William Rutherford

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About William Rutherford

http://freepages.genealogy.rootsweb.ancestry.com/~rutherford/rutherfords_of_hunthill.htm

Generation 8
--------8. Andrew Rutherford or William Rutherford of Nether Nisbet



  • The Dictionary of national Biography believed the Presbyterian leader Samuel Rutherford
    • came from a Hunthill branch and noted that his secretary said
    • 'he was a gentleman by extraction' and used the Hunthill coat of arms.
    • He was born at Nisbet in Crailing where his father was a farmer or miller.
  • (Fasti ecclesiae Scoticanae, new edn. (1915- ) VII)

Tait
    • thought he was the son of either Andrew Rutherford in Nether Nisbet or William Rutherford there,
    • both involved in a feud in 1596.
    • (The Rutherfurds of that Ilk and their cadets (18841903), in parts: H - T. Cockburn-Hood; C - C.H.E. Carmichael; T - J. Tait; M - Miscellaneous contributions pp. 82, 107).
  • 

Andrew Rutherford, a persistent Border reiver.
    • In the Warden's court at Alnwick in 1586 Thomas Carr of Felton said he took 4 oxen about midsummer 1585.
      • (Calendar of State papers relating to Scotland and Mary, Queen of Scots 1547-1603, 13 vols. (1898-1969) VIII, 322).
    • Other cases concerned stealing 28 oxen in Oct. 1587.
      • (Calendar of letters and papers relating to the Borders of England and Scotland, 2 vols. (1894-5) I, 357)

    • Andrew Rutherford joined his brother George Rutherford in taking 14 oxen from Little Houghton in Sept. 1589.
      • (Calendar of letters and papers relating to the Borders of England and Scotland, 2 vols. (1894-5) I, 363; Calendar of State papers relating to Scotland and Mary, Queen of Scots 1547-1603, 13 vols. (1898-1969) X, 153),
    • 

Andrew Rutherford was with his father and brother Richard raiding Horsley in 1590.
      • (Calendar of letters and papers relating to the Borders of England and Scotland, 2 vols. (1894-5) I, 365).


    • As William's son and the Cock's tenant Andrew Rutherford was filed in a bill of Sir Henry Woodrington and to be charged by the Council in July 1590, and he was Hunthill's surety in Sept. 1591.
      • (Register of the Privy Council of Scotland 1545-1691, 38 vols. in 3 series (1877).

Kenneth Rutherford Davis quotes Tait in his book "The Rutherfords in Britain - a history and guide" that William or his brother Andrew was Samuel Rutherford's father.
      • Below I've recorded Samuel, George and James as the sons of William and/or Andrew Rutherford.

 :


  • 9. Dr. Rev. Samuel Rutherford

    • "Father of the Presbyterian Church"
    • 
b. 1600 in Nether Nisbet, Roxburghshire

    • d. 3/29/1661 in Edinburgh, Scotland
    • 
m. [1] Euphemia Hamilton -
      • 3 children

    • m. [2] Jane McMath -
      • 6 children


  • 9. Rev. George Rutherford

    • d. 1678 at Barbados, West Indies [unproven]
 minister of Tongaland and Balnacross, Kirkcudsbright, Scotland
    • 
M.A. Edinburgh University in 1622 - schoolmaster in Kirkcudsbright in 1629
  • 9. Captain James Rutherford [see below]
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http://familytreemaker.genealogy.com/users/b/r/a/Charles-J-Branham-WA/WEBSITE-0001/UHP-0169.html

William O Rutherford (b. 1574, d. 1631)

  • William O Rutherford
    • (son of John Rutherford and Maggie Davidson)220, [220] was
    • born 1574 in Nether Nisbit220, [220], and
    • died 1631220, [220].
  • He married (1) Unknown Unknown.
  • He married (3) Isobel Davidson.
  • Children of William O Rutherford and Unknown Unknown are:
    • i. +Samuel James Rutherford,
      • b. 1600, Nisbet Farm, Roxburgh, Crailing [220, 220, ]
      • d. 20-May-1661 [220, 220].
    • Children of William O Rutherford are:
      • i. James Rutherford, b. 1605, Nisbit [220], d. 1630 [220].
      • ii. George Rutherford, b., Nesbit, Roxburgh [220], d. 1678 [220].
      • iii. James Rutherford, b. 1635 [220], d. 1660 [220].

Source for [220]. OneWorldTreeSM.

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http://www.hunthill.4t.com/blank_1.html Generation 8


8. Andrew Rutherford and/or William Rutherford of Nether Nisbet

The Dictionary of national Biography believed the Presbyterian leader Samuel Rutherford came from a Hunthill branch and noted that his secretary said 'he was a gentleman by extraction' and used the Hunthill arms. He was born at Nisbet in Crailing where his father was a farmer or miller (Fas VII); Tait thought he was the son of either ANDREW in Nether Nisbet or WILLIAM there, both involved in a feud in 1596 (IlkT 44; see pp. 82, 107).


8. ANDREW, a persistent Border reiver. In the Warden's court at Alnwick in 1586 Thomas Carr of Felton said he took 4 oxen about midsummer 1585 (CSM VIII, 322). Other cases concerned stealing 28 oxen in Oct. 1587 (CBP I, 357), joining his brother George in taking 14 oxen from Little Houghton in Sept. 1589 (Ib I, 363; CSM X, 153), and with his father and brother Richard raiding Horsley in 1590 (CBP I, 365). As William's son and the Cock's tenant he was filed in a bill of Sir Henry Woodrington and to be charged by the Council in July 1590, and he was Hunthill's surety in Sept. 1591 (PC). 

Sir Henry Woodrington [aka Widdrington] was a colorful character, from a family deeply involved in the centuries-old feuds and reiving of the Scottish Borders. He figures prominently in the Calendar of Border Papers for 1595-1603. He must have been born in about 1570, and was knighted in 1597. His father, also Sir Henry, had been Marshall of Berwick, but died in 1593; his mother remarried, to Sir Robert Carey, the same year. Carey's own father was Lord Hunsdon, who had been Warden of the East March from 1568 until his death in 1596. Henry Woodrington fell out with Lord Ralph Eure, Warden of the Middle March from 1595, and made accusations of malpractice and inefficiency against him that led to Eure's resignation in 1598. 

Lord Eure was succeeded as Warden of the Middle March by Sir Robert Carey, who appointed Henry Woodrington and William Fenwick as his deputies. Carey had married Woodrington's mother, and evidently considered him trustworthy. His trust seems to have been justified. However, the Borders were a violent region, and operated under their own laws. Henry's career as Deputy Warden was quite eventful. For example, in August 1598, Carey sent Woodrington and Fenwick to ride against a Scottish raiding party that was hunting in Redesdale. They pursued them back into Scotland, and in the chase some of the English took the opportunity to pursue private quarrels. Several of the Scots were killed - not an unusual event, but against the law: the pursuit was supposed to stop at the border. The Scots protested vehemently to the English, claiming that Woodrington and Fenwick had ordered the killings. In November, the Privy Council ordered Carey to send Woodrington and Fenwick to Durham, to await trial as prisoners of the Bishop of Durham. Carey complied, but complained bitterly in letters to Sir Robert Cecil that he could not maintain order in the Middle March without his Deputies. The Bishop of Durham, too, seems to have been impressed by Woodrington and Fenwick, and wrote several times to Cecil requesting their release. In December he wrote that their offences had been exaggerated and that "they are men of greater worth than any neighbours they have". In February he wrote of "my guests, or rather (as the world esteems them) my prisoners". Woodrington and Fenwick were eventually released in April, with Fenwick by then very ill from his captivity. 

The Warden of the Middle March on the Scottish side was Sir Robert Kerr, a wily character and a considerable thorn in Carey's side. At one point, Kerr challenged Woodrington to a duel. Woodrington had written to Kerr, complaining that Kerr had lied about him. In reply, Kerr wrote that "I shall on Friday morning next, being the 7th September [1599], God willing, be at the Hayr Crags on the March between England and Scotland by eight hours in the morning, with a short sword and a whyniard, with a plate bonnet and plate sleeves, without any more weapons offensive or defensive; where I wish some spark of courage may make thee appear in the same form." As Lord Willoughby, the governor of Berwick, described the affair on 8 September, "Sir Robert was at the place appointed; the other came not." Sir Henry can hardly be blamed; he was only trying to clear his name of slander, and it was none of his business to enter into blood feud with Kerr. 

Judging from the evidence on p. 134 he was probably father of: 


9. JOHN of thc Townhead, Provost of Jed. 

Only in a city would the provost have been called "Lord Provost", and until recent times, automatically received a knighthood at the end of his term of office.


8. WILLIAM also at the pistol fight in 1601.  William Rutherford of Nether Nisbet b. 1574 at Nether Nisbet, Scotland Kenneth Rutherford Davis quotes Tait in his book "The Rutherfords in Britain - a history and guide" that William or his brother Andrew was Samuel Rutherford's father. Below I've recorded Samuel, George and James as the sons of William and/or Andrew Rutherford.

Whichever it was fathered: 


9. Rev. Samuel Rutherford


9. Rev. George Rutherford
9. Captain James Rutherford

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William Rutherford's Timeline

1574
1574
Nesbit Farm, Roxburghshire, Scotland
1600
1600
Age 26
Village of Nesbit, Roxburgh, Scotland
1605
1605
Age 31
Nisbet Farm, Roxburgh, Scotland
1636
1636
Age 62
????