Sojourner Truth

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Sojourner Truth

Also Known As: "Isabella Baumfree", "Isabella Bomfree", "Bell", "Belle", "Sojourner Truth"
Birthdate:
Birthplace: Hardenbergh Estate, Swartekill (Esopus), Ulster County, New York, United States
Death: November 26, 1883 (82-86)
at her home on College Street, Battle Creek, Calhoun County, Michigan, United States ("Old Age" (natural) "Ulcerated Legs" (this per History Channel-see citation))
Place of Burial: Battle Creek, Calhoun County, Michigan, United States
Immediate Family:

Daughter of James Baumfree and Elizabeth Baumfree
Wife of Thomas NN
Partner of Robert (father of Diana)
Mother of Sophia Schuyler; James; Peter; Elizabeth M Boyd and Diana Corbin
Sister of Up To 4 Other Children; Michael; Sophia; Nancy; Hannah and 4 others

Occupation: Abolitionist, Public Lecturer, Women`s Rights Activist, Songwritter
Managed by: Private User
Last Updated:
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Immediate Family

About Sojourner Truth

Sojourner Truth (/soʊˈdʒɜːrnər truːθ/; born Isabella "Belle" Baumfree; c. 1797 – November 26, 1883) was an American abolitionist and women's rights activist. Truth was born into slavery in Swartekill, New York, but escaped with her infant daughter to freedom in 1826. After going to court to recover her son in 1828, she became the first black woman to win such a case against a white man.

She gave herself the name Sojourner Truth in 1843 after she became convinced that God had called her to leave the city and go into the countryside "testifying the hope that was in her".[1] Her best-known speech was delivered extemporaneously, in 1851, at the Ohio Women's Rights Convention in Akron, Ohio. The speech became widely known during the Civil War by the title "Ain't I a Woman?", a variation of the original speech re-written by someone else using a stereotypical Southern dialect, whereas Sojourner Truth was from New York and grew up speaking Dutch as her first language. During the Civil War, Truth helped recruit black troops for the Union Army; after the war, she tried unsuccessfully to secure land grants from the federal government for formerly enslaved people (summarized as the promise of "forty acres and a mule"). She continued to fight on behalf of women and African Americans until her death. As her biographer Nell Irvin Painter wrote, "At a time when most Americans thought of slaves as male and women as white, Truth embodied a fact that still bears repeating: Among the blacks are women; among the women, there are blacks."[2]

A memorial bust of Truth was unveiled in 2009 in Emancipation Hall in the U.S. Capitol Visitor's Center. She is the first African American woman to have a statue in the Capitol building.[3] In 2014, Truth was included in Smithsonian magazine's list of the "100 Most Significant Americans of All Time".[4]

Source and additional information - https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sojourner_Truth


Isabella

her given name at birth

Sojourner Truth

she later changed her given name from Isabella, to Sojourner and added Truth as her surname (being born into slavery, a surname was something she never had)

a.k.a. Belle, Isabella Baumfree or Bomfree or Boumfree, and Bomefree, Isabella Van Wagenen

Facts: born to enslaved parents, her father James (also known as Baumfree, Bomfree, Boumfree and Bomefree) note:"Bomefree" is a low dutch word translating to Tree. James, her father, being described as a man of tall stature, lends credit to Sojourner being cited as standing at nearly six feet tall. and her mother Elizabeth (also know as Betsy, Mau-mau-Bett)

Sojourner Truth (/soʊˈdʒɜrnər ˈtruːθ/; c. 1797 – November 26, 1883) was an African-American abolitionist and women's rights activist. Truth was born into slavery in Swartekill, Ulster County, New York, but escaped with her infant daughter Sophia to freedom in 1826. After going to court to recover her son Peter, she became the first black woman to win such a case against a white man. Sojourner Truth was named Isabella Baumfree when she was born. She gave herself the name Sojourner Truth in 1843. Her best-known extemporaneous speech on gender inequalities, "Ain't I a Woman?", was delivered in 1851 at the Ohio Women's Rights Convention in Akron, Ohio. During the Civil War, Truth helped recruit black troops for the Union Army; after the war, she tried unsuccessfully to secure land grants from the federal government for former slaves.

from: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sojourner_Truth

Advocate for Christianity, Humanity and Womens Suffrage

Did you know, Sojourner could neither read nor write! Sojourner is often cited as having "Preached The Holy Word" during her public speaking engagements? At the time moment she walked, not run, away from her slave master, Sojourner described her vision from GOD. Born Isabella, she believed GOD told her to change her given name (year 1843) to Sojourner, (later she added the surname Truth, being that GOD always tells the truth, so she was convicted to tell the truth.)

Her journey leads her to a remarkable life work campaigning for Womens rights, Black American rights, Human rights, being an ever mindful Witness of Testimony to her Faith in GOD Sojourner preached, with conviction, (despite no formal training or education in public speaking or theology) at her public speaking engagements. We know this, as we read about these engagements, covered by the press of that day and age.

Sojourner`s last recorded uttered words, before her death were;  "Be a Follower of The LORD JESUS"

Though no one has ever credited her for being the first American female Evangelist, it is quite possible she was. Sojourner was a Faithful "Doer and not just Hearer of The Word" This commentaries facts, are easily found within the links below and through further reading of her life through many written articles about her. [http://www.uh.edu/engines/epi517.htm] [http://digital.library.upenn.edu/women/truth/1850/1850.html#19]


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Sojourner Truth's Timeline

1797
1797
Swartekill (Esopus), Ulster County, New York, United States
1813
1813
New York, United States
1821
1821
1821
New York, United States
1825
1825
New York, United States
1883
November 26, 1883
Age 86
Battle Creek, Calhoun County, Michigan, United States
November 26, 1883
Age 86
Battle Creek, Calhoun County, Michigan, United States
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