Start My Family Tree Welcome to Geni, home of the world's largest family tree.
Join Geni to explore your genealogy and family history in the World's Largest Family Tree.

Imperial College of Science, Technology and Medicine

« Back to Projects Dashboard

Project Tags

view all

Profiles

  • George Hornidge Porter, Nobel Prize in Chemistry, 1967 (1920 - 2002)
    George Hornidge Porter, Baron Porter of Luddenham, OM, FRS . Born: 6 December 1920, Stainforth, United Kingdom. Died: 31 August 2002, Canterbury, United Kingdom, was a British physical chemist. Nobel P...
  • Geoffrey Wilkinson, III, Nobel Prize in Chemistry, 1973 (1921 - 1996)
    Sir Geoffrey Wilkinson , FRS (14 July 1921 – 26 September 1996) was a Nobel laureate (in Chemistry, 1973) English chemist who pioneered inorganic chemistry and homogeneous transition metal catalysis. ...
  • Sir Derek Barton, FRS, Nobel Prize in Chemistry, 1969 (1918 - 1998)
    Sir Derek Harold Richard Barton , FRS (8 September 1918 – 16 March 1998) was a British organic chemist and Nobel Prize laureate in Chemistry in 1969 : "for his contributions to the development of the c...
  • Sir Norman Haworth, Nobel Prize in Chemistry 1937 (1883 - 1950)
    Sir (Walter) Norman Haworth was born at Chorley, Lancashire, on March 19, 1883. He attended the local school until the age of fourteen when he joined his father, Thomas Haworth, to learn linoleum desig...
  • Peter Higgs, Nobel Prize in Physics 2013
    Peter Ware Higgs CH FRS FRSE (born 29 May 1929) is a British theoretical physicist, emeritus professor at the University of Edinburgh, and Nobel Prize laureate for his work on the mass of subatomic par...

Imperial College London (legally Imperial College of Science, Technology and Medicine)[6] is a public research university located in London, England. In 1851, Prince Albert built his vision for a cultural area composed of the Victoria and Albert Museum, Natural History Museum, Royal Albert Hall, Royal Colleges, and the Imperial Institute.[7][8] In 1907, Imperial College was established by Royal Charter, bringing together the Royal College of Science, Royal School of Mines, and City and Guilds College.[9] In 1988, the Imperial College School of Medicine was formed through a merger with St Mary's Hospital Medical School. In 2004, Queen Elizabeth II opened the Imperial College Business School.

The main campus is located in South Kensington, with a new innovation campus in White City. The college also has a research centre at Silwood Park, and teaching hospitals throughout London. Imperial is organised through faculties of natural science, engineering, medicine, and business. Its emphasis is on the practical application of science and technology. The university is amongst the most international in the world,[10] with 59% of students from outside the UK and more than 140 countries represented on campus.[11]

In 2018–19, Imperial is ranked 8th globally in the QS World University Rankings, 9th in the THE World University Rankings, 24th in the Academic Ranking of World Universities, and 8th in Reuters Top 100: World's Most Innovative Universities.[12][13][14][15] Student, staff, and researcher affiliations include 14 Nobel laureates, 3 Fields Medalists, 1 Turing Award winner, 74 Fellows of the Royal Society, 87 Fellows of the Royal Academy of Engineering, and 85 Fellows of the Academy of Medical Sciences.[16]

Nobel Laureates:

Sir Alexander Fleming (medicine) ,Sir Alexander Fleming, Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine, 1945<br/>
Sir Ernst Boris Chain,Sir Ernst Boris Chain, Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine, 1945<br/>
Sir Frederick Gowland Hopkins (physiology),Sir Fredrick Hopkins, Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine, 1929<br/>
Sir Andrew Fielding Huxley,(physiology) Sir Andrew Fielding Huxley, Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine, 1963<br/>
Rodney Robert Porter, (physiology) Rodney Porter, CH FRS, Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine, 1972<br/>
Abdus Salam, Sir George Paget Thomson, Sir George P. Thomson, Nobel Prize in Physics, 1937<br/>
Patrick Blackett ( Baron Blackett),Patrick, Baron Blackett, OM, KCB, CBE, FRS, Nobel Prize in Physics, 1948<br/>
Dennis GABOR DÉNES GÜNSZBERG Dennis Gabor, Nobel Prize in Physics, 1971<br/>

, Peter Higgs, (chemistry) Peter Higgs, Nobel Prize in Physics 2013

Sir Norman Haworth,Sir Norman Haworth, Nobel Prize in Chemistry 1937<br/>
Sir Cyril Norman Hinshelwood,Sir Cyril Hinshelwood, Nobel Prize in Chemistry, 1956<br/>

Sir Derek Barton,Sir Derek Barton, FRS, Nobel Prize in Chemistry, 1969
Sir Geoffrey Wilkinson,Geoffrey Wilkinson, III, Nobel Prize in Chemistry, 1973
Sir George Porter George Hornidge Porter, Nobel Prize in Chemistry, 1967.[16]

Fields medalists: Klaus Friedrich Roth, Sir Simon Donaldson, Martin Hairer.[177]

Academic affiliations include: Sir Tom Kibble, co-discoverer of Higgs Boson;[178] Sir Tejinder Virdee, experimental particle physicist;[179] Sir John Pendry, theoretical solid state physicist;[180] Sir Christopher Kelk Ingold, physical organic chemistry pioneer;[181] Sir William Henry Perkin, discoverer of the first synthetic organic chemical dye mauveine;[182] Sir Edward Frankland, originator of the theory of chemical valency;[183] Sir William Crookes, discoverer of thallium;[184] Sir Alan Fersht, chemist;[185] David Phillips, chemist;[186] Harold Hopkins, contributed to the theory and design of optical instruments;[187] Alfred North Whitehead, mathematician and philosopher;[188] Sir Steven Cowley, physicist and president of Corpus Christi College, Oxford;[189] and Sir John Ambrose Fleming, inventor of the vacuum tube.[190]

In biology and medicine; Thomas Huxley, advocate of the theory of evolution; Wendy Barclay, virologist; Dame Sally Davies, the Chief Medical Officer for England;[191] David Livingstone, medical missionary. In engineering; Chi Onwurah, politician;[192] Dame Julia Higgins, polymer scientist;[193] Dame Judith Hackitt, former Chair of the Health and Safety Executive;[194] Dudley Maurice Newitt, scientific director of the Special Operations Executive;[195] Julia King, Baroness Brown of Cambridge, engineer and Member of the House of Lords, Clare Lloyd, biologist.[196]

Non-academic affiliations include: H. G. Wells, author;[197] Nicholas Tombazis, chief car designer at McLaren and Ferrari; Ralph Robins, CEO of Rolls-Royce;[198] Brian May, guitarist of rock band Queen;[199] Chew Choon Seng, CEO of Singapore Airlines; Sir Julius Vogel, former Prime Minister of New Zealand;[200] Rajiv Gandhi, Prime Minister of India;[201] Teo Chee Hean, Deputy Prime Minister of Singapore; Huw Thomas, Physician to the Queen;[202] Sir Roger Bannister, ran the first four-minute mile;[203] Andreas Mogensen, first Danish astronaut; David Pearson, software engineer; Winston Wong, entrepreneur; Alan Howard, hedge fund manager and philanthropist; Cyrus Pallonji Mistry, former chairman of the Tata Group;[204] Michael Birch, entrepreneur; Henry Charles Stephens, politician; Sir Michael Uren, businessman and philanthropist; Ian Read, CEO of Pfizer, Pallab Ghosh, BBC correspondent, Hannah Devlin, science journalist.

History

The college's origins can be traced back as far as the founding of the Royal College of Chemistry on Hanover Square in 1845, with the support of Prince Albert and parliament.[8] Following some financial trouble, this was absorbed in 1853 into the newly formed Government School of Mines and Science Applied to the Arts, located on Jermyn Street. The school was renamed the Royal School of Mines a decade later.[17]

The medical school has roots in many different school across London, the oldest of which dates back to 1823, with the foundation of the teaching facilities at the West London Infirmary at Villiers Street.[18] Later known as Charing Cross Hospital Medical School, it was designed to provide medical education for the needs of a university.[19] This was followed in 1834 when Westminster Hospital surgeons started taking students under their care. Established on Dean Street, the school was forced to close in 1847, but was reopened in 1849 with a new specimen museum. The first teaching at St Mary's Hospital hospital in Paddington began in 1851, with St Mary's Hospital Medical School established in 1854.[19][20]

The Imperial Institute The Great Exhibition Proceeds from the Great Exhibition of 1851 were designated by Prince Albert to be used to develop a cultural area in South Kensington for the use and education of the public.[21] Within the next 6 years the Victoria and Albert and Science museums had opened, joined by the Natural History Museum in 1881, and in 1888 the Imperial Institute. As well as museums, new facilities for the royal colleges were also constructed, with the Royal College of Chemistry and the Royal School of Mines moving to South Kensington between 1871 and 1872.[22]

In 1881 the Normal School of Science was established in South Kensington under the leadership of Thomas Huxley, taking over responsibility for the teaching of the natural sciences and agriculture from the Royal School of Mines.[23] The school was granted the name Royal College of Science by royal consent in 1890. As these institutions were not part of universities, they were unable to grant degrees to students, and instead bestowed associateships such as the Associateship of the Royal College of Science.[24]

The Central Institution of the City and Guilds of London Institute, formed by the City of London's livery companies, was opened on Exhibition Road by the Prince of Wales, founded to focus on providing technical education, with courses starting in early 1885.[9] The institution was renamed the Central Technical College in 1893, becoming a school of the University of London in 1900.[25]

Royal College of Science 20th century At the start of the 20th century there was a concern that Britain was falling behind its key rivals – particularly Germany – in scientific and technical education, and the idea grew for a "British Charlottenburg", similar to the German Technische Hochschule Charlottenburg. In 1902, the Technical Education Board of London County Council called for the establishment of a similar institute for advanced technological training in London, and Richard Haldane had involved Lord Rosebery, Arthur Balfour and the Duke of Devonshire in a scheme to raise £600,000 as a trust fund for the proposed institution.[26]

A departmental committee was set up at the Board of Education in 1904, originally chaired by Francis Mowatt and (from 1905) by Haldane, officially to look into the future of the Royal College of Science. An interim report in 1905 asked if the government would support the unification of the two national schools of science in South Kensington – the Royal College of Science and the Royal School of Mines – into a single institution. This was followed in 1906 by the final report that called for the establishment of this unified institution, also to take in – if agreement could be reached with the City and Guilds of London Institute – their Central Technical College. The committee was divided on whether the new institution should be incorporated into the University of London or be associated as a independent college of the university, but recommended that the establishment of the new institution should not wait for this question to be settled.[26][27]

On 8 July 1907, King Edward VII granted a Royal Charter establishing the Imperial College of Science and Technology. This incorporated the Royal School of Mines and the Royal College of Science. It also made provisions for the Central Technical College to join once conditions regarding its governance were met, as well as for Imperial to become a college of the University of London.[28]. The latter of these was accomplished within a year, with Imperial joining the University of London on 22 July 1908.[29] The Central Technical College joined Imperial in 1910 under the name City and Guilds College.[9] The main campus of Imperial College was constructed beside the buildings of the Imperial Institute.

Royal School of Mines The foundation stone for the Royal School of Mines building was laid by King Edward VII in July 1909. There was controvery over the inscription on the foundation stone, which was originally to commemorate "the completion of the Royal College of Science … henceforth to be known as the Imperial College of Science and Technology". This led to objections from the Royal School of Mines and the inscription being changed to commemorate instead "the new buildings of the Royal School of Mines … and of the City and Guilds College of Engineering, which, with the Royal College of Science, form integral parts of the Imperial College of Science and Technology".[26]

While students at Imperial could study for University of London degrees, the three constituent colleges also awarded associateships at bachelor's level (Associateship of the Royal College of Science, ARCS, Associateship of the Royal School of Mines, ARSM, and Associateship of the City and Guilds of London Institute, ACGI). To these was added the Diploma of Imperial College (DIC), a postgraduate-level qualification first awarded in 1912.[30]

It was not long before agitation for full university status began. In January 1919, students and alumni met at the Imperial College Union and voted to sign a petition to make Imperial a university with its own degree awarding powers, independent of the University of London.[31] This won the backing of the rector and the professors, in addition to the majority of past and present students, and Nature called in 1920 for "a free and frank examination of the proposition in all its bearings, undisturbed and unprejudiced by lesser interests than that of increasing the efficiency of university education and especially of scientific education".[32] One of the issues raised was that, as Imperial was unable to grant degrees, only diplomas, students were going to America to study.[33] While Imperial did not gain its independence at this time, the University of London changed its regulations in 1925 so that the courses taught only at Imperial would be examined by the university, enabling students to gain a BSc.[34]

In October 1945, King George VI and Queen Elizabeth visited Imperial to commemorate the centenary of the Royal College of Chemistry, which (as part of the Royal College of Science) was the oldest of the institutions that united to form Imperial College. "Commemoration Day", named after this visit, is held every October as the university's main graduation ceremony.[35][36]

Following the second world war, there was again concern that Britain was falling behind in science – this time to the United States. The Percy Report of 1945 noted that "there have been indications lately of a readiness of the English to move in the direction of American institutions, such as the Massachusetts Institute of Technology".[37] The report of the Barlow Committee in 1946 advised doubling the number of graduates in science and technology and establishing a new technological university.[38] The idea of a "British MIT" was backed by influential scientists as politicians of the time, including Lord Cherwell, Sir Lawrence Bragg and Sir Edward Appleton,[37] but there was also strong opposition: the University Grants Committee (UGC) argued that "an institution confined to a narrow range of subjects is unfavorable to the highest attainment", while the Committee of Vice-Chancellors and Principals stated that "a single-faculty institution cannot be a university".[37] In 1952, the government stated their intention of "building up at least one institution of university rank devoted predominantly to the teaching and study of the various forms of technology".[39] However, the continued opposition of the UGC led to a compromise being announced in 1953: Imperial College would be expanded, almost doubling in size (from 1,650 to 3,000 students) over the next ten years, as the "institution of university rank" promised in the government's policy, but would remain part of the University of London rather than becoming an independent technological university.[37][40]

The expansion of the college led to a number of new buildings being erected. These included the Hill building (1957) and the Physics building (1960), and the completion of the East Quadrangle, built in four stages between 1959 and 1965. The building work also meant the demolition of the City and Guilds College building in 1962–63.[41] The Imperial Institute building was also demolished between 1957 and 1967, although it remained partly occupied by the institute until 1962. Opposition from the Royal Fine Arts Commission and others meant that the central tower (now the Queen's Tower) was retained, with work carried out between 1966 and 1968 to make it free standing.[42]

New laboratories for biochemistry were established with the support of a £350,000 grant from the Wolfson Foundation in 1959, which was also instrumental in attracting Ernst Chain to Imperial to head the biochemistry department.[43] The new buildings were opened by the Queen in 1965..[44]

A special relationship between Imperial and the Indian Institute of Technology Delhi was established in 1963. Under this agreement, Imperial helped train Indian staff and academics from Imperial went on long term secondments to Delhi. In the same year, the Department of History of Science and Technology was established.[44]

From 1965, the UGC allocated 'indicated' funding to Imperial. While the grant continued to come thorough the University of London, the federal university, was no longer free to decide on Imperial's allocation out of its block grant. As the university used its grant to cross-subsidise weaker components of the federation, leading to complaints that stronger colleges were losing out, this was a situation envied by the other colleges.[45]

An agreement was made for the Architectural Association School of Architecture to join Imperial as a fourth constituent college,[41] but this was dependent on the Architectural Association raising £500,000 for a new building and did not take place. By the late 1960s, government funding was no longer so readily available, and in 1969, Imperial launched an appeal for £2 million. Over half of this was to be spent on student accommodation, with the aim that students would spend at least one year in college-owned halls of residence, the rest to be spent supporting research and teaching and on developing the Silwood Park field station.[46]

The Department of Management Science was created in 1971 out of the Management Engineering Section of the Mechanical Engineering Department. The Associated Studies Department was established in 1972, introducing foreign language teaching to Imperial.[47] The Humanities Department was formed in 1980 by merging the Associated Studies and History of Science departments.[48]

In 1988, Imperial merged with St Mary's Hospital Medical School under the Imperial College Act 1988. Amendments to the royal charter changed the formal name of the institution to The Imperial College of Science, Technology and Medicine and made St Mary's a constituent college.[49]

In 1995, Imperial launched its own academic publishing house, Imperial College Press, in partnership with World Scientific.[50] Imperial merged with the National Heart and Lung Institute in 1995 and the Charing Cross and Westminster Medical School, Royal Postgraduate Medical School (RPMS) and the Institute of Obstetrics and Gynaecology in 1997. In the same year the Imperial College School of Medicine was formally established and all of the property of Charing Cross and Westminster Medical School, the National Heart and Lung Institute and the Royal Postgraduate Medical School were transferred to Imperial as the result of the Imperial College Act 1997.[51]

Queen Elizabeth II opening the Imperial College Business School In 2000, Imperial merged with both the Kennedy Institute of Rheumatology and Wye College, the University of London's agricultural college in Wye, Kent, which later closed.

21st century In October 2002, a merger was proposed between Imperial and UCL that would have formed an institution with 28,000 students and a research budget of £400 million – more than Oxford and Cambridge combined. Richard Sykes, then Rector of Imperial, said that the merger "would lead to the creation of a truly world-class research-based institution with the resources necessary to compete effectively with the best in the world."[52][53] Strong opposition from academics, particularly at UCL where a "takeover by Imperial" was feared, led to the proposals being dropped a month later.[54]

In 2003, Imperial was granted degree-awarding powers in its own right by the Privy Council. The London Centre for Nanotechnology was established in the same year as a joint venture between UCL and Imperial College London.[55][56]

In 2004 the Imperial College Business School, originally known as the Tanaka Business School, and a new main entrance on Exhibition Road were opened by Queen Elizabeth II.[57] The UK Energy Research Centre was also established in 2004 and opened its headquarters at Imperial. In 2008, the Tanaka Business School was renamed the Imperial College Business School.[58]

In November 2005 the Faculties of Life Sciences and Physical Sciences merged to become the Faculty of Natural Sciences. On 9 December 2005, Imperial announced that it would commence negotiations to secede from the University of London.[59] Imperial became fully independent of the University of London in July 2007.[60][61][62] In July 2008 the Centre for Advanced Structural Ceramics was opened in the Materials department.

In April 2011, Imperial and King's College London joined the UK Centre for Medical Research and Innovation (UKCMRI) as partners with a commitment of £40 million each to the project. The centre was later renamed the Francis Crick Institute and opened on 9 November 2016. It the largest single biomedical laboratory in Europe.[63] In 2014 the Dyson School of Design Engineering was opened following a £12m donation by the James Dyson Foundation, along with courses such as the MEng in Design Engineering.[64]

Campuses

The college is surrounded by many museums, such as the Natural History Museum South Kensington The South Kensington campus is the college's main campus, where most teaching and research takes place. The campus dates back to 1871,[65] and includes the land and buildings owned by the colleges which originally merged to form Imperial College: the Royal College of Science, the Royal School of Mines, and the City and Guilds College. It is home to many notable buildings, such as the Business School and the Royal School of Mines. It is also the original site of the Imperial Institute, whose Queen's Tower still stands at the heart of the campus overlooking Queen's Lawn. As part of a cultural centre known as Albertopolis (based on the vision of Prince Albert) the campus is surrounded by many of London's most popular attractions, including the Royal Albert Hall and Kensington Palace, museums including the Natural History Museum, Science Museum, and Victoria and Albert Museum, and institutions such as the Royal College of Art, the Royal College of Music, and the National Art Library.[66][67]

The campus has many restaurants and cafés run by the college,[68] and contains much of the college's student accommodation, including the Prince's Garden Halls, and Beit Hall, home to the college union, which runs student pubs, a nightclub, and a cinema on site. To the north, within easy walking distance from the college, are Kensington Gardens and Hyde Park, with green spaces and sports facilities used by many of the student clubs.[69]

White City A second major campus has started opening in White City, to the west of the main campus, providing an innovation hub for the college, including research facilities and commercialisation space, as well as postgraduate accommodation.[70] The chemistry department moved much of it's research to the new Molecular Sciences Research Hub on the campus in 2018,[71] with further departments and industry partners moving to the campus and surrounding area over the coming years.[72] The campus is also home to the Innovation Rooms, a college hackerspace and community outreach centre.[73]

Silwood Park Silwood Park is a postgraduate campus of Imperial located in the village of Sunninghill near Ascot in Berkshire. The Silwood Park campus includes a centre for research and teaching in ecology, evolution, and conservation set in 100 ha of parkland where ecological field experiments are conducted, and contains student halls for students studying for a degree on the site.

St Mary's Hospital Hospitals Imperial has teaching hospitals across London which are used by the School of Medicine for undergraduate clinical teaching and medical research.

Charing Cross Campus, Hammersmith — Based around Charing Cross Hospital, facilities include a campus library, cafe and fitness gym. Chelsea and Westminster Campus — Based around Chelsea and Westminster Hospital, facilities include a campus library. Hammersmith Campus, East Acton — Based around Hammersmith Hospital, facilities include a campus library, catering outlets and sports facilities. Royal Brompton Campus, Chelsea — Based around Royal Brompton Hospital, facilities include a campus library. St Mary's Campus, Paddington — Based around St. Mary's Hospital, facilities include the Fleming library and sports facilities,[74] and is nearby the Wilson House hall of residence, which was original connected to St Mary's Hospital Medical School. Organisation and administration Faculties and departments

53 Princes Gate, home of the Brevan Howard Centre for Financial Analysis

The Skempton Building is home to the Department of Civil & Environmental Engineering Imperial is organised through a network of faculties and departments:[75]

Faculty of Engineering Aeronautics Engineering Bioengineering Chemical Engineering Civil & Environmental Engineering Computing Design engineering Earth Science & Engineering Electrical & Electronic Engineering Materials Mechanical Engineering Faculty of Medicine Medicine Surgery and Cancer Institute of Clinical Sciences National Heart and Lung Institute School of Public Health Faculty of Natural Sciences Centre for Environmental Policy Chemistry Life Sciences Mathematics Physics Imperial College Business School Finance Innovation & Entrepreneurship Management Global institutes

Francis Crick Institute Imperial hosts global centres to promote inter-disciplinary work:

Energy Futures Laboratory Gandhi Centre for Inclusive Innovation Grantham Institute for Climate Change Institute for Security Science & Technology Centre for Health Economics & Policy Innovation Brevan Howard Centre for Financial Analysis & Technology Global Entrepreneurship & Development Index Data Science Institute Institute for Molecular Science and Engineering Francis Crick Institute Governance

The Faculty Building, designed by Norman Foster Main article: President and Rector of Imperial College London The highest academic official of Imperial College London is the President, formerly known as the Rector. The President is the chief executive, elected by the Council of the college and Chairman of the Senate.[76] The position has been held by Alice Gast, an American chemical engineer, since September 2014.[77]

In 2012, the additional post of Provost was created. James Stirling became the first Provost of Imperial College London in August 2013.[78] He was succeeded as Provost by Ian Walmsley in September 2018.

The council is the governing body of Imperial, it consists of 23 members including the Chairman, the President, the Provost, the President of the Imperial College Union, 4 members of senior staff, and between 9 and 13 lay members who are not employees of Imperial. The current Chair is Sir Philip Dilley.[79]

Finances and endowment

Imperial graduation ceremonies take place in the Royal Albert Hall In 2017/18, Imperial had a consolidated income of £1,033.0 million. It has the eighth largest endowment of any university in the United Kingdom, and the second largest of the universities in London.[3] The college's endowment is sub-divided into three distinct portfolios:

Unitised Scheme – a unit trust vehicle for the college, Faculties and Departments to invest endowments and unfettered income to produce returns for the long term Non-Core Property – a portfolio containing around 120 operational and developmental properties which the college has determined are not core to the academic mission Strategic Asset Investments – containing the college’s shareholding in Imperial Innovations and other restricted equity holdings.[3] Affiliations and partnerships Imperial is a member of the Association of Commonwealth Universities, European University Association, Global Alliance of Technological Universities, League of European Research Universities and the Russell Group. It is a founding member of the Imperial College academic health sciences centre, the Francis Crick Institute and MedCity.

Academic profile Rankings Rankings National rankings Complete (2019)[80] 4 Guardian (2019)[81] 7 Times / Sunday Times (2019)[82] 4 Global rankings ARWU (2018)[83] 24 QS (2019)[84] 8 THE (2019)[85] 9 British Government assessment Teaching Excellence Framework[86] Gold World & Europe

Imperial is ranked 8th worldwide overall by the 2018 Times Higher Education ranking,[87] as well as 3rd in Europe and in the UK after Oxford and Cambridge, and 1st in London. Within the same ranking, Imperial is 4th worldwide in medicine,[88] 9th in natural sciences and mathematics,[89] 9th in computing,[90] 10th in engineering and technology[91] as well as 10th in life sciences.[92]

The college is ranked 8th worldwide by the 2019 QS Top Universities Ranking overall,[93] as well as 4th in Europe, 3rd in the UK and 1st in London. By the same ranking in 2018, Imperial is 6th worldwide in engineering and technology[94] (including 3rd worldwide in civil engineering,[95] 5th in electrical and electronic engineering,[96] 7th in chemical engineering,[97] 8th in mechanical and aeronautical engineering[98] as well as 12th in computing[99]), 10th in natural sciences[100] (including 9th worldwide in environmental sciences,[101] 10th in mathematics,[102] 11th in materials science,[103] 11th in physics and astronomy,[104] 13th in chemistry[105] and 23rd in Earth sciences[106]), 11th in life sciences and medicine[107] (including 11th worldwide in medicine,[108] 17th in pharmacology and 19th in biological sciences[109]), and 16th worldwide for the MBA (6th in Europe[110]).

The World's Most Innovative Universities Rankings by Reuters ranked Imperial 1st in innovation in the UK, and second in Europe behind KU Leuven.[111]

National

Queen's Tower Imperial consistently scores strongly in the UK university rankings and is ranked 4th in the 2016 Times Higher Education "Table of Tables" which combines the results of the 3 main domestic league tables.[112] In the 2016 Complete University Guide, all 14 of the subjects offered by Imperial were ranked top 10 nationally meaning it was one of only two mainstream universities (along with the University of Cambridge) in the UK to have all subjects ranked in the top 10.[113]

Imperial ranked 1st in London and 3rd in the UK in the US News & World Report Global Rankings.[114]

In 2017, Imperial has been awarded the Gold Teaching Excellence Framework (TEF), judging that Imperial "delivers consistently outstanding teaching, learning and outcomes for its students" and that it "is of the highest quality found in the UK".[115]

Career

According to both the 2016 Guardian University Guide and the Complete University Guide, students were ranked as having the top employment prospects among UK universities.[116][117] As of 2014 the average starting salary of a graduate was the highest of any UK university.[118] According to data released by the Department for Education in 2018, Imperial was rated as the 3rd best university in the UK for boosting female graduate earnings with female graduates seeing a 31.3% increase in earnings compared to the average graduate, and the 4th best university for males, with male graduates seeing a 25.3% increase in earnings compared to the average graduate.[119] The New York Times ranked Imperial College as one of the top 10 most-welcomed universities by the global job market.[120]

Research

The main entrance to Imperial from Exhibition Road[121] Imperial submitted a total of 1,257 staff across 14 units of assessment to the 2014 Research Excellence Framework (REF) assessment.[122] This found that 91% of Imperial's research is “world-leading” (46% achieved the highest possible 4* score) or “internationally excellent” (44% achieved 3*), giving an overall GPA of 3.36.[123][124] In rankings produced by Times Higher Education based upon the REF results Imperial was ranked 2nd overall.[123][124] Imperial actively encourages its staff to commercialise their research and as a result has given rise to a large number of spin-out companies based on academic research.[125][126] Imperial has a dedicated technology transfer company, Imperial Innovations.

Imperial College London has a long term partnership with the Massachusetts Institute of Technology.[127][128] In January 2018, the mathematics department of Imperial and the French National Center for Scientific Research launched a joint research laboratory of mathematics – UMI Abraham de Moivre –aiming to tackle the most challenging problems still unsolved and to build a bridge between the British and French scientific knowledges, based on the South Kensington campus of Imperial.[129][130] The Fields medallists Cédric Villani and Martin Hairer hosted the launch presentation.[129]

For its research on Parkinson's disease and Multiple Sclerosis, Imperial hosts the largest brain bank in the world consisting of 296 brains.[131][132]

Admissions UCAS Admission Statistics 2017 2016 2015 2014 2013 Applications[133] 20,395 19,200 18,205 16,570 15,315 Offer Rate (%)[134] 43.6 46.2 50.7 53.6 54.4 Enrols[135] 2,715 2,545 2,630 2,515 2,425 Yield (%) 30.5 28.7 28.5 28.3 29.1 Applicant/Enrolled Ratio 7.51 7.54 6.92 6.59 6.32 Average Entry Tariff[136][note 2] n/a 219 552 567 566 For 2016 entry, the acceptance rate was 13.0% for undergraduates and 16.2% for postgraduates.[137] At undergraduate level, there is roughly 1 place for 8 candidates. For 2016 entry, the domain with the lowest acceptance rate was Mechanical Engineering (11.5:1 ratio). The highest was Bioengineering (3.7:1).[137] By way of example, acceptance ratio in Mathematics was of 9.3:1, in Medicine 8.6:1, in Chemical Engineering 8.3:1 and in Physics 6.7:1.[137]

In the 2019 table by The Complete University Guide, Imperial applicants had the 2nd highest average entry scores in the UK, after Cambridge, with new entrants having an average UCAS tariff of 219.[138]

Imperial is among the most international universities in the United Kingdom,[139][140] with 50% of students from the UK, 16% of students from the EU, and 34% of students from outside the UK or EU.[139][141][142] The student body is 39% female and 61% male.[142] 36.5% of Imperial's undergraduates are privately educated, the fourth highest proportion amongst mainstream British universities.[140]

Libraries The college's central library is located on Queen's Lawn contains the main corpus of the college's collection. It previously also housed the Science Museum's library until 2014.[143] Refurbishment works, including installing air conditioning throughout the library, concluded in late 2018.[144] The Fleming library is located at St Mary's in Paddington, originally the library of St Mary's Hospital Medical School, with other hospital campuses also having college libraries.[145]

Medicine

Queen Elizabeth II opening the Alexander Fleming Building Main articles: Imperial College Healthcare and Imperial College School of Medicine The Imperial Faculty of Medicine was formed through mergers between Imperial and the St Mary's, Charing Cross and Westminster, and Royal Postgraduate medical schools and has six teaching hospitals. It accepts more than 300 undergraduate medical students per year and has around 321 taught and 700 research full-time equivalent postgraduate students.

Imperial College Healthcare NHS Trust was formed on 1 October 2007 by the merger of Hammersmith Hospitals NHS Trust (Charing Cross Hospital, Hammersmith Hospital and Queen Charlotte's and Chelsea Hospital) and St Mary's NHS Trust (St. Mary's Hospital and Western Eye Hospital) with Imperial College London Faculty of Medicine.[146] It is an academic health science centre and manages five hospitals: Charing Cross Hospital, Queen Charlotte's and Chelsea Hospital, Hammersmith Hospital, St Mary's Hospital, and Western Eye Hospital. The Trust is currently one of the largest in the UK and in 2012/13 had a turnover of £971.3 million, employed approximately 9,770 people and treated almost 1.2 million patients.[147]

Other (non-academic health science centres) hospitals affiliated with Imperial College include Chelsea and Westminster Hospital, Royal Brompton Hospital, West Middlesex University Hospital, Hillingdon Hospital, Mount Vernon Hospital, Harefield Hospital, Ealing Hospital, Central Middlesex Hospital, Northwick Park Hospital, St Mark's Hospital, St Charles' Hospital and St Peter's Hospital.[148]

Controversies Accusations of bullying In 2003, it was reported that one third of female academics "believe that discrimination or bullying by managers has held back their careers".[149] Imperial has since won the Athena SWAN Award which recognizes employment practices that are supportive of the careers of women in science, technology, engineering and maths. In 2007, concerns were raised about the methods that were being used to fire people in the Faculty of Medicine.[150][151] However, in 2014, Stefan Grimm, of the Department of Medicine, was found dead after being threatened with dismissal for failure to raise enough grant money.[152] His last email before his passing accused his employers of bullying by demanding that he should get grants worth at least £200,000 per year.[153][154] The college announced an internal inquiry into Stefan Grimm's death, and found that the performance metrics for his position were unreasonable, with new metrics for performance being needed.[155]

Student life Student body For the 2016/17 academic year, Imperial had a total full-time student body of 17,690, consisting of 9,520 undergraduate students and 8,170 postgraduates.[156] 50.7% of the student body is from outside of the UK.[157] 32% of all full-time students came from outside the European Union in 2013–14,[158] and around 13% of the International students had Chinese nationality in 2007–08.[159]

Imperial's male–female ratio for undergraduate students is uneven at approximately 64:36 overall[159] and 5:1 or higher in some engineering courses. However, medicine has an approximate 1:1 ratio with biology degrees tending to be higher.[160]

Queen's Lawn at South Kensington Campus Imperial College Union Imperial College Union is the students' union and is run by five full-time sabbatical officers elected from the student body for a tenure of one year, and a number of permanent members of staff. It is split into constituent unions aligned with the faculties of the college, carrying on the association with the original constituent colleges of Imperial, the Royal College of Science Union, City and Guilds College Union, Royal School of Mines Student's Union and Imperial College School of Medicine Students' Union. The Union is given a large subvention by the university, much of which is spent on maintaining over 300 clubs, projects and societies.[161] Examples of notable student groups and projects are Project Nepal which sends Imperial College students to work on educational development programmes in rural Nepal[162] and the El Salvador Project, a construction based project in Central America.[163] The Union also hosts sports-related clubs such as Imperial College Boat Club and Imperial College Gliding Club.

The Union operates on two sites, with most events at the Union Building on Beit Quad at South Kensington, with mostly medical school events at the Reynold's bar, Charing Cross.

Facilities

Ethos Gym Sports facilities at Imperial's London campuses include four gyms, including the main Ethos gym at the South Kensington Campus, two swimming pools and two sports halls.[164] Imperial has additional sports facilities at the Heston and Harlington sports grounds.

On the South Kensington campus, there are a total of six music practice rooms which consist of upright pianos for usage by people of any grade, and grand pianos which are exclusively for people who have achieved Grade 8 or above.[165]

There are two student bars on the South Kensington campus, one at the Imperial College Union and one at Eastside.[166] There are a number of pubs and bars on campus and also surrounding the campus, which become a popular social activity for Imperial's students. The Pewter tankard collection at Imperial College Union is the largest in Europe, with the majority of clubs and societies having tankards associated with their clubs.[167]

The weekly college farmer's market Student media Imperial College Radio Imperial College Radio (ICRadio) was founded in November 1975 with the intention of broadcasting to the student halls of residence from a studio under Southside, actually commencing broadcasts in late 1976. It now broadcasts from the West Basement of Beit Quad over the internet.[168]

Imperial College TV

Imperial College TV (ICTV) is Imperial College Union's TV station, founded in 1969 and operated from a small TV studio in the Electrical Engineering block. The department had bought an early AMPEX Type A 1-inch videotape recorder and this was used to produce an occasional short news programme which was then played to students by simply moving the VTR and a monitor into a common room. A cable link to the Southside halls of residence was laid in a tunnel under Exhibition Road in 1972. Besides the news, early productions included a film of the Queen opening what was then called College Block.

Felix Newspaper

Felix is weekly student newspaper, first released on 9 December 1949.[169] In addition to news, Felix also carries comic strips, features, opinions, puzzles and reviews, plus reports of trips and Imperial College sporting events.

Student societies

Racing Green Endurance is a student-led project to demonstrate the potential of zero-emission cars. Imperial College Boat Club

The Imperial College Boat Club is the rowing club of Imperial and was founded on 12 December 1919. The college's boat house is located in Putney on the Thames, and was recently refurbished, reopening in 2014.[170] The club has a number of notable accolades, such as three alumni of the college in the gold medal winning GB 8+ at the 2000 Sydney Olympics, along with their coach Martin McElroy. The club has been highly successful, with many wins at Henley Royal Regatta.

Exploration Club

Imperial's Exploration Board was established in 1957 to assist students with a desire for exploration. Trips have included Afghanistan, Alaska, Cameroon, Ethiopia, Fiji, the Himalayas, Iran, Morocco, Norway, Tanzania, Thailand, Ukraine, and the Yukon.[171]

Dramatic Society The Imperial College Dramatic Society (DramSoc[172]) is one of two major theatrical arts societies, with the other being the Musical Theatre Society, and it was founded in 1912.[173] The society puts on three major plays each year, in addition to several smaller fringe productions. It is additionally one the London-based dramatic societies to participate in the London Student Drama Festival,[174] and regularly attends the Edinburgh Fringe. DramSoc is responsible for the day-to-day maintenance of the Union's theatrical space, the Union Concert Hall.

Student housing

Beit Hall

Prince's Gardens, surrounded by college halls of residence Imperial College owns and manages twenty one halls of residence in Inner London, Acton, and Ascot. Over three thousand rooms are available, guaranteeing first year undergraduates a place in College residences.

The majority of halls offer single or twin accommodation with some rooms having en suite facilities. Study bedrooms are provided with basic furniture and with access to shared kitchens and bathrooms. The majority of rooms come with internet access and access to the Imperial network. Most of them are considered among the newest student halls at London universities.

Most students in college or university accommodation are first-year undergraduates, since they are granted a room once they have selected Imperial as their firm offer with UCAS. The majority of older students and postgraduates find accommodation in the private sector, help for which is provided by the college private housing office. However a handful of students may continue to live in halls in later years if they take the position of a "hall senior", and places are available for a small number of returning students in the Evelyn Garden halls.[175] Some students also live in International Students House, London.

List of Halls of Residence:[176]

South Kensington Beit Hall Eastside Halls Linstead Hall Gabor Hall Wilkinson Hall Southside Halls Falmouth Hall Selkirk Hall Tizard Hall Keogh Hall Evelyn Gardens Holbein Hall Southwell Hall Willis Jackson Hall Parsons House Pembridge Hall Putney Boathouse Wilson House Woodward Buildings Xenia

References

"The College crest". Imperial College. Retrieved 29 January 2019.
PJGILL. "Charitable status". Retrieved 30 September 2014.
"Annual Report and Accounts 2017–18" (PDF). Imperial College London. Retrieved 15 December 2018.
Imperial College London. "Imperial College London Statistics 2016–2017" (PDF). Retrieved 4 October 2017.
"Brand colours". Imperial College London. Retrieved 28 Nov 2018.
"Imperial College of Science, Technology and Medicine – Charter" (PDF). Imperial College London.
"Prince Albert's cultural vision and the history of South Kensington: What is Albertopolis?". Royal Albert Hall. Retrieved 2019-01-03.
"Chemistry at Imperial". Imperial College London. Retrieved 2018-12-24.
"City and Guilds College ─ Imperial College". architecture.com. Royal Institute of British Architects. Archived from the original on 2 October 2012.
"Most international universities in the world 2018: top 200". Times Higher Education. 14 March 2018.
"International students | Study". Imperial College London. Retrieved 2018-12-12.
"QS World University Rankings 2018". Top Universities. 2017-02-01. Retrieved 2019-01-08.
"World University Rankings". Times Higher Education (THE). 2018-09-26. Retrieved 2019-01-08.
"ARWU World University Rankings 2018 | Academic Ranking of World Universities 2018 | Top 500 universities | Shanghai Ranking – 2018". www.shanghairanking.com. Retrieved 2019-01-08.
"Reuters Top 100: The World's Most Innovative Universities – 2018". Reuters. 2018-10-11. Retrieved 2019-01-08.
"Award winners | Imperial College London". Imperial.ac.uk. Retrieved 10 March 2015.
"Royal School of Mines – Imperial College". architecture.com. Royal Institute of British Architects. Archived from the original on 15 September 2012.
"Lost Hospitals of London". ezitis.myzen.co.uk. Retrieved 2018-12-27.
"A timeline of College developments". www.imperial.ac.uk. Imperial College London. Retrieved 2018-12-27.
Ballantyne, John (August 2004). "St Mary's: the History of a London Teaching Hospital". Journal of the Royal Society of Medicine. 97 (8): 405–406. ISSN 0141-0768. PMC 1079568.
"Albertopolis - the wisdom of Prince Albert". www.chr.org.uk. Cultural Heritage Resources. Retrieved 2018-12-24.
"Imperial College". www.british-history.ac.uk. British History Online. Retrieved 2018-12-24.
"Royal College of Science ─ Imperial College". architecture.com. Royal Institute of British Architects. Archived from the original on 2 October 2012.
The Oxford Dictionary of Abbreviations. ISBN 9780192800732.
"City and Guilds of London Institute". technicaleducationmatters.org. Technical Education Matters. Retrieved 2018-12-24.
F. H. W. Sheppard, ed. (1975). Imperial College. Survey of London: Volume 38, South Kensington Museums Area. London County Council. pp. 233–247 – via british-history.ac.uk.
The Report of the Board of Education to the King's Most Excellent Majesty in Council for the Year 1905–1906. HMSO. 1906. pp. 16–17.
"Imperial College of Science and Technology". Nature. 76 (1959): 56–57. 16 May 1907. doi:10.1038/076056a0.
University of London, the Historical Record. University of London Press. 1912. p. 85.
Hannah Gay (2007). The History of Imperial College London, 1907-2007. World Scientific. p. 71. ISBN 9781860947087.
"The London Imperial College of Science and Technology". Science. XLIX (1261): 209–210. 28 February 1919.
"The Imperial College of Science and Technology". Nature. 105 (2632): 173–175. 16 May 1907. doi:10.1038/105173a0.
J. W. Williamson (21 October 1920). "The Imperial College as a University of Science and Technology". Nature. 106 (2660): 262–263. doi:10.1038/106262a0.
"Imperial College 1920–1929". Imperial College. Retrieved 21 January 2019.
"Imperial College 1940–1949". Imperial College. Retrieved 21 January 2019.
"Imperial celebrates its newest graduates at Commemoration Day 2018". Imperial College. Retrieved 21 January 2019.
Jean Bocock, lewis Baston, Peter Scott and David Smith (2003). "American influence on British higher education: science, technology, and the problem of university expansion, 1945-1963". Minerva. 41 (4): 327–346. doi:10.1023/B:MINE.0000005154.25610.b2. JSTOR 41821255.
Michael Shattock (1 October 2012). Making Policy in British Higher Education 1945-2011. McGraw-Hill Education (UK). ISBN 9780335241873.
"Higher Technological Education (Government Policy)". Hansard. 11 June 1952. Retrieved 22 January 2019.
John Boyd-Carpenter (29 January 1953). "Imperial College Of Science And Technology (Expansion)". Hansard.
{{cite book|chapter-url=https://www.british-history.ac.uk/vch/middx/vol1/pp345-359#h3-0004%7Cpages=345–359%7Cwork=A History of the County of Middlesex: Volume 1, Physique, Archaeology, Domesday, Ecclesiastical Organization, the Jews, Religious Houses, Education of Working Classes To 1870, Private Education From Sixteenth Century|chapter=The University of London: The Constituent Colleges|title=The Imperial College of Science and Technology|year=1969|publisher=[[Victoria County History|editors= J S Cockburn, H P F King and K G T McDonnell|via=British History Online}}
"The Queen's Tower". Imperial College. Retrieved 29 January 2019.
"The Wolfson Foundation 1955-2015: Sixty Years of Philanthropy" (PDF). The Wolfson Foundation. 2015. pp. 29, 57.
"Imperial College - Centenary website - Timeline - 1960-1969". www.imperial.ac.uk. Retrieved 19 December 2016.
Rosalind M. O. Pritchard (1995). "Has the Federation a Future? The Case of the University of London". Oxford Review of Education. 21 (1): 47–65. doi:10.1080/0305498950210104. JSTOR 1050793.
"No More Special Relationship in Kensington" (PDF). Nature. 221 (5176): 118. 11 January 1969. doi:10.1038/221118a0.
"Timeline: Imperial College 1970–1979". Imperial College. Retrieved 2 February 2019.
"Timeline: Imperial College 1980–1989". Imperial College. Retrieved 2 February 2019.
"Charter and Statutes" (PDF). Imperial College. Explanatory note. Retrieved 2 February 2019.
"Imperial College Press". Icpress.co.uk. Archived from the original on 28 July 2011. Retrieved 23 March 2011.
"WEST LONDON MEDICINE - PAST AND FUTURE". Imperial College London. Retrieved 2018-06-24.
Adam, David (17 October 2002). "Top London colleges consider merger to form research giant". Nature. 419 (6908): 658. doi:10.1038/419658a.
Richard Alleyne (15 October 2002). "Imperial and UCL disucss merger to be world player".
Donald MacLeod (18 November 2002). "Opposition ends Imperial and UCL merger dream". The Guardian.
Frood, Arran (27 January 2003). "London's little idea". BBC News. Retrieved 20 July 2012.
"Nanotech under the microscope". BBC News. 12 June 2003. Retrieved 20 July 2012.
"A timeline of College Developments". Imperial College London.
"New identity for Imperial College Business School". Imperial College London. Retrieved 20 June 2017.
"Imperial College London – Imperial College London to begin negotiations to withdraw from the University of London". Imperial.ac.uk. 9 December 2005. Retrieved 16 June 2011.
"Imperial College splits from University of London". The Guardian. 5 October 2006. Retrieved 27 November 2015.
"Imperial College top choice for Singaporean students". Comp.nus.edu.sg. Archived from the original on 11 June 2011. Retrieved 23 March 2011.
"University of London: Updated position statement re: Imperial College London". London.ac.uk. Archived from the original on 10 December 2006. Retrieved 16 June 2011.
"Three's company: Imperial, King's join UCL in £700m medical project". Times Higher Education. 15 April 2011. Retrieved 16 April 2011.
Smithers, Rebecca (23 March 2015). "James Dyson Foundation gives £12m for creation of engineering school". The Guardian. London. Retrieved 31 March 2015.
"Henry Cole Wing". 28 September 2012.
"MIT expands partnership with Imperial College London". MIT News. Retrieved 2018-05-12.
"London's top tourist attractions see visitor numbers fall". 16 March 2018.
"Food and drink".
"IC Tennis - Imperial College Lawn Tennis Club". 28 August 2018.
Barrett, Claer (5 August 2014), Imperial unveils details of £3bn campus extension – via Financial Times
Djaba, Andy. "White City Woes". felixonline.co.uk. Retrieved 2018-12-24.
"Novartis joins rush of science companies moving to White City". Evening Standard. 2018-11-28. Retrieved 2018-12-24.
Fyles, Fred S. "College reaches out to White City community with Invention Rooms". felixonline.co.uk. Retrieved 2018-12-24.
"St Mary's Fleming Library". Imperial College London. Retrieved 26 December 2018.
"Faculties and departments". Imperial College London. Retrieved 21 April 2018.
Past Rectors, Imperial College London, retrieved 2009-03-21
"Professor Alice Gast to become sixteenth head and first woman to lead Imperial - Imperial News - Imperial College London".
"James Stirling to be Imperial's first Provost". Imperial College London. 12 December 2012. Retrieved 14 January 2013.
"Composition and Membership". Imperial College London. Retrieved 14 January 2018.
"University League Table 2019". The Complete University Guide.
"University league tables 2019". The Guardian. 29 May 2018.
"The Times and Sunday Times University Good University Guide 2019". Times Newspapers.
"Academic Ranking of World Universities 2018". Shanghai Ranking Consultancy.
"QS World University Rankings 2019". Quacquarelli Symonds Ltd.
"World University Rankings 2019". Times Higher Education.
"Teaching Excellence Framework outcomes". Higher Education Funding Council for England.
"World University Rankings 2018". Times Higher Education (THE). 2018-08-28.
"World University Rankings 2018 by subject: clinical, pre-clinical and health". Times Higher Education (THE). 2017-09-14. Retrieved 2018-06-13.
"World University Rankings 2018 by subject: physical sciences". Times Higher Education (THE). 2017-09-12. Retrieved 2018-06-13.
"World University Rankings 2018 by subject: computer science". Times Higher Education (THE). 2017-09-12. Retrieved 2018-06-13.
"World University Rankings 2018 by subject: engineering and technology". Times Higher Education (THE). 2017-09-12. Retrieved 2018-06-13.
"World University Rankings 2018 by subject: life sciences". Times Higher Education (THE). 2017-09-14. Retrieved 2018-06-13.
"QS World University Rankings 2019". Top Universities. 2018-08-28. Retrieved 2018-06-13.
"Engineering and Technology". Top Universities. 2018-02-22. Retrieved 2018-06-13.
"Engineering - Civil & Structural". Top Universities. 2018-02-22. Retrieved 2018-06-13.
"Engineering - Electrical & Electronic". Top Universities. 2018-02-22. Retrieved 2018-06-13.
"Engineering - Chemical". Top Universities. 2018-02-22. Retrieved 2018-06-13.
"Engineering - Mechanical, Aeronautical & Manufacturing". Top Universities. 2018-02-22. Retrieved 2018-06-13.
"Computer Science & Information Systems". Top Universities. 2018-02-22. Retrieved 2018-06-13.
"Natural Science". Top Universities. 2018-02-22. Retrieved 2018-06-13.
"Environmental Sciences". Top Universities. 2018-02-22. Retrieved 2018-06-13.
"Mathematics". Top Universities. 2018-02-22. Retrieved 2018-06-13.
"Materials Science". Top Universities. 2018-02-22. Retrieved 2018-06-13.
"Physics & Astronomy". Top Universities. 2018-02-22. Retrieved 2018-06-13.
"Chemistry". Top Universities. 2018-02-22. Retrieved 2018-06-13.
"Earth & Marine Sciences". Top Universities. 2018-02-22. Retrieved 2018-06-13.
"Life Sciences and Medicine". Top Universities. 2018-02-22. Retrieved 2018-06-13.
"Medicine". Top Universities. 2018-02-22. Retrieved 2018-06-13.
"Biological Sciences". Top Universities. 2018-02-22. Retrieved 2018-06-13.
"World University Rankings - Full Time MBA: Global 2018". TopMBA.com. 2017-11-23. Retrieved 2018-08-21.
"Reuters". Reuters. 11 October 2018.
Chris Havergal (15 October 2015). "THE 'Table of Tables' 2016: University of Cambridge top for fifth year running". Times Higher Education.
"Who's Who in the Subject League Tables". thecompleteuniversityguide.co.uk.
"Top Universities in Europe | US News Best Global Universities". Usnews.com. 28 October 2014. Retrieved 10 March 2015.
Students, Office for (2018-02-13). "TEF Outcomes - Office for Students". www.officeforstudents.org.uk. Retrieved 2018-05-17.
"Guardian University Guide". The Guardian. 2016-05-24.
"Career University Guide". Career Prospects.
"Login". Retrieved 30 September 2014.
"Undergraduate degrees: relative labour market returns (Table 7: HEI - conditional impact on earnings five years after graduation)". Department for Education. Retrieved 17 December 2018.
"What the job market wants". The New York Times. 25 October 2012. Retrieved 7 February 2013.
"Main Entrance &vbar; Administration and support services &vbar; Imperial College London".
"REF 2014 winners: who performed best?". Times Higher Education. 18 December 2014. Retrieved 5 April 2015.
"Results". Imperial College London. Retrieved 2018-05-19.
"Overall ranking of institutions including power market share". Times Higher Education. 18 December 2014. Retrieved 5 April 2015.
"Background to the Group – Imperial Innovations". Archived from the original on 31 July 2016.
"How Imperial College is turning innovation into cash". 30 November 2015.
"MIT and Imperial launch 'unparalleled' student exchange | Imperial News | Imperial College London". Imperial News. Retrieved 2018-03-21.
"MIT expands partnership with Imperial College London". MIT News. Retrieved 2018-03-21.
"Fields Medal winners launch new mathematics laboratory | Imperial News | Imperial College London". Imperial News. Retrieved 2018-05-17.
ARTIFICA. "Imperial College London and CNRS create joint laboratory to bring world's best mathematicians together - CNRS Web site - CNRS". www2.cnrs.fr (in French). Retrieved 2018-05-17.
"UK Parkinson's Disease Society Tissue Bank". Parkinsonstissuebank.org.uk. 26 April 2009. Retrieved 23 March 2011.
Green, Chris (20 April 2009). "Paxman to donate brain to charity". The Independent. London. Retrieved 2 April 2010.
"End of Cycle 2017 Data Resources DR4_001_03 Applications by provider". UCAS. UCAS. 2017. Retrieved 25 January 2018.
"Sex, area background and ethnic group: I50 Imperial College London". UCAS. UCAS. 2017. Retrieved 25 January 2018.
"End of Cycle 2017 Data Resources DR4_001_02 Main scheme acceptances by provider". UCAS. UCAS. 2017. Retrieved 25 January 2018.
"Top UK University League Table and Rankings". Complete University Guide.
"Admission Statistics" (PDF). Imperial College London Statistics. Imperial College London. Retrieved 7 October 2017.
"The 10 hardest universities to get into". The Telegraph. 2018-06-25. ISSN 0307-1235. Retrieved 2018-07-28.
"Most international universities in the world 2018: top 200". Times Higher Education (THE). 2018-03-14. Retrieved 2018-03-19.
"Widening participation: UK Performance Indicators 2016/17". hesa.ac.uk. Higher Education Statistics Authority. Retrieved 1 February 2018.
"The World's Most International Universities 2017". Times Higher Education (THE). 2017-02-01. Retrieved 2018-02-10.
"Where do HE students study?". hesa.ac.uk. Higher Education Statistics Authority. Retrieved 9 February 2018.
"Science Museum Library closes to prepare for new research centre". Imperial News. Imperial College London. Retrieved 2018-12-25.
"Imperial College London Refurbishment".
"Our libraries". www.imperial.ac.uk. Imperial College London. Retrieved 2018-12-25.
"About us – Imperial College Healthcare NHS Trust Internet". Imperial.nhs.uk. Retrieved 23 March 2011.
"Annual Report 2012/13" (PDF). Imperial College Healthcare NHS Trust. Archived from the original (PDF) on 22 December 2014. Retrieved 28 April 2013.
"Meet the Council". Chelsea and Westminster NHS Foundation Trust. Archived from the original on 14 September 2009. Retrieved 14 September 2009.
Woodward, Will; Editor, Education (2003-04-18). "Female staff 'feel bullied' at Imperial College". The Guardian. Retrieved 6 December 2014.
"Crude recipe for a 'chicken-run' sector". 2007-05-31. Retrieved 6 December 2014.
Colquhoun, David (2007). "How to get good science" (PDF). Physiology News. 69: 12–14.
"Imperial College London to 'review procedures' after death of academic". 2014-11-27. Retrieved 6 December 2014.
"Publish and perish at Imperial College London: the death of Stefan Grimm". December 2014. Retrieved 6 December 2014.
"Imperial College professor Stefan Grimm 'was given grant income target'". 2014-12-03. Retrieved 6 December 2014.
"Stefan Grimm inquest: new policies may not have prevented suicide". Times Higher Education (THE). 9 April 2015. Retrieved 23 January 2017.
"2016/17 Students by HE provider, level, mode and domicile" (CSV). Higher Education Statistics Agency. Retrieved 25 March 2018.
"World-ranked universities with the most international students". Times Higher Education. Retrieved 30 September 2015.
"2013/14 Students by HE provider, level, mode and domicile". Higher Education Statistics Agency. Archived from the original (XLSX) on 3 March 2016. Retrieved 8 November 2015.
"Statistics Pocket Guide 2009–10" (PDF). Imperial College London. Retrieved 16 August 2013.
"Search best UK universities, make university comparisons and see student satisfaction ratings and UCAS points". Unistats. Retrieved 23 March 2011.
Dave Parry. "Imperial College Union". Union.ic.ac.uk. Archived from the original on 30 April 2006. Retrieved 16 June 2011.
"Felix : The student voice of Imperial College London" (PDF). Felixonline.co.uk. Retrieved 10 March 2015.
"Sponsors". Elsalvadorproject.org.uk. Retrieved 10 March 2015.
Imperial College London. "Imperial College Sports Facilities". imperial.ac.uk. Retrieved 21 March 2012.
Imperial College London. "Imperial College Music Facilities". imperial.ac.uk. Retrieved 21 March 2012.
Imperial College Union. "Food and Drink". imperialcollegeunion.org. Retrieved 21 March 2012.
"Questions about Tankards". Archived from the original on 23 May 2017.
"Imperial College Radio, London, UK". Icradio.com. Retrieved 16 June 2011.
"Imperial College - Centenary website - Timeline - 1940-1949". www.ic.ac.uk.
"Putney Boathouse development‌". Imperial College London. Retrieved 2018-12-25.
"Exploration Club". A timeline of College Developments.
"DramSoc". DramSoc. Retrieved 2018-12-25.
"Dramatic Changes" (371). Felix Newspaper. 9 December 1974. Retrieved 28 June 2015.
"London Student Drama Festival". UCLU Drama. UCLU Drama Society. Archived from the original on 1 July 2015. Retrieved 28 June 2015.
"Accommodation for returning students".
"Undergraduate halls".
"Fields medallists". Imperial College London. Retrieved 2018-07-13.
‘KIBBLE, Sir Thomas (Walter Bannerman)’, Who Was Who, A & C Black, an imprint of Bloomsbury Publishing plc, 1920–2016; online edn, Oxford University Press, 2016 ; online edn, Nov 2016 accessed 2 April 2017
‘VIRDEE, Sir Tejinder Singh’, Who's Who 2017, A & C Black, an imprint of Bloomsbury Publishing plc, 2017; online edn, Oxford University Press, 2016 ; online edn, Nov 2016 accessed 2 April 2017
‘PENDRY, Sir John (Brian)’, Who's Who 2017, A & C Black, an imprint of Bloomsbury Publishing plc, 2017; online edn, Oxford University Press, 2016 ; online edn, Nov 2016 accessed 2 April 2017
‘INGOLD, Sir Christopher (Keik)’, Who Was Who, A & C Black, an imprint of Bloomsbury Publishing plc, 1920–2016; online edn, Oxford University Press, 2014 ; online edn, April 2014 accessed 2 April 2017
‘PERKIN, Sir William Henry’, Who Was Who, A & C Black, an imprint of Bloomsbury Publishing plc, 1920–2016; online edn, Oxford University Press, 2015 ; online edn, Feb 2015 accessed 2 April 2017
‘FRANKLAND, Sir Edward’, Who Was Who, A & C Black, an imprint of Bloomsbury Publishing plc, 1920–2016; online edn, Oxford University Press, 2014 ; online edn, April 2014 accessed 2 April 2017
‘CROOKES, Prof. Sir William’, Who Was Who, A & C Black, an imprint of Bloomsbury Publishing plc, 1920–2016; online edn, Oxford University Press, 2014 ; online edn, April 2014 accessed 2 April 2017
Fersht, Sir Alan (Roy), WHO'S WHO & WHO WAS WHO. Retrieved 27 Dec. 2017, from http://www.ukwhoswho.com/view/10.1093/ww/9780199540884.001.0001/ww-9780199540884-e-15668.
Phillips, Prof. David, WHO'S WHO & WHO WAS WHO. Retrieved 27 Dec. 2017, from http://www.ukwhoswho.com/view/10.1093/ww/9780199540884.001.0001/ww-9780199540884-e-30743.
‘HOPKINS, Prof. Harold Horace’, Who Was Who, A & C Black, an imprint of Bloomsbury Publishing plc, 1920–2016; online edn, Oxford University Press, 2014 ; online edn, April 2014 accessed 2 April 2017
‘WHITEHEAD, Alfred North’, Who Was Who, A & C Black, an imprint of Bloomsbury Publishing plc, 1920–2016; online edn, Oxford University Press, 2014 ; online edn, April 2014 accessed 2 April 2017
‘COWLEY, Prof. Steven’, Who's Who 2017, A & C Black, an imprint of Bloomsbury Publishing plc, 2017; online edn, Oxford University Press, 2016 ; online edn, Nov 2016 accessed 2 April 2017
‘FLEMING, Sir (John) Ambrose’, Who Was Who, A & C Black, an imprint of Bloomsbury Publishing plc, 1920–2016; online edn, Oxford University Press, 2014 ; online edn, April 2014 accessed 2 April 2017
Davies, Dame Sally (Claire), WHO'S WHO & WHO WAS WHO. Retrieved 27 Dec. 2017, from http://www.ukwhoswho.com/view/10.1093/ww/9780199540884.001.0001/ww-9780199540884-e-13126.
"MP Chi Onwurah: "As an engineer, I was often the only Black person in the room" | Imperial News | Imperial College London". Imperial News. Retrieved 2018-11-10.
Higgins, Dame Julia (Stretton), WHO'S WHO & WHO WAS WHO. Retrieved 27 Dec. 2017, from http://www.ukwhoswho.com/view/10.1093/ww/9780199540884.001.0001/ww-9780199540884-e-20092.
Hackitt, Dame Judith (Elizabeth), WHO'S WHO & WHO WAS WHO. Retrieved 27 Dec. 2017, from http://www.ukwhoswho.com/view/10.1093/ww/9780199540884.001.0001/ww-9780199540884-e-151505.
Newitt, Dudley Maurice, WHO'S WHO & WHO WAS WHO. Retrieved 27 Dec. 2017, from http://www.ukwhoswho.com/view/10.1093/ww/9780199540891.001.0001/ww-9780199540884-e-157958.
Brown of Cambridge, Baroness, (Julia Elizabeth King), WHO'S WHO & WHO WAS WHO. Retrieved 27 Dec. 2017, from http://www.ukwhoswho.com/view/10.1093/ww/9780199540884.001.0001/ww-9780199540884-e-41612.
Wells, Herbert George, Oxford Dictionary of National Biography. Retrieved 27 Dec. 2017, from http://www.oxforddnb.com/view/10.1093/ref:odnb/9780198614128.001.0001/odnb-9780198614128-e-36831.
‘ROBINS, Sir Ralph (Harry)’, Who's Who 2017, A & C Black, an imprint of Bloomsbury Publishing plc, 2017; online edn, Oxford University Press, 2016 ; online edn, Nov 2016 accessed 2 April 2017
‘MAY, Dr Brian Harold’, Who's Who 2017, A & C Black, an imprint of Bloomsbury Publishing plc, 2017; online edn, Oxford University Press, 2016 ; online edn, Nov 2016 accessed 2 April 2017
‘VOGEL, Hon. Sir Julius’, Who Was Who, A & C Black, an imprint of Bloomsbury Publishing plc, 1920–2016; online edn, Oxford University Press, 2014 ; online edn, April 2014 accessed 2 April 2017
‘GANDHI, Rajiv’, Who Was Who, A & C Black, an imprint of Bloomsbury Publishing plc, 1920–2016; online edn, Oxford University Press, 2014 ; online edn, April 2014 accessed 2 April 2017
‘THOMAS, Prof. Huw Jeremy Wyndham’, Who's Who 2017, A & C Black, an imprint of Bloomsbury Publishing plc, 2017; online edn, Oxford University Press, 2016 ; online edn, Nov 2016 accessed 2 April 2017
‘BANNISTER, Sir Roger (Gilbert)’, Who's Who 2017, A & C Black, an imprint of Bloomsbury Publishing plc, 2017; online edn, Oxford University Press, 2016 ; online edn, Nov 2016 accessed 2 April 2017
‘MISTRY, Cyrus Pallonji’, Who's Who 2017, A & C Black, an imprint of Bloomsbury Publishing plc, 2017; online edn, Oxford University Press, 2016 ; online edn, Nov 2016 accessed 2 April 2017

Ref: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Imperial_College_London http://www.imperial.ac.uk/

Project Created on March 11th, 2019 by Pedro L. Baldo D. ARR.

Imperial College London —en español: Escuela Imperial de Londres—, oficialmente The Imperial College of Science, Technology and Medicine, es una universidad británica fundada en 1907, situada en Londres en el barrio de South Kensington. Está especializada en ciencia, ingeniería, medicina y ciencias empresariales. El Imperial College atrae estudiantes del mundo entero (más de 125 nacionalidades representadas en 2016). Cuenta con 15 premios Nobel, 3 medallas Fields y más de 70 Fellows of the Royal Society.1​ Las contribuciones de la universidad a la sociedad incluyen el descubrimiento de la penicilina, los desarrollos de la holografía y de la fibra óptica.2​ El Imperial College está constantemente entre las diez universidades más prestigiosas del mundo en las clasificaciones internacionales.3​4​

Imperial College fue inicialmente un componente de la Universidad de Londres antes de convertirse en una institución independiente con motivo de su centenario, en 2007. Es miembro de la Liga de Universidades de Investigación Europeas desde el 1 de enero 2010. Imperial es también un miembro del Russell Group, del G5, de la Asociación de universidades del Commonwealth y del "Triángulo de oro" de las universidades británicas.

Índice 1 Historia 2 Campus 3 Estructura académica 4 Carreras de Grado 5 Reputación académica 6 Investigación 7 Graduados 8 Alojamiento de estudiantes 9 Asociación de alumnos 9.1 Clubes y sociedades en el Imperial 10 Medios de comunicación de estudiantes 10.1 Radio del Imperial College 10.2 STOIC (Televisión de Estudiantes) 10.3 Felix 10.4 Live! 11 Composición del alumnado 12 Antiguos alumnos y profesores 13 Referencias 14 Enlaces externos Historia

Entrada de la Royal School of Mines (Escuela Real de Minas) El Imperial College fue fundado en 1907, con la unión del City and Guilds College (Escuela de la Ciudad y de los Oficios), la Royal School of Mines (Real Escuela de Minas) y el Royal College of Science (Real Escuela de Ciencias); todos ellos fundados entre 1845 y 1878. Estas entidades continuaron existiendo como escuelas integrantes de la universidad. Eduardo VII legitimó esta universidad el 8 de julio de 1907.

En años posteriores las siguientes instituciones se fundieron en la escuela de medicina del Imperial College: la St Mary's Medical School (Escuela de Medicina de Santa María), en 1988; el National Heart and Lung Institute (Instituto Nacional del Corazón y Pulmón) en 1995; y el Charing Cross and Westminster Medical School (Escuela Médica de Charing Cross y Westminster), en 1988. La escuela de medicina del Imperial College se convirtió en la cuarta escuela integrante de la universidad. En 1997 el tamaño de la escuela médica aumentó con la fusión de la Royal Postgraduate Medical School (Real Escuela Médica de Posgrado) y el Institute of Obstetrics and Gynaecology (Instituto de Obstetricia y Ginecología). En 2000 la escuela médica se expandió todavía más con la entrada del Kennedy Institute of Rheumatology (Instituto Kennedy de Reumatología). También en 2000, el Imperial College absorbió al Wye College, la escuela agrícola de la Universidad de Londres en Wye, Kent. En diciembre de 2005, la Universidad anunció la creación de un parque de ciencia en el campus de Wye, invirtiendo cerca de 1 000 millones de libras esterlinas.

En 2002 el sistema de las escuelas integrantes fue abolido en favor de una nueva estructura de facultades. En octubre de ese mismo año, se propuso una fusión con el University College London, pero fue desechada un mes más tarde debido a las protestas tanto del personal como de los estudiantes de ambas universidades.

En 2003, el Privy Council dio a la Universidad poderes para conceder sus propios títulos. Ejercer este poder resulta incompatible con permanecer en la Universidad de Londres, así que el 9 de diciembre de 2005 Imperial anunció que estaba entablando negociaciones para retirarse de la Universidad de Londres. El Imperial College se independizó el 8 de julio de 2007, fecha de la celebración del primer centenario de la institución. Los primeros estudiantes que recibirán títulos del Imperial College en lugar de títulos de la Universidad de Londres empezaron a estudiar en 2008, pero a todos los estudiantes en el periodo transitorio se les ofrecerá la posibilidad de elegir entre un título de Imperial o un título de la Universidad de Londres.

El Imperial College es miembro del grupo Russell de Universidades y del AMBA (Asociación de Masters en Administración de negocios). Es también uno de los cinco miembros de la IDEA league. El nombre oficial de la universidad es Imperial College of Science, Technology and Medicine (Colegio Imperial de Ciencia, Tecnología y Medicina), nombre que ha usado en sus relaciones públicas hasta 2002.

Campus La actividad del Imperial College está centrada en el campus de South Kensington que se encuentra en una zona con una alta concentración de instituciones culturales y académicas conocida como Albertópolis (llamada así en honor del príncipe Alberto), consorte de la Reina Victoria. Se encuentran cerca del Imperial el Natural History Museum (museo de historia natural), el Science Museum (museo de ciencias), el Victoria and Albert Museum (museo de Victoria y Alberto), la Royal College of Music (escuela real de música), la Royal College of Art (escuela real de arte) y el Royal Albert Hall. El Imperial tiene otros dos campus grandes, uno en Silwood Park (cerca de Ascot, Berkshire) y otro en Wye (cercano a Ashford, Kent). Además la universidad tiene varios campus médicas asociados a diferentes hospitales de la zona metropolitana de Londres, incluyendo Mary's Hospital, Charing Cross Hospital, Northwick Park & St. Mark's Hospital y Hammersmith Hospital. La expansión del campus de South Kensington en los sesenta absorbió el sitio del pasado Imperial Institute, diseñado por Thomas Colcutt, del cual sólo queda la Queen's Tower (torre de la reina) de 85 metros de alto entre otros edificios más modernos.

Actualmente se está llevando a cabo una extensiva renovación de varios edificios de la universidad, teniendo en mente las celebraciones del centenario en 2007. Una contribución de 27 millones de libras por parte del ex-alumno Gary Tanaka en 2000, permitió la construcción de un nuevo edificio para la escuela de negocios (ahora conocida como Tanaka Business School). La escuela de negocios dio a la universidad una imponente «entrada principal», que ya es un signo oficial del Imperial College. La entrada principal fue inaugurada por la reina Isabel II en 2004.

A finales de 2005 el colegio mayor de Southside, en los Prince's Gardens (Jardines del Príncipe) fue demolido para hacer espacio para un nuevo y moderno edificio que se aproximará más al estilo de los edificios circundantes. Esto es una parte de la renovación en proceso de los Prince's Gardens que verá otros colegios mayores de la plaza reemplazados y los jardines rediseñados.

En enero de 2006, el nuevo centro deportivo de la universidad, llamado Ethos, fue abierto para el uso de estudiantes y personal de la universidad. El centro fue construido con un costo de 17,5 millones de libras. Todos los estudiantes tienen acceso al gimnasio y a la piscina.

La biblioteca central que se encuentra en el campus de South Kensington, también acoge la biblioteca del Science Museum (Museo de Ciencias) además de los libros de la universidad.

Estructura académica Imperial College ofrece carreras y educación de posgrado; teniendo su investigación y enseñanza dividida en tres facultades, cada una dirigida por un director. Las facultades son: Ingeniería, Medicina y Ciencias Naturales. Además de las tres facultades, existe una escuela de negocios y un departamento de humanidades cuyo propósito es proveer de optativas y cursos de lenguas apartados de los campos de ciencias a los estudiantes de otras facultades y departamentos. Se anima a los estudiantes a coger estas clases ya sea por créditos o en su tiempo libre. Los cursos de humanidades abarcan un gran rango de temas incluyendo filosofía, ética en la ciencia y en la ingeniería, historia, literatura moderna y drama, arte en el siglo XX y estudios de cine. Los cursos de lenguas disponibles son: francés, alemán, español, italiano, japonés, ruso, árabe y chino mandarín.

Carreras de Grado

The Queen's Tower (La Torre de la Reina). Las carreras que se pueden encontrar en el Imperial College están divididas entre las tres facultades que posee:

Facultad de Ingeniería: Ingeniería aeronáutica Bioingeniería Ingeniería química Ingeniería civil y medioambiental Ciencias de la Computación Ingeniería geológica Ingeniería de diseño industrial Ingeniería eléctrica y electrónica Ingeniería de materiales Ingeniería mecánica Facultad de Medicina: Medicina Farmacología Ciencia biomédica Facultad de Ciencias Naturales: Química Ciencias biológicas Bioquímica y biotecnología Biología Física Matemáticas Reputación académica El Imperial ha sido constantemente colocada entre las tres mejores universidades en el Reino Unido según las tablas de universidades de los periódicos. Clasificaciones recientes muestran que, a pesar de sólo encargarse de asignaturas de ciencias, es la tercera en general. Por otro lado en ingeniería y en medicina está a la cabeza de las clasificaciones. Los periódicos The Sunday Times y The Guardian pusieron a Imperial como la tercera universidad de Reino Unido. Otro periódico, The Financial Times, consideró al Imperial entre las diez mejores universidades de Europa. El FT MBA (máster en administración de negocios estudiado a jornada completa) fue puntuado como el mejor de Europa, y dentro de los tres mejores en el mundo, según Entrepreneurship. Las tablas del suplemento de educación superior de The Times de 2008 colocan al Imperial como la quinta mejor universidad del mundo y tercera en Reino Unido, por encima de universidades como el Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT).

Profesores e investigadores suman cerca de 3000 personas. De estos, 73 son miembros de la Royal Society y dos son Medallistas Fields.

La antigua entrada de la Royal School of Mines Ganadores de la Medalla Fields (el más alto honor mundial que un matemático puede recibir que se entrega cada cuatro años5​) del Imperial son6​:

Klaus Roth, FRS (1958) Simon Donaldson (1986) Martin Hairer7​ (2014) Ganadores de Premios Nobel del Imperial8​:

George Paget Thomson, Premio Nobel de Física en 1937 Patrick Maynard Stuart Blackett, Premio Nobel de Física en 1948 Dennis Gabor, Premio Nobel de Física en 1971 Abdus Salam, Premio Nobel de Física en 1979 Walter Norman Haworth, Premio Nobel de Química en 1939 Cyril Norman Hinshelwood, Premio Nobel de Química en 1956 George Porter, Premio Nobel de Química en 1967 Derek Barton, Premio Nobel de Química en 1969 Geoffrey Wilkinson, Premio Nobel de Química en 1973 Frederick Gowland Hopkins, Premio Nobel de Fisiología y Medicina en 1929 Alexander Fleming, Premio Nobel de Fisiología y Medicina en 1945 Ernst Boris Chain, Premio Nobel de Fisiología y Medicina en 1945 Andrew Fielding Huxley, Premio Nobel de Fisiología y Medicina en 1963 Rodney Robert Porter, Premio Nobel de Fisiología y Medicina en 1972 Equipos del Imperial College ganaron el University Challenge (reto de universidades) en 1996 y 2001.

Investigación Imperial presentó un total de 1,257 empleados en 14 unidades de evaluación para la evaluación del Research Excellence Framework (REF) de 2014. Esto encontró que el 91% de la investigación de Imperial es "líder mundial" (46% logró el puntaje 4*, el más alto posible) o "excelente a nivel internacional" (44% logró 3*), lo que arroja un GPA general de 3.36. En las clasificaciones producidas por Times Higher Education en base a los resultados de REF, Imperial se ubicó en el segundo lugar general.9​

Imperial College tiene una asociación académica y de investigación a largo plazo con el Instituto de Tecnología de Massachusetts.10​11​

En enero 2018, el departamento de matemáticas del Imperial y el Centro Nacional Francés para la Investigación Científica pusieron en marcha un laboratorio conjunto de investigación de las matemáticas - UMI Abraham de Moivre - para abordar los problemas más difíciles y construir un puente entre los conocimientos matemáticos británicos y franceses.12​13​ El laboratorio está basado en el campus de South Kensington del Imperial. Los medallistas Fields Cédric Villani y Martin Hairer fueron los anfitriones de la presentación de lanzamiento.12​

Para su investigación sobre la enfermedad de Parkinson y la esclerosis múltiple, Imperial alberga el banco de cerebros más grande del mundo que consta de 296 cerebros.14​15​

El Imperial College tiene una compañía dedicada a la transferencia de tecnología. Esta compañía es Imperial Innovations. Imperial anima activamente a su personal a comercializar sus investigaciones y como resultado de esto han aparecido un gran número de compañías basadas en la investigación académica en el Imperial College.16​

Graduados

La entrada principal del Imperial College en Exhibition Road (Imperial College Business School) La media del primer salario de los graduados del Imperial College es, con diferencia, la más alta entre los graduados británicos. Según los datos de The Sunday Times, el salario medio al empezar a trabajar fue de 24.257 libras al año.

Alojamiento de estudiantes El Imperial College posee y dirige más de treinta colegios mayores en el centro de Londres, Ealing, Ascot y Wye. Hay más de 3.000 habitaciones disponibles, garantizando a los estudiantes de primer curso una habitación en las residencias de la universidad.

La mayoría de las residencias ofrecen habitaciones individuales o dobles, y algunas habitaciones combinadas. Los dormitorios están equipados con los muebles básicos y tienen acceso a cocinas y cuartos de baño. En la mayoría de las residencias los estudiantes tienen que ocuparse de su alimentación.

Generalmente los estudiantes que usan estas habitaciones de la universidad son de primer curso. La mayoría de los estudiantes de otros cursos y posgrado encuentran acomodación en el sector privado. Para encontrar un sitio hay ayuda disponible por parte de la oficina de acomodación privada del Imperial.

Una lista completa de los colegios mayores del Imperial se puede encontrar en el portal del Imperial aquí.

Asociación de alumnos La asociación de alumnos (consejo estudiantil), denominada "Imperial College Union", está dirigida por cinco delegados elegidos por un año entre los estudiantes que estudien a jornada completa y estén de año sabático, también la dirigen varios miembros permanentes del personal de la universidad. La asociación recibe una gran dotación por parte del Imperial College, mucho de lo cual va a parar en el mantenimiento de clubes y sociedades.

Clubes y sociedades en el Imperial La asociación de alumnos del Imperial College tiene más de 300 clubes y sociedades, convirtiéndola en la unión de estudiantes más grande de todo el Reino Unido. Entre ellas está el próspero club de remo, famosas orquestas de estudiantes, equipos de deportes, sociedades modélicas de naciones unidas, y un largo etcétera.

Lista de los clubes y sociedades de la Unión de Estudiantes del Imperial College (en inglés). Medios de comunicación de estudiantes Radio del Imperial College La radio del Imperial College se fundó en noviembre de 1975 con la intención de retransmitir a las residencias de estudiantes desde un estudio debajo de Southside. En cualquier caso empezó a retransmitir a finales de 1976. Hoy en día se retransmite por Internet y, desde 2004, en el 1134 AM en Wye. Recientemente ha puesto otra vez en marcha su página web, con podcast y varias competiciones. La estación de radio tiene una fonoteca con más de 51.000 grabaciones, que se puede encontrar desde su sitio web (en inglés).

STOIC (Televisión de Estudiantes) STOIC (Televisión de Estudiantes del Imperial College) es la estación de TV de la Unión de Estudiantes. Retransmite desde el edificio de la Unión de Estudiantes hasta la sala común junior y ocasionalmente desde el Bar de DaVinci. ICTV es otra organización televisiva del Imperial College (que no llevan los alumnos) cuya actividad principal es la producción de vídeos relacionados con los eventos de la universidad.

Felix Publicado semanalmente, Felix es el periódico estudiantil gratuito del Imperial College London. Su objetivo es ser lo más independiente de la universidad y de la Unión de Estudiantes. El editor se elige de entre los estudiantes que estudien a jornada completa y que estén de año sabático. Existe también un periódico no-estudiantil llamado el Reporter.

Live! Live! es un fuente de información y forum en línea que dirige la City and Guilds College Union (unión de estudiantes de la escuela de la ciudad y oficios).

Composición del alumnado Durante el año académico 2004/2005, el Imperial College tuvo más de 11.000 estudiantes a jornada completa, de estos aproximadamente 3.000 son estudiantes de posgrado. Además hubo más de 900 estudiantes a media jornada, todos ellos de posgrado. El 27% de los estudiantes viene de fuera de la Unión Europea.

La proporción entre hombres y mujeres para los estudiantes que no hacen posgrado es aproximadamente del 65% para los hombres y del 35% para las mujeres en general, llegando a una ratio de 4 hombres por cada mujer en algunas carreras de ingeniería. Estos datos están en la línea de las tendencias globales para las carreras técnicas.

Antiguos alumnos y profesores Entre los antiguos alumnos y profesores del Imperial se encuentran científicos como el físico Abdus Salam, el biólogo Thomas Henry Huxley y el farmacólogo Alexander Fleming. En otros campos hay ex-alumnos de Imperial como el primer ministro indio Rajiv Gandhi, el escritor Herbert George Wells, y el astrofísico y guitarrista de Queen, Brian May.

Referencias

«Award winners | Imperial College London». www.imperial.ac.uk. Consultado el 25 de diciembre de 2016.
«Imperial College London | The Francis Crick Institute». The Francis Crick Institute. Consultado el 25 de diciembre de 2016.
«World University Rankings». Times Higher Education (THE). 30 de septiembre de 2015. Consultado el 25 de diciembre de 2016.
«QS World University Rankings 2016». Top Universities. 25 de agosto de 2016. Consultado el 25 de diciembre de 2016.
«Fields Medal | International Mathematical Union (IMU)». www.mathunion.org (en inglés). Consultado el 19 de mayo de 2018.
«Fields medallists». Imperial College London (en inglés británico). Consultado el 19 de mayo de 2018.
Johns, Stephen (en inglés). «Fields Medal winners launch new mathematics laboratory.» Sitio web oficial. Consultado el 19 de mayo de 2018.
«Nobel winners». Imperial College London (en inglés británico). Consultado el 19 de mayo de 2018.
«Results». Imperial College London (en inglés británico). Consultado el 19 de mayo de 2018.
«MIT and Imperial launch 'unparalleled' student exchange | Imperial News | Imperial College London». Imperial News (en inglés británico). Consultado el 19 de mayo de 2018.
«MIT expands partnership with Imperial College London». MIT News. Consultado el 19 de mayo de 2018.
ARTIFICA. «Imperial College London and CNRS create joint laboratory to bring world's best mathematicians together - CNRS Web site - CNRS». www2.cnrs.fr (en francés). Consultado el 19 de mayo de 2018.
«Fields Medal winners launch new mathematics laboratory | Imperial News | Imperial College London». Imperial News (en inglés británico). Consultado el 19 de mayo de 2018.
«Paxman to donate brain to charity». The Independent (en inglés británico). 20 de abril de 2009. Consultado el 19 de mayo de 2018.
«:: This Site is Under Construction ::». www.parkinsonstissuebank.org.uk. Consultado el 19 de mayo de 2018.
«How Imperial College is turning innovation into cash». The Memo (en inglés británico). 30 de noviembre de 2015. Consultado el 19 de mayo de 2018.

Enlaces externos

Wikimedia Commons alberga una categoría multimedia sobre el Imperial College London.

(Los siguientes enlaces están en inglés)

Página web del Imperial College Estadísticas de Imperial en las tablas de clasificación de universidades británicas Página web del Departamento de Humanidades ICU (Unión de estudiantes) Unión de estudiantes en el campus de Wye Unión de estudiantes de la Facultad de Ciencias Unión de Estudiantes de la Facultad de Ingeniería Unión de Estudiantes de la Facultad de Medicina STOICTV Televisión de estudiantes Radio de estudiantes Periódico de estudiantes: Felix

Ref: https://es.wikipedia.org/wiki/Imperial_College_London http://www.imperial.ac.uk/