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Settlers in South Africa from Mauritius

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  • Christiaan Zaaijman, b8 (1708 - d.)
    Baptism - b8 Page 51 “SA Genealogies” vol 17, Genealogical Institute of SA, Stellenbosch, 2008” ___________________ (Crampton, Hazel (2014) The Side Of The Sun At Noon . South Africa: Jacana).
  • Johannes Zaaijman, b7 (1704 - c.1713)
    Baptism - b7 Page 51 “SA Genealogies” vol 17, Genealogical Institute of SA, Stellenbosch, 2008” _____________________ (Crampton, Hazel (2014) The Side Of The Sun At Noon . South Africa: Jacana).
  • Daniel Zaaijman, b6 (1692 - 1725)
    b6 Page 17 “SA Genealogies” vol 51, Genealogical Institute of SA, Stellenbosch, 2008” --------------------------------- Daniel Zaaijman circa 1698-1725 sailor in the emply of the Dutch East India C...
  • Pieter Zaaijman, b5 (1688 - 1749)
    b5 Page 17 “SA Genealogies” vol 17, Genealogical Institute of SA, Stellenbosch, 2008” b5. Pieter *Mauritius 10.10.1686/8 a.Kaapstad 1711, skipper, timmerman en Kuiper oorl. Kaap 1749 x Stellenbosch 1...
  • Maria Martha Marijke Zaaijman (1686 - bef.1714)
    b4 Page 17 “SA Genealogies” vol 17, Genealogical Institute of SA, Stellenbosch, 2008” -------------------------- Vermelding in de archieven: 31-12-1712 Monsterrol de Caab, p. 259 "Hendrik de Vrie...

Leaving Mauritius - By the 1890s, Mauritius had long forgotten the sugar-fuelled prosperity of the 1840s. The opening of the Suez Canal meant that it was no longer near any major trade routes. The price of sugar had fallen due to increased competition. The island was badly overpopulated, subject to frequent epidemics of Cholera and other diseases, which ran wild through the slums in which many of the former slaves and indentured labourers lived.

Several particularly severe cyclones battered the island in the 1890s, causing great damage to crops and buildings. The French (Franco-Mauritian) community remained wealthy and tight-knit, and exercised tight control over almost all aspects of the government and business of Mauritius. They tended to move out of the crowded and unhealthy cities and up to their estates on the plateau. But even here there was trouble – large families were the norm, and there was no spare land and few suitable jobs for younger sons and daughters.

The result was a huge migration of Franco-Mauritians around the world in search of new opportunities. Some went to France or England, some to Argentina, and some to Australia. But most went to nearby South Africa.

http://www.mso.anu.edu.au/pfrancis/tree/Mauritius.pdf

List of settlers that moved from Mauritius to South Africa.

Lys van immigrante van Mauritius na Suid-Afrika.

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