Childéric I, King of the Franks

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Childéric I, roi des Francs

Nicknames: "Childeric", "Childerich"
Birthdate:
Birthplace: Nordrhein-Westfalen, Germany
Death: Died in Tournai, Orne, Basse-Normandie, France
Place of Burial: Abbey of Saint-Brice, Tournai, Hainaut, Belgium
Immediate Family:

Son of Mérovech I, King of the Salian Franks; King Merowig Salien Meroving; Chlodeswinthe (Verica) of the Franks and Queen Verica Meroving
Husband of Basina II of the Thüringians and Andovera
Father of Clovis I the Great, King of the Franks; Theodoric "the Great", King of the East Franks; Lantraldis des Francs and Audofledis of the Salian Franks

Occupation: King of the Salian Franks vers 458- vers 481, Roi des Francs Saliens 4e, 458-481, król Franków, King of the Franks of Ysel, King of the Salian Franks
Managed by: Private User
Last Updated:

About Childéric I, roi des Francs

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Childeric_I Childeric I (c. 440– c. 481) was the Merovingian king of the Salian Franks from 457 until his death, and the father of Clovis.

He succeeded his father Merovech as king, traditionally in 457 or 458. With his Frankish warband he was established with his capital at Tournai, on lands which he had received as a foederatus of the Romans, and for some time he kept the peace with his allies.

In about 463 in Orléans, in conjunction with the Roman General Aegidius, who was based in Soissons, he defeated the Visigoths, who hoped to extend their dominion along the banks of the Loire River. After the death of Aegidius, he first assisted Comes ("count") Paul of Angers, together with a mixed band of Gallo-Romans and Franks, in defeating the Goths and taking booty. Odoacer reached Angers but Childeric arrived the next day and a battle ensued. Count Paul was killed and Childeric took the city. Childeric, having delivered Angers, followed a Saxon warband to the islands on the Atlantic mouth of the Loire, and massacred them there. In a change of alliances, he also joined forces with Odoacer, according to Gregory of Tours, to stop a band of the Alamanni who wished to invade Italy.

The stories of his expulsion by the Franks, whose women he was taking; of his eight-year stay in Thuringia with King Basin and his wife Basina; of his return when a faithful servant advised him that he could safely do so by sending to him half of a piece of gold which he had broken with him; and of the arrival in Tournai of Queen Basina, whom he married, come from Gregory of Tours' Libri Historiarum (Book ii.12).

He died in 481 and was buried in Tournai, leaving a son, Clovis, afterwards king of the Franks. Tomb

Childeric's tomb was discovered in 1653 (May 27) by a mason doing repairs in the church of Saint-Brice in Tournai, a city in modern Belgium. Numerous precious objects were found, including a richly ornamented sword, a torse-like bracelet, jewels of gold and garnet cloisonné, gold coins, a gold bull's head and a ring with the inscription CHILDERICI REGIS ("of Childeric the king"), which identified the tomb. Some 300 golden bees were also found. Archduke Leopold William, governor of the Southern Netherlands (today's Belgium), had the find published in Latin. The treasure went first to the Habsburgs in Vienna, then as a gift to Louis XIV, who was not impressed with the treasure and stored it in the royal library, which became the Bibliothèque Nationale de France during the Revolution. Napoleon was more impressed with Childeric's bees and when he was looking for a heraldic symbol to trump the Bourbon fleur-de-lys. he settled on Childeric's bees as symbols of the French Empire.

On the night of November 5–6, 1831, the treasure of Childeric was among 80 kilos of treasure stolen from the Library and melted down for the gold. A few pieces were retrieved from where they had been hidden in the Seine, including two of the bees. The record of the treasure, however, now exists only in the fine engravings made at the time of its discovery and in some reproductions made for the Habsburgs. [edit] External links

  1. Northvegr website: Gregory of Tours, Historia Francorum
  2. "A note on Childeric's bees": the discovery of his tomb: follow the links for the engravings of Childeric's treasure and the two remaining gold bees.

King of the Salian Franks King at Tournai King of France

Born: 440 or 436

Photo: Signet ring of Childeric I. Inscription CHILDERICI REGIS ("of Childeric the king"). Found in his tomb at Tournai, now in the Monnaie de Paris.

Childeric I (c. 440– c. 481) was the Merovingian king of the Salian Franks from 457 until his death, and the father of Clovis.

He succeeded his father Merovech as king, traditionally in 457 or 458. With his Frankish warband he was established with his capital at Tournai, on lands which he had received as a foederatus of the Romans, and for some time he kept the peace with his allies.

His tomb was discovered in the church of Saint-Brice in Tournai, Belgium.

-------------------- Childeric I (c. 440– c. 481) was the Merovingian king of the Salian Franks from 457 until his death, and the father of Clovis.

He succeeded his father Merovech as king, traditionally in 457 or 458. With his Frankish warband he was established with his capital at Tournai, on lands which he had received as a foederatus of the Romans, and for some time he kept the peace with his allies. -------------------- http://es.wikipedia.org/wiki/Childerico_I

Childerico I (hacia 436 - 481, Tournai, Bélgica), Rey de los Francos Salios en el año 457.

Quizás fue hijo de Meroveo. Se casa con Basina de Turingia y tiene por hijo a Clodoveo I.

Este príncipe fue secuestrado cuando era niño por un destacamento del ejército de los hunos y liberado de forma milagrosa por un bravo francés llamado Viomade. Tenía valor y coraje, pero era de corazón tierno, y los señores franceses molestos por los amoríos que tenía con sus mujeres, se aliaron para destronarlo, por lo que se retiró a Alemania, donde volvió a caer en los mismos errores y sedujo a Basina, esposa del rey de Turingia, su huésped y amigo el rey Basino.

Childerico se hizo de nuevo con el trono, del que le habían echado sus galanterías, después de ganar una batalla. La reina de Turingia, Basina, abandona a su marido y se casa con Childerico, con gran escándalo de las gentes de bien, que reclaman en vano los derechos matrimoniales y las leyes inviolables de la amistad. De este matrimonio nació el gran Clodoveo I.

El final de su reinado estuvo señalado por muchos éxitos gloriosos. Derrota cerca de Orleans al ejército de Odoacro, rey de los hérulos (y conquistador en el año 476 del Imperio Romano de Occidente), toma Angers y la somete al pillaje. Mata con su propia mano al conde Paul, que estaba al mando de las tropas del Emperador. Firma un tratado de paz con Odoacro y se une con los sajones para exterminar a los alamanes que habían invadido una parte de Italia. La conquista de Alemania fue el último hecho memorable de este príncipe. Murió poco después, en el vigésimo cuarto año de su reinado y fue enterrado en la villa de Tournai. Su tumba fue descubierta el año 1653.

Le sucede su hijo Clodoveo I. -------------------- http://nl.wikipedia.org/wiki/Childerik_I

Childerik I (ca. 436-481 of 482) was een koning (hertog) van de Salische Franken. Hij volgde zijn vader Merovech op als heerser van de Saliërs in de omgeving van Doornik. Childerik diende vermoedelijk als generaal onder de Romeinse keizer Majorianus en in die hoedanigheid ook onder de Gallo-Romeinse heersers Aegidius en Paulus.

Childerik had vier kinderen, zijn zoon Chlodovech en zijn dochters Lantechilde, Audoflede (gehuwd met Theodorik de Grote) en Abboflede. Childerik stierf op 26 november 481 en werd opgevolgd door zijn zoon Chlodovech.

Het graf van Childerik in Doornik werd in 1653 ontdekt, en geldt als het rijkste Frankische koningsgraf dat ooit is gevonden. Het grootste deel van de schat werd in 1831 gestolen, maar de oorspronkelijke beschrijvingen van de voorwerpen zijn bewaard gebleven.

-------------------- Childeric I (c. 437– c. 481) was the Merovingian king of the Salian Franks from 457 until his death, and the father of Clovis.

He succeeded his father Merovech (Latinised as Meroveus or Merovius) as king, traditionally in 457 or 458. With his Frankish warband he was established with his capital at Tournai, on lands which he had received as a foederatus of the Romans, and for some time he kept the peace with his allies.

In about 463 in Orléans, in conjunction with the Roman General Aegidius, who was based in Soissons, he defeated the Visigoths, who hoped to extend their dominion along the banks of the Loire River. After the death of Aegidius, he first assisted Comes ("count") Paul of Angers, together with a mixed band of Gallo-Romans and Franks, in defeating the Goths and taking booty. Odoacer reached Angers but Childeric arrived the next day and a battle ensued. Count Paul was killed and Childeric took the city. Childeric, having delivered Angers, followed a Saxon warband to the islands on the Atlantic mouth of the Loire, and massacred them there. In a change of alliances, he also joined forces with Odoacer, according to Gregory of Tours, to stop a band of the Alamanni who wished to invade Italy.

The stories of his expulsion by the Franks, whose women he was taking; of his eight-year stay in Thuringia with King Basin and his wife Basina; of his return when a faithful servant advised him that he could safely do so by sending to him half of a piece of gold which he had broken with him; and of the arrival in Tournai of Queen Basina, whom he married come from Gregory of Tours' Libri Historiarum (Book ii.12).

He died in 481 and was buried in Tournai, leaving a son Clovis, afterwards king of the Franks.

Childeric's tomb was discovered in 1653 (May 27) by a mason doing repairs in the church of Saint-Brice in Tournai, a city in modern Belgium, where numerous precious objects were found, including a richly ornamented sword, a torse-like bracelet, jewels of gold and cloisonné enamel with garnets, gold coins, a gold bull's head and a ring with the inscription CHILDERICI REGIS ("of Childeric the king"), which identified the tomb. Some 300 golden bees were also found. Archduke Leopold William, governor of the Southern Netherlands (today's Belgium), had the find published in Latin, and the treasure went first to the Habsburgs in Vienna, then as a gift to Louis XIV, who was not impressed with them and stored them in the royal library, which became the Bibliothèque Nationale de France during the Revolution. Napoleon was more impressed with Childeric's bees when he was looking for a heraldic symbol to trump the Bourbon fleur-de-lys. He settled on Childeric's bees as symbols of the French Empire.

On the night of November 5-6, 1831, the treasure of Childeric was among 80 kilos of treasure stolen from the Library and melted down for the gold. A few pieces were retrieved where they had been hidden in the Seine, including two of the bees. The record of the treasure, however, now exists only in the fine engravings made at the time of its discovery, and in some reproductions made for the Habsburgs. -------------------- http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Childeric_I -------------------- Childeric I (c. 440– c. 481) was the Merovingian king of the Salian Franks from 457 until his death, and the father of Clovis.

He succeeded his father Merovech (Latinised as Meroveus or Merovius) as king, traditionally in 457 or 458. With his Frankish warband he was established with his capital at Tournai, on lands which he had received as a foederatus of the Romans, and for some time he kept the peace with his allies.

In about 463 in Orléans, in conjunction with the Roman General Aegidius, who was based in Soissons, he defeated the Visigoths, who hoped to extend their dominion along the banks of the Loire River. After the death of Aegidius, he first assisted Comes ("count") Paul of Angers, together with a mixed band of Gallo-Romans and Franks, in defeating the Goths and taking booty. Odoacer reached Angers but Childeric arrived the next day and a battle ensued. Count Paul was killed and Childeric took the city. Childeric, having delivered Angers, followed a Saxon warband to the islands on the Atlantic mouth of the Loire, and massacred them there. In a change of alliances, he also joined forces with Odoacer, according to Gregory of Tours, to stop a band of the Alamanni who wished to invade Italy.

The stories of his expulsion by the Franks, whose women he was taking; of his eight-year stay in Thuringia with King Basin and his wife Basina; of his return when a faithful servant advised him that he could safely do so by sending to him half of a piece of gold which he had broken with him; and of the arrival in Tournai of Queen Basina, whom he married, come from Gregory of Tours' Libri Historiarum (Book ii.12).

He died in 481 and was buried in Tournai, leaving a son Clovis, afterwards king of the Franks.

Childeric's tomb was discovered in 1653 (May 27) by a mason doing repairs in the church of Saint-Brice in Tournai, a city in modern Belgium, where numerous precious objects were found, including a richly ornamented sword, a torse-like bracelet, jewels of gold and cloisonné enamel with garnets, gold coins, a gold bull's head and a ring with the inscription CHILDERICI REGIS ("of Childeric the king"), which identified the tomb. Some 300 golden bees were also found. Archduke Leopold William, governor of the Southern Netherlands (today's Belgium), had the find published in Latin, and the treasure went first to the Habsburgs in Vienna, then as a gift to Louis XIV, who was not impressed with them and stored them in the royal library, which became the Bibliothèque Nationale de France during the Revolution. Napoleon was more impressed with Childeric's bees when he was looking for a heraldic symbol to trump the Bourbon fleur-de-lys. He settled on Childeric's bees as symbols of the French Empire.

On the night of November 5–6, 1831, the treasure of Childeric was among 80 kilos of treasure stolen from the Library and melted down for the gold. A few pieces were retrieved where they had been hidden in the Seine, including two of the bees. The record of the treasure, however, now exists only in the fine engravings made at the time of its discovery, and in some reproductions made for the Habsburgs. -------------------- ID: I6522 Name: Childeric I Merovingian Given Name: Childeric I Surname: Merovingian Suffix: King of the Franks Sex: M _UID: 560A2AFA5118D811BE490080C8C142CCF4F3 Change Date: 26 Jun 2005

Birth: 436 in Westfalen, Germany Death: 26 NOV 481

Father: Merovee Merovingian b: ABT 415 in France Mother: Verica of Sweden b: ABT 419 in Westfalen, Germany

Marriage 1 Basina Andovera von Thuringia b: ABT 438 in Thruingen Married: Children

Adelbert Ferreolus
Audofleda of the Franks b: ABT 460
CLOVIS @ OF FRANKS b: ABT 465 in Rheims, Marne, Loire-Atlantique, France
Chilperic Merovingian b: 445 in Bourgogne, France
Andelfieda Merovingian b: ABT 465

Marriage 2 Spouse Unknown Married: Children

Chilperic II of Burgundy b: 448

Forrás / Source: http://wc.rootsweb.ancestry.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=jdp-fam&id=I6522

-------------------- ID: I5437Ch82a Name: Childeric Merovingian , I Given Name: Childeric, I Surname: Merovingian Sex: M Birth: 0437A Death: 0481-2A Note: VERSIONS OF HIS NAME: - Childeric [Gardner1996] - Childerico [O'Hart1923] [wPhilip5] - OTHER RELATIONSHIPS: - Chilperic king of the Burgundians [447A-491A] was NOT his child. - SOURCES: - EB1986 "Childeric I" | "Merovingian dynasty" | "Merovech" - O'Hart1923 "The Lineal Descent of King Philip V., of Spain":p#42-3 - Gardner1996 - Gregory0594 - WNBD1983 - wCharlemagne - wPhilip5 - wYoung - PKD RUO-5437Ch82a 2001De02 Copyright (c) 2009 Paul K Davis [paulkdavis@earthlink.net] Fremont CA

Father: Merovech Franks,king-of-the Mother: Verica -

Marriage 1 Basina - Children

-1. Clovis "Magnus" Merovingian , I b: 0466A?

Forrás / Source: http://wc.rootsweb.ancestry.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=pkd&id=I5437Ch82a -------------------- On 31 August 2008, CHILDERIC THE FIRST was the earliest person profiled in our Geni tree. The following text is copied from the English-language Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia at

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Childeric_I

Tietoa Childerik I:stä suomeksi: http://fi.wikipedia.org/wiki/Childeric_I

Information om Childerik I på svenska: http://sv.wikipedia.org/wiki/Childerik_I

Childeric I (c. 440– c. 481) was the Merovingian king of the Salian Franks from 457 until his death, and the father of Clovis.

He succeeded his father Merovech (Latinised as Meroveus or Merovius) as king, traditionally in 457 or 458. With his Frankish warband he was established with his capital at Tournai, on lands which he had received as a foederatus of the Romans, and for some time he kept the peace with his allies.

In about 463 in Orléans, in conjunction with the Roman General Aegidius, who was based in Soissons, he defeated the Visigoths, who hoped to extend their dominion along the banks of the Loire River. After the death of Aegidius, he first assisted Comes ("count") Paul of Angers, together with a mixed band of Gallo-Romans and Franks, in defeating the Goths and taking booty. Odoacer reached Angers but Childeric arrived the next day and a battle ensued. Count Paul was killed and Childeric took the city. Childeric, having delivered Angers, followed a Saxon warband to the islands on the Atlantic mouth of the Loire, and massacred them there. In a change of alliances, he also joined forces with Odoacer, according to Gregory of Tours, to stop a band of the Alamanni who wished to invade Italy.

The stories of his expulsion by the Franks, whose women he was taking; of his eight-year stay in Thuringia with King Basin and his wife Basina; of his return when a faithful servant advised him that he could safely do so by sending to him half of a piece of gold which he had broken with him; and of the arrival in Tournai of Queen Basina, whom he married, come from Gregory of Tours' Libri Historiarum (Book ii.12).

He died in 481 and was buried in Tournai, leaving a son Clovis, afterwards king of the Franks.

Childeric's tomb was discovered in 1653 (May 27) by a mason doing repairs in the church of Saint-Brice in Tournai, a city in modern Belgium, where numerous precious objects were found, including a richly ornamented sword, a torse-like bracelet, jewels of gold and cloisonné enamel with garnets, gold coins, a gold bull's head and a ring with the inscription CHILDERICI REGIS ("of Childeric the king"), which identified the tomb. Some 300 golden bees were also found. Archduke Leopold William, governor of the Southern Netherlands (today's Belgium), had the find published in Latin, and the treasure went first to the Habsburgs in Vienna, then as a gift to Louis XIV, who was not impressed with them and stored them in the royal library, which became the Bibliothèque Nationale de France during the Revolution. Napoleon was more impressed with Childeric's bees when he was looking for a heraldic symbol to trump the Bourbon fleur-de-lys. He settled on Childeric's bees as symbols of the French Empire.

On the night of November 5–6, 1831, the treasure of Childeric was among 80 kilos of treasure stolen from the Library and melted down for the gold. A few pieces were retrieved where they had been hidden in the Seine, including two of the bees. The record of the treasure, however, now exists only in the fine engravings made at the time of its discovery, and in some reproductions made for the Habsburgs.

See also:

"A note on Childeric's bees" at the following address:

http://penelope.uchicago.edu/hydrionoframes/bees.html

-------------------- Childeric I (c. 440– c. 481) was the Merovingian king of the Salian Franks from 457 until his death, and the father of Clovis.

He succeeded his father Merovech as king, traditionally in 457 or 458.

Childeric's tomb was discovered in 1653 (May 27) by a mason doing repairs in the church of Saint-Brice in Tournai, a city in modern Belgium, where numerous precious objects were found, including a richly ornamented sword, a torse-like bracelet, jewels of gold and cloisonné enamel with garnets, gold coins, a gold bull's head and a ring with the inscription CHILDERICI REGIS ("of Childeric the king"), which identified the tomb. Some 300 golden bees were also found. Archduke Leopold William, governor of the Southern Netherlands (today's Belgium), had the find published in Latin, and the treasure went first to the Habsburgs in Vienna, then as a gift to Louis XIV, who was not impressed with them and stored them in the royal library, which became the Bibliothèque Nationale de France during the Revolution. Napoleon was more impressed with Childeric's bees when he was looking for a heraldic symbol to trump the Bourbon fleur-de-lys. He settled on Childeric's bees as symbols of the French Empire.

On the night of November 5–6, 1831, the treasure of Childeric was among 80 kilos of treasure stolen from the Library and melted down for the gold. A few pieces were retrieved where they had been hidden in the Seine, including two of the bees. The record of the treasure, however, now exists only in the fine engravings made at the time of its discovery, and in some reproductions made for the Habsburgs. -------------------- Childeric I (c. 440– c. 481) was the Merovingian king of the Salian Franks from 457 until his death, and the father of Clovis.

He succeeded his father Merovech as king, traditionally in 457 or 458. With his Frankish warband he was established with his capital at Tournai, on lands which he had received as a foederatus of the Romans, and for some time he kept the peace with his allies.

Childeric's tomb was discovered in 1653 (May 27) by a mason doing repairs in the church of Saint-Brice in Tournai, a city in modern Belgium, -------------------- http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Childeric_I

------------- Sucedeu seu pai Meroveu como rei, tradicionalmente em 457 ou 458. Com seus guerreiros francos, ele se estabeleceu na sua capital Tournai, nas terras que havia recebido como um dos foederatus do Império Romano e por algum tempo manteve a paz com seus aliados. Por volta de 463 em Orleães, junto com o general romano Egídio, que estava baseado em Soissons, ele derrotou os visigodos, que esperavam estender seus domínios ao longo das margens do rio Loire. Após a morte de Egídio, ele primeiro ajudou o conde Paulo de Angers, junto com um bando misto de galo-romanos e francos a derrotar e saquear os godos. Odoacro alcançou Angers mas Childerico chegou no dia seguinte, iniciando-se a batalha. O conde paulo foi morto e Chiderico tomou a cidade. Childerico, após abandonar Angers, seguiu um bando guerreiro saxão às ilhas da desembocadura do Loire no Atlântico, massacrando-as. Numa mudança de alianças, ele também uniu forças a Odoacro, de acordo com Gregório de Tours, para parar um bando de alamanos que tencionavam invadir a Itália. Morreu em 481 ou 482 e foi sepultado em Tournai, deixando seu filho Clóvis, mais tarde rei de todos os francos. A tumba de Chiderico foi descoberta em 1653 por um pedreiro que fazia reparos na igreja de Saint-Brice em Tournai onde numerosos objetos preciosos foram encontrados, incluindo uma espada esplendidamente ornamentada, um bracelete, jóias de ouro com granadas encrustadas, moedas de ouro, uma cabeça de touro de ouro e um anel com a inscrição CHILDERICI REGIS ("de Childerico o rei"), o que identificou a tumba. Cerca de 300 abelhas douradas também foram encontradas. O arquiduque Leopoldo Guilherme, governador espanhol dos Países Baixos, publicou a descoberta em latim, e os tesouros foram enviados aos Habsburgos em Viena, que os deu como presente a Luís XIV, que não se impressionou com o mesmo e o armazenou na biblioteca real, que se tornou a Biblioteca Nacional da França durante a Revolução Francesa. Napoleão ficou impressionado com as abelhas de Childerico quando ele estava procurando por um símbolo heráldico para substituir a flor-de-lis dos Bourbons. Ele estabeleceu as abelhas de Childerico como símbolos do Primeiro Império Francês. Na noite de 5 para 6 de novembro de 1831, o tesouro de Childerico estava entre os 80 kg de tesouro roubados da biblioteca e fundidos em barras de ouro. Poucas peças foram resgatadas de onde haviam sido escondidas no Sena, incluíndo duas abelhas. O registro do tesouro, no entanto, agora existe apenas em refinadas pinturas feitas na época de seu descobrimento, e em algumas reproduções feitas pelos Habsburgos.

-------------------- King Childeric I of Franks Born: 0436 Westphalia, Germany Died: 26-Nov-0481 Tournai, France

Childeric I (c. 437- c. 482) was the Merovingian king of the Salian Franks from 457 until his death. Page 212 in Dawn of European civilization has Merovingian chart. It differs a little from some others.

Cloderic is same as Childeric

"Rulers of the World" by R.F.Tapsell Between 458 and 480: Childeric I became the third King of the Franks in 458. He fought with the Roman Aegidius against the Wisigoths. When Agidius died in 464, he was succeeded by Count Paul. Childeric I's army helped Count Paul push back a Saxon advance from Angers around 466. Count Paul would die in 470. They had to repeat this feat around 475, after Count Paul had died and the Saxons once again had attempted to expand into Angers.

1 Childeric I, King des Francs (Paul, Nouveau Larousse Universel.) (Stuart, Royalty for Commoners, Page 216, Line 303-52.)

(Andre Castelot, Histoire de La France, Pages, 176, 200). Born: before 433, son of Merovee=Merovech, Prince des Francs and N?, Childeric I is presumed to have been at least 15 years of age by the time he succeeded his father in 448.

Between 480 and 481 Childeric I's tomb in Tournai was discovered in 1653 and contained magnificent weapons. Buried: circa 481 in Tournai, Bigorre, France.

Children Chlodovich CLOVIS I "THE RIPARIAN" b: 467 in in Rheims, Marne, Loire-Atlantique, France Andelfieda AUDEFLEDE DE FRANCIE b: Abt 469 in Rheims, Marne, Loire-Atlantique, France Auberdon b: 460

King Childeric I 's Family

Spouse: Basina Andovera of Thuringia (Married) Children: Andelfieda of Merovinga Franks, King Clovis I "the Great" "the Riparian" of Franks

Page 212 in "Dawn of European Civilization" has Merovingian chart. It differs a little from some others; Cloderic is same as Childeric.

From "Rulers of the World" by R. F. Tapsell: "Childeric I became the third King of the Franks in 458. He fought with the Roman Aegidius against the Wisigoths. When Aegidius died in 464, he was succeeded by Count Paul. Childeric I's army helped Count Paul push back a Saxon advance from Angers around 466. Count Paul died in 470. They had to repeat this feat around 475, since Count Paul had died and the Saxons once again had attempted to expand into Angers.

(Andre Castelot, Histoire de La France, Pages, 176, 200). Born: before 433, son of Merovee=Merovech, Prince des Francs and N?, Childeric I is presumed to have been at least 15 years of age by the time he succeeded his father in 448. Between 480 and 481 Childeric I's tomb in Tournai was discovered in 1653 and contained magnificent weapons. Buried: circa 481 in Tournai, Bigorre, France.

King of the Salian Franks 456-481, Childeric succeeded his semi-legendary father Merovech as king of the Salian Franks of northern Gaul in 456, during Roman times. He became infatuated with the daughters of his subjects, who were so incensed about this that they forced him to give up the throne. He discovered that they intended to assassinate him, and he fled to Thuringia, leaving a close friend and telling him to send him a message when Childeric could return to his kingdom.

Childeric took refuge with Bisinus, King of the Thuringian Franks, and his wife Basina. The king elected by the Franks was cruel, and soon after Childeric was re-called to his kingdom by his friend, and was restored to the throne. Once Bisinus and Childeric were both kings, Basina deserted her husband and went to live with Childeric, who married her and had a son Clovis.

After a battle with Odoacer, King of the Saxons (and conquerer of the Western Roman Empire, 476), at Orleans, Childeric and the Saxon king made a peace treaty and together subdued the Alamanni, who had invaded a part of Italy. In 481 Childeric died and was succeeded by Clovis, his son by Basina.

Childeric I began his rule in 458. He deposed in 459 and restored in 463. He continued to rule until 481.

Reign He succeeded his father Merovech (Latinised as Meroveus or Merovius) as king, traditionally in 457 or 458. With his Frankish warband he was established with his capital at Tournai, on lands which he had received as a foederatus of the Romans, and for some time he kept the peace with his allies.

In about 463 in Orléans, in conjunction with the Roman General Aegidius, who was based in Soissons, he defeated the Visigoths, who hoped to extend their dominion along the banks of the Loire River. After the death of Aegidius, he first assisted Comes ("count") Paul of Angers, together with a mixed band of Gallo-Romans and Franks, in defeating the Goths and taking booty. Odoacer reached Angers but Childeric arrived the next day and a battle ensued. Count Paul was killed and Childeric took the city. Childeric, having delivered Angers, followed a Saxon warband to the islands on the Atlantic mouth of the Loire, and massacred them there. In a change of alliances, he also joined forces with Odoacer, according to Gregory of Tours, to stop a band of the Alamanni who wished to invade Italy.

These are all the facts known about him, and they are not secure. The stories of his expulsion by the Franks, whose women he was taking; of his eight-year stay in Thuringia with King Basin and his wife Basina; of his return when a faithful servant advised him that he could safely do so by sending to him half of a piece of gold which he had broken with him; and of the arrival in Tournai of Queen Basine, whom he married, are entirely legendary and come from Gregory of Tours' Libri Historiarum (Book ii.12).

He died in 481 and was buried in Tournai, leaving a son Clovis, afterwards king of the Franks.

His Tomb Childeric's tomb was discovered in 1653 by a mason doing repairs in the church of Saint-Brice in Tournai where numerous precious objects were found, including a richly ornamented sword, a torse-like bracelet, jewels of gold and cloisonné enamel with garnets, gold coins, a gold bull's head and a ring with the inscription CHILDERICI REGIS ("of Childeric the king"), which identified the tomb. Some 300 golden bees were also found. Archduke Leopold William, Spanish governor of the Netherlands, had the find published in Latin, and the treasure went first to the Habsburgs in Vienna, then as a gift to Louis XIV, who was not impressed with them and stored them in the royal library, which became the Bibliothèque Nationale de France during the Revolution. Napoleon was more impressed with Childeric's bees when he was looking for a heraldic symbol to trump the Bourbon fleur-de-lys. He settled on Childeric's bees as symbols of the French Empire.

On the night of November 5-6, 1831, the treasure of Childeric was among 80 kilos of treasure stolen from the Library and melted down for the gold. A few pieces were retrieved where they had been hidden in the Seine, including two of the bees. The record of the treasure, however, now exists only in the fine engravings made at the time of its discovery, and in some reproductions made for the Habsburgs.

1 2 3 4 5 6 Birth: 436 in North Rhine-Westphalia, Preussen 7 8 6 2 Death: 26 NOV 481 in Tournai, Hainaut, Wallonie, Belgium 2 Burial: DEC 481 St. Vincent Abbey, Paris, Ville-de-Paris, France 7 8 9 6 2 -------------------- Childeric I From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Childeric I (c. 437– c. 481) was the Merovingian king of the Salian Franks from 457 until his death, and the father of Clovis.

He succeeded his father Merovech (Latinised as Meroveus or Merovius) as king, traditionally in 457 or 458. With his Frankish warband he was established with his capital at Tournai, on lands which he had received as a foederatus of the Romans, and for some time he kept the peace with his allies.

In about 463 in Orléans, in conjunction with the Roman General Aegidius, who was based in Soissons, he defeated the Visigoths, who hoped to extend their dominion along the banks of the Loire River. After the death of Aegidius, he first assisted Comes ("count") Paul of Angers, together with a mixed band of Gallo-Romans and Franks, in defeating the Goths and taking booty. Odoacer reached Angers but Childeric arrived the next day and a battle ensued. Count Paul was killed and Childeric took the city. Childeric, having delivered Angers, followed a Saxon warband to the islands on the Atlantic mouth of the Loire, and massacred them there. In a change of alliances, he also joined forces with Odoacer, according to Gregory of Tours, to stop a band of the Alamanni who wished to invade Italy.

The stories of his expulsion by the Franks, whose women he was taking; of his eight-year stay in Thuringia with King Basin and his wife Basina; of his return when a faithful servant advised him that he could safely do so by sending to him half of a piece of gold which he had broken with him; and of the arrival in Tournai of Queen Basina, whom he married come from Gregory of Tours' Libri Historiarum (Book ii.12).

He died in 481 and was buried in Tournai, leaving a son Clovis, afterwards king of the Franks.

His tomb

Childeric's tomb was discovered in 1653 (May 27) by a mason doing repairs in the church of Saint-Brice in Tournai, a city in modern Belgium, where numerous precious objects were found, including a richly ornamented sword, a torse-like bracelet, jewels of gold and cloisonné enamel with garnets, gold coins, a gold bull's head and a ring with the inscription CHILDERICI REGIS ("of Childeric the king"), which identified the tomb. Some 300 golden bees were also found. Archduke Leopold William, governor of the Southern Netherlands (today's Belgium), had the find published in Latin, and the treasure went first to the Habsburgs in Vienna, then as a gift to Louis XIV, who was not impressed with them and stored them in the royal library, which became the Bibliothèque Nationale de France during the Revolution. Napoleon was more impressed with Childeric's bees when he was looking for a heraldic symbol to trump the Bourbon fleur-de-lys. He settled on Childeric's bees as symbols of the French Empire.

On the night of November 5-6, 1831, the treasure of Childeric was among 80 kilos of treasure stolen from the Library and melted down for the gold. A few pieces were retrieved where they had been hidden in the Seine, including two of the bees. The record of the treasure, however, now exists only in the fine engravings made at the time of its discovery, and in some reproductions made for the Habsburgs.

External links Northvegr webite: Gregory of Tours, Historia Francorum "A note on Childeric's bees": the discovery of his tomb: follow the links for the engravings of Childeric's treasure and the two remaining gold bees. -------------------- Childeric I (c. 440– c. 481) was the Merovingian king of the Salian Franks from 457 until his death, and the father of Clovis.

He succeeded his father Merovech as king, traditionally in 457 or 458. With his Frankish warband he was established with his capital at Tournai, on lands which he had received as a foederatus of the Romans, and for some time he kept the peace with his allies.

Childeric's tomb was discovered in 1653 (May 27) by a mason doing repairs in the church of Saint-Brice in Tournai, a city in modern Belgium -------------------- Traditionally called king of the Franks (Roi des Francs) Reign: 456/457 - 481/482 (traditional dates) End of reign: 481/482 (traditional date), died

Childéric, named the son of Mérovée by Gregory of Tours (1), was the chief of the Salian Franks, who settled in Belgica Secunda, between the Meuse and Somme rivers. He was exiled to Thuringia for eight years by his own subjects, irritated by his violence, and replaced with the Roman military commander Ægidius. On his return, Childéric played an important role as an ally of the Romans. He helped the Romans to repel the Visigoths near Orléans, then took Angers (c. 463 or c. 469) and allied with Odoacer against the Aleman invasion (476/480). ------------------------ From: http://www.fluckers.com/family/daspit/merovingian.html

Childeric married his cousin Basina, daughter of Basin, King of Thuringia. Basin was the grandson of Widelphrus and first cousin to Merovius. In 465 A.D. a son was born of this marriage: Clovis, b. 465 A.D. -------------------- Childeric I (c. 440– c. 481) was the Merovingian king of the Salian Franks from 457 until his death, and the father of Clovis.

He succeeded his father Merovech (Latinised as Meroveus or Merovius) as king, traditionally in 457 or 458. With his Frankish warband he was established with his capital at Tournai, on lands which he had received as a foederatus of the Romans, and for some time he kept the peace with his allies.

In about 463 in Orléans, in conjunction with the Roman General Aegidius, who was based in Soissons, he defeated the Visigoths, who hoped to extend their dominion along the banks of the Loire River. After the death of Aegidius, he first assisted Comes ("count") Paul of Angers, together with a mixed band of Gallo-Romans and Franks, in defeating the Goths and taking booty. Odoacer reached Angers but Childeric arrived the next day and a battle ensued. Count Paul was killed and Childeric took the city. Childeric, having delivered Angers, followed a Saxon warband to the islands on the Atlantic mouth of the Loire, and massacred them there. In a change of alliances, he also joined forces with Odoacer, according to Gregory of Tours, to stop a band of the Alamanni who wished to invade Italy.

The stories of his expulsion by the Franks, whose women he was taking; of his eight-year stay in Thuringia with King Basin and his wife Basina; of his return when a faithful servant advised him that he could safely do so by sending to him half of a piece of gold which he had broken with him; and of the arrival in Tournai of Queen Basina, whom he married, come from Gregory of Tours' Libri Historiarum (Book ii.12).

He died in 481 and was buried in Tournai, leaving a son Clovis, afterwards king of the Franks.

[source: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Childeric_I] -------------------- http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Childeric_I -------------------- http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Childeric_I -------------------- Childeric I (c. 440– c. 481) was the Merovingian king of the Salian Franks from 457 until his death, and the father of Clovis.

He succeeded his father Merovech as king, traditionally in 457 or 458. With his Frankish warband he was established with his capital at Tournai, on lands which he had received as a foederatus of the Romans, and for some time he kept the peace with his allies.

In about 463 in Orléans, in conjunction with the Roman General Aegidius, who was based in Soissons, he defeated the Visigoths, who hoped to extend their dominion along the banks of the Loire River. After the death of Aegidius, he first assisted Comes ("count") Paul of Angers, together with a mixed band of Gallo-Romans and Franks, in defeating the Goths and taking booty. Odoacer reached Angers but Childeric arrived the next day and a battle ensued. Count Paul was killed and Childeric took the city. Childeric, having delivered Angers, followed a Saxon warband to the islands on the Atlantic mouth of the Loire, and massacred them there. In a change of alliances, he also joined forces with Odoacer, according to Gregory of Tours, to stop a band of the Alamanni who wished to invade Italy.

The stories of his expulsion by the Franks, whose women he was taking; of his eight-year stay in Thuringia with King Basin and his wife Basina; of his return when a faithful servant advised him that he could safely do so by sending to him half of a piece of gold which he had broken with him; and of the arrival in Tournai of Queen Basina, whom he married, come from Gregory of Tours' Libri Historiarum (Book ii.12).

He died in 481 and was buried in Tournai, leaving a son Clovis, afterwards king of the Franks

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Childeric_I -------------------- CHILDERIC I, KING OF THE SALIC FRANKS b. 436 A.D.; d.481 Childeric married his cousin Basina, daughter of Basin, King of Thuringia. Basin was the grandson of Widelphrus and first cousin to Merovius. In 465 A.D. a son was born of this marriage: Clovis, b. 465 A.D. -------------------- He succeeded his father Merovech as king, traditionally in 457 or 458. With his Frankish warband he was established with his capital at Tournai, on lands which he had received as a foederatus of the Romans, and for some time he kept the peace with his allies. In about 463 in Orléans, in conjunction with the Roman General Aegidius, who was based in Soissons, he defeated the Visigoths, who hoped to extend their dominion along the banks of the Loire River. After the death of Aegidius, he first assisted Comes ("count") Paul of Angers, together with a mixed band of Gallo-Romans and Franks, in defeating the Goths and taking booty. Odoacer reached Angers but Childeric arrived the next day and a battle ensued. Count Paul was killed and Childeric took the city. Childeric, having delivered Angers, followed a Saxon warband to the islands on the Atlantic mouth of the Loire, and massacred them there. In a change of alliances, he also joined forces with Odoacer, according to Gregory of Tours, to stop a band of the Alamanni who wished to invade Italy. The stories of his expulsion by the Franks, whose women he was taking; of his eight-year stay in Thuringia with King Basin and his wife Basina; of his return when a faithful servant advised him that he could safely do so by sending to him half of a piece of gold which he had broken with him; and of the arrival in Tournai of Queen Basina, whom he married, come from Gregory of Tours' Libri Historiarum (Book ii.12). He died in 481 and was buried in Tournai, leaving a son, Clovis, afterwards king of the Franks. -------------------- Childeric I was the Merovingian king of the Salian Franks from 457 until his death, and the father of Clovis.

He succeeded his father Merovech (Latinized as Meroveus or Merovius) as King, traditionally in 457 or 458. With his Frankish warband he was established with his capital at Tournai, on lands which he had received as a foederatus of the Romans, and for some time he kept the peace with his allies.

In about 463 in Orléans, in conjunction with the Roman General Aegidius, who was based in Soissons, he defeated the Visigoths, who hoped to extend their dominion along the banks of the Loire River. After the death of Aegidius, he first assisted Comes ("count") Paul of Angers, together with a mixed band of Gallo-Romans and Franks, in defeating the Goths and taking booty. Odoacer reached Angers but Childeric arrived the next day and a battle ensued. Count Paul was killed and Childeric took the city. Childeric, having delivered Angers, followed a Saxon warband to the islands on the Atlantic mouth of the Loire, and massacred them there. In a change of alliances, he also joined forces with Odoacer, according to Gregory of Tours, to stop a band of the Alamanni who wished to invade Italy.

The stories of his expulsion by the Franks, whose women he was taking; of his eight-year stay in Thuringia with King Basin and his wife Basina; of his return when a faithful servant advised him that he could safely do so by sending to him half of a piece of gold which he had broken with him; and of the arrival in Tournai of Queen Basina, whom he married, come from Gregory of Tours' Libri Historiarum (Book ii.12).

He died in 481 and was buried in Tournai, leaving a son Clovis, afterwards king of the Franks.

See http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Childeric_I for more information. -------------------- The Franks or the Frankish peoples were an ever-changing confederation of west Germanic tribes, such as the Salians, Sicambri, Chamavi, Tencteri, Chattuarii, Bructeri, Usipetes, Ampsivarii. The Salians, later preeminent among the tribes, were a "proto-Dutch" (Old Low Franconian) speaking people. The Franks first appeared in history around 260. Sometimes the Franks allied with non-Old Frankish speaking tribes as the Frisians and Chatti and occasionally with Saxons. They were not originally grouped into one tribe, but "as with the other barbarians, they belonged to much smaller groups that would join constantly changing confederations."[1]

Most of those peoples were living at the northern borders of the Rhine in, and opposite to the Insula Batavorum in a region then called "Francia" in the Panegyrici Latini. They formed a constant pressure on the Roman borders but also took active service in the Roman army, climbing up the ranks to dominating positions, such as at the time of Arbogastes. They slowly replaced the Batavians in their native domains and according to Ammianus Marcellinus expanded their territory on Roman soil to the delta of the Scheldt, where the Salians blocked grain supplies for the Roman Army. With later invasions of the Salians Chlodio and Childeric they moved up the Scheldt and homed around Tournai, from where those Salians finally conquered the Roman army, that was supported by other Franks.

The Merovingian family of Childeric united all Franks in Gaul and slowly expanded their influence to other territories until a new dynasty called the Carolingians took over and conquered a major part of western Europe. The location of Francia moved with the Franks untill finally around the year 1000 it became to be known as France.

-------------------- Childerik gifte sig med sin kusin Basina , dotter till Basin , kung av Thüringen. Basin var sonson till Widelphrus och kusin till Merovius . I 465 AD en son föddes i detta äktenskap: Clovis , b. 465 A.D. -------------------- Childeric I (c. 437– c. 481) was the Merovingian king of the Salian Franks from 457 until his death, and the father of Clovis.

He succeeded his father Merovech (Latinised as Meroveus or Merovius) as king, traditionally in 457 or 458. With his Frankish warband he was established with his capital at Tournai, on lands which he had received as a foederatus of the Romans, and for some time he kept the peace with his allies.

In about 463 in Orléans, in conjunction with the Roman General Aegidius, who was based in Soissons, he defeated the Visigoths, who hoped to extend their dominion along the banks of the Loire River. After the death of Aegidius, he first assisted Comes ("count") Paul of Angers, together with a mixed band of Gallo-Romans and Franks, in defeating the Goths and taking booty. Odoacer reached Angers but Childeric arrived the next day and a battle ensued. Count Paul was killed and Childeric took the city. Childeric, having delivered Angers, followed a Saxon warband to the islands on the Atlantic mouth of the Loire, and massacred them there. In a change of alliances, he also joined forces with Odoacer, according to Gregory of Tours, to stop a band of the Alamanni who wished to invade Italy.

The stories of his expulsion by the Franks, whose women he was taking; of his eight-year stay in Thuringia with King Basin and his wife Basina; of his return when a faithful servant advised him that he could safely do so by sending to him half of a piece of gold which he had broken with him; and of the arrival in Tournai of Queen Basina, whom he married come from Gregory of Tours' Libri Historiarum (Book ii.12).

He died in 481 and was buried in Tournai, leaving a son Clovis, afterwards king of the Franks. -------------------- Childeric I From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia Jump to: navigation, search

Childeric I (c. 437– c. 481) was the Merovingian king of the Salian Franks from 457 until his death, and the father of Clovis.

He succeeded his father Merovech (Latinised as Meroveus or Merovius) as king, traditionally in 457 or 458. With his Frankish warband he was established with his capital at Tournai, on lands which he had received as a foederatus of the Romans, and for some time he kept the peace with his allies.

In about 463 in Orléans, in conjunction with the Roman General Aegidius, who was based in Soissons, he defeated the Visigoths, who hoped to extend their dominion along the banks of the Loire River. After the death of Aegidius, he first assisted Comes ("count") Paul of Angers, together with a mixed band of Gallo-Romans and Franks, in defeating the Goths and taking booty. Odoacer reached Angers but Childeric arrived the next day and a battle ensued. Count Paul was killed and Childeric took the city. Childeric, having delivered Angers, followed a Saxon warband to the islands on the Atlantic mouth of the Loire, and massacred them there. In a change of alliances, he also joined forces with Odoacer, according to Gregory of Tours, to stop a band of the Alamanni who wished to invade Italy.

The stories of his expulsion by the Franks, whose women he was taking; of his eight-year stay in Thuringia with King Basin and his wife Basina; of his return when a faithful servant advised him that he could safely do so by sending to him half of a piece of gold which he had broken with him; and of the arrival in Tournai of Queen Basina, whom he married come from Gregory of Tours' Libri Historiarum (Book ii.12).

He died in 481 and was buried in Tournai, leaving a son Clovis, afterwards king of the Franks. -------------------- Childeric established his capital in what is now Tournai. This is in modern Belgium, near the French border, 120 miles southwest of the Rhine.

Sources: The book, 'Kings & Queens of Europe' The book, 'The Dark Ages', by Isaac Asimov Funk & Wagnalls New Encyclopedia -------------------- Childeric I (c. 440– c. 481) was the Merovingian king of the Salian Franks from 457 until his death, and the father of Clovis.

He succeeded his father Merovech (Latinised as Meroveus or Merovius) as king, traditionally in 457 or 458. With his Frankish warband he was established with his capital at Tournai, on lands which he had received as a foederatus of the Romans, and for some time he kept the peace with his allies.

In about 463 in Orléans, in conjunction with the Roman General Aegidius, who was based in Soissons, he defeated the Visigoths, who hoped to extend their dominion along the banks of the Loire River. After the death of Aegidius, he first assisted Comes ("count") Paul of Angers, together with a mixed band of Gallo-Romans and Franks, in defeating the Goths and taking booty. Odoacer reached Angers but Childeric arrived the next day and a battle ensued. Count Paul was killed and Childeric took the city. Childeric, having delivered Angers, followed a Saxon warband to the islands on the Atlantic mouth of the Loire, and massacred them there. In a change of alliances, he also joined forces with Odoacer, according to Gregory of Tours, to stop a band of the Alamanni who wished to invade Italy.

The stories of his expulsion by the Franks, whose women he was taking; of his eight-year stay in Thuringia with King Basin and his wife Basina; of his return when a faithful servant advised him that he could safely do so by sending to him half of a piece of gold which he had broken with him; and of the arrival in Tournai of Queen Basina, whom he married, come from Gregory of Tours' Libri Historiarum (Book ii.12).

He died in 481 and was buried in Tournai, leaving a son Clovis, afterwards king of the Franks.

- Tomb -

Childeric's tomb was discovered in 1653 (May 27) by a mason doing repairs in the church of Saint-Brice in Tournai, a city in modern Belgium, where numerous precious objects were found, including a richly ornamented sword, a torse-like bracelet, jewels of gold and cloisonné enamel with garnets, gold coins, a gold bull's head and a ring with the inscription CHILDERICI REGIS ("of Childeric the king"), which identified the tomb. Some 300 golden bees were also found. Archduke Leopold William, governor of the Southern Netherlands (today's Belgium), had the find published in Latin, and the treasure went first to the Habsburgs in Vienna, then as a gift to Louis XIV, who was not impressed with them and stored them in the royal library, which became the Bibliothèque Nationale de France during the Revolution. Napoleon was more impressed with Childeric's bees when he was looking for a heraldic symbol to trump the Bourbon fleur-de-lys. He settled on Childeric's bees as symbols of the French Empire.

On the night of November 5–6, 1831, the treasure of Childeric was among 80 kilos of treasure stolen from the Library and melted down for the gold. A few pieces were retrieved where they had been hidden in the Seine, including two of the bees. The record of the treasure, however, now exists only in the fine engravings made at the time of its discovery, and in some reproductions made for the Habsburgs. -------------------- Clovis I From Wikipedia, the free encyclopediaJump to: navigation, search


Clovis roi des Francs by François-Louis Dejuinne (1786–1844)Clovis (c. 466–511) was the first King of the Franks to unite all the Frankish tribes under one ruler. He was also the first Catholic King to rule over Gaul (France). He was the son of Childeric I and Basina. In 481, when he was fifteen, he succeeded his father.[1] The Salian Franks were one of two Frankish tribes who were then occupying the area west of the lower Rhine, with their center in an area known as Toxandria, between the Meuse and Scheldt (in what is now the Netherlands and Belgium). Clovis's power base was to the southwest of this, around Tournai and Cambrai along the modern frontier between France and Belgium. Clovis conquered the neighboring Salian Frankish kingdoms and established himself as sole king of the Salian Franks before his death. The small church in which he was baptized is now named Saint Remy, and a statue of him being baptized by Remigius can be seen there. Clotiar I and his son Sigebert I were both buried in Soissons, St Waast. Clovis himself and his wife Clotilde are buried in the St. Genevieve church (St. Pierre) in Paris. An important part of Clovis's legacy is that he reduced the power of the Romans in 486 by beating the Roman ruler Syagrius in the famous battle of Soissons.[2]

Clovis was converted to Catholicism, as opposed to the Arian Christianity common among the Goths who ruled most of Gaul at the time, at the instigation of his wife, Clotilde, a Burgundian Gothic princess who was a Catholic in spite of the Arianism which surrounded her at court. He was baptized in a small church which was on or near the site of the Cathedral of Rheims, where most future French kings would be crowned. This act was of immense importance in the subsequent history of Western and Central Europe in general, for Clovis expanded his dominion over almost all of the old Roman province of Gaul (roughly modern France). He is considered the founder of the Merovingian dynasty which ruled the Franks for the next two centuries.

Contents [hide] 1 Name 2 History 2.1 Frankish consolidation 2.2 Christian king 2.3 Campaigns of Clovis 2.4 Later years and death 2.5 Legacy 3 Ancestry 4 References 5 External links


[edit] Name In primary sources Clovis's name is spelled in a number of variants: the Frankish form Chlodovech was Latinized as Chlodovechus, from which came the Latin name Ludovicus, which evolved into the French form Louis. Clovis ruled the Franks from 481 to 511 AD. The name features prominently in subsequent history: three other Merovingian Kings have been called Clovis, while nine Carolingian rulers and thirteen other French kings and one Holy Roman Emperor have been called Louis. Nearly every European language has developed its own spelling of his name. Louis (French), "Chlodwig" and Ludwig (German), Lodewijk (Dutch), ??????? (Russian), Luis (Spanish), Luigi (Italian), and Lewis (English) are just seven of the over 100 possible variations. Scholars differ about the exact meaning of his (first) name. Most believe that Chlodovech is composed out of the Germanic roots Chlod- and -vech. Chlod- = (modern English) loud, with its oldest connotation praised. -vech = "fighter" (modern English). Compare in modern Dutch luid (hard sound or noise), luiden (verb - the oldest meaning is: to praise aloud) and vechten (verb - to fight). Chlodovech means "praised fighter".[3]

[edit] History [edit] Frankish consolidation In 486, with the help of Ragnachar, Clovis defeated Syagrius, the last Roman official in northern Gaul, who ruled the area around Soissons in present-day Picardie.[4] This victory at Soissons extended Frankish rule to most of the area north of the Loire. After this, Clovis secured an alliance with the Ostrogoths through the marriage of his sister Audofleda to their king, Theodoric the Great. He followed this victory with another in 491 over a small group of Thuringians east of the Frankish territories. Later, with the help of the other Frankish sub-kings, he narrowly defeated the Alamanni in the Battle of Tolbiac.

[edit] Christian king Images of the King Battle of Tolbiac. Fresco at the Panthéon (Paris) by Paul-Joseph Blanc circa 1881.

Saint Remigius baptizes Clovis, in a painting of ca 1500

Statue depicting the baptism of Clovis by Saint Remigius.

Clovis statue at the Abbey Church of Saint-Denis

Clovis had previously married the Christian Burgundian princess Clotilde (493), and, according to Gregory of Tours, as a result of his victory at Tolbiac (traditionally set in 496), he converted to her Catholic faith. Conversion to Trinitarian Christianity set Clovis apart from the other Germanic kings of his time, such as those of the Visigoths and the Vandals, who had converted from heathen beliefs to Arian Christianity. It also ensured him of the support of the Catholic Gallo-Roman aristocracy in his later campaign against the Visigoths, which drove them from southern Gaul (507).

Clovis was baptised at Rheims on Christmas 496, 498 or 506 by Saint Remigius.[5] The conversion of Clovis to Catholic Christianity, the religion of the majority of his subjects, strengthened the bonds between his Roman subjects, led by their Catholic bishops, and their Germanic conquerors. Nevertheless, Bernard Bachrach has argued that this conversion from his Frankish paganism alienated many of the other Frankish sub-kings and weakened his military position over the next few years. William Daly, in order more directly to assess Clovis's allegedly barbaric and pagan origins,[6] was obliged to ignore the bishop Saint Gregory of Tours and base his account on the scant earlier sources, a sixth-century "vita" of Saint Genevieve and letters to or concerning Clovis from bishops and Theodoric.

In the "interpretatio romana", Gregory of Tours gave the Germanic gods that Clovis abandoned the names of roughly equivalent Roman gods, such as Jupiter and Mercury.[7] Taken literally, such usage would suggest a strong affinity of early Frankish rulers for the prestige of Roman culture, which they may have embraced as allies and federates of the Empire during the previous century.[citation needed]

Though he fought a battle at Dijon in the year 500, Clovis did not successfully subdue the Burgundian kingdom. It appears that he somehow gained the support of the Arvernians in the following years, for they assisted him in his defeat of the Visigothic kingdom of Toulouse in the Battle of Vouillé (507) which eliminated Visigothic power in Gaul and confined the Visigoths to Hispania and Septimania; the battle added most of Aquitaine to Clovis's kingdom.[4] He then established Paris as his capital,[4] and established an abbey dedicated to Saints Peter and Paul on the south bank of the Seine. Later it was renamed Sainte-Geneviève Abbey, in honor of the patron saint of Paris.[8]

According to Gregory of Tours, following the Battle of Vouillé, the Byzantine Emperor Anastasius I, granted Clovis the title of consul. Since Clovis's name does not appear in the consular lists, it is likely he was granted a suffect consulship.

[edit] Campaigns of Clovis [show]v • d • eCampaigns of Clovis I


Soissons – Frankish-Thuringian – Tolbiac – Dijon – Vouillé


Gregory of Tours recorded Clovis's systematic campaigns following his victory in Vouillé to eliminate the other Frankish "reguli" or sub-kings. These included Sigobert the Lame and his son Chlodoric the Parricide; Chararic, another king of the Salian Franks; Ragnachar of Cambrai, his brother Ricchar, and their brother Rignomer of Le Mans.

[edit] Later years and death


Gaul after Clovis's death.Shortly before his death, Clovis called a synod of Gallic bishops to meet in Orléans to reform the church and create a strong link between the Crown and the Catholic episcopate. This was the First Council of Orléans. Thirty-three bishops assisted and passed thirty-one decrees on the duties and obligations of individuals, the right of sanctuary, and ecclesiastical discipline. These decrees, equally applicable to Franks and Romans, first established equality between conquerors and conquered.


Tomb of Clovis I at the Basilica of St Denis in Saint Denis.Clovis I is traditionally said to have died on 27 November 511; however, the Liber Pontificalis suggests that he was still alive in 513.[9] After his death, he was put to rest in Saint Denis Basilica, near Paris.

Upon his death his realm was divided among his four sons: Theuderic, Chlodomer, Childebert, and Clotaire. This partitioning created the new political units of the Kingdoms of Rheims, Orléans, Paris and Soissons and inaugurated a period of disunity which was to last, with brief interruptions, until the end (751) of his Merovingian dynasty.

[edit] Legacy Clovis is remembered for three main accomplishments:

1.his unification of the Frankish nation, 2.his conquest of Gaul, and 3.his conversion to Christianity. By the first act, he assured the influence of his people beyond the borders of Gaul, something no petty regional king could accomplish. By the second act, he laid the foundations of a later nation-state: France. Finally, by the third act, he made himself the ally of the papacy and its protector as well as that of the people, who were mostly Catholics.

Detracting perhaps, from this legacy, is his aforementioned division of the state. This was done not along national or even largely geographical lines, but primarily to assure equal income amongst his sons after his death. While it may or may not have been his intention, this division was the cause of much internal discord in Gaul. This precedent led in the long run to the fall of his dynasty, for it was a pattern repeated in future reigns.[10] Clovis did bequeath to his heirs the support of both people and church such that, when the magnates were ready to do away with the royal house, the sanction of the Pope was sought first.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Clovis_I

===============

Clovis I Meroving King of Franks (Childeric I Meroving King of Franks5, Mherovee von Westphalia King of South Franks4, Clodion " Le Chevelu" King of Franks3, Argotta Queen of Franks2, Genebald Duke of the East Franks1) was born ABT 0466 in Rhiems, France , and died 27 Nov 0511. He was buried in Eglise De St. Pierre, France . He married St. Clotilde de Bourgogne Queen of Franks, daughter of Chilperic King of Burgundy. She was born ABT 0475 in Bourgogne, France , and died 3 Jun 0548 in Tours, France .

   
Children of Clovis I Meroving King of Franks and St. Clotilde de Bourgogne Queen of Franks are:

+ 16 i. Clotaire I "The Old" Meroving King of Franks was born ABT 0497 in Rhiems, France , and died 23 Nov 0561 in Braines, France . + 17 ii. Clothilde Meroving Princess of France was born ABT 0499 in Rhiems, Neustria, France , and died 0531.


==============================

NameClovis I (The Great) King of Franks Birth465, Rheims, Marne, Loire-Atlantique, France Death27 Nov 511, Paris FatherChilderic I King of Salic Franks (437-481) MotherBasina of Thuringia Misc. Notes Through influence of wife Chlotilda, Clovis was baptized as a Christian by St. Remy at Rheims on 25 December 496. He defeated the Burgundians in 500, fixed his court at Paris in 507, defeated the Visigoths at Voulon near Poitiers in 507, and at his death was sole king of France. {Clovis had defeated the Romans near Soissons in 486...} He "was the true founder of the Frankish monarchy. He reigned over the Salian Franks by hereditary right; over the Frankish tribes by reason of his kinship with their kings and by the choice of the warriors who raised him on the shield, and he governed the Gallo-Romans by right of conquest." {- Encycl.Brit., 1956, 5:857, 9:698; cf.9:587} He received the sanction of the church and was appointed to preside at the Council of Orleans, 511. The eastern emperor sent him emblems of authority, thus adding legal sanction. Thus was established the Merovingian claim to the western empire. {Ref. "The Long-haired Kings," J.M.Wallace-Hadrill, 1962.} Clovis' kingdom was divided among his four surviving sons. He was buried in the Church of St. Peter and St. Paul which he had built. [Note: name Clovis = Louis.]

Medieval Sourcebook: Gregory of Tours: On Clovis

The history of the Franks was written about a century after the time of Clovis by Gregory, bishop of Tours. The following extracts give some notion of this valuable source, upon which a great part of Our knowledge of the Merovingian period rests

The Incident of the Vase at Soissons

At this time [A.D. 486] the army of Clovis pillaged many churches, for he was still sunk in the errors of idolatry. The soldiers had borne away from a church, with all the other ornaments of the holy ministry, a vase of marvelous size and beauty. The bishop of this church sent messengers to the king, begging that if the church might not recover any other of the holy vessels, at least this one might be restored. The king, bearing these things, replied to the messenger: "Follow thou us to Soissons, for there all things that have been acquired are to be divided. If the lot shall give me this vase, I will do what the bishop desires."

When be had reached Soissons, and all the booty had been placed in the midst of the army, the king pointed to this vase, and said: "I ask you, O most valiant warriors, not to refuse to me the vase in addition to my rightful part," Those of discerning mind among his men answered, "O glorious king, all things which we see are thine, and we ourselves are subject to thy power; now do what seems pleasing to thee, for none is strong enough to resist thee." When they had thus spoken one of the soldiers, impetuous, envious, and vain, raised his battle-axe aloft and crushed the vase with it, crying, "Thou shalt receive nothing of this unless a just lot give it to thee." At this all were stupefied.

The king bore his injury with the calmness of patience, and when he had received the crushed vase he gave it to the bishop's messenger, but be cherished a hidden wound in his breast. When a year had passed he ordered the whole army to come fully equipped to the Campus Martius and show their arms in brilliant array - But when he had reviewed them all he came to the breaker of the vase, and said to him, "No one bears his arms so clumsily as thou ; for neither thy spear, nor thy sword, nor thy ax is ready for use." And seizing his ax, he cast it on the ground. And when the soldier had bent a little to pick it up the king raised his hands and crushed, his head with his own ax. "Thus," he said, "didst thou to the vase at Soissons."

The Conversion of Clovis to Christianity

[Clovis took to wife Clotilde, daughter of the king of the Burgundians. Now Clotilde was a Christian. When her first son was born] she wished to consecrate him by baptism, and begged her husband unceasingly, saying, I , The gods whom thou honorest are nothing they cannot help themselves nor others; for they are carved from stone, or from wood, or from some metal. The names which you have given them were of men, not of gods, - like Saturn, who is said to have escaped by flight, to avoid being deprived of his power by his son; and like Jupiter himself, foul perpetrator of all uncleanness. . . . What power have Mars and Mercury ever had ? They are endowed with magical arts rather than divine power.

"The God who should be worshiped is he who by his word created from nothingness the heavens and the earth, the sea and all that in them is; he who made the sun to shine and adorned the sky with stars; who filled the waters with creeping things, the land with animals, the air with winged creatures; by whose bounty the earth is glad with crops, the trees with fruit, the vines with grapes; by whose hand the human race was created; whose bounty has ordained that all things should give homage and service to man, whom he created."

But when the queen had said these things, the mind of Clovis was not stirred to believe. He answered: "By the will of our gods all things are created and produced. Evidently your god can do nothing, and it is not even proved that he belongs to the race of gods."

Meantime- the faithful queen presented her son for baptism. She had the church adorned with tapestry, seeking to attract by this splendor him whom her exhortations had not moved. But the child whom they called Ingomer, after he had been born again through baptism, died in his white baptismal robe. Then the king reproached the queen bitterly. , if the child had been consecrated in the name of my gods he would be alive still. But now, because he is baptized in the name of your god, he cannot live."

After this another son was born to him, and called in baptism Clodomir. He fell very ill. Then the king said: "Because he, like his brother, was baptized in the name of Christ he must soon die." But his mother prayed, and by God's will the child recovered.

The queen unceasingly urged the king to acknowledge the true God, and forsake idols. But he could not in any wise be brought to believe until a war broke out with the Alemanni. Then he was by necessity compelled to confese what he had before willfully denied.

It happened that the two armies were in battle and there was great slaughter. Clovis' army was near to utter destruction. He saw the danger; his heart Was stirred; he was moved to tears, and he raised his eyes to heaven, saying - , Jesus Christ, whom Clotilde declares to be the son of the living God, who it is said givest aid to the oppressed and victory to those who put their hope in thee, I beseech the glory of thy aid. If thou shalt grant me victory over these enemies and I test that power which people consecrated to thy name say they have proved concerning thee, I will believe in thee and be baptized in thy name. For 1 have called upon my gods, but, as 1 have proved, they are far removed4 from my aid. So I believe that they have no power, for they do not succor those who serve them. Now 1 call upon thee, and I long to believe in thee -all the more that may escape my enemies."

When he had said these things, the Alemanni turned their backs and began to flee. When they saw that their king was killed, they submitted to the sway of Clovis, saying: "We wish that no more people should perish. Now we are thine." When the king had forbidden further war, and praised his soldiers, he told the queen how he had won the victory by calling on the name of Christ.

Then the queen sent to the blessed Remigius, bishop of the city of Rheims, praying him to bring to the king the gospel of salvation. The priest, little by little and secretly, led him to believe in the true God, maker of heaven and earth, and to forsake idols, which could not help him nor anybody else.

But the king said: "Willingly will I hear thee, O father; but one thing is in the way - that the people who follow me are not content to leave their gods. I will go and speak to them according to thy word."

When be came among them, the power of God went before him, and before he had spoken all the people cried out together: " We cast off mortal gods, 0 righteous king, and we are ready to follow the God whom Remigius tells us s immortal."

These thin-s were told to the bishop. He was filled with joy, and ordered the font to be prepared. The streets were shaded with embroidered hangings ; the churches were adorned with white tapestries, the baptistery was set in order, the odor of balsam spread around, candles gleamed, and all the temple of the baptistery was filled with divine odor. . . . Then the king confessed the God omnipotent in the Trinity, and was baptized in the name of the Father, and of the Son, and of the Holy Ghost, and was anointed with the sacred chrism with the sign of the cross of Christ. Of his army there were baptized more than three thousand. Spouses

1Clothilda of Burgundy Birth475, Bourgogne, France Death3 Jun 548, Tours, Ingre-et-Loire, France FatherChilperic II of Burgundy (~450-486) Marriage493 ChildrenChlothar (Lothar) I (499-561)

Clotilda (~507-~531)

Last Modified 18 Oct 1999 -------------------- Noteringar

CHILDERIC I, KING OF THE SALIC FRANKS

b. 436 A.D.; d.481

Childeric married his cousin Basina, daughter of Basin, King of Thuringia. Basin was the grandson of Widelphrus and first cousin to Merovius. In 465 A.D. a son was born of this marriage: Clovis, b. 465 A.D.

-------------------- http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Childeric_I -------------------- King of the Salian Franks. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Childeric_I -------------------- Merovingisk kung över de saliska frankerna mellan Maas och Somme, troligen med säte i Tournai. Enligt en otillförlitlig legend tvingades Childeric en tid vistas i landsflykt i Thüringen, vars drottning han skall ha fört med sig som hustru vid sin återkomst. Childeric var allierad med Aegidius, den romerske ledaren i norra Gallien, och han stödde romarna i kampen mot visigoter och saxare. Childeric förde även krig mot alemannerna. Han efterträddes av sonen Klodvig I. Childerics praktfulla grav är känd.

Childerikgraven, skelettgrav i en träkammare, påträffad 1653 nära kyrkan Saint-Brice i Tournai i nuv. Belgien. Den dödes signetring bar inskriften Childerici Regis (lat., 'kung Childeriks'). Därmed kan den gravlagde på ett unikt sätt identifieras som frankernas kung Childerik I (d. 482). Fynden lämnades till ärkehertig Leopold Vilhelm, vars läkare J.-J. Chiflet gjorde en publikation som utkom 1655. Denna bok är en viktig källa för kännedomen om graven och dess utrustning, då föremålen till stor del har försvunnit.

I graven fanns ett tveeggat svärd, spata, och ett eneggat av typ scramasax, båda med guldbeslag och almandiner. Dessutom ingick en lans av järn och en järnyxa. Personlig utrustning var söljor för bälte och skor, fibula och armring av guld, signetring och en slät guldring. I graven låg ett 100-tal guldmynt, solidi, samt ca 200 romerska silvermynt. Beslag i form av bin och ett tjurhuvud hörde till den guldstickade dräkten. Andra beslag har tolkats som hästutrustning. En kula av bergkristall kan liksom armringen ha varit statusföremål.

Utrustningen visar ett högtstående konsthantverk, som förenar lokala traditioner med inflytelser från Donauområdet och Orienten. Båda svärden anknyter sålunda till frankisk vapentradition men har en östligt färgad ornamentik. Gravutrustningen visar den gravlagdes maktställning som romersk bundsförvant och som härskare över ett stort rike med vida kontakter, bl.a. med omvärlden långt i öster.

Källa: Nationalencyklopedin. -------------------- Childeric I (c. 437– c. 481) was the Merovingian king of the Salian Franks from 457 until his death, and the father of Clovis.

He succeeded his father Merovech (Latinised as Meroveus or Merovius) as king, traditionally in 457 or 458. With his Frankish warband he was established with his capital at Tournai, on lands which he had received as a foederatus of the Romans, and for some time he kept the peace with his allies.

In about 463 in Orléans, in conjunction with the Roman General Aegidius, who was based in Soissons, he defeated the Visigoths, who hoped to extend their dominion along the banks of the Loire River. After the death of Aegidius, he first assisted Comes ("count") Paul of Angers, together with a mixed band of Gallo-Romans and Franks, in defeating the Goths and taking booty. Odoacer reached Angers but Childeric arrived the next day and a battle ensued. Count Paul was killed and Childeric took the city. Childeric, having delivered Angers, followed a Saxon warband to the islands on the Atlantic mouth of the Loire, and massacred them there. In a change of alliances, he also joined forces with Odoacer, according to Gregory of Tours, to stop a band of the Alamanni who wished to invade Italy.

The stories of his expulsion by the Franks, whose women he was taking; of his eight-year stay in Thuringia with King Basin and his wife Basina; of his return when a faithful servant advised him that he could safely do so by sending to him half of a piece of gold which he had broken with him; and of the arrival in Tournai of Queen Basina, whom he married come from Gregory of Tours' Libri Historiarum (Book ii.12).

He died in 481 and was buried in Tournai, leaving a son Clovis, afterwards king of the Franks. -------------------- http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Childeric_I -------------------- D: 26 Nov 481/484

General Notes

  1. Note: SOURCES:
  2. Note: Page 212 in Dawn of European civilization has Merovingian chart. It differs a little from some others.
  3. Note: Cloderic is same as Childeric
  4. Note: "Rulers of the World" by R.F.Tapsell
   Between 458 and 480: Childeric I became the third King of the Franks in 458. He fought with the Roman Aegidius against the Wisigoths. When Agidius died in 464, he was succeeded by Count Paul. Childeric I's army helped Count Paul push back a Saxon advance from Angers around 466. Count Paul would die in 470. They had to repeat this feat around 475, after Count Paul had died and the Saxons once again had attempted to expand into Angers.
  1. Note: 1 Childeric I, King des Francs (Paul, Nouveau Larousse Universel.) (Stuart, Royalty for Commoners, Page 216, Line 303-52.)
  2. Note: (Andre Castelot, Histoire de La France, Pages, 176, 200). Born: before 433, son of Merovee=Merovech, Prince des Francs and N?, Childeric I is presumed to have been at least 15 years of age by the time he succeeded his father in 448.
  3. Note: Between 480 and 481 Childeric I's tomb in Tournai was discovered in 1653 and contained magnificent weapons. Buried: circa 481 in Tournai, Bigorre, France.
  4. Note: Title: Encyclopedia Britannica, Treatise on Childeric I 481/482 year only

-------------------- Roi des Francs Saliens -------------------- Childeric I (c. 440– c. 481) was the Merovingian king of the Salian Franks from 457 until his death, and the father of Clovis.

He succeeded his father Merovech (Latinised as Meroveus or Merovius) as king, traditionally in 457 or 458. With his Frankish warband he was established with his capital at Tournai, on lands which he had received as a foederatus of the Romans, and for some time he kept the peace with his allies.

In about 463 in Orléans, in conjunction with the Roman General Aegidius, who was based in Soissons, he defeated the Visigoths, who hoped to extend their dominion along the banks of the Loire River. After the death of Aegidius, he first assisted Comes ("count") Paul of Angers, together with a mixed band of Gallo-Romans and Franks, in defeating the Goths and taking booty. Odoacer reached Angers but Childeric arrived the next day and a battle ensued. Count Paul was killed and Childeric took the city. Childeric, having delivered Angers, followed a Saxon warband to the islands on the Atlantic mouth of the Loire, and massacred them there. In a change of alliances, he also joined forces with Odoacer, according to Gregory of Tours, to stop a band of the Alamanni who wished to invade Italy.

The stories of his expulsion by the Franks, whose women he was taking; of his eight-year stay in Thuringia with King Basin and his wife Basina; of his return when a faithful servant advised him that he could safely do so by sending to him half of a piece of gold which he had broken with him; and of the arrival in Tournai of Queen Basina, whom he married, come from Gregory of Tours' Libri Historiarum (Book ii.12).

He died in 481 and was buried in Tournai, leaving a son Clovis, afterwards king of the Franks.

Golden bees or flies discovered in the tomb of Childeric, possibly pagan symbols representing longevity or the cult of Artemis.

[edit] Tomb

Childeric's tomb was discovered in 1653 (May 27) by a mason doing repairs in the church of Saint-Brice in Tournai, a city in modern Belgium, where numerous precious objects were found, including a richly ornamented sword, a torse-like bracelet, jewels of gold and cloisonné enamel with garnets, gold coins, a gold bull's head and a ring with the inscription CHILDERICI REGIS ("of Childeric the king"), which identified the tomb. Some 300 golden bees were also found. Archduke Leopold William, governor of the Southern Netherlands (today's Belgium), had the find published in Latin, and the treasure went first to the Habsburgs in Vienna, then as a gift to Louis XIV, who was not impressed with them and stored them in the royal library, which became the Bibliothèque Nationale de France during the Revolution. Napoleon was more impressed with Childeric's bees when he was looking for a heraldic symbol to trump the Bourbon fleur-de-lys. He settled on Childeric's bees as symbols of the French Empire.

On the night of November 5–6, 1831, the treasure of Childeric was among 80 kilos of treasure stolen from the Library and melted down for the gold. A few pieces were retrieved where they had been hidden in the Seine, including two of the bees. The record of the treasure, however, now exists only in the fine engravings made at the time of its discovery, and in some reproductions made for the Habsburgs.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Childeric_I -------------------- http://pt.wikipedia.org/wiki/Childerico_I

Childerico I (◊ c. 436 † c. 482), foi rei federado, possuidor das honras de um general romano, chefe civil e militar da província romana da Gallia Belgica II, foi rei merovíngio dos francos salianos de 457 até sua morte.

Reinado

Sucedeu seu pai Meroveu como rei, tradicionalmente em 457 ou 458. Com seus guerreiros francos, ele se estabeleceu na sua capital Tournai, nas terras que havia recebido como um dos foederatus do Império Romano e por algum tempo manteve a paz com seus aliados.

Por volta de 463 em Orleães, junto com o general romano Egídio, que estava baseado em Soissons, ele derrotou os visigodos, que esperavam estender seus domínios ao longo das margens do rio Loire. Após a morte de Egídio, ele primeiro ajudou o conde Paulo de Angers, junto com um bando misto de galo-romanos e francos a derrotar e saquear os godos. Odoacro alcançou Angers mas Childerico chegou no dia seguinte, iniciando-se a batalha. O conde paulo foi morto e Chiderico tomou a cidade. Childerico, após abandonar Angers, seguiu um bando guerreiro saxão às ilhas da desembocadura do Loire no Atlântico, massacrando-as. Numa mudança de alianças, ele também uniu forças a Odoacro, de acordo com Gregório de Tours, para parar um bando de alamanos que tencionavam invadir a Itália.

Morreu em 481 ou 482 e foi sepultado em Tournai, deixando seu filho Clóvis, mais tarde rei de todos os francos.

Sua tumba

A tumba de Chiderico foi descoberta em 1653 por um pedreiro que fazia reparos na igreja de Saint-Brice em Tournai onde numerosos objetos preciosos foram encontrados, incluindo uma espada esplendidamente ornamentada, um bracelete, jóias de ouro com granadas encrustadas, moedas de ouro, uma cabeça de touro de ouro e um anel com a inscrição CHILDERICI REGIS ("de Childerico o rei"), o que identificou a tumba. Cerca de 300 abelhas douradas também foram encontradas. O arquiduque Leopoldo Guilherme, governador espanhol dos Países Baixos, publicou a descoberta em latim, e os tesouros foram enviados aos Habsburgos em Viena, que os deu como presente a Luís XIV, que não se impressionou com o mesmo e o armazenou na biblioteca real, que se tornou a Biblioteca Nacional da França durante a Revolução Francesa. Napoleão ficou impressionado com as abelhas de Childerico quando ele estava procurando por um símbolo heráldico para substituir a flor-de-lis dos Bourbons. Ele estabeleceu as abelhas de Childerico como símbolos do Primeiro Império Francês.

Na noite de 5 para 6 de novembro de 1831, o tesouro de Childerico estava entre os 80 kg de tesouro roubados da biblioteca e fundidos em barras de ouro. Poucas peças foram resgatadas de onde haviam sido escondidas no Sena, incluíndo duas abelhas. O registro do tesouro, no entanto, agora existe apenas em refinadas pinturas feitas na época de seu descobrimento, e em algumas reproduções feitas pelos Habsburgos.

-------------------- Childeric I

King of Salic Franks •Birth: 436 1 •Death: 481 in Tournai

CHILDERIC I (c. 437-481), king of the Salian Franks, succeeded his father, Merwech (Merovech), as king about 457. With his tribe he was established around the town of Tournai on lands which he had received as a 'foederatus' of the Romans, and for some time he kept the peace with his allies. About 463, in conjunction with the Roman general Egidius, he assisted Count Paul in attempting to check an invasion of the Saxons. Paul having perished in the struggle, Childeric defended Angers against the Saxons, recovered from them the islands they had seized at the mouth of the Loire and destroyed their forces. The Saxon chief Odoacer now agreed to serve the Romans and the two chieftains, now reconciled, intercepted a band of the Alamanni. These are all the facts known about him. The stories of his early life by the Franks, of his stay of eight years in Thuringia with King Basin and his wife (or sister) Basine, of his return when a faithful servant advised him that he could safely do so by sending to him half of a piece of gold which he had broken with him and of the arrival at Tournai of Queen Basine, whom he married, are presevered by Gregory of Tours, and have found a place in French epic poetry. After the fall of the western empire in 476 there is no doubt that Childeric regarded himself as freed from his engagements toward Rome. He died in 481 and was buried at Tournai, leaving a son Clovis, afterward king of the Franks. His tomb was discovered in 1653, when numerous precious objects, arms, jewels, coins and a ring with his name and the image of a long-haired warrior, were found. [Encyclopaedia Britannica, 1961 ed., Vol. 5, pg. 468, CHILDERIC I]

Father: Merovaeus b: ABT 415 in Gaul (France) Mother: Verica Of Sweden

Marriage 1 Basina Of Thuringia b: ABT 440 •Married: AFT 463 1 5 Children 1. Chlodovech I b: 465 in Domains of the Salian Franks 2. Cloderic Of Cologne b: ABT 475 in Cologne, Westphalia

-------------------- The ancestry of Childeric and his wife are very confused, According to Gregory of Tours, his wife was Bazina, former wife of Bizin, King of the Thuringians, who eloped with Childerich. King of the Franks on the Ijssel circa 457-481 or 458-496. His tomb was found at Tournai in 165 Childeric succeeded his semi-legendary father Merovech as king of the Salian Franks of northern Gaul in 456, during Roman times. He became infatuated with the daughters of his subjects, who were so incensed about this that they forced him to give up the throne. He discovered that they intended to assassinate him, and he fled to Thuringia, leaving a close friend and telling him to send him a message when Childeric could return to his kingdom. Childeric took refuge with Bisinus, King of the Thuringian Franks, and his wife Basina. The king elected by the Franks was cruel, and soon after Childeric was re-called to his kingdom by his friend, and was restored to the throne. Once Bisinus and Childeric were both kings, Basina deserted her husband and went to live with Childeric, who married her and had a son Clovis. After a battle with Odoacer, King of the Saxons (and conquerer of the Western Roman Empire, 476), at Orleans, Childeric and the Saxon king made a peace treaty and together subdued the Alamanni, who had invaded a part of Italy. In 481 Childeric died and was succeeded by Clovis, his son by Basina.

-------------------- http://gw.geneanet.org/nobily?lang=fr;pz=elisabeth+therese+marie+helene;nz=de+belgique;ocz=0;p=childeric+ier;n=merovingien;oc=1 -------------------- Titres: Gouverneur de la province de "Belgique seconde", Roi de Tournai (Tournaisis) et des Francs saliens (458-481) http://gw.geneanet.org/nobily?lang=fr;pz=elisabeth+therese+marie+helene;nz=de+belgique;ocz=0;p=childeric+ier;n=merovingien;oc=1

view all 21

Childéric I, King of the Franks's Timeline

436
436
Nordrhein-Westfalen, Germany
452
452
Age 16
Rheims, Marne, Loire-Atlantique, France
457
457
Age 21
459
459
Age 23
King of, Franks
459
Age 23
King of, Franks
459
Age 23
King of, Franks
463
463
Age 27
Tournai, Hainaut, Belgium
464
464
Age 28
465
465
Age 29
Loire-Atlantique, Pays de la Loire, France

His birth year is determined by the fact that he was 15 years old at the time of his father's death.

469
December 25, 469
Age 33
Reims, Neustria