns was demolished when the property of John Baggiley (Baguley), Baguley Hall was made over to Sir John Leigh of Booths near Knutsford around 1353.

In medieval times Bowdon had a distinguished array of tombs. Many described by Rangle Holme have vanished entirely, whilst those spared are somewhat ill at ease in their new home. The modern church was built in 1856-1860. Although dreadfully mutilated, one of the most interesting is the free stone effigy of a knight, Sir William Baguley known to be living in 1319 which after many vicissitudes again reposes in its original home in Bowdon Parish Church. Although broken away at the knees it must when complete have been a figure of extraordinary size. The knight's head rests upon a cushion, his hands clasped in prayer, holding what is evidently intended for a heart. The figure is clothed in a suit of chain mail, but has not been carved on the stone, but applied in gesso, traces of which may be seen beneath the paint, of which many coats in verying colors have been applied in the past. The chief interest in the figure is centered upon the garment worn over the mail, namely a gambeson quilted in straight folds below the waist. This garment was generally worn over a woolen shirt and beneath the suit of mail to soften the discomfort and ease the weight of the armour. The gambeson reaches to the knees, being gathered in at the waist by a broad belt from which depends a short sword lying in front of the figure towards the left side. The left arm is protected by a shield emblazoned with three lozenges, two lozenges being repeated on the upper part of the gambeson, being the arms of Baguley. The face of the effigy has entirely perished.

In 1314 before being knighted, he is mentioned at Matley by Earwaker in a transaction with his son William.

===

Sir William de BAGULEY Knight [Parents] 1, 2, 3 was born 1290 in Baguley, Cheshire, England. He died 1324/1325 in Baguley, Cheshire, England. William married Clemence de CHEDLE on 1319 in Cheadle, Cheshire, England.

Clemence de CHEDLE [Parents] 1, 2, 3 was born 1298 in Cheadle, Cheshire, England. She married Sir William de BAGULEY Knight on 1319 in Cheadle, Cheshire, England.

Other marriages:

MOLYNEUX, John de Knight

They had the following children:

  F i Isabel de BAGULEY was born 1320 and died 1370. 
  M ii Sir John de BAGULEY Knight 1 was born 1323 in Baguley, Cheshire, England. He died 1356 in Baguley, Cheshire, England. 

Sources

  1. 713 George Ormerod, The History of the County Palatine and City of Chester, Second Edition, Revised and Enlarged by Thomas Helsby, Published in 1882, London, England, by George Routledge and Sons, Volumes I-III on CD purchased from the Family History Society of Cheshire found on their website at www.fhsc.org.uk , the page numbers are given on individual webpages.
  2. 718 Compiled from Historical Documents and Family Papers and edited by George Francis Savage-Armstong, The Ancient and Noble Family of the Savages of the Ards, London, 1888, Marcus Ward & Co., found on Google Books .

Links

About 100 years later there is a record of the village of Clifton being given to Galfrid or Geoffrey of Dutton, a son of the then Lord of Dutton, by John the Baron and Constable of Chester.In due course this branch of the Dutton family lapsed and the two daughters of Sir Roger de Cheadle were the co-heirs. The elder daughter named Clemence chose Clifton as part of her share of the estate and later married Raufe de Baggiley. Their daughter Isobel married Sir Thomas Danyers of Bradley and Appleton who greatly distinguished himself at the battle of Cressy in 1346 by rescuing the Royal Standard of the Black Prince and also capturing the Chamberlain of France. For this service the Black Prince granted him an annuity charged on his Royal Manor of Frodsham.


A William de Baggiley is listed as mayor of Stockport (Stokeport) serving 1370 and again in 1372 and again in 1383-1384.

Source: John Parson Earwaker's "East Chesire: A History of the One Hundred of Macclesfield" Page: 346. Image uploaded. ______________________________________________________________________________________ From Harleian Ms. 2151 fol. 33 In Bowden church Cheshire in the body of the church on the South side, this monument cut in freestone for Sir william de Baguley, Knt. A warrior in mail, with surcoat. The surcoat and shield emblazoned with the arms of Baguley.

In the head of the South aisle in old glass very ancient this coat: Or, three lozenges Azur: Bagulegh (gold shield, with 3 diamond shapes in blue and word "Baguley"I The above memorial, not now existing, with the monument, are described in a volume of church notes taken in the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries. (In 1873, Mr. Abraham O.Bigelow of Boston visited Baguley and saw the monument which had recently been discovered, after having been lost sight of for several years, and brought to Baguley Hall. --A.A. Bigelow]

Sir William Baggiley was Lord of Baggiley 13 Edward II [1319], and John Baggiley his son made a foofment of the manor of Baggiley in Cheshire, and of his manors of Hyde and Leveshulme in Lancashire unto Sir John Legh of Boothes near Knutsford, covenanting that Sir John shall settle them on the said John Baggiley and the heirs male of his body, and for default of such, then to settle the manor of Hyde on Sir John Hyde and his heirs, and to settle the manors of Baggiley and Leveshulme upon William, John, and Geoffrey, sons of the said Sir John Legh, and to the heirs male of their bodies in order one after another, the remainder to Thomas, son of Richard Massy; then to John, son of Robert Legh, then to William, son of Piers Legh, then to Robert, son to Robert Massy of Kelshall.

The original, now in French, now remaining with Edward Legh of Baggiley, esquire, 1666, a fair seal with Sir John Legh's coat-of-arms, viz. a bend over two bars; the other seal is demolished, to wit: Baggiley's coat: three lozenges with a bear's head for the crest.

There is no date put to the deed, but Sir John Legh did settle them accordingly, with the services of all the freeholders in Baggiley, to wit: Richard son of William, Richard Hod, Robert son of William, and Hamon son of Edwin the Wise, dated Anno Domini 1353, 28 Edw. III. John Baggiley died about 1356. Sir John Legh of Boothes near Knutsford married for his second wife Isabel, daughter of Sir William Baggiley and sister and co-heir of John Baggiley of Baggiley.


Sir John's first wife was named Agnes; Norris D. (B.M.), n. 494, dated 1314. His second wife was Clemency, daughter and co-heir of Roger de Cheadle, and widow of William de Baguley; Earwaker, East Ches. i, 170; Staff. Hist. Coll. (Salt Soc.), xvi, 5, 6, from a Chest. Plea Roll of 1336; Geneal. (New Ser.), xiii, 102; xii, 111, 112, where is an error in the descent. Richard son of Sir John de Molyneux and Isabel his wife were defendants in a plea of 1342; Assize R. 1435, m. 47 d. He was witness to a charter in 1341, and in the following year had a grant of lands from Roger son of Adam son of William de Crosby, his father (Sir John) being a witness; Blundell of Crosby D. K. 127, 259. Five years later he was plaintiff in a case of trespass; De Banc. R. 352, m. 311 d.

Source: http://www.british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=41297

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Sir William de Baguley, Knight's Timeline

1285
1285
Bucklow (Baguley), Cheshire, England
1300
1300
1324
1324
Baguley, Cheshire, , England
1332
1332
Age 47
Cheadle, Stockport, Cheshire, England
1384
1384
Age 47