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Queen's Medal for Champion Shots in the Military Forces

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The Medal for the Best Shot in the British Army, Infantry, was instituted by Queen Victoria in 1869 and was awarded annually from 1870 to 1882 to the best shot of the Infantry of the British Army, including the Royal Engineers and the Colonial Corps.

In 1923, the medal was re-introduced by King George V and designated the King's Medal for Champion Shots in the Military Forces. It could now be awarded to the champions of Army marksmanship competitions, held under battle conditions at annual central meetings in the United Kingdom, the British Dominions, Colonies and India. Early participating countries were Australia, Canada, India, New Zealand, South Africa and Southern Rhodesia.

The number of countries which awarded the King's Medal for Champion Shots in the Military Forces grew to twelve by the mid-20th century, but as some countries gained independence from the United Kingdom or instituted their own equivalent awards, that number dwindled to the present three: the United Kingdom, Jamaica and New Zealand.

An Air Force version of the medal, the Queen's Medal for Champion Shots of the Air Forces, was instituted in 1953. This was followed by the institution of the Queen's Medal for Champion Shots of the New Zealand Naval Forces in 1958 and the Queen's Medal for Champion Shots of the Royal Navy and Royal Marines in 1966.

Institution

Queen Victoria authorized the creation of the Medal for the Best Shot in the British Army, Infantry, by Royal Warrant dated 30 April 1869. The medal, initially struck in bronze and from 1872 in silver, was inscribed with the year in which won and the winner's name, number and regiment. It became the winner's property and could be worn by him during the whole of his service. From 1870, the medal was awarded annually, along with a £20 Prize for Skill at Arms, to the best shot of the Infantry of the British Army, including the Royal Engineers and the Colonial Corps. With only thirteen medals won, award of the medal and the £20 prize ceased after 1882. A £5 prize and a crowned badge of crossed carbines or rifles, worked in gold and worn upon the left arm, was approved to replace it on 10 June 1884.

After a 41-year lapse, the medal was re-introduced by King George V in 1923 and designated the King's Medal for Champion Shots in the Military Forces. The medal could now be awarded to the champions of Army marksmanship competitions, held under battle firing conditions at annual central meetings in the United Kingdom, India, the British Dominions and the Colony of Southern Rhodesia. Early participating countries were Australia, Canada, India, New Zealand, South Africa and Southern Rhodesia.

A date clasp was also introduced in 1923, for award with the medal to first recipients as well as, without a medal, to champions who had already been awarded the medal. The clasp is inscribed with the year of the award and is designed to be attached to the medal's suspension bar. The institution of the clasp was followed in 1926 with the provision that a rosette may be worn on the ribbon bar to indicate the award of each subsequent clasp.

Award criteria

All medal contenders have to be actual serving members of the Regular Army, Army Emergency Reserve, Territorial Army, or Local Militia and Volunteer Forces in the countries concerned. Members of independent Naval and Air Forces, while not excluded from the competition, could therefore not be awarded the medal even though they won the championship. This regulation had consequences on two occasions.

  • The 1938 competition in Canada was won by Leading Aircraftman T.W. Gregory, who had won the medal in 1935 as a Sergeant in the Canadian Regular Army. In 1938, since he was a member of the Royal Canadian Air Force by then, he was ineligible to be awarded the clasp and the medal was awarded to the runner-up. An Air Force version of the medal, the Queen's Medal for Champion Shots of the Air Forces, was instituted by Queen Elizabeth II in 1953. In 1955, Gregory won this new medal and became the only person to have won Queen's Medals in two different Arms of the Service.[6][8][14][15]
  • The 1962 competition in Rhodesia was won by Corporal Technician B.T. Gilpin, a member of the Royal Rhodesian Air Force. Despite protests from the Army commanders, the Minister of Defence presented Gilpin with the Army medal. As a result of the controversy, Rhodesia sought and was granted the Crown's permission to introduce the Queen's Medal for Champion Shots of the Air Forces. The first Rhodesian Air Force award was backdated to 1962 and the first two medals were presented in December 1963, one to Gilpin and the other to the Air Force champion for 1963. Gilpin's 1962 Army medal was returned and the 1962 Army runner-up, Inspector D. Hollingworth, was awarded a second clasp to his existing medal.

The institution of the Queen's Medal for Champion Shots of the Air Forces was followed by the institution of the Queen's Medal for Champion Shots of the New Zealand Naval Forces in 1958 and the Queen's Medal for Champion Shots of the Royal Navy and Royal Marines in 1966.

Participating countries

In the United Kingdom, the medal is at present awarded annually to the winner of the Regular Army championship, the Army Operational Shooting Competition.

From 1935, a second medal could be awarded annually in the United Kingdom, to the champion shot of the Territorial Army. In order to also be eligible for the medal, members of the Supplementary Reserve were included in the competition's definition of the Territorial Army from 1936. The competition to determine the annual medal winner for the part-time forces is held during the annual Bisley Meeting of the National Rifle Association of the United Kingdom.

Outside the United Kingdom, the number of British Commonwealth countries which awarded the medal grew to eleven by the mid-20th century. This number decreased over the ensuing years, however, since some countries became republics and stopped awarding the medal, while others replaced the medal with new domestic versions. The tables below list the recipients of the medal in the respective countries.

Australia

The first King's Medal Competition in the Dominion of Australia was held in 1924 and the first medal to an Australian was won by Temporary Quartermaster and Honorary Captain W.C.G. Ruddock of the Australian Instructional Corps. In 1988, the Champion Shots Medal was instituted in Australia and the Queen's Medal for Champion Shots in the Military Forces ceased to be awarded.

Year Rank Initials Surname Unit or Formation

  • 1924 T/QM (Hon Capt) W.C.G. Ruddock Australian Instructional Corps
  • 1925 WO2 A. Taylor Australian Instructional Corps
  • 1926 WO1 (Hon Lt) E.F. Davies Australian Instructional Corps, 3 MD
  • 1927 WO1 J.D. Shearim Australian Instructional Corps, Small Arms School
  • 1928 WO1 (Hon Lt) J. Hutchison Australian Instructional Corps, 2 MD
  • 1929 WO1 J.D. Shearim (2) Australian Instructional Corps, Small Arms School
  • 1930 WO1 W.H. Hackfath DCM Australian Instructional Corps, 5 MD
  • 1931 WO1 J.D. Shearim (3) Australian Instructional Corps, Small Arms School
  • 1932 Lt C.W. Potter 3rd Light Horse Regiment 4 MD
  • 1933 WO1 J.D. Shearim (4) Australian Instructional Corps, Small Arms School
  • 1934 Bdr J.C. King 2 SRG 3 MD, 2nd Survey Co AGA
  • 1935 Cpl A.F. Carson 32nd Infantry Battalion, 3MD
  • 1936 Pte E.W. Potter 43/48 Infantry Battalion, 4 MD
  • 1937 Pte E.W. Potter (2) 43/48 Infantry Battalion, 4 MD
  • 1938 Pte N.W. Savage Sydney University Regiment 2 MD
  • 1939 Sgt N.P.W. Hall 37/39 Infantry Battalion 3 MD
  • 1947 Lt A. Preston EDN 1 MD, Northern Command AMF
  • 1948 Capt E.A. Green AEME 2 MD
  • 1949 Capt L.A.J. Eagleson RAAC Eastern Command, 1RNSWL
  • 1950 WO2 R.D. Archer 5 Inf Bn Southern Command
  • 1951 Maj G.C. Magenis RAAC AHQ
  • 1952 Maj G.C. Magenis (2) Army Branch Depart of Supply, RAAC
  • 1953 Sgt G.L. Loveband 16 NS TRG Bn Central Command, RAINF
  • 1954 Sgt P.F. Jeffery INT Corps HQ Western Command ARA
  • 1955 Sgt R.K. Beardman 16 Petroleum Platoon RAASC (CMF) Western Command
  • 1956 Maj E.A. Green (2) HQ Eastern Command, RAEME
  • 1957 WO2 R.D. Archer (2) RAINF Southern Comd Trg School
  • 1958 WO1 J.A. Guymer CRE Central Command, RAINF
  • 1959 WO1 R.D. Archer (3) RAINF HQ Southern Command
  • 1960 L Cpl G.A. Dennis RAE Central Command
  • 1961 WO2 P.J. Pini Army Headquarters.
  • 1962 WO2 G.L. Loveband (2) 4 Cadet Battalion. RAINF Central Command.
  • 1963 Capt G.S. Pratt HQ FARELF, 2RAR
  • 1964 Pte E.R. French JTC, RAINF
  • 1965 Capt M.D. Hauber HQ Northern Command, RAINF
  • 1966 WO2 L.F. Steele Northern Command Workshops
  • 1967 Capt M.D. Hauber (2) 3 Cadet Bn, Northern Command
  • 1968 WO2 L.F. Steele (2) Northern Command Workshops
  • 1969 Maj K.J. Bladen HQ Western Command
  • 1970 WO2 L.F. Steele (3) Northern Command Workshops
  • 1971 Sgt J.W. Guest RAINF 2 MD
  • 1972 Sgt P.K. Oakford RAINF 3 MD
  • 1973 Sgt P.T.G. Clarke 4th Field Force Group Intelligence Unit
  • 1974 Sgt P.K. Oakford (2) Melbourne University Regiment
  • 1975 Sgt J.W. Guest (2) 1 Recruit Training Battalion
  • 1976 Sgt P.K. Oakford (3) Melbourne University Regiment
  • 1977 S Sgt P.T.G. Clarke (2) 4th Field Force Group Intelligence Unit
  • 1978 Capt R.G. Skelton HQ 2nd Military District. DPR, DOD.
  • 1979 Capt G.L. Mincham RAEME 3rd Military District, HQ Logistic Command
  • 1980 Sgt J.W. Dixon 8/9th Battalion, Royal Australian Regiment
  • 1981 S Sgt P.K. Oakford (4) 2/4th Battalion, Royal Australian Regiment
  • 1982 Sgt G.J. Sawle Infantry Centre, Singleton
  • 1983 Sgt J.W. Dixon (2) Land Warfare Centre, Canungra
  • 1984 WO2 P.K. Oakford (5) 2nd Cadet Group
  • 1985 WO1 A.H. Bowden HQ Training Command
  • 1986 WO2 P.K. Oakford (6) 11 Field Force Group
  • 1987 Sgt L.W. Nayda Army Apprentices School

Canada

The first King's Medal Competition in Canada was held for the Canadian Regular Force in 1923 and the first medal to a Canadian was won by Warrant Officer Class 1 F.J. Goodhouse of the Royal Canadian Army Service Corps. From 1963, two Queen's Medals for Champion Shots in the Military Forces were awarded annually in Canada, the second to a member of either the Royal Canadian Mounted Police or the Canadian Reserve Force. The first of these was won by Lance Sergeant T.A.P. Richardson of the Victoria Rifles of Canada. On 28 August 1991 the Queen's Medal for Champion Shot (French: Médaille de la Reine pour tireur d'élite), a distinct Canadian version of the medal, was instituted and from 1992 the British version of the Queen's Medal for Champion Shots in the Military Forces ceased to be awarded.

Regular Forces United or Formation Winners

Year Rank Initials Surname Regular Forces Unit or Formation

  • 1923 WO1 F.J. Goodhouse CASC
  • 1924 Cpl W.J. Livingstone The Governor General's Foot Guards
  • 1925 Lt D.T. Burke The Governor General's Foot Guards
  • 1926 Cpl W.J. Livingstone (2) The Governor General's Foot Guards
  • 1927 Lt D.T. Burke (2) The Governor General's Foot Guards
  • 1928 Maj J. Jeffrey OBE MC RCR
  • 1929 Lt D.T. Burke (3) The Governor General's Foot Guards
  • 1930 Lt D.T. Burke (4) The Governor General's Foot Guards
  • 1931 Lt D.T. Burke (5) The Governor General's Foot Guards
  • 1932 Capt J.W. Houlden The Sherbrooke Regiment
  • 1933 Lt A.B. Coulter OBE ED The Governor General's Foot Guards
  • 1934 Capt J.W. Houlden (2) The Sherbrooke Regiment
  • 1935 Sgt T.W. Gregory 7th BN CMG Corps
  • 1936 L Cpl C. Robins PPCLI
  • 1937 Lt G.A. Molecey Canadian Irish Fusiliers
  • 1938 Pte F. Wallace 48 Highlanders of Canada
  • 1939 Capt D.T. Burke (6) The Governor General's Foot Guards
  • 1947 Maj D.T. Burke (7) RCAMC
  • 1948 Lt R.F.P. Fendick RCEME, RCOC
  • 1949 CO G.S. Boa Central Command Contingent (48 Highlanders of Canada)
  • 1950 Lt G.S. Boa (2) 48 Highlanders of Canada
  • 1951 Lt G.S. Boa (3) 48 Highlanders of Canada
  • 1952 Lt S.F. Johnson OBE ED 14th Armoured Regiment (King's Own Calgary Regiment)
  • 1953 Lt A.H. McKeage Canadian Grenadier Guards
  • 1954 Capt D.C. Lawford 1st Canadian Signals Regiment
  • 1955 2 Lt E.L. Warner The Sherbrooke Regiment (12th Armoured Regiment)
  • 1956 Sgt J.R. Hardy RCEME
  • 1957 Lt A. S. Derrick RCSME, RCE
  • 1958 S Sgt L.A. White MMM CD RCS of I, PPCLI
  • 1959 Capt J.J. Barrett CD AHQ, RCR
  • 1960 WO2 C.F. Rowell CD RCS of I, Regiment of Canadian Guards
  • 1961 Pte J.W. Matthews PPCLI
  • 1962 Lt D.K. Lidgren RCS of I, PPCLI
  • 1963 Sgt J.E. Daigle MMM Royal 22e Régiment
  • 1964 Lt W.J. Molnar The Black Watch (Royal Highland Regiment)
  • 1965 Sgt R.E. Bennett RCE
  • 1966 Sgt J.E. Daigle MMM (2) 3 Bn, Royal 22e Régiment
  • 1967 Cpl K.A. Fleming RCOC
  • 1968 Cpl L. Mercier 3 Bn, Royal 22e Régiment
  • 1969 MWO L.A. White MMM CD (2) Canadian Airborne Regiment
  • 1970 Sgt J.E. Daigle MMM CD (3) 3 Bn, Royal 22e Régiment
  • 1971 M Cpl J.R. Hennick CD 1 Bn, Royal Canadian Regiment
  • 1972 WO L.G. Glibbery 3 Bn, Royal Canadian Regiment
  • 1973 Sgt R. L'Heureux 3 Bn, Royal 22e Régiment
  • 1974 Sgt L. Mercier (2) 3 Bn, Royal 22e Régiment
  • 1975 Sgt L. Mercier (3) 3 Bn, Royal 22e Régiment
  • 1977 Sgt E.J. Luscombe 3 Bn PPCLI
  • 1978 Cpl H. McKay 2 Bn, Royal Canadian Regiment
  • 1979 M Cpl A.M Cromwell Canadian Airborne Regiment
  • 1980 Sgt H.B. McLellan Canadian Airborne Regiment
  • 1981 WO J.R.A. Surette 2 Bn The Royal Canadian Regiment
  • 1982 M Cpl D.L.V. Demeuse 3 Bn, Royal 22e Régiment
  • 1983 WO J.R.A. Surette (2) 2 Bn The Royal Canadian Regiment
  • 1984 WO J.R.A. Surette (3) 2 Bn The Royal Canadian Regiment
  • 1985 WO J.R.A. Surette (4) 2 Bn The Royal Canadian Regiment
  • 1986 WO J.R. Levesque MMM CD 3 Bn, Royal 22e Régiment
  • 1987 WO J.R. Levesque MMM CD (2) 3 Bn, Royal 22e Régiment
  • 1988 Capt S. Tibbetts 2 Bn, Royal Canadian Regiment
  • 1989 Sgt S.G. Hitchcock CD 3rd Bn PPCLI
  • 1990 M Cpl W.T. Smith 2 Bn, Royal Canadian Regiment
  • 1991 M Cpl F.J. Snow 2 Bn, Royal Canadian Regiment

RCMP or Reserves Unit or Formation

Year Rank Initials Surname RCMP or Reserves Unit or Formation

  • 1963 L Sgt T.A.P. Richardson Victoria Rifles of Canada
  • 1964 S Sgt C. Tremblay CD Les Voltigeurs de Quebec
  • 1965 Sgt G.C. Campbell Royal Westminster Regiment
  • 1966 Pte R.D. Clerk Royal Montreal Regiment
  • 1967 S Sgt L. Fish Canadian Lorne Scots Regiment
  • 1968 Maj E.L. Warner CD (2) The Sherbrooke Hussars
  • 1969 Maj E.L. Warner CD (3) The Sherbrooke Hussars
  • 1970 Sgt G.W. Black Royal Canadian Mounted Police "A" Division
  • 1971 Maj E.L. Warner CD (4) The Sherbrooke Hussars
  • 1972 Maj E.L. Warner CD (5) The Sherbrooke Hussars
  • 1973 Lt W. Kedziora CD Royal Hamilton Light Infantry
  • 1974 S Sgt G.W. Black (2) Royal Canadian Mounted Police "A" Division
  • 1975 WO G.N. Senetchko Queen's Own Rifles of Canada
  • 1976 Lt R. Savinski Le Regiment du Saguenay
  • 1977 Capt K.K. Nicholson The Elgin Regiment
  • 1978 Cpl D.D. Oakie Royal Montreal Regiment
  • 1979 Cpl D.D. Oakie (2) The Loyal Edmonton Regiment
  • 1980 Lt K.E. Ferguson 1st Battalion Nova Scotia Highlanders (North)
  • 1981 Lt K.E. Ferguson (2) 1st Battalion Nova Scotia Highlanders (North)
  • 1982 Lt M.R. Williams Queen's Own Rifles of Canada
  • 1983 Lt M.R. Williams (2) Queen's Own Rifles of Canada
  • 1984 Lt K.E. Ferguson (3) 1st Battalion Nova Scotia Highlanders (North)
  • 1985 Lt K.E. Ferguson (4) 1st Battalion Nova Scotia Highlanders (North)
  • 1986 Sgt G.J. West Royal Hamilton Light Infantry
  • 1987 Sgt G.J. West (2) Royal Hamilton Light Infantry
  • 1988 Pte Shannon M. Wills 12 (Vancouver) Service Battalion
  • 1989 WO J.R.A. Surette (5) Royal New Brunswick Regiment
  • 1990 Lt K.E. Ferguson (5) 1st Battalion Nova Scotia Highlanders (North)
  • 1991 Cpl M.E. Paquette Les Fusiliers Mont-Royal

Ceylon

The first Queen's Medal Competition in Ceylon was held in 1954 and the first medal to a Ceylonese was won by Captain C.L.A.P. Direkze of the Ceylon Light Infantry Regiment. The medal was awarded in Ceylon only three more times, in 1957, 1958 and 1966.

Year Rank Initials Surname Unit or Formation

  • 1954 Capt C.L.A.P. Direkze The Ceylon Light Infantry Regiment
  • 1957 L Cpl K.R. Perera 1st Bn The Ceylon Light Infantry Regiment
  • 1958 L Cpl K.R. Perera 1st Bn The Ceylon Light Infantry Regiment
  • 1966 Sgt S.W. Silva The Ceylon Light Infantry Regiment

Ghana

The Queen's Medal Competition was held in Ghana only once, in 1959, and was won by Sergeant M.P. Konkomba of the 2nd Battalion Ghana Regiment of Infantry. The competition and award was abolished by Ghana in 1963.

India

The first King's Medal Competition in India was held in 1924 and the first medal to an Indian was won by Naik S.S. Lama of the 2nd King Edward VII's Own Gurkha Rifles (The Sirmoor Rifles). English soldiers were also entitled to compete for the medal while stationed in India, and won it on several occasions. The last competition was held in 1938, before it was interrupted by the outbreak of the Second World War in 1939. In 1947, India was granted independence and the medal ceased to be awarded.

Year Rank Initials Surname Unit or Formation

  • 1924 Naik S.S. Lama 2nd King Edward's Own Gurkha Rifles
  • 1925 Jemadar K. Raza 4th Hazara Pioneers
  • 1926 Sgt B. Cartwright 1st Battalion South Staffordshire Regiment
  • 1927 Rfn H. Lewis 1st Battalion King's Royal Rifle Corps
  • 1928 Naik B.S. Thapa 2nd King Edward's Own Gurkha Rifles
  • 1929 Naik B.S. Thapa (2) 2nd King Edward's Own Gurkha Rifles
  • 1930 Jemadar Y. Ali Hazara Pioneers
  • 1931 Havildar B.S. Thapa (3) 2nd King Edward's Own Gurkha Rifles
  • 1932 Sgt C.S. Cole The Simla Rifles
  • 1933 Sgt W.H. Bayes 13th/18th Hussars
  • 1934 L Cpl Thurbon 1st Battalion Norfolk Regiment
  • 1935 Bhm N. Thapa 1st/5th Royal Gurkha Rifles
  • 1936 Capt E.E.E. Cass DSO MC King's Own Yorkshire Light Infantry
  • 1937 Havildar H. Gurung 1st/5th Royal Gurkha Rifles
  • 1938 Maj W.P. Khan 1st/15th Punjab Regiment

Jamaica

Before 1963, the Jamaican competition was an annual local shooting competition which did not form part of the Queen's Medal Competitions. The first Queen's Medal Competition in Jamaica was held in 1963 and the first medal to a Jamaican was won by Private J.E.P. Daley of the 1st Battalion, The Jamaica Regiment. The medal can still be awarded annually in Jamaica.

Year Rank Initials Surname Unit or Formation

  • 1963 Pte J.E.P. Daley 1st Battalion The Jamaica Regiment
  • 1964 Sgt D.dQ. Small 1st Battalion The Jamaica Regiment
  • 1965 L Cpl C. Barker 1st Battalion The Jamaica Regiment
  • 1966 Sgt A. Thompson 1st Battalion The Jamaica Regiment
  • 1967 L Cpl C. Burke 1st Battalion The Jamaica Regiment
  • 1970 Pte B. Black 1st Battalion The Jamaica Regiment
  • 1971 Cpl T.N. Martin 1st Battalion The Jamaica Regiment
  • 1972 Sgt T.N. Martin (2) 1st Battalion The Jamaica Regiment
  • 1973 C Sgt T.N. Martin (3) 1st Battalion The Jamaica Regiment
  • 1974 Sgt R. McPherson 1st Battalion The Jamaica Regiment
  • 1975 Lt D. Clarke Supply & Services Battalion
  • 1977 Maj I.C. Robinson 1st Battalion The Jamaica Regiment
  • 1978 Cpl N. Rose 3rd Battalion The Jamaica Regiment National Reserve
  • 1979 WO2 T.N. Martin (4) 1st Battalion The Jamaica Regiment
  • 1980 Cpl N. Rose (2) 3rd Battalion The Jamaica Regiment National Reserve
  • 1981 C Sgt J. Drummond Support Company Group
  • 1982 Sgt A. Kidd 3rd Battalion The Jamaica Regiment National Reserve
  • 1983 Pte D. Forrester 1st Battalion The Jamaica Regiment
  • 1984 WO1 T.N. Martin (5) 2nd Battalion The Jamaica Regiment
  • 1985 WO1 T.N. Martin (6) 2nd Battalion The Jamaica Regiment
  • 1986 WO1 T.N. Martin (7) 2nd Battalion The Jamaica Regiment
  • 1987 Pte L. Richards 3rd Battalion The Jamaica Regiment National Reserve
  • 1988 Cpl E.B. Grant 2nd Battalion The Jamaica Regiment
  • 1989 Capt H.A. Blake 2nd Battalion The Jamaica Regiment
  • 1990 Cpl E. Gordon 2nd Battalion The Jamaica Regiment
  • 1993 PO L. Heron Jamaican Defence Force Coast Guard
  • 1994 Cpl N.S. Mullings 1st Battalion The Jamaica Regiment
  • 1995 Sgt F. Dixon 3rd Battalion The Jamaica Regiment National Reserve
  • 1998 L Cpl C. Chung 2nd Battalion The Jamaica Regiment
  • 2004 Cpl B. Mignott
  • 2005 L Cpl L. Clarke
  • 2006 Pte L. Peynado
  • 2007 Pte G. Bryan Jamaica Defence Force Air Wing
  • 2011 L Cpl Robinson Support and Services Battalion
  • 2012 Pte M. Montaque 2nd Battalion The Jamaica Regiment
  • 2015 L Cpl G. Bryan (2) Jamaica Defence Force Air Wing

New Zealand

The first King's Medal Competition in New Zealand was held in 1923 and the first medal to a New Zealander was won by Staff Sergeant-Major A.J. Moore of the New Zealand Permanent Staff. Although the competition was interrupted on a few occasions, the longest period being from 1931 to 1954 due to the discontinuance of the Combined Services Small Arms Association Annual Meetings and the Second World War, the medal is still being awarded annually in New Zealand.

Year Rank Initials Surname Unit or Formation

  • 1923 S Sgt A.J. Moore New Zealand Permanent Staff
  • 1924 S Sgt H.L.S. Frank New Zealand Permanent Staff
  • 1926 S Sgt J.S. Thomson New Zealand Permanent Staff
  • 1927 Lt T.J. Denton New Zealand Permanent Air Force
  • 1928 L Cpl S.W. Barnet 1st Battalion, The Wellington Regiment (C.W.O)
  • 1929 S Sgt J.H.P. Kearney New Zealand Permanent Staff
  • 1930 S Sgt J.S. Thomson (2) New Zealand Permanent Staff
  • 1955 Pte I.R. Larsen Royal New Zealand Army Ordnance Corps
  • 1956 L Cpl I.R. Larsen (2) Royal New Zealand Army Ordnance Corps
  • 1957 S Sgt I.G. Campbell Royal New Zealand Army Ordnance Corps
  • 1958 Lt J.S. Wooster New Zealand Electrical and Mechanical Engineers
  • 1959 Cpl I.R. Larsen (3) Royal New Zealand Army Ordnance Corps
  • 1960 Lt J.S. Wooster (2) New Zealand Electrical and Mechanical Engineers
  • 1961 Lt J.S. Wooster (3) New Zealand Electrical and Mechanical Engineers
  • 1962 Lt J.S. Wooster (4) New Zealand Electrical and Mechanical Engineers
  • 1963 S Sgt G. Collins New Zealand Electrical and Mechanical Engineers
  • 1964 WO2 G. Collins (2) Royal New Zealand Electrical and Mechanical Engineers
  • 1965 WO2 G. Collins (3) Royal New Zealand Electrical and Mechanical Engineers
  • 1969 Pte R. Dunlea Royal New Zealand Infantry Regiment
  • 1970 L Cpl A.G. Owens 1st Infantry Workshops
  • 1971 L Cpl A.G. Owens (2) 1st Infantry Workshops
  • 1972 Cpl A.G. Owens (3) 1st Infantry Workshops
  • 1973 S Sgt V.E. Mottram Royal New Zealand Army Service Corps
  • 1974 Sgt R.D. Johns 2/1 Royal New Zealand Infantry Regiment
  • 1975 Sgt I.L. Smeath 2/1 Royal New Zealand Infantry Regiment
  • 1976 Sgt L.M.H. Pederson Royal New Zealand Infantry Regiment
  • 1977 Sgt L.M.H. Pederson (2) Royal New Zealand Infantry Regiment
  • 1978 S Sgt F.V. Thompson Royal New Zealand Electrical and Mechanical Engineers (TF)
  • 1979 Sgt I.L. Smeath (2) T.M.S. A.T.G (RNZIR)
  • 1980 WO2 G.W. Benfell Royal New Zealand Infantry Regiment
  • 1981 L Cpl T.J. Quirke Royal New Zealand Electrical & Mechanical Engineers, 4 ATG Wksp
  • 1982 S Sgt C.J. Parkinson Royal New Zealand Electrical and Mechanical Engineers
  • 1983 L Cpl P. Harris NZSAS
  • 1984 Capt R.S. Macmillan Royal New Zealand Corps of Transport
  • 1985 S Sgt M.A.H. Gillice Royal New Zealand Electrical and Mechanical Engineers
  • 1986 L Cpl I.D. Lawrence Royal New Zealand Infantry Regiment
  • 1987 S Sgt M.A.H. Gillice (2) Royal New Zealand Electrical and Mechanical Engineers
  • 1988 S Sgt M.A.H. Gillice (3) Royal New Zealand Electrical and Mechanical Engineers
  • 1989 S Sgt M.A.H. Gillice (4) Royal New Zealand Electrical and Mechanical Engineers
  • 1990 S Sgt M.A.H. Gillice (5) Royal New Zealand Electrical and Mechanical Engineers
  • 1991 S Sgt T.W. Small Royal New Zealand Infantry Regiment
  • 1992 Pte R.D. Bird Royal New Zealand Infantry Regiment
  • 1993 Sgt C.J. Venning Royal New Zealand Infantry Regiment
  • 1994 Sgt N.M. Greer Royal New Zealand Infantry Regiment
  • 1995 Sgt G. Beer Royal New Zealand Electrical and Mechanical Engineers
  • 1996 Pte C.P. Hally Royal New Zealand Infantry Regiment
  • 1997 L Cpl R.D. Bird (2) Royal New Zealand Infantry Regiment
  • 1998 WO2 P.R.S. Chalmers RNZALR
  • 1999 WO2 P.R.S. Chalmers (2) RNZALR
  • 2000 Lt G.D. Beer RNZALR
  • 2003 Pte T.H.M. Bush Royal New Zealand Infantry Regiment
  • 2004 Sgt C.P. Hally (2) 1 Bn., Royal New Zealand Infantry Regiment
  • 2005 Lt N. Fisher 3rd Logistics Battalion
  • 2006 S Sgt D. Sarney 7 Wellington Hawkes Bay Battalion, RNZ Infantry Regiment
  • 2007 L Cpl A. Miller 1 Bn., Royal New Zealand Infantry Regiment
  • 2008 S Sgt C.P. Hally (3) 1 Bn., Royal New Zealand Infantry Regiment
  • 2009 Capt S. Davis 7 Wellington Hawkes Bay Battalion, RNZ Infantry Regiment
  • 2010 Cpl T. Bryce 1 Bn., Royal New Zealand Infantry Regiment
  • 2014 Capt B. Jones

Pakistan

The first Queen's Medal Competition in Pakistan was held in 1950 and the first medal to a Pakistani was won by Jemadar S.P. Akbar of the South Waziristan Scouts. The competition was not held again after 1956.

Year Rank Initials Surname Unit or Formation

  • 1950 Jemadar S.P. Akbar South Waziristan Scouts
  • 1951 Maj M.M. Amin 14th Punjab Regiment
  • 1952 Naik A. Khan 14th Punjab Regiment
  • 1953 Havildar A. Khan 14th Punjab Regiment
  • 1955 Havildar Zabardast South Waziristan Scouts
  • 1956 Jemadar B. Khan South Waziristan Scouts

Rhodesia

The first King's Medal Competition in Southern Rhodesia was held in 1926 and the first medal to a Rhodesian was won by Sergeant F.G. Elliott of the British South Africa Police. From 1940 to 1947 the competition was interrupted by the Second World War. After Rhodesia's Unilateral Declaration of Independence on 11 November 1965, the competition and the award of the Queen's Medal for Champion Shots in the Military Forces continued for another four years, until Rhodesia severed its ties with the British Crown on 2 March 1970 and, in that same year, instituted the President's Medal for Shooting of the Security Forces.

Year Rank Initials Surname Unit or Formation

  • 1926 Sgt F.G. Elliott British South Africa Police
  • 1927 CQMS F.H. Morgan MBE Territorial Force
  • 1928 CQMS F.H. Morgan MBE (2) Territorial Force
  • 1929 CQMS F.H. Morgan MBE (3) Territorial Force
  • 1930 Sgt N.A. Fereday Territorial Force
  • 1931 Sgt N.A. Fereday (2) Territorial Force
  • 1932 Lt F.H. Morgan MBE (4) Territorial Force
  • 1933 CQMS N.A. Fereday (3) 1st Bn Salisbury Regiment
  • 1934 CQMS N.A. Fereday (4) 1st Bn Salisbury Regiment
  • 1935 Rfn D.F. Butcher 2nd Bn Rhodesia Regiment
  • 1936 Pipe Maj A. Macbean 1st Bn Rhodesia Regiment
  • 1937 Rfn P.J. Cumming 1st Bn Rhodesia Regiment
  • 1938 Lt F.H. Morgan MBE (5) 2nd Bn Rhodesia Regiment
  • 1939 Sgt D.F. Butcher (2) The Rhodesia Regiment
  • 1948 Sgt Maj W.D.P. Cook 1st Bn Royal Rhodesia Regiment
  • 1949 Sgt G. Lamont 2nd Bn Royal Rhodesia Regiment
  • 1950 Sgt G. Lamont (2) 2nd Bn Royal Rhodesia Regiment
  • 1951 Sgt G. Lamont (3) 2nd Bn Royal Rhodesia Regiment
  • 1952 Inspector H.R. Cooke British South Africa Police
  • 1953 Capt R.V. Allan DFC 1st Bn Royal Rhodesia Regiment
  • 1954 Rfn A.D. Scates 1st Bn Royal Rhodesia Regiment
  • 1956 S Sgt D. Hollingworth British South Africa Police
  • 1957 S Sgt D. Hollingworth (2) British South Africa Police
  • 1958 Lt M.C. Godfrey Central Africa Command Training School (School of Infantry)
  • 1959 Capt M.C. Godfrey (2) 1st King's African Rifles
  • 1962 Inspector D. Hollingworth (3) British South Africa Police
  • 1963 Inspector D. Hollingworth (4) British South Africa Police
  • 1964 Inspector B.W. Pratt British South Africa Police
  • 1965 Inspector W.H. Osborne British South Africa Police
  • 1966 WO2 A.K. Tourle 1st Rhodesian Light Infantry
  • 1967 Sgt M.J. Cary 1 Engineer Squadron
  • 1968 Inspector D.G. Toddun British South Africa Police
  • 1969 C Sgt P.F.G. Maunder Special Air Service

South Africa

The first King's Medal Competition in the Union of South Africa was held in 1924 and the first medal to a South African was won by G.W. Church of the 7th Infantry (Kimberley Regiment). The competition did not take place in 1926 and was interrupted from 1940 to 1947 by the Second World War. The last medal was awarded in 1961, the year that South Africa became a republic. From 1962, the British medal was replaced by the Commandant General's Medal (Afrikaans: Kommandant-Generaalsmedalje), which could be awarded to champions from any of the three Arms of the Service.

Year Rank Initials Surname Unit or Formation

  • 1924 G.W. Church 7th Infantry (Kimberley Regiment)
  • 1925 Maj R. Bodley 5th Mounted Rifles (Imperial Light Horse)
  • 1927 Sgt L.D. Busschau 8th Infantry (Transvaal Scottish)
  • 1928 Sgt L.D. Busschau (2) 8th Infantry (Transvaal Scottish)
  • 1929 R.E. Neville Durban & Coast Defence Rifle Association
  • 1930 Capt H.A. Viljoen Phillippolis Defence Rifle Association
  • 1931 G.W. Church (2) 7th Infantry (Kimberley Regiment)
  • 1932 Col F.L.A. Buchanan MC VD Active Citizen Force, OC 1st Infantry Brigade
  • 1933 Lt M.J.G. Bodley East Rand Defence Rifle Association
  • 1934 L. Towne Albany Defence Rifle Association, Grahamstown
  • 1935 Lt J. Liebman Witwatersrand Rifles
  • 1936 O.M. Peckham Maritzburg Defence Rifle Association No 24.
  • 1937 Lt J. Liebman (2) Witwatersrand Rifles
  • 1938 Capt J. Liebman (3) Witwatersrand Rifles
  • 1939 Capt R.E. Bodley Imperial Light Horse
  • 1948 Lt D.C.P. Welch Rand Light Infantry
  • 1949 S Sgt J.J. Bezuidenhout Technical Services Corps
  • 1950 Pte J.M. Potgieter Kirkwood Rifle Commando
  • 1951 Sgt R.V.E. Smith Pietermaritzberg Rifle Commando
  • 1952 WO2 P. Waterfall South African Infantry Corps
  • 1953 WO2 J.J. Bezuidenhout (2) Technical Services Corps
  • 1954 WO2 P. Waterfall (2) South African Infantry Corps
  • 1955 WO2 P. Waterfall (3) South African Infantry Corps
  • 1956 S Sgt W.H. Page Technical Services Corps
  • 1957 Lt A.J. Maartens Central South West African Rifle Commando
  • 1958 WO2 P. Waterfall (4) South African Infantry Corps
  • 1959 WO2 J.J. Bezuidenhout (3) Technical Services Corps
  • 1960 Cpl W.J. Scholtz Thabazimbi Commando
  • 1961 WO1 P. Waterfall (5) South African Infantry Corps

Trinidad and Tobago

The Queen's Medal Competition was introduced in Trinidad and Tobago in 1970, but the first medal was only awarded in 1972, to Lance Corporal F.P. Marcano of the 1st Battalion Trinidad and Tobago Regiment. The medal was won only two more times, in 1973 and 1975.

Year Rank Initials Surname Unit or Formation

  • 1972 L Cpl F.P. Marcano 1st Battalion Trinidad and Tobago Regiment
  • 1973 Pte R. Mclean 1st Battalion Trinidad and Tobago Regiment
  • 1975 Maj J.L. Theodore 1st Battalion Trinidad and Tobago Regiment

Description

The first few medals of the original Queen Victoria version were struck in bronze, but in 1872 it was ordained that it should be of silver. It is a disk, 36 millimetres (1.42 inches) in diameter, with a raised rim on each side and suspended from a straight silver bar, swivelling on some versions. On the Queen Victoria version, the suspender is affixed to the medal by means of a double-toe claw and a pin through the upper edge of the medal. On the Kings' versions and the first Queen Elizabeth II version, the attachment is by a single-toe claw. On the second Queen Elizabeth II version, the suspension is either riveted or welded to the top of the medal.

Obverse

The obverse bears the effigy of the reigning monarch. Seven versions of the medal have been awarded.

  • The original Queen Victoria version of 1869 has her diademed and veiled effigy, facing left, and is circumscribed "VICTORIA REGINA". It was designed by British medallist L.C. Wyon.
  • The first King George V version of 1923 shows him in Field Marshal's uniform, facing left, and is circumscribed "GEOGIVS V BRITT: OMN: REX ET IND: IMP:".
  • The second King George V version was awarded from 1933 to 1936 and shows him crowned and in coronation robes, facing left. It is circumscribed "GEORGIVS•V•D•G•BRITT•OMN•REX•ET•INDIÆ•IMP•".
  • The first King George VI version was introduced after his succession to the throne in 1936 and has his effigy in coronation robes, facing left and circumscribed "GEORGIVS•VI•D•G•BR•OMN•REX•ET•INDIÆ•IMP•".
  • The second King George VI version was introduced after 1947, when his title "Emperor of India" was abandoned and the reference to India was omitted from the medal inscription. The effigy on the obverse remained the same, but the circumscription was changed to "GEORGIVS VI DEI GRA BRITT: OMN: REX FID: DEF:".
  • The first Queen Elizabeth II version was introduced after her succession to the throne in 1952. It has her crowned effigy, facing right, and is circumscribed "ELIZABETH II D: G: BR: OMN: REGINA F: D:", reading around from the top. The effigy was designed by sculptor Cecil Thomas OBE and was used on a number of medals.
  • The second Queen Elizabeth II version was introduced after her coronation in 1953. This version has the same effigy as the first, but is circumscribed "ELIZABETH II DEI GRATIA REGINA F. D.", reading around from the top.

Reverse

The reverse shows the winged mythological goddess Pheme, with a trumpet in her left hand and rising from her throne to crown a warrior with a laurel wreath. At left is the naked and cloaked warrior, with his left foot on the throne dais, a bow and a quiver of arrows in his right hand and supporting a target with three arrows through its centre on his left knee. The design was by Sir Edward John Poynter, 1st Baronet PRA, and the original die was engraved by L.C. Wyon.

Clasp

The medal can be won multiple times. Each subsequent award is indicated by the award of another clasp, which displays the year of the subsequent award. The clasps are designed to be attached to the suspender and to each other with rivets, in roller chain fashion. When medals are not worn, the award of second and subsequent clasps are denoted by silver rosettes on the ribbon bar. Since it is impossible to sew more than four rosettes onto a single ribbon bar and since several champions have won the award more than five times, gold rosettes were introduced to cover situations where more than five championships have been won.

Ribbon

The ribbon is 32 millimetres wide and dark crimson, with a 3 millimetres wide black band, a 3 millimetres wide beige band and a 3 millimetres wide black band on each edge.