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Profiles

  • Charles "Wayne" Apple (1931 - 2019)
    ST. MARY-OF-THE-WOODS - Charles Wayne Apple, 88, of St. Mary-of-the-Woods, passed away at 2:03 AM on Tuesday, October 29, 2019, in his residence. He was born in Paoli, IN, on January 13, 1931, to Charl...
  • Asa Roy Deal (1878 - 1957)
    Obituary
  • Charles Leonard Davis (1881 - 1946)
    Obituary
  • Alva Knox Gillis, Sr. (1904 - 1985)
    GILLIS – Alva K. Gillis, Sr. passed away June 13, 1985. He was born in Knox Hill, Walton County, Fla., January 12, 1904, but had resided in Jacksonville, Fla. since 1923. He received a Bachelor of Law ...
  • Howard Lawrence Ketcham (1898 - 1986)
    Son of William L and Alice D. Ketcham. On June 30, 1925, he married Sarah Elizabeth Ellen Irwin in an Episcopal service at Chester, VA. Their two children were, Howard Laurence b. 24 Jul 1926 & William...

A mail carrier, mailman, mailwoman, postal carrier, postman, postwoman, or letter carrier (in American English), sometimes colloquially known as a postie (in Australia, Canada, New Zealand, and the United Kingdom), is an employee of a post office or postal service, who delivers mail and parcel post to residences and businesses. The term "mail carrier" came to be used as a gender-neutral substitute for "mailman" soon after women began performing the job. In the Royal Mail, the official name changed from "letter carrier" to "postman" in 1883, and "postwoman" has also been used for many years.

Letter carriers typically work urban routes that are high density and low mileage. Such routes are classified as either "mounted" routes (for those that require a vehicle) or "walking" routes (for those that are done on foot). When working a mounted route, letter carriers usually drive distinctive white vans with the logo of the United States Postal Service on the side and deliver to curbside and building affixed mailboxes. Carriers who walk generally also drive postal vehicles to their routes, park at a specified location, and carry one "loop" of mail, up one side of the street and back down the other side, until they are back to their vehicle. This method of delivery is referred to as "park and loop". Letter carriers may also accommodate alternate delivery points if "extreme physical hardship" is confirmed. In cases where mail carriers do not have assigned vehicles, they may also get undelivered mail from relay boxes placed along their routes.

Rural carriers typically work routes that have a lower density and higher mileage than those of letter carriers. They all work mounted routes, leaving their vehicles only to deliver to group mailboxes or to deliver an article that must be taken to a customer's door. However, now that former rural areas are being urbanized, their routes are growing very similar to mounted "city routes." Rural carriers often use their own vehicles and are not required to wear a uniform. Because of urbanization around cities and because rural carriers deliver mail at less cost to the Postal Service, the rural carrier craft is the only craft in the Postal Service that is growing.

Highway Contract Route carriers work routes that were established with a density of less than one customer per mile driven (some later become denser and can then be converted to rural delivery). They are only mounted routes, and all HCR carriers use their own vehicle. These routes are typically found in outlying areas, or around very small communities.

The United States Postal Service's Railway Mail Service was a significant mail transportation service in the US from the mid-19th century until the mid-20th century. The RMS, or its successor the Postal Transportation Service (PTS), carried the vast majority of letters and packages mailed in the United States from the 1890s until the 1960s.

Famous Postal Workers