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National Football League (NFL) Champions

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  • Tom Landry (1924 - 2000)
    Thomas Wade Landry (September 11, 1924 – February 12, 2000) was an American football player and coach. He is legendary for his successes as the coach of the Dallas Cowboys. He is ranked as one of the g...
  • Gus Sonnenberg (1898 - 1944)
    Gustave Adolph Sonnenberg (March 6, 1898 – September 9, 1944) was an American football player and professional wrestler of German descent. As a wrestler, he was National Wrestling Association world h...
  • Chuck Noll (1932 - 2014)
    Charles Henry Noll (January 5, 1932 – June 13, 2014) was an American professional football player, assistant coach and head coach. His sole head coaching position was for the Pittsburgh Steelers of t...
  • Tobin Rote (1928 - 2000)
    Tobin Cornelius Rote (January 18, 1928 – June 27, 2000) was an American college and Professional Football player who played quarterback for the NFL's Green Bay Packers and Detroit Lions, the Canadian...
  • Kyle Rote (1928 - 2002)
    William Kyle Rote, Sr. (October 27, 1928 – August 15, 2002) was an All-American running back at Southern Methodist University, Class of 1951, played for 11 years for the New York Giants, 1951-1961. F...

Throughout its history, the National Football League (NFL) and other rival American football leagues have used several different formats to determine their league champions, including a period of inter-league matchups determining a true world champion.

The NFL first determined champions through end-of-season standings, but switched to a playoff system in 1933. The rival All-America Football Conference (AAFC) and American Football League (AFL) have since merged with the NFL (the only two AAFC teams that currently exist joined the NFL in 1950—the Cleveland Browns and the San Francisco 49ers), but AAFC championships games and records do not count in NFL record books. The AFL began play in 1960 and, like its rival league, used a playoff system to determine its champion.

From 1966–1969 prior to the merger in 1970, the NFL and the AFL agreed to hold an ultimate championship game, first called the AFL-NFL World Championship Game and later renamed the Super Bowl after 1968. Following the merger in 1970, the Super Bowl name continued as the game to determine the NFL champion. The most important factor of the merger was that all ten AFL teams joined the NFL in 1970 and every AFL championship game and record count in NFL record books. The old NFL Championship Game became the NFC Championship Game, while the old AFL Championship Game became the AFC Championship Game. The NFL lists the old AFL/NFL championship games with "new" AFC/NFC championship games in its record books. The Green Bay Packers have won the most championships with 13 total (9 NFL championships pre-merger, four (4) Super Bowl championships). The Packers are also the only team to win three consecutive championships, having done so twice (1929–1931, 1965–1967). The Chicago Bears have won the second most overall championships with nine (9) (eight NFL championships, one Super Bowl championship).

For more information, see the Wikipedia Article History of the National Football League championship.