William de Braose II, 3rd Lord of Bramber

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William de Braose, II

Birthdate:
Birthplace: Bramber, Sussex, England
Death: between circa 1179 and 1196 (50-101)
Weoley Castle, Herefordshire, England (United Kingdom)
Place of Burial: Unknown
Immediate Family:

Son of Philip de Braose, 2nd Lord of Bramber and Aenor Eva de Totenais
Husband of Bertha de Hereford
Father of William III de Braose, 4th Lord of Bramber; Sybil de Braose; Reynold (Reginald) de Braose and Bertha de Beauchamp
Brother of Philip de Braose, II; Robert de Braose; Basilia de Braose; Gillian de Braose and Maud Matilda de Braose

Occupation: Sheriff of Hereford, BARON OF GROENTLAND (1ST), 5th Baron de Braose, Sheriff of Hertford 1173 - 1175, Sheriff of Hereford in 1174., 1st Baron of Gwentland, Sheriff Of Hereford, 3rd Lord of Bramber, Sheriff of Herefordshire, Third Baron Braose
Managed by: James Fred Patin, Jr.
Last Updated:

About William de Braose II, 3rd Lord of Bramber

Birth and death dates highly conjectural. He was certainly the eldest son and heir.

http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/ENGLISHNOBILITYMEDIEVAL3.htm

WILLIAM [II] de Briouse, son of PHILIPPE de Briouse & his wife Eleanor de Barnstaple (before 5 Jan [1096]-after [1175]).

  • The most difficult question relating to William [II] de Briouse is whether he in fact represents one person or two persons, father and son. If the charter dated to [1096] is correctly dated, his life was improbably long if he was one person. In addition, the 1157 Pipe Roll lists William among "Nova Placita et Novæ Conventiones" for the honour of Barnstaple, which suggests that the William in question had recently inherited his property rights, presumably from his father as the death of his supposed grandfather Philippe is dated to [1131/39]. This looks straightforward until we consider the charter dated [1140], which clarifies that Berthe of Gloucester was the wife of William, son of Philippe de Briouse, which appears to exclude their being two individuals named William.
  • "Philippus de Brausia" confirmed the donations to the church of Saints Gervais et Protais de Briouze, by "pater eius Guillemus de Brausia", before leaving for Jerusalem, by charter dated 5 Jan [1096], with the consent of "uxor eius Aanor et Guillelmus filius suus"[1159].
  • "Willielmus de Braiosa" confirmed the donations to the church of Saints Gervais et Protais de Briouze by "Philippus de Braiosa pater eiusdem Willielmi", by undated charter, witnessed by "Bertam conjugem meam, Philippum fratrem meum"[1160].
  • "Willelmus de Braiosa, Philippi filius" notified "filio suo" that he had donated "Armigetone mansionem" to the monks of Saint-Florent by charter dated to [1140], witnessed by "Robertus frater meus…", later confirmed by "Willelmus dominus de Braiosa filius Philippi, avi mei filii Willelmi" witnessed by "Bertam conjugem meam, Philippum fratrem meum…"[1161].
  • A charter dated [1154] records that "Willelmus de Braiosa et Willelmus de Harecourt" donated the church of Sumtinges to the Templars[1162].
  • This joint donation suggests a family relationship between the donors, but this has not yet been traced.
  • The 1157 Pipe Roll records "Will´s de Braiosa" owing 1000 marks for "parte sua de honore de Barnestapl" in "Nova Placita et Novæ Conventiones"[1163].
  • The 1157 Pipe Roll records "Will. de Braiosa" in Herefordshire[1164].
  • Military fee certifications in the Red Book of the Exchequer, in 1166, record the knights´ fees held from "Willelmi de Brahosa de honore de Berdestaple" in Devon[1165].
  • The Red Book of the Exchequer refers to "Willelmus de Breose xxviii m" in Devonshire in [1167/68][1166].
  • The Red Book of the Exchequer records enfeoffments in the duchy of Normandy in [1172], "Willemus de Braiosa" with three knights "de Braiosa"[1167].
  • He was Lord of Abergavenny and Brecon from [1173] by grant of his brother-in-law Mahel FitzMiles[1168].
  • The Annales Cambriæ record that "Willielmo de Breusa" killed "Seisil filius Dinawal et Gefrei filius eius…in Abergavenni" in 1175[1169].
  • “Willielmus de Braosa” confirmed donations to Abergavenny Priory by “Hamelinus de Balon et Brientius comitis filius et Walterus de Herefort et Henricus de Herefort” by undated charter, witnessed by “Rogero fratre meo…”[1170].

m (before [1140]) BERTHA, daughter of MILES of Gloucester Earl of Hereford & his wife Sibylle de Neufmarché.

  • The Historia fundationis cum fundatoris genealogia of the priory of Abergavenny names “Margaretam, Bertam et Luciam” as the three daughters of “Milonem” & his wife, adding that Berthe married “Philippo de Brusa domino de Duelth“ (naming their descendants) and inherited “tota terra Breconiæ, Wenciæ superioris et Gower”[1171].
  • A manuscript narrating the history of Brecknock priory records that “Berte” married “Willame de Brewes”, and also lists her descendants[1172].
  • "Willielmus de Braiosa" confirmed the donations to the church of Saints Gervais et Protais de Briouze by "Philippus de Braiosa pater eiusdem Willielmi", by undated charter, witnessed by "Bertam conjugem meam, Philippum fratrem meum"[1173].
  • "Willelmus de Braiosa, Philippi filius" notified "filio suo" that he had donated "Armigetone mansionem" to the monks of Saint-Florent by charter dated to [1140], witnessed by "Robertus frater meus…", later confirmed by "Willelmus dominus de Braiosa filius Philippi, avi mei filii Willelmi" witnessed by "Bertam conjugem meam, Philippum fratrem meum…"[1174].

William & his wife had [five] children:

1. WILLIAM [III] de Briouse (-Corbeil 9 Apr 1211, bur Paris, Saint-Victor). A manuscript which narrates the descents of the founders of Lanthony Abbey names “Willielmus, Egidius et Reginaldus” as the three sons of “Willelmo Brewes” and his wife “Berta…comitis Milonis secunda filia”, adding that William was disinherited by King John[1175].

2. [BERTHA de Briouse . According to Domesday Descendants, the wife of William [I] de Beauchamp was "Bertha, daughter of William II de Braose"[1176]. The primary source which confirms her parentage and marriage has not yet been identified but, if it is correct, the chronology of her husband´s family suggests that she must have been one of her parents´ older children. The introduction to the Beauchamp Cartulary states that "according to an early 14th century inquest, he married Berta, a daughter of the marcher lord William de Braose c. 1140 and received with her lands in three villages in south Gloucestershire", but noting that the jurors incorrectly states that Bertha was the wife of the great-grandfather of Guy Earl of Warwick who would have been William [II] de Beauchamp[1177]. m WILLIAM [I] de Beauchamp, son of WALTER [I] de Beauchamp & his wife [Emmeline] de Abitot (-1170).]

3. GILES de Briouse (-Gloucester 13 Nov 1215, bur Hereford Cathedral). A manuscript which narrates the descents of the founders of Lanthony Abbey names “Willielmus, Egidius et Reginaldus” as the three sons of “Willelmo Brewes” and his wife “Berta…comitis Milonis secunda filia”, adding that Giles was Bishop of Hereford[1178]. Giles de Briouse is sometimes shown in secondary sources as the son of William [III] de Briouse and his wife Mathilde. The primary source on which this is based has not yet been identified. Presumably some such source exists, but, unless it is unequivocal, the probability is that we will be left with two contradictory sources and little information on which to resolve the difference between them. One difficulty is that there are few definite indications of the chronology of this family: from what little is known, it appears that, from a chronological point of view only, the father of Giles could either have been William [II] or William [III]. Bishop of Hereford 1200. The Annals of Dunstable record that “Ægidius Herefordensis episcopus” died in 1216[1179].

4. REYNOLD de Briouse . A manuscript which narrates the descents of the founders of Lanthony Abbey names “Willielmus, Egidius et Reginaldus” as the three sons of “Willelmo Brewes” and his wife “Berta…comitis Milonis secunda filia”, adding that William was disinherited by King John[1180]. This document suggests that Reynold, son of William [II] de Briouse, was a different person from Reynold, son of William [III] de Briouse (see below), but this hypothesis has not been confirmed by any primary source.

5. [SIBYL (-after 5 Feb 1228). “Willielmus comes de Ferrariis” donated property to Tutbury Priory, for the soul of “uxoris meæ Sibillæ et liberorum meorum”, by charter which names “antecessores mei…Henricus de Ferrariis et Engenulphus et Robertus avus meus et Robertus comes pater meus”[1181]. “Robertus [mistake for Willielmus] comes de Ferrariis” donated property to Dore Abbey, for the souls of “Sibilla de Braosa, uxoris meæ matris W. filii mei et sua, et…Bertæ (fuit filia Milonis comitis Herefordiæ) matris uxoris meæ”, by undated charter[1182]. However, the Complete Peerage states that this charter is considered to be a fabrication, and that there is no other proof of the parentage of William´s wife[1183]. m firstly WILLIAM de Ferrers Earl [of Derby], son of ROBERT de Ferrers Earl [of Derby] & his wife Margaret [Peverel] (-killed in battle Acre 1190 before 21 Oct). m secondly as his second wife, ADAM de Port, son ofJOHN de Port & his wife Maud --- ([1150/55]-[26 Jun/28 Jul] 1213).]

Sources

  • [1159] Saint-Florent Saumur (Chartes normandes), 20, p. 688.
  • [1160] Saint-Florent Saumur (Chartes normandes), 20 bis, p. 689.
  • [1161] Saint-Florent Saumur (Chartes normandes), 23, p. 692.
  • [1162] Actes Henri II, Tome I, LXXXIV, p. 89.
  • [1163] Pipe Roll 4 Hen II (1157), Herefordshire, p. 183.
  • [1164] Pipe Roll 4 Hen II (1157), Herefordshire, p. 144.
  • [1165] Red Book Exchequer, Part I, Certificationes factæ de feodis militum, p. 258.
  • [1166] Red Book Exchequer, Part I, Knights fees, p. 42.
  • [1167] Red Book Exchequer, Part II, Infeudationes militum…duci Normanniæ…1172, p. 631.
  • [1168] Domesday Descendants, p. 346.
  • [1169] Williams ab Ithel, J. (ed.) (1860) Annales Cambriæ (London), p. 54.
  • [1170] Dugdale Monasticon IV, Priory of Bergavenny or Abergavenny in Monmouthshire, III, p. 616.
  • [1171] Dugdale Monasticon IV, Priory of Bergavenny or Abergavenny in Monmouthshire, Cartæ I, p. 615.
  • [1172] Dugdale Monasticon III, Brecknock Priory I, Quædam de Loco, et Dominis eius Historica, p. 264.
  • [1173] Saint-Florent Saumur (Chartes normandes), 20 bis, p. 689.
  • [1174] Saint-Florent Saumur (Chartes normandes), 23, p. 692.
  • [1175] Dugdale Monasticon VI, Lanthony Abbey, Gloucestershire, II, Fundatorum progenies, p. 134.
  • [1176] Domesday Descendants, p. 315.
  • [1177] Beauchamp Cartulary, Introduction, p. xxii, footnote 7, citing Calendar of Inquisitions Miscellaneous, Vol. I, 1971 (not yet consulted).
  • [1178] Dugdale Monasticon VI, Lanthony Abbey, Gloucestershire, II, Fundatorum progenies, p. 134.
  • [1179] Annales de Dunstaplia, p. 52.
  • [1180] Dugdale Monasticon VI, Lanthony Abbey, Gloucestershire, II, Fundatorum progenies, p. 134.
  • [1181] Dugdale Monasticon, Vol. III, Tutbury Priory, IV, p. 393.
  • [1182] Dugdale Monasticon, Vol. V, Dore Abbey, Herefordshire, I, p. 553.
  • [1183] CP XIV 250.

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William de Braose, 3rd Lord of Bramber

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/William_de_Braose,_3rd_Lord_of_Bramber

William de Braose, 3rd Lord of Bramber (fl. 1135–1179) was a 12th-century Marcher lord who secured a foundation for the dominant position later held by the Braose family in the Welsh Marches. In addition to the family's English holdings in Sussex and Devon, William had inherited Radnor and Builth, in Wales, from his father Philip. By his marriage he increased the Braose Welsh holdings to include Brecon and Abergavenny.

William remained loyal to King Stephen during the 12th century period of anarchy. He became a trusted royal servant during the subsequent reign of Henry II, accompanying the king on campaigns in France and Ireland. He served as sheriff of Herefordshire from 1173 until 1175. The family's power reached its peak under his son William during the reigns of King Richard I and King John.

Lands and family

William was the eldest son of Philip de Braose, lord of Bramber.[1] His mother was Aenor, daughter of Juhel of Totnes.[1] He was the third in the line of the Anglo-Norman Braose family founded by his grandfather, the first William de Braose.[1] After his father died in the 1130s William inherited lordships, land and castles in Sussex, with his caput at Bramber. He also held Totnes in Devon and Radnor and Builth in the Welsh Marches.[2] He confirmed the grants of his father and grandfather to the abbey of St Florent in Anjou and made further grants to the abbey's dependent priory at Sele in Sussex.[3] In about 1155, he also inherited through his mother's family one half of the honour of Barnstaple in Devon, paying a fee of 1000 marks for the privilege.[2] William became an internationally recognised figure. When Archbishop Theobald of Canterbury was asked by Pope Adrian IV to inquire into the background of a certain Walter, canon of St Ruf, his reply, dated to 1154/9 read:

The facts which you demand need but little enquiry; for they shine so brightly in themselves that they cannot be hid; so great is the brilliance of his noble birth and the glory of all his kin. For Walter, as we know for a fact, was the son of a distinguished knight and born of a noble mother in lawful wedlock, and he is closely related by blood to the noble William de Braose.[4]

William had married Bertha, daughter of Miles of Gloucester and Sibyl de Neufmarché, by 1150.[1] When each of Bertha's four brothers died leaving no issue, William's marriage became unexpectedly valuable. He gained control of the lordships of Brecon and Abergavenny after 1166 when the last brother died.[1] These additional land holdings greatly expanded the territorial power and income of the Braose family. They now held a vast block of territory in the Welsh Marches as well as their extensive interests in Sussex and Devon. William's daughters were able to make good marriages, notably Sibyl to William de Ferrers, Earl of Derby.[5] Maud was married to John de Brompton of Shropshire.[6] William's son and heir, another William de Braose, became a major player in national politics under King John.[7]

Royal service

Empress Maud, the only legitimate living child of Henry I, landed in England in 1139 in an attempt to press her claim to the monarchy. She was soon besieged by King Stephen's forces at Arundel castle. Stephen allowed Maud a safe conduct to Bristol and provided her with an escort, which included William de Braose,[8] suggesting that he was an adherent of King Stephen. William was present as a witness when three charters were issued by Stephen at Lewes dated to the years 1148–53,[9] therefore it appears that he remained loyal to the king until the Treaty of Wallingford ended the hostilities.

William was in Sussex in 1153,[nb 1] but he followed Duke Henry, soon to become King Henry II, to Normandy in 1154.[nb 2] William was frequently with the new king. He was one of the military leaders who supported Henry at Rhuddlan in 1157.[12] He witnessed one of the king's charters at Romsey in 1158,[13] and he is recorded at the king's court in Wiltshire in 1164 when the Constitutions of Clarendon were enacted.[14] He accompanied the king on expedition to France, witnessing at Leons[nb 3] in 1161 and Chinon in 1162. William is also documented on the Irish campaign at Dublin in 1171 and Wexford 1172.[15] William's younger brother, Philip, also accompanied the king to Ireland, and remained with the garrison at Wexford. In 1177 Philip was granted the kingdom of Limerick by Henry but failed to take possession after the citizens set fire to the town.[16]

When Henry was facing war with his sons in 1173, William was appointed as sheriff of Hereford at Easter. He maintained the King's interests in Herefordshire until 1175.[1]

Later life and death

King Henry withdrew his favour from the family after William's son organised the murder of Seisyll ap Dyfnwal and other Welsh princes at Abergavenny in 1176.[17] There is little subsequent record of William in public life, and it is likely that he retired to his estates in Sussex. William died after 1179 and was succeeded by his son, William de Braose, 4th Lord of Bramber,[1] who gained the favour of both King Richard I and King John and became a dominant force in the Welsh Marches during their reigns.[18]

Footnotes

  1. ^ He confirmed a charter at Bramber.[10]
  2. ^ He is recorded as present when Henry issued a charter at Rouen.[11]
  3. ^ Eyton suggests this is probably Lyons-la-Forêt

References

  1. ^ a b c d e f g Cokayne, G.E., ed V. Gibbs (1910). The Complete Peerage, Vol. 1. London: The St. Catherine Press Ltd.. pp. 21/22.
  2. ^ a b Rees, William. BRAOSE family, Dictionary of Welsh Biography. The National Library of Wales. Retrieved 24 November 2010.
  3. ^ Salter, Rev. H. E. (1929). Facsimiles of Early Charters. Oxford: The University Press. Charters 4, 6 & 8 notes
  4. ^ Millor, W. J. et al. (1986). The Letters of John of Salisbury: The early letters (1153-1161). Oxford University Press. p. 86. Retrieved 25 November 2010.
  5. ^ Cokayne, G.E., ed V. Gibbs (1916). The Complete Peerage, Vol. 4. London: The St. Catherine Press Ltd. p. 190.
  6. ^ Eyton, Rev. R.W. (1861). Antiquities of Shropshire. London. p. 246. Retrieved 25 November 2010.
  7. ^ Holden, Brock W. (2001). King John, the Braoses, and the Celtic Fringe, 1207-1216. Albion: Journal of British Studies v.33. p. 5. Retrieved 11 December 2010.
  8. ^ Salter, Rev. H.E. (1929). Facsimiles of Early Charters. Oxford: The University Press. Charter 5 notes
  9. ^ Davis, H. W. C. ed. Cronne & Davis (1968). Regesta regum anglo-normannorum, 1066-1154, Vol. 3. Oxford: The Clarendon Press.
  10. ^ Salter, Rev. H.E. (1929). Facsimiles of Early Charters. Oxford: The University Press. Charter 9
  11. ^ Lees, Beatrice A. (1935). Records of the Templars in England in the twelfth century. Oxford University Press. p. 235.
  12. ^ Holt, James Clarke (1997). Colonial England, 1066-1215. London: Hambledon Press. pp. 279–80.
  13. ^ Farrer, William (1914). Early Yorkshire Charters, Vol. 1. Edinburgh.
  14. ^ The Avalon Project. Constitutions of Clarendon. Yale Law School. Retrieved 25 November 2010.
  15. ^ Eyton, Rev. R.W. (1878). Court, Household and Itinerary of King Henry II. Holborn, London: Taylor & Co..
  16. ^ Round, J.H. rev. M. T. Flanagan (2004). Briouze , Philip de; Oxford Dictionary of National Biography. Oxford University Press. Retrieved 1 December 2010.
  17. ^ Harper-Bill, C. & Vincent, N. (2007). Henry II: new interpretations. Woodbridge: The Boydell Press. p. 149.
  18. ^ Turner, Ralph V. (2004). Briouze , William (III) de (d. 1211); Oxford Dictionary of National Biography. Oxford University Press. Retrieved 18 January 2011.

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William de BRAOSE 1st Baron of Gwentland (1112-1179) [Pedigree]

Son of Phillip de BRAOSE (1075-1112) and Eva de TOTNES (1084-)

      REF AR7. Of Brecknock, Abergavenney, and Gowr.
      1st Baron of Gwentland, Lord Bamber and Gower, Lord Brecon
      (Brecknock) and Abergavenny. Sheriff of Hereford.
   b. ABT 1112, of Brecknock, Abergavenney and Gowr, Wales
   d. AFT 1179, Corbeil, France

Married Berta of Hereford (1123-)

Children:

Maud de BRAOSE m(1) William de BEAUCHAMP Baron Elmley (1105-1170)

William de BRAOSE Lord Brecknock 5th Baron de Braiose (1144-1211) m. Matilda (Maud) de ST. VALERIE (1148-1210)

Sibyl de BRAIOSE (1150-1227) m. William de FERRERS 3rd Earl of Derby (1136-1190)

Bertha de BRAOSE (1151-)

References: [CP],[EnglishP],[PlantagenetA],[MRL],[AR7], [WallopFH],[ConverseA],[Weis1],[RoyalAAF]

--------------------

William was born into a second generation English Norman dynasty holding Lordships and land in Sussex at Bramber, also at Totnes in Devon and Radnor and Builth in the Welsh Marches of Wales. He maintained his Sussex lands and titles, extended St Mary de Haura Church in Shoreham and contributed to a priory at Sele, West Sussex. His mother was Aenor Fitz Judhel of Totnes.

He also inherited one half of the honour of Barnstaple in Devon, paying a fee of 1000 marks for the privilege.

William married Bertha de Pitres, also known as Bertha de Hereford, daughter of Miles of Gloucester, Earl of Hereford. Through this marriage, William acquired lordships of Brecon and Abergavenny in 1166 because Bertha's four brothers all died young without heirs.

These vast land holdings greatly expanded the territorial power and income of the de Braose dynasty. They now held the Middle March with extensive interests in Sussex and Devon.

William's younger brother Phillip accompanied King Henry II to Ireland, receiving in 1172 the honour of Limerick.

(SOURCE????)

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William De Braose 2868 SmartMatches

Birth: 1112 in Brecknock, Surrey, Wales

Death: 1192 in England

Sex: M

Father: Phillip De Braose

Mother: Aenor De Totnes

	 

Spouses & Children

Berthe De Pitres (Wife)

Children:

Bertha De Braose

William De Braose

Sybil De Braose

Susan De Braose

Engeram De Braose

Reginald De Braose

Roger De Braose

Giles De Braose


Notes

Text:

Name Suffix: Lord of Braose

Alias: 1st Baron of /Gwentland/

William was very fortunate in his marriage to Berta. All of her brothers

died youngwithout heirs so she brought a number of important lordships

to the de Braoses in 1166. These included Breconand Abergavenny. William

became Sheriff of Hereford in 1174. His interest inSussex was maintained

as he confirmed the grantsof his father and grandfather for the

maintenance of Sele Priory and extendedSt. Mary's, Shoreham.


William de Braose, 3rd Lord of Bramber

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

 (Redirected from William de Braose, Third Lord of Bramber)

William de Braose, Third Lord of Bramber (born 1112 in Brecon) (d. ca. 1192) was the eldest son of Philip de Braose, Second Lord of Bramber.

[edit]Family and early career

William was born into a second generation English Norman dynasty holding Lordships and land in Sussex at Bramber, also at Totnes in Devon and Radnor and Builth in the Welsh Marches of Wales. He maintained his Sussex lands and titles and extended St Mary's, Shoreham and contributed to a priory at Sele, West Sussex. His mother was Aenor Fitz Judhel of Totnes.

He also inherited one half of the honour of Barnstaple in Devon, paying a fee of 1000 marks for the privilege.

William married Bertha de Pitres, also known as Bertha de Hereford, daughter of Miles of Gloucester, Earl of Hereford. Through this marriage, William acquired lordships of Brecon and Abergavenny in 1166 because Bertha's four brothers all died young without heirs.

These vast land holdings greatly expanded the territorial power and income of the de Braose dynasty. They now held the Middle March with extensive interests in Sussex and Devon.

William's younger brother Phillip accompanied King Henry II to Ireland, receiving in 1172 the honour of Limerick.

[edit]Marcher titles

In 1174, William became sheriff of Hereford. He died in about 1192 and was succeeded as Lord of Bramber by his son, William. He had also fathered two daughters, Maud and Sibilla, who married well and possibly a later son, named John.

[edit]


William de Braose, Third Lord of Bramber (born 1112 in Brecon) (d. ca. 1192) was the eldest son of Philip de Braose, Second Lord of Bramber.

William was born into a second generation English Norman dynasty holding Lordships and land in Sussex at Bramber, also at Totnes in Devon and Radnor and Builth in the Welsh Marches of Wales. He maintained his Sussex lands and titles and extended St Mary's, Shoreham and contributed to a priory at Sele, West Sussex. His mother was Aenor Fitz Judhel of Totnes.

He also inherited one half of the honour of Barnstaple in Devon, paying a fee of 1000 marks for the privilege.

William married Bertha de Pitres, also known as Bertha de Hereford, daughter of Miles of Gloucester, Earl of Hereford. Through this marriage, William acquired lordships of Brecon and Abergavenny in 1166 because Bertha's four brothers all died young without heirs.

These vast land holdings greatly expanded the territorial power and income of the de Braose dynasty. They now held the Middle March with extensive interests in Sussex and Devon.

William's younger brother Phillip accompanied King Henry II to Ireland, receiving in 1172 the honour of Limerick.


Sir Knight

Lord of Abergavenny and Brecon

Sheriff of Hereford

3rd Lord Bramber

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/William_de_Braose,_3rd_Lord_of_Bramber


William de Braose was 3rd Baron Bramber.

He married Bertha de Pîtres, daughter of Miles of Gloucester, Earl of Hereford, and Constable of England and Sibyl de Neufmarché, circa 1148 in Herefordshire,.

William acquired Brecknock, by right of his wife (whose brothers all died young without heirs), co-heir of William FitzWalter, and other extensive territorial possessions (including Brecon and Abergavenn), after 1148. He was a personage of great power and influence during the reigns of Henry II and Richard I between 1154 and 1192.

William became Lord of Abergavenny in Monmouthshire, Wales, after 1166. He was also Lord of Brecon in Powys, Wales.

He maintained his interests in Sussex as he confirmed the grants of his father and grandfather for the maintenance of Sele Priory and extended St. Mary's, Shoreham after 1166 at West Sussex.

William was Sheriff of Hereford in the Welsh Marches.

William obtained from King Henry II a grant of "the whole kingdom of Limerick," for the service of sixty knight's fees, to be held of the king and his younger son John, circa 1177 in Munster, Ireland.

William was our ancestor through two distinct descent lines--both through his son William and through his daughter Sybil, both of whom independently were our ancestors.

See "My Lines"

( http://homepages.rootsweb.ancestry.com/~cousin/html/p379.htm#i6814 )

from Compiler: R. B. Stewart, Evans, GA

( http://homepages.rootsweb.ancestry.com/~cousin/html/index.htm )


Sources:

The book, 'Reconstructing the Past', by Alan Sorrell

The book, 'The Thomas Book', by Lawrence Buckley Thomas


3rd Lord of Bramber
William was Lord of Briouze in Normandy, and of Bramber, Sussex, of Brecknock, Abergavenney and Gowr, first Baron of Gwentland.{-see "EnglishBaronies," I. J. Sanders, Oxford, 1960, pp. 7 & 21.} He was Sheriff of Hereford in 1175 and was granted by King John a moity of the barony of Totnes. See article and pictures of Abergavenny Castle on the Web at:http://www.castlewales.com/abergav.html

BIOGRAPHY: Of Brecknock, Abergavenney, and Gowr. 1st Baron of Gwentland, Lord Bamber and Gower, Lord Brecon (Brecknock) and Abergavenny. Sheriff of Hereford.

Wikipedia:

William de Braose, Third Lord of Bramber (born 1112 in Brecon) (d. ca. 1192) was the eldest son of Philip de Braose, Second Lord of Bramber.

Family and early career

William was born into a second generation English Norman dynasty holding Lordships and land in Sussex at Bramber, also at Totnes in Devon and Radnor and Builth in the Welsh Marches of Wales. He maintained his Sussex lands and titles, extended St Mary de Haura Church in Shoreham and contributed to a priory at Sele, West Sussex. His mother was Aenor Fitz Judhel of Totnes.

He also inherited one half of the honour of Barnstaple in Devon, paying a fee of 1000 marks for the privilege.

William married Bertha de Pitres, also known as Bertha de Hereford, daughter of Miles of Gloucester, Earl of Hereford. Through this marriage, William acquired lordships of Brecon and Abergavenny in 1166 because Bertha's four brothers all died young without heirs.

These vast land holdings greatly expanded the territorial power and income of the de Braose dynasty. They now held the Middle March with extensive interests in Sussex and Devon.

William's younger brother Phillip accompanied King Henry II to Ireland, receiving in 1172 the honour of Limerick.

Marcher titles

In 1174, William became sheriff of Hereford. He died in about 1192 and was succeeded as Lord of Bramber by his son, William. He had also fathered two daughters, Maud and Sibilla, who married well and possibly a later son, named John.


William de Braose, Third Lord of Bramber (born 1112 in Brecon) (d. ca. 1192) was the eldest son of Philip de Braose, Second Lord of Bramber.

William was born into a second generation English Norman dynasty holding Lordships and land in Sussex at Bramber, also at Totnes in Devon and Radnor and Builth in the Welsh Marches of Wales. He maintained his Sussex lands and titles and extended St Mary's, Shoreham and contributed to a priory at Sele, West Sussex. His mother was Aenor Fitz Judhel of Totnes.

He also inherited one half of the honour of Barnstaple in Devon, paying a fee of 1000 marks for the privilege.

William married Bertha de Pitres, also known as Bertha de Hereford, daughter of Miles of Gloucester, Earl of Hereford. Through this marriage, William acquired lordships of Brecon and Abergavenny in 1166 because Bertha's four brothers all died young without heirs.

These vast land holdings greatly expanded the territorial power and income of the de Braose dynasty. They now held the Middle March with extensive interests in Sussex and Devon.

William's younger brother Phillip accompanied King Henry II to Ireland, receiving in 1172 the honour of Limerick.


Sources:

The book, 'Reconstructing the Past', by Alan Sorrell

The book, 'The Thomas Book', by Lawrence Buckley Thomas


Died about 1180.

William de Braose, 3rd lord of Bramber was a Marcher lord, active during the 12th century period of anarchy and the subsequent reign of Henry II. He served as sheriff of Herefordshire from 1173 to 1175.

William was the eldest son of Philip de Braose, lord of Bramber. His mother was Aenor, daughter of Juhel of Totnes. He was the third in the line of the Anglo-Norman Braose family. After his father died in the 1130s William held lordships, land and castles in Sussex, with his caput at Bramber, also at Totnes in Devon and Radnor and Builth in the Welsh Marches. He confirmed the grants of his father and grandfather to the abbey of St Florent in Anjou and made further grants to the abbey's dependent priory at Sele in Sussex. About 1155, he also inherited through his mother's family one half of the honour of Barnstaple in Devon, paying a fee of 1000 marks for the privilege.

William became an internationally recognised figure. When Archbishop Theobald of Canterbury was asked by Pope Adrian IV to inquire into the background of a certain Walter, canon of St Ruf, his reply, dated to 1154/9 read:

"The facts which you demand need but little enquiry; for they shine so brightly in themselves that they cannot be hid; so great is the brilliance of his noble birth and the glory of all his kin. For Walter, as we know for a fact, was the son of a distinguished knight and born of a noble mother in lawful wedlock, and he is closely related by blood to the noble William de Braose."

William had married Bertha, daughter of Miles of Gloucester by 1150. When each of Bertha's four brothers died leaving no issue William's marriage became unexpectedly valuable. He gained control of the lordships of Brecon and Abergavenny after 1166 when the last brother died. These additional land holdings greatly expanded the territorial power and income of the Braose family. They now held a vast block of territory in the Middle March as well as their extensive interests in Sussex and Devon. William's daughters were able to make good marriages, notably Sibyl to William de Ferrers, Earl of Derby. William's son and heir, became a major player in national politics under King John.

Empress Maud landed in England in 1139 in an attempt to press her claim to the monarchy. She was soon besieged by King Stephen's forces at Arundel castle. Stephen allowed Maud a safe conduct to Bristol, and provided her with an escort which included William de Braose. Thus, at the start of this conflict, William was an adherent of King Stephen. He witnessed three charters with Stephen at Lewes dated by Davis as 1148/53 so it appears that he remained loyal to the king until the Treaty of Wallingford which ended the hostilities.

William was in Sussex in 1153, but he followed Duke Henry, soon to become King Henry II, across to Normandy in 1154. William was frequently with the new king. He was one of the great men in the army at Rhuddlan in 1157. He witnessed one of the king's charters at Romsey in 1158 and he is recorded at the king's court in Wiltshire in 1164 when the Constitutions of Clarendon were enacted. He accompanied the king on expedition to France, witnessing at Leons, in 1161 and Chinon in 1162. William is also documented on the Irish campaign at Dublin in 1171 and Wexford 1172.

When Henry was facing war with his sons in 1173, William was appointed as sheriff of Hereford at Easter. He maintained the King's interests in Herefordshire until 1175. King Henry withdrew his favour from the family after William's son organised the murder of Seisyll ap Dyfnwal and other Welsh princes at Abergavenny in 1176. There is little record of William in public life after this and it is likely that he retired to his estates in Sussex. It is at this time that the extensions were made to St. Mary's, Shoreham.

http://freespace.virgin.net/doug.thompson/BraoseWeb/family/william2...

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/William_de_Braose,_3rd_Lord_of_Bramber


http://wc.rootsweb.ancestry.com/

DE BRIOUZE, LORD OF BRAMBER


William was very fortunate in his marriage to Berta. All of her brothers died young without heirs so she brought a number of important lordships to the de Braoses in 1166. These included Brecon and Abergavenny.

William became Sheriff of Hereford in 1174.
His interest in Sussex was maintained as he confirmed the grants of his father and grandfather for the maintenance of Sele Priory and extended St. Mary's, Shoreham

William de Braose, 3rd Lord of Bramber was born on 1112 in Brecon, Powrys, Wales to Philip De Braose, 2nd Lord of Bramber and Aenor de Fitzjudhel of Totnes de Braose. William married Bertha De Pitres and had 3 children: Sybil de Braose; William De Braose, 4th Lord of Bramber; and Bertha De Braose. He passed away on 1192.

NOTE: See Link:

[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/William_de_Braose,_3rd_Lord_of_Bramber]

Lord William de Braose, 3rd Lord of Bramber is my 28th great grandfather.


William de Braose, 3rd Lord of Bramber From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia Jump to: navigation, search For other people named William de Braose, see William de Braose (disambiguation). Photograph Arundel castle's 12th-century keep. Empress Maud was escorted from Arundel to Bristol by William de Braose.

William de Braose, 3rd Lord of Bramber (circa 1100–1179) was a 12th-century Marcher lord who secured a foundation for the dominant position later held by the Braose family in the Welsh Marches. In addition to the family's English holdings in Sussex and Devon, William had inherited Radnor and Builth, in Wales, from his father Philip. By his marriage he increased the Braose Welsh holdings to include Brecon and Abergavenny.

William remained loyal to King Stephen during the 12th-century period of civil war. He became a trusted royal servant during the subsequent reign of Henry II, accompanying the king on campaigns in France and Ireland. He served as sheriff of Herefordshire from 1173 until 1175. The family's power reached its peak under his son William during the reigns of King Richard I and King John. Contents

   1 Lands and family
   2 Royal service
   3 Later life and death
   4 Notes

Lands and family

William was the eldest son of Philip de Braose, lord of Bramber.[1] His mother was Aenor, daughter of Juhel of Totnes.[1] He was the third in the line of the Anglo-Norman Braose family founded by his grandfather, the first William de Braose.[1] After his father died in the 1130s William inherited lordships, land and castles in Sussex, with his caput at Bramber. He also held Totnes in Devon and Radnor and Builth in the Welsh Marches.[2] He confirmed the grants of his father and grandfather to the abbey of St Florent in Anjou and made further grants to the abbey's dependent priory at Sele in Sussex.[3] In about 1155, he also inherited through his mother's family one half of the honour of Barnstaple in Devon, paying a fee of 1000 marks for the privilege.[2] William became an internationally recognised figure. When Archbishop Theobald of Canterbury was asked by Pope Adrian IV to inquire into the background of a certain Walter, canon of St Ruf, his reply, dated to 1154/9 read:

   The facts which you demand need but little enquiry; for they shine so brightly in themselves that they cannot be hid; so great is the brilliance of his noble birth and the glory of all his kin. For Walter, as we know for a fact, was the son of a distinguished knight and born of a noble mother in lawful wedlock, and he is closely related by blood to the noble William de Braose.[4]

William had married Bertha, daughter of Miles of Gloucester and Sibyl de Neufmarché, by 1150.[1] When each of Bertha's four brothers died leaving no issue, William's marriage became unexpectedly valuable. He gained control of the lordships of Brecon and Abergavenny after 1166 when the last brother died.[1] These additional land holdings greatly expanded the territorial power and income of the Braose family. They now held a vast block of territory in the Welsh Marches as well as their extensive interests in Sussex and Devon. William's daughters were able to make good marriages, notably Sibyl to William de Ferrers, Earl of Derby.[5] Maud was married to John de Brompton of Shropshire.[6] William's son and heir, another William de Braose, became a major player in national politics under King John.[7] Royal service

Empress Maud, the only legitimate living child of Henry I, landed in England in 1139 in an attempt to press her claim to the monarchy. She was soon besieged by King Stephen's forces at Arundel castle. Stephen allowed Maud a safe conduct to Bristol and provided her with an escort, which included William de Braose,[8] suggesting that he was an adherent of King Stephen. William was present as a witness when three charters were issued by Stephen at Lewes dated to the years 1148–53,[9] therefore it appears that he remained loyal to the king until the Treaty of Wallingford ended the hostilities.

William was in Sussex in 1153,[nb 1] but he followed Duke Henry, soon to become King Henry II, to Normandy in 1154.[nb 2] William was frequently with the new king. He was one of the military leaders who supported Henry at Rhuddlan in 1157.[12] He witnessed one of the king's charters at Romsey in 1158,[13] and he is recorded at the king's court in Wiltshire in 1164 when the Constitutions of Clarendon were enacted.[14] He accompanied the king on expedition to France, witnessing at Leons[nb 3] in 1161 and Chinon in 1162. William is also documented on the Irish campaign at Dublin in 1171 and Wexford 1172.[15] William's younger brother, Philip, also accompanied the king to Ireland, and remained with the garrison at Wexford. In 1177 Philip was granted the kingdom of Limerick by Henry but failed to take possession after the citizens set fire to the town.[16]

When Henry was facing war with his sons in 1173, William was appointed as sheriff of Herefordshire at Easter. He maintained the King's interests in Herefordshire until 1175.[1] Later life and death

King Henry withdrew his favour from the family after William's son organised the murder of Seisyll ap Dyfnwal and other Welsh princes at Abergavenny in 1176.[17] There is little subsequent record of William in public life, and it is likely that he retired to his estates in Sussex. William died after 1179 and was succeeded by his son, William de Braose, 4th Lord of Bramber,[1] who gained the favour of both King Richard I and King John and became a dominant force in the Welsh Marches during their reigns.[18]


"...A 12th century Marcher lord who secured a foundation for the dominant position later held by the Braose family in the Welsh Marches. In addition to the family's English holdings in Sussex and Devon, William had inherited Radnor and Builth, in Wales, from his father Phillip. By his marriage, he increased the Braose Welsh holdings to include Brecon and Abergavenny.......William remained loyal to King Stephen during the 12th century period of anarchy. He became a trusted royal servant during the subsequent reign of Henry II, accompanying the king on campaigns in France and Ireland. He served as sheriff of Herefordshire from 1173 until 1175. The family's power reached its peak under his son Willian during the reigns of King Richard I ("The Lionhearted") and King John."

Wikipedia -- "William de Braose, 3d Lord of Bramber"


http://www.celtic-casimir.com/webtree/5/15413.htm

Another name for William was William DE BRIOUZE.

  Ancestral File Number: 9G8Z-FB.
  General Notes:

From c1173 to 1230 successive fathers, sons, and younger brothers called de Briouze were feudal lords of Abergavenny. William de Briouze, the first of them, who derived his name from his lordship of Briouze in Normandy, married the sister and coheir of the 2nd Earl of Hereford (also daughter of 1st Earl) mentioned above, which seems to account for his coming into possession of a lordship in that part of the Welsh marches. [Burke's Peerage]

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OWNERS of the LORDSHIP of ABERGAVENNY (X) 1173?

William de Briouze (e), Lord of Briouze in Normandy, and of Bramber, Sussex, son and heir of Philip de Briouze, be Aenor, daughter and heir of Juhel son of Alvred, Lord of Barnstaple and Totnes. He married, in or before 1150, Bertha, 2nd sister and coheir of William of Hereford being daughter of Miles of Gloucester, 1st Earl of Gloucester (sic. Earl of Hereford). Sheriff of Hereford, Easter 1173-75, at which earlier date probably he already possessed the Lordship of Over Gwent. He was living in 1179. [Complete Peerage I:21-2, XIV:6, (transcribed by Dave Utzinger)]

(e) Briouze-Saint-Gervais (formerly Braiose), arrond. of Argentan, dept. of Orne. His descendants spelt the name Brewes. In some 25 early references to this name, not in charter latin, it appears as Breouse, Breuse, or Brewys (the last of which still exists as a surname), but never as Braose, the form adopted in peerages, for which it seems doubtful if there be any good authority.

Note: The above text "1st Earl of Gloucester", which was part of a correction in CP XIV:6, is a mistake; Miles was Earl of Hereford.

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William was very fortunate in his marriage to Berta. All of her brothers died young without heirs, so she brought a number of important lordships to the de Braoses in 1166. These included Brecon and Abergavenny. William became Sheriff of Hereford in 1174. His interest in Sussex was maintained as he confirmed the grants of his father and grandfather for the maintenance of Sele Priory and extended St Mary's, Shoreham.

See St Mary's, Shoreham, Sussex.

William m. Berta, dau. of Milo de Gloucester, Earl of Hereford, and co-heir of her brother, William, Earl of Hereford, by whom he acquired Brecknock, with other extensive territorial possessions. He had two sons, William and Reginald, and was s. by the elder. [Sir Bernard Burke, Dormant, Abeyant, Forfeited and Extinct Peerages, Burke's Peerage, Ltd., London, 1883, p. 72, Braose, Baron Braose, of Gower] 594

  Events:

1. Occupation. 3rd Baron de Braiose; Sheriff Of Herfordshire (1174- )

  Marriage Information:

William married Bertha DE GLOUCESTER Heiress of Brecon, daughter of Miles (Milo) Fitz Walter DE GLOUCESTER Earl of Gloucester and Cts Sybil DE NEUFMARCHÉ, in 1166 in Herefordshire, England 594,4048. (Bertha DE GLOUCESTER Heiress of Brecon was born about 1130 in Brecon (Aberhonddu), Powys, Wales

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William de Braose II, 3rd Lord of Bramber's Timeline

1100
1100
Bramber, Sussex, England
1145
1145
Sussex, England
1149
1149
Bramber, Sussex, England
1178
1178
Bramber, Sussex, England
1179
1179
Age 79
Herefordshire, England
1933
February 1, 1933
Age 79
February 1, 1933
Age 79
February 1, 1933
Age 79
February 1, 1933
Age 79