Augustine Bearse (1618 - 1686) MP

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Nicknames: "Austin", "August"
Birthplace: Southampton, Hampshire, England
Death: Died in Barnstable, Barnstable County, Plymouth Colony
Occupation: Farmer, from Southampton, England in ship "Confidence" on Apr. 24, 1638, Grand juror in Barnstable, MA, surveyor of highways in 1674, a farmer,
Managed by: Thomas Edward Shirley
Last Updated:

About Augustine Bearse

Myth of Mary Hyanno

Bearse-Hyanno DNA Project proposal

Augustine (Austin) BeArce arrived in Mass from the Parish Longstock Hampshire on the ship Confidence. He may or may not have had (full) Romany blood, may or may not have been a convicted murderer and may or may not have married Mary Hyanno, who some family researchers believe did not exist but who is known in several disparate branches of the family including Native American branches.

The house Austin and Mary had still exists and was recently for sale. It is located about a mile west of Barnstable Village - right where the train tracks cross over 6A. In Centerville on the corner of Churchill Road and So Main Street. It is very old and has those old fashioned leaded windows in the older protion of the house. It is an interesting house.

More About Augustine Bearss and Mary Hyanno:

Marriage: 1639, Cape Cod, Mass.

Children of Augustine Bearss and Mary Hyanno are:

  1. +Joseph Bearss, b. January 25, 1651/52, Barnstable, Mass, d. 1695.
  2. Mary Bearss, b. 1640, Barnstable, Mass, d. date unknown.
  3. Martha Bearss, b. 1642, Barnstable, Mass, d. date unknown.
  4. Priscilla Bearss, b. March 10, 1643/44, Barnstable, Mass, d. date unknown.
  5. Sarah Bearss, b. March 28, 1646, Barnstable, Mass, d. date unknown.
  6. Abigail Bearss, b. December 18, 1647, Barnstable, Mass, d. date unknown.
  7. Hannah Bearss, b. November 16, 1649, Barnstable, Mass, d. date unknown.
  8. Hester Bearss, b. October 02, 1653, Barnstable, Mass, d. date unknown.
  9. Lydia Bearss, b. 1655, Barnstable, Mass, d. date unknown.
 10. Rebecca Bearss, b. 1657, Barnstable, Mass, d. date unknown.
 11. James Bearss, b. 1660, Barnstable, Mass, d. date unknown.

"The Pioneers of Massachusetts" says Augustine Bearse ae 20 came in the Confidence April 11, 1638 and had children born 1640, 1642, 1643, 1646, 1647, 1649, 1651, 1653, 1657, and 1660. No mention of his wife's name.

"New England Marriages Prior To 1700" says Austin/Augustine Beirse married Mary b 1640 Barnstable.

If Mary (?Wilder) was born in 1640, she could not have been the mother of most, if any, of these children. Is it possible that she was a second wife? Does anyone have a different date for her birth, or a date for her marriage to Mr. Bearse?

And . . . is it possible that the mother of Austin Bearse's children was Mary Hyanno, b 1623/24, d after 1660 (per familysearch.org) and that he married Mary (?Wilder) after her death? If Mary Hyanno died aft 1660 and Mary (?Wilder) was born in 1640, this would make sense.

.......................................................

And another point of view:

There is no evidence of any kind that a person named Mary Hyanno ever existed, other than the semi-literate fairy tale of Franklyn Bearce, a man who lived two hundred years later.

There is, however, positive proof, contained in the church records of Barnstable, Mass, to show that Austin Bearce was neither a gypsy nor the husband of an Indian.

The claims that Josiah Bearse married Mary Sissel are likewise completely disproven by the record, as are, in fact, all claims of Indian heritage in the first 5 generations of the Bearse family.

That so many persist in repeating these errors, and disseminating them to yet more databases is not entirely explainable.

A desire for a more 'romantic' or exotic family legacy, and the current trendiness of all things Native American are probably at fault here, for the record shows the Bearse family kept Indian slaves, usurped Indian lands, and fought in the Indian wars.

A number of the current generation of Bearse descendants now seek to usurp an Indian familial heritage as well, but even a cursory examination of the extant records puts the lie to this absurd tale.

Honest researchers with an interest in historical accuracy should take notice, and conduct inquiries accordingly before accepting such information as fact.

Those who willfully disregard the evidence in compiling family history risk the disappointment of their own descendants, who, upon investigating the histories passed down to them, find the data not credible, compiled with carelessness and filled with inaccuracies, and their opinion of ouselves, their forebears, diminished accordingly.

Sincerely,

A. W. Brown

According to this document based on family legend based on a diary which no longer exists by Zerviah Newcombe Augustine's daughter-in-law and passed down through Franklin Bearse's family, Augustine Bearse was a gypsy who was expelled from England and put on the ship to the New World. Once at Plymouth, the single Bearse was shunned by the English women because of his ancestry. As a result he married a Wampanoag Indian woman named Mary Hyanno, the daughter of John Hyanno, and granddaughter of Iyannough, the sachem of the Mattachee village of Wampanoags of Cape Cod. Mary Hyanno is said to have been of fair complexion and red hair. The Wampanoags were often referred to as "white Indians" due to their light skin and are believed to have descended from Viking explorers. John Hyanno's mother is said to have been a princess of the Narragansett tribe and the daughter of Canonicus who was a sachem of some renown. Canonicus along with one Miantonomi were the two principals in deeding over what is now called Rhode Island to Roger Williams.

There is no proof of Bearse's gypsy ancestry. However, Jacobus' assertion that "to suppose that a Gypsy, a deported criminal, and the husband of an Indian, would have enjoyed such standing in a Puritan community is absurd" perhaps betrays more than a touch of modern-day prejudice.

Among librarians at the Library of Congress, Jacobus is known as an author for hire. A librarian told one Bearse researcher that Jacobus wrote so many books each year that he could not have done much research. In one instance he was hired by a town to compile the records they provided. Wealthy people paid to be in the book and provided the details. Of course, they were selective in what they included and omitted. The poor and non-prominent were not included.

Neither is there any record of his marriage to Mary Hyanno. In fact there is no record at all of his marriage. All we know is that he was married to a woman named Mary. Some have identified her as Mary Wilder, who traveled on the same ship as Augustine to the New World. A careful review of the records, however, shows that Mary Wilder was married to another man at the time Bearse and his Mary were having children of their own.

See refutation of dispute on his wife under Mary Hyanno

--------------------

Also known as Austin Bearse and wed in Indian rites in Mattachee Village in the summer of 1639. He arrived in Plymouth at age 20 from Southampton, England on April 24, 1638 aboard the a ship named Confidence.

According to this document based on family legend based on a diary which no longer exists by Zerviah Newcombe Augustine's daughter-in-law and passed down through Franklin Bearse's family, Augustine Bearse was a gypsy who was expelled from England and put on the ship to the New World. Once at Plymouth, the single Bearse was shunned by the English women because of his ancestry. As a result he married a Wampanoag Indian woman named Mary Hyanno, the daughter of John Hyanno, and granddaughter of Iyannough, the sachem of the Mattachee village of Wampanoags of Cape Cod. Mary Hyanno is said to have been of fair complexion and red hair. The Wampanoags were often referred to as "white Indians" due to their light skin and are believed to have descended from Viking explorers. John Hyanno's mother is said to have been a princess of the Narragansett tribe and the daughter of Canonicus who was a sachem of some renown. Canonicus along with one Miantonomi were the two principals in deeding over what is now called Rhode Island to Roger Williams.

"Augustine Bearse came to Barnstable with the first company in 1639. His house lot, containing twelve acres of very rocky land, was in the westerly part of the East Parish. He was one of the very few against who no complaint was ever made; a fact which speaks well for his character as a man and a citizen. He was a farmer, lived on the produce of his land, and brought up his large family to be like himself, useful members of society. He became a member of Mr. Lothrop's church, April 29, 1643. His name stands at the head of the list, he being the first who joined after its removal to Barnstable. He appears to have been very exact in the performance of his religious duties, causing his children to be baptized on the Sabbath next following the day of their birth. His son Joseph was born on Sunday and was carried two miles to the church and baptized the same day. Many believed in those times that children dying unbaptized were lost, and it was consequently the duty of the parent to present his child early for baptism. Goodman Bearse was influenced by this feeling; he did not wish, by a week's delay. to peril the eternal salvation of his child."

--------------------

The origin of the Bearce (Bearse, Barss, Bierce) surname is unknown, it's earliest form is said to be BeArce. Legend says that Augustine Bearce was of Romany (gypsy) extraction of the Heron tribe of Gypsys. He came to the new land at Plymouth, MA on the "good Shipp, the Confidence of London, of two hundred tonnes," from Southampton, England April 23, 1638 at the age of 20.

--------------------

http://www.murrah.com/gen/hyanno.htm

Mary Hyanno, Wampanoag Princess?

NOTE: The purpose of this article is to summarize information about Mary Hyanno that circulates among genealogists. All information about Mary Hyanno--her life, ancestry and even existence--should be viewed as legend and not as proven fact. The information in this article comes from many informal sources and should not be attributed any researcher.

Mary Hyanno, known as "Litttle Dove", is said to have married early Plymouth settler Augustine Bearse. Mary was the daughter of John Hyanno, who was born in 1595 at the Mattachee Village at what is now Barnstable, Massachusetts, and Mary No-Pee, who was born at Gays Head on Martha's Vineyard and was the daughter of No-Took-Seet. John was the son of Iyannough, the sachem of the Mattachee village of Wampanoags of Cape Cod, and Princess Canonicus. He died after 1680 on Cape Cod. Princess Canonicus was the daughter of Canochet (Chief) Canonicus and Posh-Pw. Canochet Canonicus was the son of Wessonsuoum and Keshechoo. Wessonsuoum was the son of Chief Tashtassuck, who was born before 1520.

Mary Hyanno is said to have been of fair complexion and red hair. The Wampanoags were often referred to as "white Indians" due to their light skin and are thought by some to have descended from Viking explorers. This assertion is very controversial. There indeed was an Iyannough, and Hyannis, Massachusetts is named for him.

The Bearse/Hyanno marriage entered the written record via a document filed in the 1930's by Franklin Ele-watum Bearse, a Scaticoke and Eastern Indian, in an attempt to obtain benefits as an Indian from the State of Connecticut. Mr. Bearse's claims are analyzed in a article by Jacobus entitled "Austin Bearse and His Alleged Indian Connectionis" in THE AMERICAN GENEALOGIST published about 1936. Mr. Jacobus does not accept the Franklin Bearse story and endeavored to disprove it. However, family traditions of the Hyanno marriage exist to this day in other branches of the Bearse family. These traditions do not appear to have been derived from Franklin Bearse.

The Cornwall family also claims Mary Hyanno as an ancestor.

My Hyanno Line

M. Lee Murrah

Ina Gertrude Johnson m. Earvin Elroy Murrah

Florence Ophelia Largent and Franklin John Johnson

Malcom David Largent and Eliza Azalee Spears

Thomas Wayne Largent and Talitha Maria Freeman

David Barss Freeman and Talitha T. Thompson

James Freeman and Hannah Barss

David Barss m. Rebecca Gammon

Benjamin Barss II m. Jane Collins

Benjamin Bearse I m. Sarah Cobb

Joseph Bearse m. Martha Taylor

Augustin BeArce and Mary (Hyanno?)

John Hyanno and mary No Pee

Iyannouth and Princess Canonicus

Other Hyanno Internet Resources

MaryARoot's Home Page

Mary Hyanno (Little Dove)

Mary Hyanno Genealogy

The Wampanoag Indians

http://wc.rootsweb.ancestry.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=glencoe&id=I5270

•ID: I5270

•Name: Augustine (Immigrant, 1638 “Confidence”) * Bearse

•Given Name: Augustine (Immigrant, 1638 “Confidence”) *

•Surname: Bearse

•Sex: M

•Birth: 1618 in Longstock, Hampshire, England

•Death: Aft 1686 in Barnstable, Barnstable Co., MA 1

•Occupation: Farmer

•Religion: Rev. John Lothrop's Church

•_UID: 4C69EABED9A54B8F996F23E08F84E58E46B4

•Change Date: 10 Jul 2008 at 17:25

•Note:

aka Augustin, Austin

Presidents George H. W. and George W. Bush, as well as writer Ambrose Bierce are descendants.

IMMIGRATED, 1638

GRAND JUROR, SURVEYOR OF HIGHWAYS

In 1638, Augustine, at the age of 20, emigrated to America on the ship "Confidence." Family tradition says he was a gypsy, who was deported to the New World for a minor violation of English law. After a short time in Plymouth, he moved to Barnstable. Records show he was a pious man and no complaint was ever made against him, a testament to his character. One story says that Augustine once carried his newborn son two miles in a blinding snowstorm in order to have him baptised and save his soul from damnation.

There are two stories as to the identity of Augustine's wife, whose name was Mary. One says he married Mary Wilder (b. abt 1620) of Shiplake, Oxfordshire, England, but she was married to another man at the time Augustine was having children. The other says that he married a Wampanoag Indian woman named Mary Hyanno. Oral traditions support this claim, though there are no records from the time to prove it.

The Bearse home is still standing today in Centerville, MA.

ORIGIN OF THE SURNAME

The earliest known form of the name is said to be Be Arce. Legend says Augustine Bearse was a gypsy. Perhaps the name is of Romany (gypsy) extraction.

REV. LOTHROP'S CHURCH

Rev. John Lothrop led a very tolerant, liberal congregation, admitting anyone who believed in God and promised to keep the Ten Commandments. He is credited with the founding of Barnstable, MA in 1639.

“BEARSE, BEARCE, or BIERCE, AUSTIN, or AUGUSTINE, Barnstable, came in the Confidence 1638, aged 20, from Southampton, and join. Lothrop's ch. in Apr. 1643, had Mary, b. 1640; Martha, 1642; both bapt. 7 May 1643; Pricilla, 10 Mar. 1644; Sarah, 29 Mar. 1646; Abigail, 19 Dec. 1647; Hannah, 18 Nov. 1649; Joseph, 20 Jan. 1652; Esther, 2 Oct. 1653; Lydia, late in Sept. 1655; Rebecca, 26 Sept. 1657; and James, late in July 1660. Of this sec. s. as no more is heard, it is suppos. that he d. young; but for the nine ds. we know only three that m., Sarah, in Aug. 1667 to John Hamlin; Abigail, 12 Apr. 1670 to Allen Nichols; and Rebecca, 17 Feb. 1671 to William Hunter.” --James Savage

Notes on this website are authored by Larry Overmire, unless noted otherwise. Permission of the author is required to reproduce elsewhere.

Sources:

1) Steve Riddle Database

http://worldconnect.genealogy.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET &db=sriddle&id=I08267

2) Bill Aylor Database

http://worldconnect.genealogy.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET &db=:1880976&id=I1186

3) Bruce Cox Database

http://worldconnect.genealogy.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET &db=bcox2899&id=I15490

4) The Great Migration Begins, by Robert Charles Anderson

5) A Genealogical Dictionary of the First Settlers of New England Showing Three Generations of Those Who Came Before May 1692, Vol I-IV Boston 1860-1862 by James Savage

6) "The Pioneers of Massachusetts", by Charles Henry Pope

7) Who our Forefathers really were, by Franklin Bearse

8) Cape Cod Genealogy, by Edward A. Cooper, 2000.

http://history.vineyard.net//allen/Web%20Cards/WC17/WC17_034.HTM

9) Little Dove

http://members.bellatlantic.net/~vze297s2/hyanno.htm

10) Lee Murrah's Hyano Family Page

http://www.murrah.com/gen/hyanno.htm

11) Bearse / Barss Family Page, by Lee Murrah

http://www.murrah.com/gen/bearse.htm

12) "Saints and Strangers" by George F. Williams (page 408; Time Inc. edition, 1964)

Discusses Rev. Lothop's Church.

13) Rosemary West Database, Pedigree of Dorothy Walker

http://worldconnect.genealogy.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=PED &db=rkwest&id=I5686

14) Jacobus, Donald L., "Austin Bearse and His Alleged Indian Connectionis", The American Genealogist, published abt. 1936.

15) Descendants of Augustine Bearse

http://members.bellatlantic.net/~vze297s2/ab_descendents.htm

16) Bearse/Bearce

http://www.geocities.com/Heartland/Prairie/3374/bearce.htm

17) Mid-Cape, Barnstable, information on Rev. Lothrop

http://www.insiders.com/capecod/main-historic4.htm

18) Jim Baker Database, Pedigree of Ambrose Bierce

http://worldconnect.genealogy.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=PED &db=wesslingbaker1&id=I3155

19) Ambrose Bierce: Alone in Bad Company, By Roy Morris, Jr., The Washington Post

http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-srv/style/longterm/books/chap1/b ierce.htm

20) Mary Hilliard Database, 11 Nov 2004

http://worldconnect.genealogy.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET &db=maryhilliard&id=I1102

21) A Genealogical Dictionary of The First Settlers of New England,

Before 1692, By James Savage, Volume #1, Pgs 144 - 155

http://www.usgennet.org/usa/topic/newengland/savage/bk1/144-155.h tm

Father: Gauche * Bearse b: Abt 1592 in of Southampton, Hampshire, England

Mother: Unknown * Matchowitch

Marriage 1 MARY HYANNO * OF THE WAMPANOAG TRIBE b: Abt 1623 in Barnstable, Barnstable, (Cummaquid) MA

•Married: Summer 1639 in Mattachee Village, (Barnstable) MA

•Change Date: 10 Jul 2008

Children

1. Priscilla * !!! Bearse b: Bef 10 Mar 1643/44 in Barnstable, Barnstable Co., MA

2. Sarah (President Bush Ancestor) Bearse b: 28 Mar 1646 in Barnstable, Barnstable Co., MA

3. James (Ambrose Bierce Ancestor) Bearse b: 31 Jul 1660 in Barnstable, Barnstable Co., MA

4. Joseph Bearse b: 25 Jan 1650/51 in Barnstable, Barnstable Co., MA

Sources:

1.Media: Website

Abbrev: Overmire Tifft Richardson Bradford Reed

Title: The Ancestry of Overmire, Tifft, Richardson, Bradford, Reed

Author: Larry Overmire

Publication: RootsWeb World Connect Project, © 2000-2007

Date: 3 May 2007 -------------------- Austin or Augustine Bearse, the ancestor of this family, came over in the ship Confidence of London, from Southampton, 24th April, 1638, and was then twenty years of age. He came to Barnstable with the first company in 1639. His house lot, containing twelve acres of very rocky land, was in the westerly part of the East Parish, and was bounded westerly by John Crocker's land, now owned by his heirs, northerly by the meadow, easterly by Gooman Isaac Robinson's land, and "southerly into ye woods." He owned six acres of meadow adjoining his upland on the north, and two thatch islands, still known as Bearse's islands. He had also six acres of land in the Calves Pasture, esteemed to be the best soil in the town, eight acres of planting land on the north side of Shoal pond, and bounded by Goodman Cooper's, now called Huckins' Neck, and thrity acres at the Indian pond, bounded easterly by the Herring River. The Indian pond lot he sold to Thomas Allyn, who sold the same in 1665 to Roger Goodspeed.

He was proposed to be admitted a freeman June 3, 1652, and admitted May 3, following. His name rarely occurs in the records. He was agrand juror in 1653 and 1662, and a surveyor of highways in 1674.

He became a member of Mr.Lothrop's Church April 29, 1643. His name stands at the head of the

list, he being the first named who joined after its removal to Barnstable. He appears to have been very exact in the performance of his religious duties, causing his children to be baptised on the Sabbath next following th day of their birth. His son Joseph was born on Sunday, January 25, 1651, O.S. was carried two miles to the church and baptized the same day. Many believed that children dying unbaptized were lost, and that consequently it was the duty of parents to present their children early for baptism. Goodman Bearse was influenced by this feeling, he did not wish by a week's delay to imperil the eternal salvation of his child. Now such an act would be pronounced unnecessary and cruel. However differently the present generation may view the question of baptism, he did what he honestly believed his duty, and he who does that intelligently is to be justified.

He was one of the very few against whom no complaint was ever made, a fact which speaks well for his character as a man and a citizen. He was a farmer, living on the produce of his land, and brought up his large family to be like himself--useful members of society. His house stood on the north side of the road, and his celar and some remains of his orchard, existed at the commencement of the present century. There appears to be no record of his death, nor settlemant of his estate on the probate records. He was living in 1686, but died before 1697. His marriage is not on record. Had eleven children, all born at Barnstable, Cape Cod, Massachusetts."

GENEALOGICAL NOTES OF BARNSTABLE FAMILIES

FROM LEE MURRAH'S WEBSITE

Mary Hyanno, Wampanoag Princess?

NOTE: The purpose of this article is to summarize information about Mary Hyanno that circulates among genealogists. All information about Mary Hyanno--her life, ancestry and even existence--should be viewed as legend and not as proven fact. The information in this article comes from many informal sources and should not be attributed any researcher.

Mary Hyanno, known as "Litttle Dove", is said to have married early Plymouth settler Augustine Bearse. Mary was the daughter of John Hyanno, who was born in 1595 at the Mattachee Village at what is now Barnstable, Massachusetts, and Mary No-Pee, who was born at Gays Head on Martha's Vineyard and was the daughter of No-Took-Seet. John was the son of Iyannough, the sachem of the Mattachee village of Wampanoags of Cape Cod, and Princess Canonicus. He died after 1680 on Cape Cod. Princess Canonicus was the daughter of Canochet (Chief) Canonicus and Posh-Pw. Canochet Canonicus was the son of Wessonsuoum and Keshechoo. Wessonsuoum was the son of Chief Tashtassuck, who was born before 1520.

Mary Hyanno is said to have been of fair complexion and red hair. The Wampanoags were often referred to as "white Indians" due to their light skin and are thought by some to have descended from Viking explorers. This assertion is very controversial. There indeed was an Iyannough, and Hyannis, Massachusetts is named for him.

The Bearse/Hyanno marriage entered the written record via a document filed in the 1930's by Franklin Ele-watum Bearse, a Scaticoke and Eastern Indian, in an attempt to obtain benefits as an Indian from the State of Connecticut. Mr. Bearse's claims are analyzed in a article by Jacobus entitled "Austin Bearse and His Alleged Indian Connectionis" in THE AMERICAN GENEALOGIST published about 1936. Mr. Jacobus does not accept the Franklin Bearse story and endeavored to disprove it. However, family traditions of the Hyanno marriage exist to this day in other branches

-------------------- Augustine, born in Europe was a full blood Gypsy of the Romany Race. He was deported by the British Government on the Confidence of London 1638 on the passenger listed as Augustine BeArce, single,20 years old. He married the summer of 1639 in Machatche Village Cape Cod, now Hyannis, under pagan Indian ceremonial rights to Mary Hyanno, a full blood Wampanoag Princess, daughter of John Hyanno Sagamore at Cummunaquad Barnstable Harbor. At the time of their marriage, some of the best land was ceded verbally and held jointly by her grandfather, Highyannough Sachem and them. Land was in family for 3 generations without a written deed. Since Augustine was of Romany blood, no Puritan maid would marry a Romany due to religious and racial scruples. So Augustine married Mary Hyanno at the age of puberty. They joined the Puritan church (for protection) and he became a freeman in 1652. Mary's grandmother was a daughter of the ruling Narragansett tribe. The marriage of Austine and Mary was a powerful factor in preventing the Cape tribes from attacking the English. -------------------- http://familytreemaker.genealogy.com/users/r/u/t/John-D-Rutherford/WEBSITE-0001/UHP-0196.html

Augustine Bearce (b. April 24, 1618, d. Abt. 1697) Augustine Bearce (son of Gauche BeArce and Matchowitch)22, 23 was born April 24, 1618 in Saxony, France24, 25, and died Abt. 1697 in Barnstable, Barnstable, MA26, 27. He married Mary Hyanno on 1639 in Mattachee Village, Cummaquid, Barnstable, MA28, 29, daughter of Iyannough and Mary Nopee.

Includes NotesNotes for Augustine Bearce:

The origin of the Bearce (Bearse, Barss, Bierce) surname is unknown, it's earliest form is said to be BeArce. Legend says that Augustine Bearce was of Romany (gypsy) extraction of the Heron tribe of Gypsys. He came to the new land at Plymouth, MA on the "good Shipp, the confidence of London, of two hundred tonnes," from Southampton, England April 23, 1638 at the age of 20.

He went to Barnstable, MA in 1639 with the first company of settlers. His settlement at Barnstable placed him in the midst of the Wampanoag villages on the Cape. He soon married in the summer of 1639 Mary Hyanno at the Mattachee village of Cummaquid (Barnstable). Mary was a Mattachee Wampanoag Indian girl of 15; daughter of Iyannough, Sagamore at Cummaquid and Granddaughter of Highyannough, Sachim on the Cape. With this special relationship he gained accession to large amounts of land in that area. Some of the best land in the Barnstable area was ceded verbally by old Highyannough to Augustine and Mary and held by the family for three generations without written deed.

His home which still stands is believed to be the oldest in what is now Centerville, MA. During remodeling of the home a coin dated 1689 was found as well as a beam marked 1692. It was a custom in early times to place a coin in a new home. A road from his house to Hyannis is still known as "Bearse's Way." Two thatch islands off the coast are still known as "Bearse's Islands."

He became a member of Lothrop's Church April 29, 1643; his name stands at the head of the list, - - - the first person admitted. He joined the Puritan Church in 1650 for the protection afforded. His wife Mary also joined the church that year. He was proposed to be admitted a freeman, June 3, 1652 and admitted the May 3rd of the following year.

His name rarely occurs in records. He was a grand juror in 1653 and 1662 and a surveyor of highways in 1674. He was a farmer and also mastered as Captain the ship "Two Marys." His marriage to Mary Hyanno which produced eleven children all born at Barnstable is not on record. The only reference to the marriage is "by Indian Ceremony at Mattachee." Many decend from this union both white and Indian Bearce. There appears to be no record of his death, nor settlement of his estate on probate records. He was living in 1686, but died before 1697.

[Bearce.FTW]

The origin of the Bearce (Bearse, Barss, Bierce) surname is unknown, it's earliest form is said to be BeArce. Legend says that Augustine Bearce was of Romany (gypsy) extraction of the Heron tribe of Gypsys. He came to the new land at Plymouth, MA on the "good Shipp, the confidence of London, of two hundred tonnes," from Southampton, England April 23, 1638 at the age of 20.

He went to Barnstable, MA in 1639 with the first company of settlers. His settlement at Barnstable placed him in the midst of the Wampanoag villages on the Cape. He soon married in the summer of 1639 Mary Hyanno at the Mattachee village of Cummaquid (Barnstable). Mary was a Mattachee Wampanoag Indian girl of 15; daughter of Iyannough, Sagamore at Cummaquid and Granddaughter of Highyannough, Sachim on the Cape. With this special relationship he gained accession to large amounts of land in that area. Some of the best land in the Barnstable area was ceded verbally by old Highyannough to Augustine and Mary and held by the family for three generations without written deed.

His home which still stands is believed to be the oldest in what is now Centerville, MA. During remodeling of the home a coin dated 1689 was found as well as a beam marked 1692. It was a custom in early times to place a coin in a new home. A road from his house to Hyannis is still known as "Bearse's Way." Two thatch islands off the coast are still known as "Bearse's Islands."

He became a member of Lothrop's Church April 29, 1643; his name stands at the head of the list, - - - the first person admitted. He joined the Puritan Church in 1650 for the protection afforded. His wife Mary also joined the church that year. He was proposed to be admitted a freeman, June 3, 1652 and admitted the May 3rd of the following year.

His name rarely occurs in records. He was a grand juror in 1653 and 1662 and a surveyor of highways in 1674. He was a farmer and also mastered as Captain the ship "Two Marys." His marriage to Mary Hyanno which produced eleven children all born at Barnstable is not on record. The only reference to the marriage is "by Indian Ceremony at Mattachee." Many decend from this union both white and Indian Bearce. There appears to be no record of his death, nor settlement of his estate on probate records. He was living in 1686, but died before 1697.

[Reed1.FTW]

The origin of the Bearce (Bearse, Barss, Bierce) surname is unknown, it's earliest form is said to be BeArce. Legend says that Augustine Bearce was of Romany (gypsy) extraction of the Heron tribe of Gypsys. He came to the new land at Plymouth, MA on the "good Shipp, the confidence of London, of two hundred tonnes," from Southampton, England April 23, 1638 at the age of 20.

He went to Barnstable, MA in 1639 with the first company of settlers. His settlement at Barnstable placed him in the midst of the Wampanoag villages on the Cape. He soon married in the summer of 1639 Mary Hyanno at the Mattachee village of Cummaquid (Barnstable). Mary was a Mattachee Wampanoag Indian girl of 15; daughter of Iyannough, Sagamore at Cummaquid and Granddaughter of Highyannough, Sachim on the Cape. With this special relationship he gained accession to large amounts of land in that area. Some of the best land in the Barnstable area was ceded verbally by old Highyannough to Augustine and Mary and held by the family for three generations without written deed.

His home which still stands is believed to be the oldest in what is now Centerville, MA. During remodeling of the home a coin dated 1689 was found as well as a beam marked 1692. It was a custom in early times to place a coin in a new home. A road from his house to Hyannis is still known as "Bearse's Way." Two thatch islands off the coast are still known as "Bearse's Islands."

He became a member of Lothrop's Church April 29, 1643; his name stands at the head of the list, - - - the first person admitted. He joined the Puritan Church in 1650 for the protection afforded. His wife Mary also joined the church that year. He was proposed to be admitted a freeman, June 3, 1652 and admitted the May 3rd of the following year.

His name rarely occurs in records. He was a grand juror in 1653 and 1662 and a surveyor of highways in 1674. He was a farmer and also mastered as Captain the ship "Two Marys." His marriage to Mary Hyanno which produced eleven children all born at Barnstable is not on record. The only reference to the marriage is "by Indian Ceremony at Mattachee." Many decend from this union both white and Indian Bearce. There appears to be no record of his death, nor settlement of his estate on probate records. He was living in 1686, but died before 1697.

More About Augustine Bearce: AKA (Facts Pg): BeArce, Bearse, Barss, Bierce.30, 31 Emigration: April 24, 1638, "Confidence" of London.31 Immigration: April 24, 1638, "Confindence" of London. Nationality: Romany/Gypsy.32, 33 Occupation: Farming & Fishing.34, 35 TRIBAL: Romany, Heron/Herne.36, 37

More About Augustine Bearce and Mary Hyanno: Marriage: 1639, Mattachee Village, Cummaquid, Barnstable, MA.38, 39

Children of Augustine Bearce and Mary Hyanno are:

   Mary Bearce, b. 1640, Barnstable, Barnstable, MA40, 41, d. date unknown.
   Martha Bearce, b. 1642, Barnstable, Barnstable, MA42, 43, d. date unknown.
   Presilla Bearce, b. March 10, 1643/44, Barnstable, Barnstable, MA44, 45, d. date unknown.
   +Sarah Bearce, b. March 28, 1646, Barnstable, Barnstable, MA46, 47, d. date unknown47.
   Abigail Bearce, b. December 18, 1647, Barnstable, Barnstable, MA48, 49, d. date unknown, Barnstable, Barnstable, MA49.
   Hannah Bearce, b. November 16, 1649, Barnstable, Barnstable, MA50, 51, d. date unknown.
   +Joseph Bearce, b. January 25, 1650/51, Barnstable, Barnstable, MA52, 53, d. February 13, 1716/17, Barnstable, Barnstable, MA53.
   Hester Bearce, b. October 02, 1653, Barnstable, Barnstable, MA54, 55, d. date unknown.
   Lydia Bearce, b. September 29, 1655, Barnstable, Barnstable, MA56, 57, d. date unknown.
   Rebecca Bearce, b. September 26, 1657, Barnstable, Barnstable, MA58, 59, d. date unknown.
   +James Bearce, b. July 30, 1660, Barnstable, Barnstable, MA, d. 1728, Plympton, Barnstable, MA59.
view all 20

Capt. Augustine Bearse's Timeline

1618
April 24, 1618
Southampton, Hampshire, England
1638
April 24, 1638
Age 20
Southampton, England - Æ 20 Yrs.
April 24, 1638
Age 20
Barnstable County, Massachusetts, USA
1640
August 16, 1640
Age 22
Barnstable, Cape Cod, Plymouth Colony
1642
May 6, 1642
Age 24
Barnstable, Barnstable, Massachusetts, USA
1643
March 10, 1643
Age 24
Barnstable, Cape Cod, Plymouth Colony
1646
March 28, 1646
Age 27
Mattachee, Cape Cod, Plymouth Colony
1647
December 18, 1647
Age 29
Coventry, Warwickshire, England, (Present UK)
1649
November 16, 1649
Age 31
Barnstable, Barnstable, Massachusetts, USA
1650
August 7, 1650
Age 32
Matachee Village (near Yarmouth), (Present Barnstable County), Plymouth Colony (Present Massachusetts), (Present USA)

Wed in Indian rites in Mattachee Village in the summer of 1639.