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"Rachael" (Barque ) - Colonists to South Australia in 1847

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    William Holmes Hamilton HAMILTON William Holmes (crew) arrived in SA 1836-07-27 aboard Duke of York from London 1836-04-05 HAMILTON William Holmes (first arr 1836 D of York), Charlotte Johnson LA...
  • Charlotte Johnson Hamilton (1818 - 1905)
    Reference: WikiTree Genealogy - SmartCopy : Jan 20 2016, 20:53:14 UTC

1847 Rachel aka Rachael from London, The Downs 27 - 05 1847 - Captain Richard H. Brown, arrived Port Adelaide on 24-09-1847

The South Australian Register. Adelaide: Wednesday, September 29, 1847.

THE "RAJAH," THE "RACHEL," AND THE "MARINER" FROM ENGLAND.

In our last publication we could only announce the arrival of the two first-mentioned ships, the Mariner's identity not having been ascertained until the business of publication was all but complete. These three arrivals, which have added to our population no fewer than 467 souls, named elsewhere, may be thus briefly particularized in this part of our publication.

The barque Rajah, 350 tons, sailed from Plymouth on the 23d May, with the total number of 173 passengers, comprising 15 cabin and intermediate, and the remainder free emigrants, of whom all the male adults are miners.

The Rachel, from the Downs, 29th May, brings 30 passengers, and a large quantity of goods. The Mariner, which left the Downs on the 16th June, and the Lizard on the 23d June, brought 264 emigrants, but no cabin passengers. From the voluminous particulars of cargo which appear in our Port intelligence, it will be seen that the long-expected steam-engine for the Kapunda mine has arrived in the Rachel; it is accompanied by a competent engineer; and we need scarcely observe that the large quantities of mining materials, implements, and clothing consigned to the resident directors of the (London) Australian Mining Company, may vouch for the intended vigourous prosecution of that Company's objects in this province, where they already possess such extensive and, it is hoped, valuable mineral lands.

A meeting of gentlemen resident in England, but interested in the South Australian Special Survey, known as that of Currency Creek, was held in the London Tavern on the 31st May last, when M. Hananel de Castro was called to the chair. The chairman said— In 1839, a company was formed called the "Currency Creek Company" which had for its object the purchase of land in South Australia. In consequence of some difficulty, the company was dissolved in 1841, and it was agreed that the land should be divided. He then ob- served that he had received letters from the colony, giving an account of the discovery of silver aod copper ores on the lands of the late company. He had also received several specimens of the ores, which he had assayed — the first specimen was found to contain 30 per cent. of silver and 40 percent, of copper; the second lot contained 8 per cent. silver, and 37½ per cent of copper. The extent of the lode appeared to be about 45 acres. Several gentlemen present also read letters from their agents in South Australia confirmatory of the chairman's statements. The chairman proposed that the company should be re-organised, and that the whole of the land should be amalgamated for the general interest of the shareholders in the original company by working the mines. After some discussion it was agreed, on the motion of Mr Lindon, to appoint a committee to pro- cure further information, devise a distinct plan of action, and then call the shareholders together.

We have no doubt Mr H. de Castro, in describing the Currency Creek minerals, meant to state that one sample contained 40 per cent. of copper with silver in the proportion of 30 ounces in the ton of ore, and the other 37½ per cent. of copper with 8 ounces of silver in the ton. There is evidently an inaccuracy also in the expression that "the extent of the lode appeared to be about 45 acres." However it is enough for us at present to know that this seemingly valuable property will not be suffered to remain without productive exploration. The substance of the April meeting of the Barossa Range Mining Company, which is reported at length in the (London) South Australian News of June, appeared in our publication of the 21st July last.

There is now some prospect of a visit from the chief proprietor of the Barossa Range lands, George Fife Angas, Esq. In a letter received from that gentlemen by the Chairman of the South Australian League, acknowledging the receipt of the petition from the colonists against State support to religion.

Mr Angas says — I have been favoured with your communication of the 18th December last, per Competitor, requesting me to take charge of a petition, signed by 2600 colonists, against the support of religion by the State, and to place in the hands of some member of parliament, in order that it may be duly presented. I am now in communication with such of the members of parliament as I consider most likely to support the prayer of the petition in the house. I have to thank you, and the gentlemen who have done me the honour to confide the petition to my care. and as my physicians advise me to try the climate of South Australia for my health, I am making arrangements to visit it, which I expect to do next year ; and shall then make common cause with the public in the support of our rights and privileges. The Queen has granted a Royal Charter of Incorporation to the India and Australia Royal Mail Steam Packet Company, and the Times of the 29th May, announces that the business of the new and enterprising company was to be forthwith commenced. The B shop of South Australia was, with three other newly-appointed colonial Bishops, to be consecrated in Westminster Abbey by the Archbishop of Canterbury, on the 29th of June, after which ceremony, and that of presentation to her Majesty, the Bishops would forthwith prepare for embarkation. The Annual Meeting of the Royal Geographical Society was held on Monday the 24th of April, Lord Colchester presiding, when the Founders' Gold medal was awarded to Captain Sturt, and the Queen's Gold Medal to Dr. Leichardt, for their discoveries in Australia. If the state of the Money Market in England is, as heretofore, a pretty sure index of the national condition, we may presume that the monetary, agricultural, and famine panics have much subsided although evidences of the general prevalence of high prices and comparative scarcity are still unhappily rife. The 4 lb loaf was 13d ; beef and mutton, 9d to 11d per lb ; potatoes so dear as to be un- attainable by poor buyers ; and other vegetables were in many places excessively dear. The sympathy of America with Irish dis- tress, is, we believe, without a parallel in the history of nations. On the 24th April, Captain Forbes, of the United States sloop-of-war Jamestown, arrived at the Cove of Cork with a relief cargo, valued at £14,000, which it was determined to distribute amoungst the ten unions of the county, according to the extent of the population and the prevalence of distress in each, and the Macedonia, another national ship was expected at Sligo.

Deputations from the City of Cork and some public bodies proceeded to the Cove to present addresses to Captain Forbes, who, in his reply expressed the necessity of "raising the moral standard of the people." In his reply to the City of Cork he said : — You know, gentlemen, that in America we have no "lower orders," in a moral point of view, unless they be imported, and that they are not long permitted to live as they were not to do at home ; they are obliged, by the social customs and the civil laws, to do their share of the common weal. When we state that these ships were destined for the Mexican war, and that the guns were actually taken out in order that they might be promptly despatched with relief cargoes, we may well say that nothing finer in humanity can be imagined than such noble, graceful acts of charity and kindness. At the close of a discussion in the House of Lords on the subject of Irish Emigration, on the 4th June, Earl Fitzwilliam assured the Government it was full time they were all convinced that such measures as their Poor Law and their loans of £1,500,000 would do nothing to meet the exigencies of Ireland. Lord Monteagle said there was no solution of the difficulties of Ireland, save a cautious and a wise system of emigration from that country ; and the motion for a select committee was agreed to. Parliament was to be dissolved about the middle of July. The annual packet ship Competitor was positively to sail on the 16th June, and may therefore be looked for daily; and the next emigrant ship, the Lady McNaughten, may be expected very shortly, as also the Antilla with a full cargo consigned to Messrs Montefiore, & Co. The Gunga and the Helen Thompson, from Liverpool, and the Rebecca Jane, from Guernsey, were on the eve of departure at the dates of the last advices. The Rev. Dr. Chalmers expired suddenly at Edinburgh on the 31st May. The venerable and distinguished divine had been called to London to give evidence before the Site Committee of the House of Commons, and had returned on Friday the 28th to his own residence at Morning-side, near Edinburgh, apparently in his ordinary health. On Sunday, though complaining a little, he attended the Free Church at Morning-side, in the afternoon, in company with Dr. Cunningham, and walked with his friend part of the way home. He called upon a lady afterwards, and dined with his family as usual. In the evening he walked for a short time in his garden with another minister from the country, and conversed with his accustomed cheerfulness and animation. Before going to bed, he wrote a letter to his sister in England, intimating his safe arrival from London, and remarking that such was now the celerity of travelling, that though he scarcely expected to have the pleasure of seeing her, he might have the pleasure of seeing her again. On the following morning, the rev. doctor not having rung his bell at his usual, hour was discovered by his servant sitting up in bedded. The legs of the body were crossed over each other, by one of them being drawn upwards to the knee of the other; and betwixt them a basin was firmly retained, which it is supposed the aged divine must have taken into bed on experiencing the first access of the fatal attack, from feeling a disposition to vomit, such as might be created by any sudden apoplectic stroke or even by spasms. The body was quite cold when discovered by the servant. Dr. Chalmers had been dead some time. His reputation was European ; he was universally beloved, as well as admired ; and he was followed to the grave by the tears of his country and the world. Lady Dudley Stuart, second daughter of Lucien Bonaparte, Prince of Canino, died at Rome on the 19th May. The Hon. and Very Rev. the Dean of Manchester died suddenly in May last, at his mansion in Hereford street, Park lane, in his 69th year. The deceased was a member of the noble house of Caernarvon, and uncle of the present earl. The Right Hon. Sir J. Becket, Bart., expired at Brighton, in the 71st year of his age. We are compelled to defer our digest of English and Foreign news till Saturday.

The South Australian Register. ADELAIDE: WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 29, 1847. (1847, September 29). South Australian Register (Adelaide, SA : 1839 - 1900), p. 2. Retrieved January 10, 2016, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article48545668


Sources:

  • [The Ships Passenger List]

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  • [The Ships Passenger List]

If you have information on passengers or need help locating them on the tree, start a [ discussion here..]

Some of the passengers:

Stories

Related Projects:

This project is included in The History Link Project - Trace your ancesters! you can add projects here