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Early Settlement of Delaware County Pennsylvania - Map Cross referencing

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Profiles

  • Thomas Lloyd, Lieutenant-Governor of PA. (1640 - 1694)
    Lloyd (6 April 1640 – 10 September 1694) was a lieutenant-governor of provincial Pennsylvania.He was born in Dolobran, Montgomeryshire, Wales, and subsequently educated at Ruthin School. He studied law...
  • Sarah Jones (1672 - 1699)
  • John Morgan (1695 - 1731)
  • John Evans (1670 - 1703)
    ~• the following from: "And this is the good authority for John ap John, the first minister among Welsh Friends, having been the Father of the "Welsh Tract" in Pennsylvania, and of the variously call...

Purpose

To take the names on a map of early settlers and cross reference them to Geni Profiles The surname will be alphabetized. Added to each surname will be the Township where each occurs. Some will be in several townships.
The juxtaposition of first settlers of Chester, now Delaware County then becomes better illustrated.
The originator of this project is adding profiles of early PA families of the surname and their spouse and children. Should you join this project, feel free to add ones on your own.

important dates

  • 1638 Swedish Rule
  • 1644 : Governor Johan Björnsson Printz built Fort Nya Vasa where the Great Minquas Path crossed Cobbs Creek.
  • 1653 : people of Wales introduce themselves to the Quaker faith (see screen capture)
  • 1650s : overrun by the Dutch West India Company
  • 1660's : British assume control
  • 1680s : William Penn's great experiment
    • Welsh Tract (2 miles x 3 miles x 6 miles ?) March 1684, see page 27
  • 1789 .. When Delaware County split from Chester County in 1789, the seat of local government was retained in Upland/Chester. As the interior developed, complaints grew concerning the distance to the county seat and finally was moved to Media in 1850 with the beautiful Delaware County Courthouse being erected in 1889. Geographically, it would have made sense for Merion to be part of the new Delaware County but it remained part of Chester. The upshot of this is that our map here does not cover those who remained in CHESTER CO. after 1789

TOWNSHIP CODES

  • ASTON (AST)
  • BIRMINGHAM (BHM)
  • BETHEL (BTL)
  • CHESTER (CTR)
  • CHICHESTER (CHI)
  • CONCORD (CON)
  • DARBY (DBY)
  • EGMONT (EMT)
  • HAVERFORD (HAV)
  • LOWER PROVIDENCE (NPR)
  • MARPLE (MAR)
  • MIDDLETOWN (MID)
  • NEWTOWN (NEW)
  • UPPER PROVIDENCE (UPR)
  • RADNOR (RAD)
  • RIDLEY (RID)
  • SPRINGFIELD (SPR)
  • THORNBURY (THN)
  • WILLISTOWN (WLT)

THE MAP ITSELF

icn_favorite.gif THE MAP (CLICK), held by the Library of Congress reconstructs location of land owners from Europe who came in the 17th and early 18th centuries

Title: Map of the early settlements of Delaware County, Penna. Contributor Names: Smith, George, 1804-1882., Ashmead, Henry Buckley. of Bowen & Co.
Created / Published: [Philadelphia : H.B. Ashmead, 1862]

ALPHA LIST

NO DUPLICATES FOR MEMBERS OF SAME SURNAME. This is complicated by Welsh patronymic naming patterns

  • Baker: EMT,
  • Bevan (aka Stevens much later): HVR,
  • Bezar: BTL
  • Bonsall: DBY The Derbyshire Bonsalls arrived in America in several branches. Others include the Bonsalls of NYC who didn't arrive until the mid 18th century. See: Mary Spingler and brrothers
  • Brassey: CTR (related to Worley)
  • Brinton: THN, BHM
  • Cartledge: DBY,
  • Chad(ds): BHM,
  • Chandler: CHI
  • Cheyney: THN, but doesn't ssem to be on map
  • Coppock: MAR, SPR,
  • David: HVR
  • Dilworth: BHM,
  • ~Ellis: HVR
  • ~Evan: (son of Evan ap William; RAD
  • Fearne: DBY
  • Havard:
  • ~Humphrey: HVR,
  • ~Hunter: NEW, MID n(did not arrive until the early 18th century but are on the project map
  • ~Lewis : HAV, NEW, see also: James Lewis
  • Lightfoot: DBY
  • ~Maris: SPR,
  • Mendenhall: CON,
  • ~Morgan : RAD
  • Nayle: THN, MID
  • Nixon: NPR,
  • Need: DBY
  • Newlin: CON,
  • ~Pearson': NEW, MAR,
  • Pennel: MID,
  • Pusey: CTR,
  • ~Rees: HVR,
  • ~verch Robert: HVR
  • Routh: CTR,AST
  • Sharpless, RID,
  • Simcock: RID,
  • ~Taylor: SPR,
  • Thatcher: BHM
  • Trego: MID,
  • Evan ap William'" RAD
  • Vernon: NPR,
  • Withers: CHI,
  • Wood: DBY
  • ~Woodward: MID, THN, NEW
  • Worley: CTR,

Welsh Tract 1684

~ all of these in Chester County but not all are now in Delaware County as the County was split in two much later

  1. Charles Lloyd and Margaret Davis 5,000 acres (quickly divided amongst many Quakers by the turn of the century. Robert Owen was one.
  2. Richard Davis 5,000 acres
  3. William Jenkins 1,000
  4. John Poy 750
  5. John Burge 750
  6. William Mordant 500 < my own personal interest > land of my grandparents Frank Wildman and Elizabeth Bean (20th century) Mordant was not a Quaker and was not a resident
  7. William Powell 1,250
  8. Lewis David 3,000
  9. Morris Llewelin 500
  10. Thomas Simons 500
  11. John Bevan 2,000
  12. Edward Pritchard 2,500
  13. John ap John & Thomas Wyn 5,000
  14. Richard Davis 1,250
  15. Richard ap Thomas 5,000
  16. Mordicia Moore in right of ___ 500
  17. John Millington 500
  18. Henry Right 500
  19. Daniel Med ___ 200
  20. Thomas Ellis 1000 his son ELLIS ELLIS appear on the project map; Reverend Rowland Ellis is Robert (Thomas) Ellis' wife's nephew.
  21. Thomas Ellis for B. Roules 250
  22. Thomas Ellis on account of Humphrey Thomas 100
  23. David Powell 1,000
  24. John Kinsy 200
  25. David Meredith 250
  26. David Davis 200
  27. Thomas John Evan 250
  28. John Evans 100
  29. John Jorman 50
  30. David Kinsy 200
  31. Evan Oliver 100
  32. Samuell Mills (Miles) 100
  33. Thomas Joanes 50
  34. David Joanes 100
  35. John Kinsy 100
  36. Daniel Hurry 300
  37. Henry Joanes 400
  38. John Ffish 300
  39. John Day 300
  40. Burke and Simson 1,000
  • The whole... 50,0000
    • all the above from Pennsylvania Magazine

other sources