Henry Hayes Lockwood (1814 - 1899)

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About Henry Hayes Lockwood

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Henry_Hayes_Lockwood

Henry Hayes Lockwood (August 17, 1814 – December 7, 1899) was an American soldier and authority on military tactics.

Early life

Lockwood was born in Kent County, Delaware, Delaware. He graduated from the United States Military Academy in 1836, served in the Seminole Wars as a lieutenant in the Second Artillery, and resigned his commission in the next year. In 1841 he was made professor of mathematics at the United States Naval Academy, where from 1851 to 1866 he held the professorship of field artillery and infantry tactics. In 1856, his son, James Booth Lockwood, was born. James would later go on to participate in and perish on the Lady Franklin Bay Expedition in 1884.

Civil War

Lockwood entered the Union Army as colonel of the 1st Delaware Infantry, was commissioned a brigadier general of volunteers on August 8, 1861, and served in the defenses of the lower Potomac River. He commanded a brigade attached to XII Corps at the Battle of Gettysburg. His brigade was kept directly under corps headquarters during the battle, because the acting corps commander, Brig. Gen. Alpheus S. Williams, did not want an unknown officer commanding 1st Division just because he was senior of Brig. Gen. Thomas H. Ruger. The brigade was absorbed into the division after Williams returned to that command and Maj. Gen. Henry W. Slocum resumed corps command. In the winter of 1863–64 Lockwood was commander of the Middle Department, with headquarters at Baltimore, Maryland. Later he took part in the Richmond Campaign, briefly commanding a division in V Corps. He was sent back to the Middle Department because his corps commander, Maj. Gen. Gouverneur K. Warren, did not find him sufficiently competent for so high a rank.

Postbellum career

After the war, Lockwood became a professor at the U.S. Naval Academy. He commanded the U.S. Naval Observatory from 1870 to 1876 and retired from service on August 18, 1876. He died in Georgetown, D.C., and is buried at the U.S. Naval Academy Cemetery in Annapolis, Maryland.

He was the author of Manual of Naval Batteries (1852) and Exercises in Small Arms and Field Artillery (1852).

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Birth: Aug. 17, 1814 Death: Dec. 7, 1899 Georgetown District of Columbia District Of Columbia, USA

Civil War Union Brigadier General. He was born in Kent County, Delaware, and was a graduate of the West Point class of 1836, ranking 22nd among 49 cadets. He was assigned to the 2nd United States Artillery and was sent to Florida to oppose the Seminole uprising. On September 12, 1837, he resigned his commission and spent four years on his Delaware farm until he was appointed professor of mathematics in the United States Navy. He taught aboard ships, then at a naval facility in Philadelphia, and finally at the newly opened Naval Academy, in Annapolis, Maryland. During the Mexican War he served aboard the USS United States off the coast of California coast. In 1851 he transferred to the chair of field artillery and infantry tactics, with the additional duty of professor of astronomy. With the outbreak of the Civil War, he returned to army service as Colonel of the 1st Delaware Infantry. On August 8, 1861, he was appointed Brigadier General of Volunteers. Soon afterward he led an expedition to the eastern shore of Virginia, then took command of the prison at Point Lookout and the defenses of the lower Potomac. He did not see field service until Gettysburg, where he led a XII Corps brigade, composed primarily of Maryland regiments, in the Army of the Potomac. At the close of the campaign in Pennsylvania, his command was detached for garrison duty outside Harpers Ferry. He spent 5 months at this post before going to Baltimore, in December 1863, to succeed Major General Robert C. Schenck in charge of the Middle Department. Rejoining the Army of the Potomac the following spring, he directed a V Corps division at Cold Harbor. Afterward he was again detached to head a portion of the Middle Department, encompassing Baltimore and the eastern shore of Maryland. In July he led a conglomeration of provisional units against Lieutenant General Jubal A. Early's Confederate raiders; after the latter's retreat to Virginia, he returned to departmental duties. On his muster out, in August 1865, he returned to Annapolis, where he taught gunnery and other subjects of a mathematical, scientific, and tactical nature. In 1870 he was assigned to the Naval Observatory in Washington D.C., serving there until his retirement 6 years later. His remaining years were spent in Washington, where he later would die. Although a West Point man, because of his long service at the Naval Academy, he was accorded the distinction of burial in its cemetery at Annapolis. His tombstone remembers his service there, citing him as one of the founders. He was the father of Artic Explorer James Booth Lockwood, who lost his life during the "Lady Franklin Bay Expedition" while serving as second in command under Adolphus W. Greely. (bio by: Ugaalltheway)


Family links:

Children:
 Eliza Rogers Lockwood Sigsbee (1850 - 1926)*
 James Booth Lockwood (1852 - 1884)*

Spouse:
 Anna Rogers Booth Lockwood (1820 - 1894)*
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Brig. General Henry Hayes Lockwood (USA)'s Timeline

1814
August 17, 1814
1852
October 9, 1852
Age 38
1899
December 7, 1899
Age 85
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