Chlothar I the Old, King of the Franks

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Chlothar «le Vieux», roi des Francs

Also Known As: "Chlotar", "Clotario", "Chlothachar", "Chlothar", "Chlotochar", "Clothaire", "Clothar", "Clotaire", "Hlothar", ""The Old"", "Chlotar I", "Chlodomir II", "King of the Franks"
Birthdate:
Birthplace: Soissons, (Present département de l'Aisne), Neustria (Present région Picardie), Frankish Kingdom (Present France)
Death: Died in Soissons, (Present département de l'Aisne), Neustria (Present Picardie), Frankish Kingdom (Present France)
Place of Burial: Abbaye Saint-Médard, Soissons, (Present département de l'Aisne), Neustria (Present Picardie), Frankish Kingdom (Present France)
Immediate Family:

Son of Clovis I the Great, King of the Franks and Saint Clotilde of Burgundy
Husband of Theodosia of Burgundy; Arégonde, Queen of the Franks; Clothilde der Franken Koningin van Franken; Ingonde, Queen of the Franks; Guntheuca of the Burgundians, Queen of Orléans and 1 other
Partner of Chusène of the Franks, Concubine 1 and Waldrada of the Lombards
Father of Chilpéric I, King of the Franks at Soissons; Charibert I, King of the Franks at Paris; Saint Guntram, King of Burgundy; Siegbert I, King of Austrasia; Chlodosinda, Queen of the Lombards and 5 others
Brother of Chlodomir I, King the Franks at Orléans; Childébert I, King of Paris; Ingomer Prince of the Franks and Clotilde, Queen consort of the Visigoths
Half brother of Théodoric I, King of Austrasia

Occupation: Roi des Francs (558-561) Roi de Neustrie (511-558) Roi d'Austrasie (555-558) Roi d'Orléans (532-558) Co-roi de Burgondie (534-558) Roi de Paris et de Bourgogne, King of Soissons, King of the Franks, King, Frankisk kung, Frankisk konge, King of France
Managed by: Private User
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About Chlothar I the Old, King of the Franks

Ben M. Angel's summary:

Relationships:

Parents:

  • Clovis/Chlodovech I (446/467 - 511), King of the Franks (482-511)
  • Clotilde/Rotilde/Chrotechildis (c480-544/548), Queen of the Franks (492-511), nun at St. Martin at Tours (511-544/548)

Older Half-Sibling (by Clovis' first partner, an unknown Frankish woman):

  • 1. Theoderich I (485-533), King of the Franks (511-533)

Siblings:

  • 2. Ingomer (493-493)
  • 3. Chlodomer (494/495 - 524), King of the Franks at Orleans (511-524), husband of Guntheuca of Burgundy (her second marriage - first husband unknown)
  • 4. Childebert (497 - 558), King of the Franks at Paris (511-558)
  • 5 Chlothachar (501/502 - 561), King of the Franks at Soissons (511-561)
  • 6 Theodechildis (492/501 - 576), Queen (unknown kingdom), founder of Mauriac monastery in Auvergne
  • 7 Chrothieldis/Clotilde (502/511 - 531), wife of Amalric, King of the Visigoths
  • 8 Unknown legendary daughter, mother of Agiulf, 26th bishop of Metz, and Arnold, 27th bishop of Metz

Spouses and children:

First wife: Guntheuca/Gondioque, widow of Chlodomer, King of the Franks at Orleans (her third marriage, wedding in 524) - No children

Second wife: Radegund of Thuringia (daughter of Berthechar, King of the Thuringians, wedding in 531, repudiated shortly after) - No children

Third wife: Ingundis/Ingonde (concubine in 517, wife in 532)

  • 1. Gunthar (517 - after 532)
  • 2. Childerich (d. 561)
  • 3. Charibert (520 - 567), King of the Franks at Paris (561-567), wife of Ingolberga (520-589, repudiated), Merofledis (daughter of a wool-worker), Theodechildis (daughter of a shepherd), and Marcovefa (Mirofledis' sister)
  • 4. Guntchramn/Gontran (532/534 - 592), King of the Franks at Orleans (561-592) husband of Marcatrudis (daughter of Magnachar Duke of the Transjuranian Franks, married 556), Austrechildis/Bobilla (Magnachar's servant, married 566), and Veneranda (partner/mistress before 549)
  • 5. Sigebert (535 - 575) King of the Franks at Reims and Metz (561-575)
  • 6. Chlodesindis (d. 567) wife of Alboin, King of the Lombards (married 556/560)
  • 7. Bilichildis, legendary wife of Ansbert, ancestor of Charlemagne

Fourth wife: Arnegundis/Aregonde, sister of Ingundis/Ingonde (polygamous marriage)

  • 8. Chilperich (535 - 584), King of the Franks at Soissons (561-584)

Fifth wife: Waldrada, daughter of Waccho of the Lombards, widow of Theobald, King of the Franks at Reims (his nephew, wedding in 555)

First mistress, Chunsina/Gunsina

  • 9. Chramn (d. 560, killed in Breton with his family), exiled illegitimate son of Clothaire, husband of Chalda (daughter of Willichar)

Second mistress

  • 10 Gundobald/Ballomer (d. 585), exiled illegitimate son of Clothaire, King of the Franks at Brives-la-Gallarde (584-585).

Basic information and justifications:

Birth: 501/502 (FMG) - Soissons (presumed by English Wikipedia)

Death: 30 Nov/31 Dec 561 - Soissons (FMG, although English Wikipedia suggests "the royal palace at Compiegne")

Burial: Basilique Saint-Medard at Soissons (FMG)

Occupation: King of the Franks at Soissons or Roi de Soissons 27 November 511 - 31 December 561, Roi d'Orleans July 524 onward (after the 25 June Battle of Vezeronce, when Chlodomer was killed), Roi de Burgondie 534 onward, Roi de Metz 555 onward, and Roi de Paris et des Burgondes 13 December 558 onward (effectively King of All Franks)

Alternate names: Clothachar, Clotaire, Clothaire, Lothar, epitaph "le Vieux" or "the Old"

-------------------

From the Foundation for Medieval Genealogy page on Merovingians (covering his birth family):

http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/MEROVINGIANS.htm#ClotaireIdied561A

CHLODOVECH [Clovis], son of CHILDERICH I King of the Franks & his wife Basina --- ([464/67]-Paris [27 Nov] 511, bur Paris, basilique des Saints-Apôtres [later église de Sainte-Geneviève]).

Gregory of Tours names Clovis as son of Childerich & Basina[37]. The Liber Historiæ Francorum names "Childerico" as father of "Chlodovecho rege"[38].

He succeeded his father in [481/82] as CLOVIS I King of the Franks.

He defeated Syagrius, ruler at Soissons, in 486. The Liber Historiæ Francorum records that "Chlodovechus" expanded his kingdom "usque Sequanam" and afterwards "usque Ligere fluvio"[39].

He remained a pagan after his marriage to a Catholic wife, but converted to Christianity in [496] allegedly having vowed to do so if successful in a battle against the Alamans[40].

He allied with Godegisel against Gondebaud King of Burgundy in [500][41]. He defeated and killed Alaric II King of the Visigoths at the campus Vogladensis[42], probably Voulan, near Poitiers, athough this is popularly known as the battle of Vouillé[43], in 507.

Gregory of Tours records that Clovis took control of the territory of the Sigebert King of the Franks of the Rhine, after persuading Sigeric's son Chloderic to kill his father and then killing Chloderic, as well as the territory of Chararic King of the Salian Franks[44].

Gregory of Tours records the death of King Clovis in Paris "five years after the battle of Vouillé" and his burial in the church of the Holy Apostles, which he and Queen Clotilde had built[45].

[m firstly] ---, daughter of --- [of the Franks of the Rhine].

  • According to Gregory of Tours, the mother of Theoderich was one of King Clovis's concubines not his first wife[46]. Settipani[47] suggests that his mother was a Frank from the Rhine region, based on the inheritance of Austrasia by Theoderich and the roots "Theode-" and "-rich" in his name, possibly transmitted through his mother from Theodemer and Richomer who were both 4th century Frankish kings.

m [secondly] (492) CHROTECHILDIS [Clotilde/Rotilde[48 of Burgundy, daughter of CHILPERICH King of Burgundy & his wife --- ([480]-Tours, monastery of Saint-Martin 544 or 548, bur Paris, basilique des Saints-Apôtres [later église de Sainte-Geneviève]).

Gregory of Tours names "Clotilde" as the younger daughter of Chilperich, recording that she and her sister were driven into exile by their paternal uncle King Gundobad, but that the latter accepted a request for her hand in marriage from Clovis King of the Franks[49]. Fredegar states that she was driven into exile to Geneva by her uncle, after he allegedly murdered her father, and that King Clovis requested her hand in marriage as a means of controlling Gundobad's power[50].

A charter dated 2 Oct [499], classified as spurious in the collection, of "Clodoveus rex Francorum" names "uxoris meæ Chrochildis…patris Chilperici regis Burgundiorum"[51].

Gregory of Tours records Clotilde's lack of success in converting her husband to Christianity until the fifteenth year of his reign, when he and his people were baptised by St Rémy Bishop of Reims[52]. Gregory of Tours records that Queen Clotilde became a nun at the church of St Martin at Tours after her husband died, and in a later passage records her death in Tours and burial in Paris next to her husband in the church which she had built[53].

She was canonised by the Catholic church, feast day 3 Jun[54].

King Clovis & his first [wife/concubine] had one child:

1. THEODERICH ([485]-end 533, bur Metz).

  • Gregory of Tours names Theoderich as son of King Clovis by one of his mistresses, born before his marriage to Clotilde[55]. "Theodorico, Chlomiro, Hildeberto, Hlodario" are named (in order) as sons of "Chlodoveus" in the Regum Merowingorum Genealogia[56].
  • In 508, he led his father's campaign against the Visigoths, allied with the Burgundians[57], and temporarily occupied Aquitaine.
  • He succeeded his father in 511 as THEODERICH I King of the Franks, based at Reims, his territory covering the right bank of the Rhine, the Moselle valley and Champagne, the lands which were later to become the kingdom of Austrasia.
  • He helped Hermanfrid King of the Thuringians defeat the latter's brother Baderic, after being promised half his kingdom, a promise which was not kept[58]. Gregory of Tours records that King Theoderich and his half-brother King Clotaire invaded Thuringia in 531, deposed King Hermanfred (who was later killed) and annexed the kingdom[59]. The Liber Historiæ Francorum records that "Theudericus et Theudobertus filius eius et Chlotharius rex" invaded Thuringia and attacked "Ermenfredum regem Toringorum", a marginal addition recording that "Teodericus filius Clodovei ex concubina" threw "Ermenfridum regem" from a wall and killed his two sons[60].
  • Adam of Bremen names "Hadugato" as the duke of the Saxons to whom "Theodericus rex Francorum" sent legates[61], undated but recorded immediately after the Thuringian invasion of 531.
  • Gregory of Tours records the death of Theoderich in the twenty third year of his reign[62].
  • m firstly ---.
  • The assumed birth date range of King Theoderich's son, Theodebert, indicates that the king's known wife, the daughter of the Burgundian king, could not have been Theodebert´s mother, considering her own estimated birth date. The king must therefore have been married earlier, or at least have had an earlier concubine, although no information has been found about this first partner in any of the primary sources consulted.
  • Europäische Stammtafeln states that the king´s first wife was named "Suavegotta (died by 566)"[63]. Presumably this is based on Flodoard's history of Reims, quoted below under the king´s second wife. If this is correct, the king must have repudiated his first wife before marrying the Burgundian king´s daughter. However, no indication has been found in any source about such a repudiation.
  • It is more natural to assume that, if Suavegotha was indeed the name of one of Theoderich´s wives (which in itself cannot be proved conclusively as discussed further below), she was his second wife.
  • m secondly ([507/16]) [SUAVEGOTHA] of Burgundy, daughter of SIGISMUND King of Burgundy & his first wife Ostrogotha of the Ostrogoths (495 or later-[after 549]).
  • Gregory of Tours records that Theoderich King of the Franks married the daughter of Sigismund but does not name her[64]. Gregory does not name the mother of King Theoderich´s wife, but chronologically it is more probable that she was born from King Sigismund's first marriage, which is also suggested by the root "-gotha" in her first name.
  • Her name is suggested by Flodoard´s history of the church of Reims, dated to the mid-10th century. This source records that "Suavegotta regina" bequeathed one third of "ville Virisiaci" by testament to the church of Reims during the bishopric of Bishop Mapinius, subject to the life interest of "Teudichildi prefate regine filie", adding that the latter later confirmed the donation during the bishopric of Bishop Egidius[65].
  • The identification of "Suavegotha regina" as King Theoderbert´s wife depends on the identification of "Teudchildi" as his daughter which, as explained in more detail below, is uncertain.
  • The link cannot therefore definitively be made between "Suavegotha" and the daughter of Sigismund King of Burgundy. Nevertheless, the chronology for such a link is favourable, as the editor of the Monumenta Germaniæ Scriptores edition of Flodoard dates Mapinius's bishopric to "ca 549-573" and Egidius´s to "ca 573-590"[66].
  • King Theoderich & his first wife had one child, Theodebert (499/504 - 547), King of the Franks at Reims (533 - 547) husband of Doeteria de Cabrieres, Wisgardis of the Lombards, and "another woman".
  • King Theoderich & his second wife had one child, Theodechildes/Techilde (516/520 - 570-595), wife of Hermengisel, King of Warnes (d. before 547), and her stepson Radegis of Warnes (repudiated shortly after)

King Clovis & his second wife had [six] children:

2. INGOMER (b and d 493).

  • Gregory of Tours names Ingomer as eldest son of King Clovis and his wife Clotilde, recording that his mother insisted on having him baptised against the wishes of her husband, who considered his early death as a sign of dissatisfaction on the part of the pagan gods[100].

3. CHLODOMER ([494/95]-killed in battle Vézeronce 21 Jun 524).

  • Gregory of Tours names Chlodomer as second son of King Clovis and his wife Clotilde[101]. "Theodorico, Chlomiro, Hildeberto, Hlodario" are named (in order) as sons of "Chlodoveus" in the Regum Merowingorum Genealogia[102].
  • He succeeded his father in 511 as CHLODOMER King of the Franks, at Orléans, his territory covering the Loire valley from Orléans to Tour, Chartres, Sens and Auxerre. Gregory of Tours records that Chlodomer's mother incited him to attack Burgundy to revenge the death of her parents.
  • He defeated and captured Sigismund King of Burgundy in his first invasion, but was defeated and killed by Sigismund's brother Gondemar during a second invasion[103]. The Liber Historiæ Francorum records that "Chlodomiris" led an army into Burgundy against "Godmarum", a marginal additional recording that "Gladmirus filius Clodovei regis Francorum" was killed during the course of the attack[104].
  • m ([514] or 521) as her first husband, GUNTHEUCA [Gondioque], daughter of --- [King of Burgundy]. Gregory of Tours names Guntheuc as widow of King Chlodomer and records her second marriage with his brother Clotaire, but does not give her origin[105]. The Liber Historiæ Francorum records that "Chlotharius" married "uxorem fratris sui…Gundeucam"[106]. Settipani suggests, for onomastic reasons only, that she may have belonged to the Burgundian royal family which, if correct, means that she must have been the daughter of either King Gondebaud or his brother Godogisel[107]. However, Gregory makes no mention of this in his lengthy description of King Chlodomer's campaigns in Burgundy, an omission which is surprising if his wife was related to his opponents.
  • She married secondly ([524]) as his first wife, Clotaire I [Chlothachar/Lothar] King of the Franks.
  • King Chlodomer & his wife had three children: Theodebald (521 - 531), Gunthar (523 - 531), St. Chlodovald/Cloud (524 - 560).

4. CHILDEBERT ([497]-23 Dec 558, bur Paris, Saint-Germain des Prés).

  • Gregory of Tours names Childebert as son of King Clovis and his wife Clotilde, listed after Chlodomer and before Clotaire[119]. "Theodorico, Chlomiro, Hildeberto, Hlodario" are named (in order) as sons of "Chlodoveus" in the Regum Merowingorum Genealogia[120].
  • He succeeded his father in 511 as CHILDEBERT I King of the Franks, at Paris, his territory covering the Seine and Somme valleys, as well as the northern coast of France as far as Brittany, Nantes and Angers.
  • Gregory of Tours records that King Childebert attacked and defeated Amalric King of the Visigoths[121], which marked the end of the Visigothic presence in France and the start of the transfer of their power-base to Spain.
  • He and his brother Clotaire launched a third attack on Burgundy, besieged Autun and occupied the whole kingdom, deposing King Gondemar II[122].
  • Gregory of Tours records that the childless King Childebert adopted his nephew Theodebert as his heir after the death of the latter's father[123].
  • He founded the monastery in Paris which, from the end 11th century, was called Saint-Germain des Prés.
  • Gregory of Tours records the death of King Childebert in Paris and his burial in the church of St Vincent[124]. The Marii Episcopi Aventicensis Chronica records the death in 558 of "Childebertus rex Francorum"[125].
  • m ULTROGOTHA, daughter of --- (-after 561, bur Paris, Saint-Germain des Prés). Gregory of Tours names Ultrogotha as the wife of King Childebert, specifying that she was sent into exile with her two daughters by King Clotaire after her husband died[126].
  • Childebert I & his wife had two children: Chrodesindis (d. after 566/567) and Chrodoberga (d. after 566/567)

---

5. CHLOTHACHAR [Clotaire/Lothar] ([501/02]-Soissons [30 Nov/31 Dec] 561, bur Soissons, basilique Saint-Médard).

Gregory of Tours names Clotaire as son of King Clovis and his wife Clotilde, listed after Childebert[131].

He succeeded his father in 511 as CLOTAIRE I King of the Franks, at Soissons.

---

6. [THEODECHILDIS ([492/501]-576).

  • A charter dated 2 Oct [499], classified as spurious in the collection, of "Clodoveus rex Francorum" purports to be written when "filia mea…Theodechildis" was becoming a nun[132]. As noted above, the editor of the Monumenta Germaniæ Scriptores series assumes that this charter refers to the daughter of King Theoderich[133]. Another charter, classified as spurious, in the name of "Theodechildis filia Chlodoveo" purports to record a donation to the monastery of St Peter at Sens dated Sep 569[134].
  • She founded the monastery of Mauriac in Auvergne[135].
  • m ---, king.]

7. CHROTHIELDIS [Clotilde] ([502/11]-531, bur Paris, basilique des Saints-Apôtres [later église de Sainte-Geneviève]).

  • Gregory of Tours refers to the marriage of the (unnamed) sister of the four brothers Theoderich, Chlodomer, Childebert and Clotaire with Amalric King of the Visigoths, arranged after the death of their father, specifying that she was sent to Spain "with a great dowry of expensive jewellery"[136]. Procopius records that “rex…Visigotthorum Amalaricus” married "Regis Theodeberti sororem"[137].
  • Gregory names her Clotilde in a later passage in which he records that she was maltreated by her husband, and brought back to France by her brother King Childebert who attacked and defeated King Amalric, but died on the journey and was buried in Paris beside her father[138].
  • m (511) AMALRIC King of the Visigoths, son of ALARIC II King of the Visigoths & his wife Theodegotha of the Ostrogoths (502-murdered 531).

8. [daughter .

  • The Gesta Episcoporum Mettensis names "Agiulfus" as sixth bishop of Metz, stating that "patre ex nobili senatorum familia orto, ex Chlodovei regis Francorum filia procreatus", and that "nepos ipsius…Arnoaldus" succeeded him as bishop[139]. This is the only reference so far identified to this supposed daughter of King Clovis, whose existence should presumably therefore be treated with caution. The reference to her supposed grandson Arnold suggests some confusion with the sources which allege the existence of Bilichildis, possible daughter of King Clotaire I (see below).
  • m ---.] [Two possible children:] Agiulf, 26th Bishop of Metz, the mother of Arnold, 27th Bishop of Metz.

References:

  • [37] Gregory of Tours II.12, p. 129.
  • [38] Liber Historiæ Francorum 6, MGH Auct. Ant. II, p. 246.
  • [39] Liber Historiæ Francorum 14, MGH SS rer Merov II, p. 260.
  • [40] Wood (1994), p. 48, suggests that Clovis's conversion may have taken place in 508.
  • [41] Gregory of Tours II.32, pp. 145-6, and the Chronicle of Marius of Avenches, cited in Wood (1994), pp. 41 and 43.
  • [42] Gregory of Tours II.37, pp. 153-4.
  • [43] Wood (1994), p. 46.
  • [44] Gregory of Tours II.40 and 41, pp. 155-6.
  • [45] Gregory of Tours II.43, p. 158.
  • [46] Gregory of Tours II.28, p. 141.
  • [47] Settipani (1993), p. 56.
  • [48] Settipani (1993), p. 57, footnote 68, points out that "Rotilde" is the correct form.
  • [49] Gregory of Tours II.28, p. 141.
  • [50] Fredegar, III 17-20, MGH SS rer Merov II, p. 99.
  • [51] MGH DD Mer (1872), Diplomata Spuria I, no. 2, p. 114.
  • [52] Gregory of Tours II.30 and 31, pp. 143-4.
  • [53] Gregory of Tours II.43 and IV.1, pp. 158 and 197.
  • [54] Attwater, D. (1970) The Penguin Dictionary of Saints (Penguin Books), p. 89.
  • [55] Gregory of Tours II.28, p. 141.
  • [56] Regum Merowingorum Genealogia (Cod S. Galli, 732), Regum Francorum Genealogiæ, MGH SS II, p. 307.
  • [57] Chronicle of 511, 689 and 690, cited in Wood (1994), p. 48.
  • [58] Gregory of Tours III.4, p. 164.
  • [59] Gregory of Tours III.7 and 8, pp. 167-9.
  • [60] Liber Historiæ Francorum 22, MGH SS rer Merov II, p. 277.
  • [61] Adami, Gesta Hammenburgensis Ecclesiæ Pontificum I.4, MGH SS VII, p. 285.
  • [62] Gregory of Tours III.23, p. 184.
  • [63] ES I.1 1.
  • [64] Gregory of Tours III.5, p. 166.
  • [65] Flodoardus Remensis Historia Remensis Ecclesiæ, II, 1, MGH SS XXXVI, p. 132.
  • [66] MGH SS XXXVI, p. 132, footnotes 3 and 9.
  • [100] Gregory of Tours II.29, p. 142.
  • [101] Gregory of Tours II.29, p. 142.
  • [102] Regum Merowingorum Genealogia (Cod S. Galli, 732), Regum Francorum Genealogiæ, MGH SS II, p. 307.
  • [103] Gregory of Tours III.6, pp. 166-7.
  • [104] Liber Historiæ Francorum 21, MGH SS rer Merov II, p. 276.
  • [105] Gregory of Tours III.6, pp. 166-7.
  • [106] Liber Historiæ Francorum 21, MGH SS rer Merov II, p. 277.
  • [107] Settipani (1993), p. 66.
  • [119] Gregory of Tours III.1, p. 162.
  • [120] Regum Merowingorum Genealogia (Cod S. Galli, 732), Regum Francorum Genealogiæ, MGH SS II, p. 307.
  • [121] Gregory of Tours III.10, p. 170.
  • [122] Gregory of Tours III.11, p. 171.
  • [123] Gregory of Tours III.24, p. 184.
  • [124] Gregory of Tours IV.20, p. 215.
  • [125] Marii Episcopi Aventicensis Chronica 558, MGH Auct. ant. XI, p. 237.
  • [126] Gregory of Tours IV.20, p. 215.
  • [131] Gregory of Tours III.1, p. 162.
  • [132] MGH DD Mer (1872), Diplomata Spuria I, no. 2, p. 114.
  • [133] MGH DD Mer (1872), Diplomata Spuria I, p. 114, footnote 1.
  • [134] MGH DD Mer (1872), Diplomata Spuria I, no. 16, p. 132.
  • [135] Settipani (1993), pp. 58-9, citing the sources for her affiliation and highlighting her possible co-identity with Theodechildis daughter of King Theoderich.
  • [136] Gregory of Tours III.1, p. 162.
  • [137] Procopius, Vol. II, De Bello Gothico I.13, p. 69.
  • [138] Gregory of Tours III.10, p. 170.
  • [139] Pauli Gesta Episcoporum Mettensis , MGH SS 2, p. 264.

-------------------------

From the Foundation for Medieval Genealogy page on Merovingians (covering his married life):

http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/MEROVINGIANS.htm#ClotaireIdied561B


CLOTAIRE 511-561, CHARIBERT 561-567, GONTRAN 561-592


CHLOTHACHAR [Clotaire/Lothar], son of CHLODOVECH King of the Franks & his second wife Chrotechildis of Burgundy ([501/02]-Soissons [30 Nov/31 Dec] 561, bur Soissons, basilique Saint-Médard).

Gregory of Tours names Clotaire as son of King Clovis and his wife Clotilde, listed after Childebert[144]. "Theodorico, Chlomiro, Hildeberto, Hlodario" are named (in order) as sons of "Chlodoveus" in the Regum Merowingorum Genealogia[145].

He succeeded his father in 511 as CLOTAIRE I King of the Franks, at Soissons, his territory covering Soissons, Laon, Noyon, Arras, Cambrai, Tournai and the lower Meuse, the lands which were later to become the kingdom of Neustria.

Gregory of Tours records that King Clotaire and his half-brother King Theoderich invaded Thuringia in 531, deposed King Hermanfred and annexed the kingdom, specifying that Clotaire brought his second wife back as part of his booty[146].

He and his brother King Childebert launched a third attack on Burgundy, besieged Autun and occupied the whole kingdom, deposing King Gondemar II[147] in 534.

He invaded Spain, with his brother King Childebert, and besieged Zaragoza but was forced to withdraw[148].

He inherited the territories of his great-nephew King Theodebert in 555 and those of his brother King Childebert in 558, when he became sole king of the Franks.

Gregory of Tours records his death, in the 51st year of his reign on the first anniversary of the killing of his son Chramn, at Soissons from a fever caught while hunting in the forest of Cuise and his burial at Soissons Saint Medard[149]. The Marii Episcopi Aventicensis Chronica records the death in 561 of "Chlothachrius rex"[150].

m firstly ([524]) as her second husband, his sister-in-law, GUNTHEUCA [Gondioque], widow of CHLODOMER King of the Franks, daughter of --- [King of Burgundy].

Gregory of Tours names Guntheuc as widow of King Chlodomer and records her second marriage with his brother Clotaire, but does not give her origin[151]. Settipani suggests, for onomastic reasons only, that she may have belonged to the Burgundian royal family which, if correct, means that she must have been the daughter of either King Gondebaud or his brother Godogisel[152]. However, Gregory makes no mention of this in his lengthy description of King Chlodomer's campaigns in Burgundy, an omission which is surprising if his wife was related to his opponents.

m secondly (531, repudiated) RADEGUND of Thuringia, daughter of BERTHECHAR [Bertaire] King of the Thuringians & his wife --- (Erfurt 518-Poitiers 13 Aug 587, bur Poitiers, basilique Sainte-Marie-hors-les-Murs).

Gregory of Tours names Radegund as the orphaned daughter of Berthar[153]. The Vitæ Sanctæ Radegundis names "Radegundis natione barbare de regione Thoringa" and her "avo rege Bessino, patruo Hermenfredo, patre rege Bertechario"[154]. In a later passage, Gregory records that, after the Frankish invasion of Thuringia, Radegund formed part of the booty taken home by Clotaire I King of the Franks, who later married her[155]. The testament of Radegundis dated to [584/87] survives[156].

Gregory of Tours records the death of St Radegund on 13 Aug[157]. She was canonised, her feast day is 13 Aug[158].

[m] thirdly ([532]) INGUNDIS [Ingonde], daughter of ---.

Gregory of Tours names Ingund as the wife of King Clotaire and mother of six of his children[159]. She was King Clotaire's concubine from [517][160].

[m] fourthly ARNEGUNDIS [Aregonde], sister of his third wife Ingonde, daughter of ---.

Gregory of Tours specifies that King Clotaire's wife Aregonde was the sister of his wife Ingonde, making clear that the marriage was polygamous as he records that Clotaire reported his "marriage" to Aregonde to his wife Ingonde[161]. She is named "Chæregundem" in the Liber Historiæ Francorum[162].

[m] [fifthly] (555, repudiated) [as her second husband], WALDRADA, widow of THEODEBALD King of the Franks, daughter of WACCHO King of the Lombards & his second wife Ostrogotha of the Gepides.

According to Gregory of Tours, King Clotaire "began to have intercourse" with the widow of King Theodebald, before "the bishops complained and he handed her over to Garivald Duke of Bavaria"[163], which does not imply that Clotaire married Waldrada. Herimannus names "Wanderadam" wife of "Theodpaldus rex Francorum" when recording her second marriage to "Lotharius rex patris eius Theodeberti patruus"[164].

She married thirdly (after 555) Garibald Duke in Bavaria.

Mistress (1): CHUNSINA, daughter of ---. Gregory of Tours names Chunsina as the mistress of King Clotaire, mother of Chramn[165]. She is named "Gunsinam" in the Liber Historiæ Francorum[166].

Mistress (2): ---. The name of King Clotaire's second mistress is not known.

King Clotaire & his third [wife] had [seven] children:

1. GUNTHAR ([517]-after 532).

  • Gregory of Tours names (in order) Gunthar, Childerich, Charibert, Guntram, Sigibert and a daughter Clothsind as the children of King Clotaire and his wife Ingonde, specifying that Gunthar died in his father's lifetime[167].
  • It is assumed that the first three children at least were born illegitimate.
  • Gregory of Tours reports that he served as an officer in his father's army, but died young[168].

2. CHILDERICH (-before 561).

  • Gregory of Tours names (in order) Gunthar, Childerich, Charibert, Guntram, Sigibert and a daughter Clothsind as the children of King Clotaire and his wife Ingonde, specifying that Childerich died during his father's lifetime[169].
  • It is assumed that the first three children at least were born illegitimate.

3. CHARIBERT ([520]-Paris end 567, bur [Paris, Saint-Germain des Prés]).

  • Gregory of Tours names (in order) Gunthar, Childerich, Charibert, Guntram, Sigibert and a daughter Clothsind as the children of King Clotaire and his wife Ingonde[170]. It is assumed that the first three children at least were born illegitimate.
  • He succeeded his father in 561 as CHARIBERT King of the Franks, his territories covering those previously held by his uncle King Childebert, with Paris as his capital[171]. The Marii Episcopi Aventicensis Chronica records that "filii ipsius Charibertus, Guntegramnus, Hilpericus et Sigibertus" divided the kingdom between them on the death of their father in 561[172].
  • Herimannus names "Hariberti rex libidini deditus" when recording his marriages[173].
  • After his death, his kingdom was divided among his brothers.
  • m firstly (repudiated) INGOLBERGA [Ingelberge], daughter of --- ([520]-Tours 589). Gregory of Tours names Ingoberg as the wife of King Charibert, but records that he dismissed her and took Merofled in her place[174]. Herimannus records the repudiation by "Hariberti" of his wife "Ingoberga"[175]. She retired to Tours after her repudiation. Gregory of Tours records the death of Queen Ingoberg, widow of Charibert, in the fourteenth year of King Childebert's reign, saying he thought that she was in her 70th year[176], although this age seems exaggerated considering the likely birth date of her daughter.
  • [m] secondly (after 561) MEROFLEDIS, daughter of ---, a wool-worker. Gregory of Tours records that King Charibert fell in love with the two daughters of a wool-worker, Marcovefa and Merofled, and that after Queen Ingoberg humiliated their father by making him prepare wool for the royal household he dismissed the Queen and replaced her by Merofled[177].
  • [m] thirdly (after 561) THEODECHILDIS, daughter of ---. Gregory of Tours names Theudechild, daughter of the shepherd who looked after King Charibert's flocks, as another of the king's women and that after Charibert died she offered her hand in marriage to King Gontran, who seized most of her goods and packed her off to a nunnery at Arles from which she unsuccessfully tried to escape[178].
  • [m] fourthly his sister-in-law, MARCOVEFA, sister of MEROFLEDIS, daughter of --- (-before end 567). Gregory of Tours records the marriage of King Charibert and Marcovefa, sister of Merofled, for which they were excommunicated by "Saint Germanus the Bishop", as well as Marcovefa's death soon after before her husband[179].
  • King Charibert & his first wife had one child, Berta (560-601/616) wife of Aethelberht, (550-616) King of Kent.
  • King Charibert & his [second] [wife] had one child, Berthefledis (561-589)
  • King Charibert & his third wife had one son (died as an infant).
  • King Charibert & his --- wife had [one child], Chrotieldis (Clotilde, 561-590) of Leubovera Convent

4. GUNTCHRAMN [Gontran] ([532/34]-28 Mar 592, bur basilique Saint-Marcel, near Chalon-sur-Saône).

  • Gregory of Tours names (in order) Gunthar, Childerich, Charibert, Guntram, Sigibert and a daughter Clothsind as the children of King Clotaire and his wife Ingonde[189].
  • He succeeded his father in 561 as GONTRAN King of the Franks, his territories covering those previously held by his uncle King Chlodomer, with Orléans as his capital[190]. The Marii Episcopi Aventicensis Chronica records that "filii ipsius Charibertus, Guntegramnus, Hilpericus et Sigibertus" divided the kingdom between them on the death of their father in 561[191].
  • He adopted his nephew King Childebert II as his successor in 577, the arrangement being renewed under the treaty of Andelot dated 28 Nov 587[192].
  • Fredegar records the death of King Guntram "anno 33 regni…V Kal Apr" and his burial "in ecclesia sancti Marcelli" in the monastery which he had built[193].
  • m firstly ([556]) MARCATRUDIS, daughter of MAGNACHAR Duke of the Transjuranian Franks & his wife --- (-after [556]). Gregory of Tours names Marcatrude, daughter of Magnachar, as the wife of King Gontran, specifying that she poisoned her stepson Gundobald but died soon after her own son[194].
  • m secondly (566) AUSTRECHILDIS [Bobilla], daughter of --- ([548]-Sep 580). Gregory of Tours names Austrechild "also called Bobilla" as the second wife of King Gontran[195]. She was a servant in the household of his first wife's father. Gregory of Tours records the death of Queen Austrechild, specifying that "this wicked woman" requested as a dying wish that the two doctors who had unsuccessfully treated her should have their throats cut[196]. An epitaph to “Austrigildis Reginæ” refers to her as “Regum genetrix et Regia conjunx”[197]. The record of the Council of Valence dated 22 Jun 585 names “Guntramni Regis…bonæ memoriæ iugalis sua Austrechildis regina vel filiæ eorum Deo sacratæ puellæ…bonæ memoriæ Clodeberga vel Clodehildis”[198].
  • Mistress (1): (before [549]) VENERANDA, daughter of ---. Gregory of Tours names Veneranda, servant of one of his subjects, as the mistress of King Gontran before his first marriage[199].
  • King Gontran & his first wife had one son, died early.
  • King Gontran & his second wife had four children: Chlothachar (Clotaire, 567-577), Chlodomer (d. 577), Chlodoberga (d. 585), and Chrothieldis (d. 585)
  • King Gontran had one child by Mistress (1), Gundobald (549-556)

5. SIGEBERT ([535]-murdered Vitry [Nov/Dec] 575, bur Soissons, basilique Saint-Médard).

  • Gregory of Tours names (in order) Gunthar, Childerich, Charibert, Guntram, Sigibert and a daughter Clothsind as the children of King Clotaire and his wife Ingonde[211].
  • He succeeded his father in 561 as SIGEBERT I King of the Franks, at Reims, later at Metz.

6. CHLODESINDIS (-before 567[212]).

  • Gregory of Tours names (in order) Gunthar, Childerich, Charibert, Guntram, Sigibert and a daughter Clothsind as the children of King Clotaire and his wife Ingonde, specifying that Clothsind married Alboin King of the Lombards[213].
  • The Origo Gentis Langobardorum names "Flutsuinda…filia Flothario regis Francorum" as the first wife of Albuin[214]. The Historia Langobardorum names "Ludusenda…filia Flothari regis" as the first wife of Alboin[215]. Paulus Diaconus names "Chlotharius rex Francorum, Chlotsuindam ei suam filiam" as wife of Alboin[216].
  • m ([556/60]) as his first wife, ALBOIN King of the Lombards, son of AUDOIN King of the Lombards & his wife --- (-murdered 28 Jun 572). He was crowned King of the Lombards in Italy at Milan in [570].

7. [BILICHILDIS .

  • The Liber Historiæ Francorum records that "Chlotharius…rex" had seven children by "Ingunde", the same six as are named in Gregory of Tours with a marginal note adding "Blitchildim" as the seventh child and specifying that she married "Ansbertus nobilissimus" and by him was mother of "Arnoldum"[217]. An alternative origin for Bilichildis is provided by the Chronico Marcianensi de Sancta Rictrude which names “Dagobertum Regem et Blithildem sororem eius” as children of “Lotharius…[et] Beretrudam” (chronologically impossible if she was the grandmother of Arnoul Bishop of Metz), but commenting that “others say” that Bilichildis was the daughter of “primi Lotharii avi istius”, adding that Bilichildis married “Ansberto Duci nobili in Germania”[218].
  • The Carmen de Exordio Gentis Francorum names "Hlotharius [rex]…filia…Blithild" and records her marriage to "Ansbertus"[219]. The recorded names of the alleged children of Bilichildis do not have a Merovingian ring about them. It is uncertain whether Bilichildis existed at all or whether she and her family were invented for the purposes of compiling a Merovingian descent for the Carolingian dynasty, an enterprise undertaken in Metz from the late 8th century onwards. Her absence from the list of the children of King Clotaire given by Gregory of Tours certainly suggests that she was a spurious later invention, although Gregory's treatment of the families of the early Merovingians was not exhaustive, as can be seen from the examples of Berthoara, daughter of King Theodebald I, and [Theodechildis] sister of the same king (see above), whom Gregory does not mention at all. Settipani demonstrates convincingly that there are sufficient indications in other primary sources that parts, if not all, these reconstructions may be based on historical fact[220]. Sifting the fact from the fiction is inevitably speculative.
  • m ANSBERT, son of ---. A 9th century genealogy names "Ansbertus…ex genere senatorum", his brothers "Deotarium, Firminum, Gamardum, Aigulfum episcopum et Ragnifridum" and their supposed descendants, Ansbert's marriage to "filiam Hlotarii regis Francorum…Blithildem" and their children as shown below[221].]

King Clotaire & his fourth wife had one child:

8. CHILPERICH (before 535-murdered Chelles [27 Sep/9 Oct] 584, bur Paris, Saint-Germain-des-Prés).

  • Gregory of Tours names Chilperich as the son of King Clotaire and his wife Aregund[222].
  • He succeeded his father in 561 as CHILPERICH I King of the Franks, at Soissons.

King Clotaire had one child by Mistress (1):

9. CHRAMN (-murdered [30 Nov/31 Dec] 560).

  • Gregory of Tours names Chramn as the son of King Clotaire and his concubine Chunsina[223]. Gregory records that Chramn was hated by the townsfolk of Clermont-Ferrand, where he lived, for his dissolute way of life, and in a later passage specifies that he moved on to Poitiers where he conspired against his father[224]. Gregory also says that Chramn allied himself with his uncle King Childebert in Paris, later rebelling once more against his father before fleeing to Brittany, where he and his wife and daughters went into hiding with "Chanao Count of the Bretons" but were captured and murdered[225].
  • The Marii Episcopi Aventicensis Chronica records that "Cramnus filius Chlothacharii regis" sought a hiding place from "Childeberto patruo suo" in 555[226].
  • Paulus Diaconus records that "duce Francorum Chramnichis" laid waste to Trentino after defeating a Lombard invasion of France but was defeated by "Euin Tridentum dux" at "Salurnis"[227].
  • Gregory of Tours records his father, King Clotaire, died on the first anniversary of the killing of his son Chramn[228].
  • m CHALDA, daughter of WILLICHAR & his wife --- (-murdered 560). Gregory of Tours records that the wife of Chramn was the daughter of Willichar, but does not name her[229]. The Liber Historiæ Francorum names "Willecharii filiam…Chaldam" as the wife of Chramn, adding in a later passage that "Willecharius…socer eius" fled with the family to "basilicam sancti Martini"[230]. Gregory of Tours says that Chramn fled to Brittany, where he and his wife and daughters went into hiding with "Chanao Count of the Bretons" but were captured and murdered[231].
  • Chramn & his wife had [two or more] daughters, murdered in 560.

King Clotaire had one possible child by Mistress (2):

10. [GUNDOBALD "Ballomer" (-murdered Mar 585).

  • Gregory of Tours records that Gundobald claimed to be the son of King Clotaire, who disowned him, that he was brought up by King Childebert and later supported by King Charibert.
  • He was received in Italy by General Narses, married and had sons there before moving to Constantinople.
  • He was invited back to Gaul, landed at Marseille and was welcomed by Bishop Theodore[233]. He was declared king at Brives-la-Gaillarde in Dec 584, but was betrayed and captured at Comminges by Gontran King of Burgundy, who murdered him[234].]
  • m (in Italy) ---. The name of Gundobald´s wife is not known. Gregory of Tours records that the two sons of Chramn were born in Italy, and they were taken to Byzantium by their father after the death of their mother[235].

Gundobald & his wife had two sons, taken to Byzantium.

References:

  • [144] Gregory of Tours III.1, p. 162.
  • [145] Regum Merowingorum Genealogia (Cod S. Galli, 732), Regum Francorum Genealogiæ, MGH SS II, p. 307.
  • [146] Gregory of Tours III.7, pp. 167-8.
  • [147] Gregory of Tours III.11, p. 171.
  • [148] Gregory of Tours III.29, pp. 186-7.
  • [149] Gregory of Tours IV.21, p. 217.
  • [150] Marii Episcopi Aventicensis Chronica 561, MGH Auct. ant. XI, p. 237.
  • [151] Gregory of Tours III.6, pp. 166-7.
  • [152] Settipani (1993), p. 66.
  • [153] Gregory of Tours III.4, p. 164.
  • [154] Vita Sanctæ Radegundis Liber I, 2, MGH SS rer. Merov. II, p. 365.
  • [155] Gregory of Tours III.7, p. 168.
  • [156] MGH DD Mer (1872), Diplomata Regum Francorum, no. 7, p. 8.
  • [157] Gregory of Tours IX.2, p. 481.
  • [158] Attwater, p. 295.
  • [159] Gregory of Tours IV.3, pp. 197-8.
  • [160] Settipani, p. 70.
  • [161] Gregory of Tours IV.3, pp. 197-8.
  • [162] Liber Historiæ Francorum 27, MGH SS rer Merov II, p. 286.
  • [163] Gregory of Tours IV.9, p. 203.
  • [164] Herimanni Augiensis Chronicon 553, MHG SS V, p. 88.
  • [165] Gregory of Tours IV.3, p. 197.
  • [166] Liber Historiæ Francorum 27, MGH SS rer Merov II, p. 286.
  • [167] Gregory of Tours IV.3, pp. 197-8.
  • [168] Gregory, III 21, and IV 25.
  • [169] Gregory of Tours IV.3, pp. 197-8.
  • [170] Gregory of Tours IV.3, p. 197.
  • [171] Gregory of Tours IV.22, p. 217.
  • [172] Marii Episcopi Aventicensis Chronica 561, MGH Auct. ant. XI, p. 237.
  • [173] Herimanni Augiensis Chronicon 563, MHG SS V, p. 88.
  • [174] Gregory of Tours IV.26, p. 219.
  • [175] Herimanni Augiensis Chronicon 563, MHG SS V, p. 88.
  • [176] Gregory of Tours IX.26, p. 513.
  • [177] Gregory of Tours IV.26, p. 219.
  • [178] Gregory of Tours IV.26, pp. 219-21.
  • [179] Gregory of Tours IV.26, p. 220.
  • [189] Gregory of Tours IV.3, p. 197.
  • [190] Gregory of Tours IV.22, p. 217.
  • [191] Marii Episcopi Aventicensis Chronica 561, MGH Auct. ant. XI, p. 237.
  • [192] Gregory of Tours V.17 and IX.20, pp. 274-5 and 503-7.
  • [193] Fredegar, IV, 14, MGH SS rer Merov II, p. 127.
  • [194] Gregory of Tours IV.25, pp. 218-19.
  • [195] Gregory of Tours IV.25, p. 219.
  • [196] Gregory of Tours V.26, pp. 298-9.
  • [197] RHGF II, p. 536.
  • [198] MGH Conc. I, p. 162.
  • [199] Gregory of Tours IV.25, p. 218.
  • [211] Gregory of Tours IV.3, p. 197.
  • [212] The date of her husband's second marriage.
  • [213] Gregory of Tours IV.3, pp. 197-8.
  • [214] Origo Gentis Langobardorum 5, MGH SS rer Lang I, p. 4.
  • [215] Historia Langobardorum Codicis Gothani 5, MGH SS rer Lang I, p. 9.
  • [216] Pauli Historia Langobardorum I.27, MGH SS rer Lang I, p. 68.
  • [217] Liber Historiæ Francorum 27, MGH SS rer Merov II, p. 285.
  • [218] Ex Chronico Marcianensi de Sancta Rictrude, RHGF 3, p. 522.
  • [219] Carmen de Exordio Gentis Francorum, MGH Poetæ Latini ævi Carolini II, pp. 142-3.
  • [220] Settipani, C. 'L'apport de l'onomastique dans l'étude des genealogies carolingiennes', Keats-Rohan, K. S. B. and Settipani, C. (eds.) (2000) Onomastique et Parenté dans l'Occident medieval (Prosopographica et Genealogica, Vol. 3), pp. 185-229.
  • [221] Genealogiæ Karolorum I, MGH SS XIII, p. 245.
  • [222] Gregory of Tours IV.3, p. 197.
  • [223] Gregory of Tours IV.3, p. 197.
  • [224] Gregory of Tours IV.13 and IV.16, pp. 207-8 and 211-12.
  • [225] Gregory of Tours IV 17 and 20, pp. 213 and 215-16.
  • [226] Marii Episcopi Aventicensis Chronica 555, MGH Auct. ant. XI, p. 236.
  • [227] Pauli Historia Langobardorum III.9, MGH SS rer Lang I, p. 97.
  • [228] Gregory of Tours IV.21, p. 217.
  • [229] Gregory of Tours IV.17, p. 213.
  • [230] Liber Historiæ Francorum 28, MGH SS rer Merov II, pp. 286 and 287.
  • [231] Gregory of Tours IV 17 and 20, pp. 213 and 215-16.
  • [233] Gregory of Tours VI.24, p. 352.
  • [234] Gregory of Tours VII.10, p. 394 and VII.34-38, pp. 418-23. Wood (1994), pp. 93-100, discusses the significance of Gundobald's rebellion in the context of contemporary politics.
  • [235] Gregory of Tours VII.36, p. 419.

--------------------------

From the English Wikipedia entry for Clotaire I:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Clotaire_I

Chlothar I (or Chlothachar, Chlotar, Clothar, Clotaire, Chlotochar, or Hlothar, giving rise to Lothair; 497 – 561), called the Old (le Vieux), King of the Franks, was one of the four sons of Clovis. He was born about 497 in Soissons (now in Aisne département, Picardie, France).

On the death of his father in 511, he received, as his share of the kingdom, the town of Soissons, which he made his capital; the cities of Laon, Noyon, Cambrai, and Maastricht; and the lower course of the Meuse River. But he was very ambitious, and sought to extend his domain.

He was the chief instigator of the murder of his brother Chlodomer's children in 524, and his share of the spoils consisted of the cities of Tours and Poitiers. He took part in various expeditions against Burgundy and, after the destruction of that kingdom in 534, obtained Grenoble, Die, and some of the neighbouring cities.

When the Ostrogoths ceded Provence to the Franks, he received the cities of Orange, Carpentras, and Gap. In 531, he marched against the Thuringii with his nephew Theudebert I and in 542, with his brother Childebert I against the Visigoths of Spain. On the death of his great-nephew Theodebald in 555, Clotaire annexed his territories. On Childebert's death in 558 he became sole king of the Franks.

He also ruled over the greater part of Germany, made expeditions into Saxony, and for some time exacted from the Saxons an annual tribute of 500 cows. The end of his reign was troubled by internal dissensions, his son Chram rising against him on several occasions. Following Chram into Brittany, where the rebel had taken refuge, Clotaire shut him up with his wife and children in a cottage, which he set on fire. Overwhelmed with remorse, he went to Tours to implore forgiveness at the tomb of St Martin, and died shortly afterwards.

Family

Clotaire's first marriage was to Guntheuc, widow of his own brother Chlodomer, sometime around 524. They had no children.

His second marriage, which occurred around 532, was to Radegund, daughter of Bertachar, King of Thuringia, whom he and his brother Theuderic defeated. She was later canonized. They had no children.

His third and most successful marriage was to Ingund, by whom he had five sons and two daughters:

  • 1. Gunthar, predeceased father
  • 2. Childeric, predeceased father
  • 3. Charibert, King of Paris
  • 4. Guntram, King of Burgundy
  • 5. Sigebert, King of Austrasia
  • 6. Chlothsind, married Alboin, King of the Lombards

His next marriage was to a sister of Ingund, Aregund, with whom he had a son:

  • 7. Chilperic, King of Soissons

His last wife was Chunsina (or Chunsine), with whom he had one son:

  • 8. Chram, who became his father's enemy and predeceased him

Chlothar may have married and repudiated Waldrada.

Sources:

  • Bachrach, Bernard S. (1972). Merovingian Military Organization, 481–751. Minneapolis: University of Minnesota Press, ISBN 0 81660 621 8.
  • Geary, Patrick J. (1988). Before France and Germany: The Creation and Transformation of the Merovingian World. Oxford: Oxford University Press, ISBN 0 19504 458 4.
  • James, Edward (1991). The Franks. London: Blackwell, ISBN 0 63114 872 8.
  • Oman, Charles (1914). The Dark Ages, 476–918. London: Rivingtons.
  • Wallace-Hadrill, J. M. (1962). The Long-Haired Kings, and Other Studies in Frankish History. London: Methuen.
  • Wood, Ian N. (1994). The Merovingian Kingdoms, 450–751. London: Longman, ISBN 0 58221 878 0.

Chlothar I, Merovingian Dynasty

  • Born: 497 Died: 561

Preceded by Clovis I King of Soissons 511–558 Succeeded by Chilperic I

Preceded by Chlodomer King of Orleans 524–558 Succeeded by Guntram

Preceded by Theudebald King of Reims 555–558 Succeeded by Sigebert I, Moved to Metz

Preceded by Childebert I King of Paris 558 Succeeded by Charibert I Vacant: Title last held by Clovis I King of the Franks 558–561 Vacant Title next held by Clotaire II

-------------------- De la página de Wikipedia en español para Clotario I:

http://es.wikipedia.org/wiki/Clotario_I

Clotario I LeVieux, nacido hacia el año 497 y fallecido el 29 de noviembre del 561, fue un monarca del reino de los francos, hijo menor de Clodoveo y de Clotilde. Fue rey de Neustria (511-561), de Orleans (532-561), de Borgoña, compartido con su hermano Childeberto (534-558), de Austrasia (555-561) y de París y de Borgoña (558-561).

Reinado

En el reparto del Regnum Francorum, a la muerte de su padre en el 511, Clotario heredó la Neustria. Se casó con Ingonda en el 517.

A la muerte de su hermano Clodomiro (524), Clotario se casó con su viuda, Gondioque, pero ni siquiera de este modo obtuvo el territorio de su hermano difunto, puesto que la ley sálica impuso la partición del reino entre los hijos de Clodomiro. Para evitarlo, Clotario se alió con Childeberto para organizar el asesinato de sus jóvenes herederos (532). De los tres hermanos, dos fueron asesinados, y el último (Clodoaldo) renunció a su parte y escogió la vida monástica. Así, Clotario y Childeberto, se pudieron repartir libremente el territorio de su hermano.

En el año 531, se casó con Radegunda, quien prefirió retirarse a un convento en vez de convivir a su lado, fundando en Poitiers la abadía de la Santa Cruz, la primera abadía femenina de Europa. Fue canonizada como Santa Radegunda. Clotario se volvió a casar en el 532 con Ingonda y luego con su hermana Arnegonda.

La muerte de Teodobaldo (nieto de Teodorico, su hermano difunto) en el 555, y la de Childeberto (sin descendencia) en el 558, permitieron a Clotario reunificar el Regnum Francorum de su padre.

Aún volvió a contraer un nuevo matrimonio con Chunsina, y luego con Vulderade (555) viuda de Teodobaldo, rey de Austrasia.

Su reinado estuvo marcado por numerosas campañas militares, entre las que cabe destacar la guerra contra los burgundios (523-526); la campaña de Turingia (530); la invasión de Borgoña (534), en compañía de su hermano Childeberto (donde se repartieron la corona); o la tentativa fallida de la invasión de España (542), con Childeberto,aunque fueron rechazados en Zaragoza.

A finales de su reinado tuvo problemas con su hijo Cramne, que se reveló contra él en numerosas ocasiones. Siguió a Cramne hasta Inglaterra, donde se había refugiado, y Clotario lo encerró a él y a su mujer e hijos en una granja y le prendió fuego. Sobrecogido por el remordimiento, fue a Tours a implorar perdón sobre la tumba de San Martín. Murió poco después, en Compiègne, el 29 de noviembre.

--------------------

From the Encyclopedia Britannica (Forrás / Source):

http://www.britannica.com/EBchecked/topic/113816/Chlotar-I

Chlotar I

  • Merovingian king
  • born c. 500?
  • died late 561, Compiègne, Fr.

Merovingian king of Soissons from 511 and of the whole Frankish kingdom from 558, who played an important part in the extension of Frankish hegemony.

The youngest of Clovis I’s sons, Chlotar shared in the partition of his father’s kingdom in 511, receiving the old heartlands of the Salian Franks in modern northern France and Belgium. After the death of his brother, Clodomir, in 524, he murdered his nephews and shared the kingdom of Orléans with his two remaining brothers, Childebert I and Theodoric I. The deaths without heirs of the latter’s grandson, Theodebald, in 555 and of Childebert in 558 brought all the Frankish lands finally under Chlotar’s sway.

Chlotar’s principal campaigns were against the Burgundians in 532–534 (when he and Childebert finally imposed Frankish rule), against the Visigoths in 541 (with Childebert), and against the Thuringians in 531 (with Theodoric); he married the Thuringian princess, Radegunda. In 535 he joined the other Merovingian kings in a military treaty with Justinian. Chlotar was ruthless and brutal, and the family rivalries and sometimes open hostilities in which he figured prominently were characteristic of Merovingian history; in 560 he even had his rebellious son, Chram, together with Chram’s family, put to death. Gregory of Tours describes Chlotar, wracked with fever on his deathbed, asking—whether in outrage or in admiration—what manner of heavenly king it was who would bring great rulers to their deaths in such a fashion.

--------------------

Unknown Spanish biography:

Quando seu pai morreu em 511, ele recebeu, como sua parte do reino, a cidade de Soissons, da qual ele fez sua capital; as cidades de Laon, Noyon, Cambrai e Maastricht; e o baixo curso do rio Mosa. Mas ele era muito ambicioso, e tentou ampliar seus domínios.

Ele foi o principal instigador do assassinato dos filhos de seu irmão Clodomiro em 524, e sua parte na divisão dos espólios consistiu nas cidades de Tours e Poitiers. Ele tomou parte em várias expedições contra a Borgonha e, depois da destruição daquele reino em 534, obteve Grenoble, Die e algumas das cidades vizinhas. Quando os ostrogodos cederam Provença aos francos, ele recebeu as cidades de Orange, Carpentras e Gap.Em 531, ele marchou contra os turíngios junto ao seu irmão Teodorico I e em 542, com seu irmão Childeberto I contra os visigodos da Espanha. Com a morte de seu sobrinho neto Teodebaldo em 555, Clotário anexou seus territórios. Com a morte de Chideberto em 558 ele se tornou rei único dos francos.

Ele também governou sobre grande parte da Alemanha, fez expedições no interior da Saxônia e por algum tempo exigiu dos saxões um tributo anual de 500 vacas. O fim de seu reinado foi perturbado por divergências internas. Seu filho Cram se levantou contra ele em várias ocasiões. Seguindo Cram na Borgonha, onde o rebelde havia se refugiado, Clotário o prendeu com sua mulher e filhos numa cabana, queimando-a. Impressionado de remorso, ele retornou a Tours para implorar perdão na tumba de Saint Martin, morrendo pouco tempo depois.

--------------------

Forrás / Source:

http://wc.rootsweb.ancestry.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=pkd&id=I5497Ch61a

ID: I5497Ch61a Name: Chlotar Merovingian , I

Given Name: Chlotar, I Surname: Merovingian

  • Sex: M
  • Birth: abt 0497A
  • Death: 0561A in Compiègne (France)

Note: VERSIONS OF HIS NAME: - Chlotar [Thompson1937] [WNBD1983] - Chlothaire [wYoung] - Chlothar [wWikipedia] - Clotaire [wCharlemagne] - Clotario [O'Hart1923] [wPhilip5] - Clothaire [Pittman1970] - Olotario [O'Hart1923] - OTHER RELATIONSHIPS: - Blithildis Merovingian [531A-590A] was probably his child. - TITLES: - #I - "the Old" - king of Soissons ; 0511A - king of the Franks ; 0558A - 0561A - SOURCES: - EB1986 "Chlotar I" | "Merovingian dynasty" - | "Chilperic I" | "Sigebert I" | "Theodoric I [Merovingian dynasty]" - | "Gruntram" | "Charibert I" | "Childebert II" | "Radegunda, Saint" - O'Hart1923 "The Lineal Descent of King Philip V., of Spain":p#42-3 - Pittman1970 "Manson-Moore" - wWikipedia "Chlothar I" - Gregory0594 - Thompson1937 - WNBD1983 - wCharlemagne - wGx/Bacher - wYoung - wPhilip5 - PKD RUO-5497Ch61a 2008Oc18 Copyright (c) 2009 Paul K Davis [paulkdavis@earthlink.net] Fremont CA

Father: Clovis "Magnus" Merovingian , I b: 0466A?

Mother: Clotilda Burgundian,the

Marriage 1 Guntheuc -

  • Married: abt 0524A

Marriage 2 Radegunda Thuringian,the

  • Married: abt 0532A

Marriage 3 Ingund Franks,queen-of

  • Children
  • 1. Charibert Merovingian , I b: in Paris (France)
  • 2. Guntram Merovingian
  • 3. Sigebert Merovingian , I

Marriage 4 Aregund -

  • Children: Chilperic Merovingian , I b: abt 0539A

Marriage 5 Chunsina -

  • Children: Chram Merovingian

--------------------

Forrás / Source:

http://wc.rootsweb.ancestry.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=pkd&id=I5496Cl24a

ID: I5496Cl24a Name: Clodomir Merovingian

  • Given Name: Clodomir
  • Surname: Merovingian
  • Sex: M
  • Birth: abt 0496A
  • Death: 0524A Jun 25

Note: TITLES: - king ?; 0511A - - SOURCES: - EB1986 "Clodomir" | "Childebeert - Thompson1937 - wWikipedia - PKD RU6-5496Cl24a 2008No23 Copyright (c) 2009 Paul K Davis [paulkdavis@earthlink.net] Fremont CA

Father: Clovis "Magnus" Merovingian , I b: 0466A?

Mother: Clotilda Burgundian,the

Marriage 1 Guntheuc -

--------------------

My first wife was Guntheurca, my own brother's widow.

--------------------

notes or source: ancestry.com

Clotaire (Clothaire) (Chlothar) I, King of the Franks, 558-562, born in 500 and died in 562.

He married, according to Gregory of Tours, (1) Guntheuca, wife of his dead brother, Chlodomer.

He married (2) Chunsina; (3) Ingunde; (4) Aregunda, Ingunda's sister; (5) *Radegunda, daughter of the Thuringian king *Berthar, who became a nun at Poitiers about 550; (6) a concubine; and (7) Vuldetrude, Theodovald's widow.

At the time of his father's death, he received Soissons, Laon, Noyon, and the old Frankish country: Cambrai, Tournai, and the lower side of the Meuse.

--------------------

Unknown biography:

Chlotarius I de oude

Chlothar I (c. 497 – 29 November 561), called the Old (le Vieux), King of the Franks, was one of the four sons of Clovis. He was born about 497 in Soissons (now in Aisne département, Picardie, France).

On the death of his father in 511, he received, as his share of the kingdom, the town of Soissons, which he made his capital; the cities of Laon, Noyon, Cambrai, and Maastricht; and the lower course of the Meuse River. But he was very ambitious, and sought to extend his domain.

He was the chief instigator of the murder of his brother Chlodomer's children in 524, and his share of the spoils consisted of the cities of Tours and Poitiers. He took part in various expeditions against Burgundy and, after the destruction of that kingdom in 534, obtained Grenoble, Die, and some of the neighbouring cities.

When the Ostrogoths ceded Provence to the Franks, he received the cities of Orange, Carpentras, and Gap. In 531, he marched against the Thuringii with his nephew Theudebert I and in 542, with his brother Childebert I against the Visigoths of Spain. On the death of his great-nephew Theodebald in 555, Chlothar annexed his territories. On Childebert's death in 558 he became sole king of the Franks.

He also ruled over the greater part of Germany, made expeditions into Saxony, and for some time exacted from the Saxons an annual tribute of 500 cows. The end of his reign was troubled by internal dissensions, his son Chram rising against him on several occasions. Following Chram into Brittany, where the rebel had taken refuge, Chlothar shut him up with his wife and children in a cottage, which he set on fire. Overwhelmed with remorse, he went to Tours to implore forgiveness at the tomb of St Martin, and died shortly afterwards at the royal palace at Compiègne.

--------------------

Noteringar

CLOTHAIR I, KING OF SOISSONS, ORLEANS, METZ AND PARIS, b. 497 A.D. ; d. 561 A.D.

He married first to the Princess Theodosa, daughter of the Sigemond, King of Burgundy and his queen Theudegoth, daughter of the King of the Ostrogoths. He secondly married Radegonde, daughter of the King of the Thuringians. Thirdly he married Ingunda. There were four children recorded:

  • 1.( 1) CHARIBERT, b. 521 A.D.;
  • 2.(1) CHILPERIC, b. 523 A.D.;
  • (3) SIGEBERT , b. 535 A.D.; and
  • (2) BLITHILDIS,b. 527 A.D.

Charibert became King of Paris (561-567). He married the lady Ingeberga as his first wife. The union produced Princess Bertha who married St. Ethelbert, King of Kent. (Saxon Royal houses). Chilperic became King of Soissons (561-584). He married Fredegunde and became the progenitor of the main branch of Merovingian Kings of France (Genealogy of Aragon, Navarre, Gascony and Aquitaine).

Sigebert became King of Metz ( 561-574). He married the Princess Brunhilda, daughter of Athanagild, King of the Visigoths. From this union came Childebert, King of Austrasia and Ingunda wife of St. Herminguild, Prince of the Visigoths, son of Leuvigild, King of the Visigoths. (Genealogy of the Cid)

Blithildis married Ausbertus, Duke of Moselle, grandson of Albero, Duke of Moselle, son of Clodio I, King of the Franks and Argotta, daughter of Theoderic, King of Verona. From this union came the royal line of the Carolingians (Genealogy of Capetians and Counts of Champagne).

Eventually the Royal line of Navarre is descended from all four children of Clothair I.

--------------------

Noteringar

CLOTHAIR I, kung av Soissons , ORLEANS , Metz och Paris, b. 497 A.D. d. 561 A.D.

Han gifte sig med prinsessan Theodosa , dotter till Sigemond , kung av Burgund och hans drottning Theudegoth , dotter till kungen av ostrogoterna . Han gifte sig andra Radegonde , dotter till kungen av Thuringians . För det tredje gifte han sig Ingunda . Det fanns fyra inspelade barn:

  • 1 (1). Charibert , b. 521 A.D. ;
  • 2 (1). Chilperik , b. 523 A.D. ;
  • (3) Sigibert , b. 535 A.D. , och
  • (2) BLITHILDIS , b. 527 A.D.

Charibert blev kung av Paris ( 561-567 ). Han gifte sig med damen Ingeberga som hans första fru. Förbundet producerade Prinsessan Bertha som gifte sig med St Ethelbert , kung av Kent. ( Saxon Royal hus ).

Chilperik blev kung i Soissons ( 561-584 ). Han gifte sig Fredegunde och blev stamfader till de viktigaste grenen av Merovingian Kings of Frankrike ( släktforskning av Aragonien , Navarra, Gascogne och Aquitaine ).

Sigebert blev kung av Metz ( 561-574 ). Han gifte sig med prinsessan Brunhilda , dotter till Athanagild , kung över visigoterna . Ur denna förening kom Childebert , kung av Austrasien och Ingunda hustru till St Herminguild , prins av visigoterna , son till Leuvigild , kung över visigoterna . ( Släktforskning i Cid )

Blithildis gift Ausbertus , hertig av Mosel , sonson till Albero , hertig av Mosel , son till Clodio I, kung av frankerna och Argotta , dotter till Theoderic , kung av Verona. Ur denna förening kom kungliga raden i Karolingerna ( genealogi Capetians och räknar Champagne ).

Så småningom kungliga linjen i Navarra härstammar från alla fyra barn till Clothair I.

--------------------

Kung över frankerna

Frankisk kung.

--------------------

AKA: Chlothar I. Titles: Also, the King of Neustria, Austrasia & Soissons.

Sources: The book, 'Kings & Queens of Europe'. The book, 'The Dark Ages'. -------------------- King of Franks (558-561)

  1. Note: King of Soissons (511), King of Orleans, King of France
  2. Note: SOURCES:
  3. Note: "Rulers of the World" by R.F.Tapsell
  4. Note: Clotaire = Clothar I, King de Soissons (Paul, Nouveau Larousse Universel.) (Rosamond, Frankish kingdom under Carolingians.)
  5. Note: (Stuart, Royalty for Commoners, Page 216, Line 303-50.) (Andre Castelot, Histoire de La France, Tome 1, Pages 200 - 208, 214).
  6. Note: AKA: Clotaire I, King d'Orleans. AKA: Clotaire I, King d'Austrasie. Born: in 497, son of Clovis I, King des Francs and Sainte Clotilde de Bourgogne.
   Married between 510 and 515: Ingonthe who was Clotaire I's first wife. She gave him a daughter and five sons, three of whom survived. Married circa 516: Aregonde); Radegonde was Clotaire I's second legitimate wife. Note - between 523 and 560: In accordance with Salic Law, upon Clovis I's death, his four sons [Thierry, the eldest and born from an unknown concubine before Clovis was married, and the other three, Clodomir, Childebert and Clotaire, divided the kingdom not unlike a cake, but with unequal parts. Clotaire, the youngest, received the most primitive lands, extending from the charbonniere forest [the North of Gaule] to the Somme River and beyond to include Noyon, Soissons and Laon. Soissons was its capital. The brothers constantly engaged in bloody fights in order to augment their holdings. In 523, three of Clovis I's sons, Clotaire, Childebert and Clodomir, launch their first campaign against the Burgundians. They catch Sigismond=Zygmund, out of the Monastery of Agaune, as well as his wife and his children. They are given to the custody of Clodomir. He has the entire family murdered by throwing them into a well at Saint-Peravy-la-Coulombe [near Patay] . Clotaire I became King of Orleans in 526 and King of Austrasie in 555. He was known for his cruelty and plotted and implemented the murder of his brother's (Clodomir) sons with Childebert, his other brother. In July through December 524, two of Clodomir's sons thus are murdered. Clodomir himself had died at the Battle of Vezeronce [in Isere] on 25 June 524. Clotaire gets Tours and Poitiers. In 531 Thierry and Clotaire I are occupied in battle against the Thuringians. Their King, Hermanefried died in combat by falling from a rempart in Tolbiac [with a little push] . His mother, Radegonde, who is among the captives, becomes Clotaire's third wife. In 532, Clotaire and Childebert begin their third campaign against the Burgundians. This time, they take Autun. Upon Thierry;s death in 534, his lands are divided, and Clotaire gets the entire southern portion of Thierry's holdings including Grenoble, Die and neighboring cities.:
   In 536, Clotaire obtains the northern part of Provence encompassing Orange, Carpentras and Gap from Vitiges, King of the Ostrogoths. When Theobald dies in 555, Clotaire gives the Auvergne to his son, Chramne. The next year, Clotaire would fail
   in his campaign against the Saxons, but they will continue to pay him an annual tribute of 500 cows. Chramne rebels and fights against his father. Upon Childebert's death 23 December 558, he reunited all parts of the Frankish kingdom, and Clotaire becomes sole King of the Francs. The following year, his son, Chramne again rebels, but has to seek refuge with the Count of Brittany, Conober who is established in Vannes. In 560, they lose to Clotaire and Chramne, his wife and their children are burnt alive on the orders of Clotaire. Married circa 547: Radegonde, Princess de Turinge , daughter of Hermanefried, King de Turinge (8164) and N? ; The Thuringians had been submitted to the Francs. Clotaire and his half-brother Thierry had led a brutal campaign against them and had crushed them on the banks of the Saale in 531. Among Clotaire's share of the bounty was a beautiful young girl, the Christian Princess Radegonde. Radegonde was Clotaire I's third legitimate wife, and fifth mate. Clotaire I was about 50 years old.
  1. Note: Title: Encyclopedia Britannica, Treatise on
  2. Note: Page: Chlotar I
  3. Note: Text: late 561

-------------------- His ancestors are presented elsewhere on this tree.

King of Franks (558-561)

  1. Note: King of Soissons (511), King of Orleans, King of France
  2. Note: SOURCES:
  3. Note: "Rulers of the World" by R.F.Tapsell
  4. Note: Clotaire = Clothar I, King de Soissons (Paul, Nouveau Larousse Universel.) (Rosamond, Frankish kingdom under Carolingians.)
  5. Note: (Stuart, Royalty for Commoners, Page 216, Line 303-50.) (Andre Castelot, Histoire de La France, Tome 1, Pages 200 - 208, 214).
  6. Note: AKA: Clotaire I, King d'Orleans. AKA: Clotaire I, King d'Austrasie. Born: in 497, son of Clovis I, King des Francs and Sainte Clotilde de Bourgogne.
   Married between 510 and 515: Ingonthe who was Clotaire I's first wife. She gave him a daughter and five sons, three of whom survived. Married circa 516: Aregonde); Radegonde was Clotaire I's second legitimate wife. Note - between 523 and 560: In accordance with Salic Law, upon Clovis I's death, his four sons [Thierry, the eldest and born from an unknown concubine before Clovis was married, and the other three, Clodomir, Childebert and Clotaire, divided the kingdom not unlike a cake, but with unequal parts. Clotaire, the youngest, received the most primitive lands, extending from the charbonniere forest [the North of Gaule] to the Somme River and beyond to include Noyon, Soissons and Laon. Soissons was its capital. The brothers constantly engaged in bloody fights in order to augment their holdings. In 523, three of Clovis I's sons, Clotaire, Childebert and Clodomir, launch their first campaign against the Burgundians. They catch Sigismond=Zygmund, out of the Monastery of Agaune, as well as his wife and his children. They are given to the custody of Clodomir. He has the entire family murdered by throwing them into a well at Saint-Peravy-la-Coulombe [near Patay] . Clotaire I became King of Orleans in 526 and King of Austrasie in 555. He was known for his cruelty and plotted and implemented the murder of his brother's (Clodomir) sons with Childebert, his other brother. In July through December 524, two of Clodomir's sons thus are murdered. Clodomir himself had died at the Battle of Vezeronce [in Isere] on 25 June 524. Clotaire gets Tours and Poitiers. In 531 Thierry and Clotaire I are occupied in battle against the Thuringians. Their King, Hermanefried died in combat by falling from a rempart in Tolbiac [with a little push] . His mother, Radegonde, who is among the captives, becomes Clotaire's third wife. In 532, Clotaire and Childebert begin their third campaign against the Burgundians. This time, they take Autun. Upon Thierry;s death in 534, his lands are divided, and Clotaire gets the entire southern portion of Thierry's holdings including Grenoble, Die and neighboring cities.:
   In 536, Clotaire obtains the northern part of Provence encompassing Orange, Carpentras and Gap from Vitiges, King of the Ostrogoths. When Theobald dies in 555, Clotaire gives the Auvergne to his son, Chramne. The next year, Clotaire would fail
   in his campaign against the Saxons, but they will continue to pay him an annual tribute of 500 cows. Chramne rebels and fights against his father. Upon Childebert's death 23 December 558, he reunited all parts of the Frankish kingdom, and Clotaire becomes sole King of the Francs. The following year, his son, Chramne again rebels, but has to seek refuge with the Count of Brittany, Conober who is established in Vannes. In 560, they lose to Clotaire and Chramne, his wife and their children are burnt alive on the orders of Clotaire. Married circa 547: Radegonde, Princess de Turinge , daughter of Hermanefried, King de Turinge (8164) and N? ; The Thuringians had been submitted to the Francs. Clotaire and his half-brother Thierry had led a brutal campaign against them and had crushed them on the banks of the Saale in 531. Among Clotaire's share of the bounty was a beautiful young girl, the Christian Princess Radegonde. Radegonde was Clotaire I's third legitimate wife, and fifth mate. Clotaire I was about 50 years old.
  1. Note: Title: Encyclopedia Britannica, Treatise on
  2. Note: Page: Chlotar I
  3. Note: Text: late 561

-------------------- Roi des Francs -------------------- http://a.decarne.free.fr/gencar/dat0.htm#14

continues back from here on this site Sharon Doubell -------------------- Suffix : Kung av Soissons , Austrasien och Neu

•Anmärkning:

Chlothacharius I gick Gracia Dei Francorum rex också med namnet ofClotaire jag " le Vieux " des Francs franska. Chlothacharius jag , Gracia DeiFrancorum rex gick också under namnet Clothar jag " gamla "av theFranks le Vieux = Gamla . Kallas även Lothar .

Han ärvde kungadömet Soissons från sin far i 511 . King ofFranks i Soissons , Neustrien , frankiska kungadömena mellan 27 November511 och 558 .

Han förknippas med Ingundis (?) , dotter till Baderic i Thüringen , i 517 , ( konkubin ).

Han och Theudericus jag var kung av frankerna i Austrasien themerovingians som underkuvade det Thuringians och besegra deras konung , Hermanfrid i 531 .

Han och Childebertus I, Rex Francorum , vir inluster bedriver theirown inbördeskrig , idriftsättning det deras brorson Theodebert innan 545 inthe skog av Brotonne , Normandie , Frankrike. En bön av sin mamma , St Chlothild , vid graven i St Martin, och bad med tårar allnight att inte tillåta en annan brodermord. "Plötsligt en förfärlig tempestarose och skingrades de två arméerna ( som Chlotaire s eftersträvas byChildebert och Theodebert s ) som var i begrepp att utöva ahand -to- hand kamp , och därför säger krönikören gjorde helgon answerthe böner de drabbade mor.

Han ärvde kungadömet Austrasien från hans barnlösa BRONS SONSON , Theobald, i 553 . Kung av Franks i Austrasien , frankiska kungadömena mellan 553 och 558 .

Han gifte sig Waldrada , longobardiska prinsessa , dotter till Waccho , kung ofthe longobarder och Austrigusa , prinsessa av Gepidae , ca 555 anddivorced i 556 , avvisats .

" Chlothacharius I. rex Monasterio Giannofoliensi i Pago Andegavensi , Ubi Maurus ABBA, beati Benedicti discipulus , pracesse videtur , donaconfert . --- Fragmentum . "

Han förvärvade riken Bourgogne och Paris från sin brotherChildebert i 558 . Han konsoliderade sin fars forna herravälde , byacquiring den landar i hans bröder och BRONS SONSON att bli thesecond kung över alla Franks i 558 . Kung av Franks i Bourgogne, FrankishKingdoms , mellan 23 December 558 och 561 . Kung av Franks i Paris, frankiska kungadömena mellan 23 December 558 och 561 . 2. King of allFranks i frankiska kungadömena mellan 558 och 561 .

Han besegrade Conomor av Domnonée (alias Cunomorus ) i strid 560 .

•Händelse: Clothar fruar Övrigt

•Anmärkning: " Clothar var först gift mellan 817 och 523 till Ingund , anoblewoman . Den dog hans bror Chlodomer i 524 som anopportunity för att förvärva mark och behovet av att ta en ny bride.Together med sin bror Childebert , Clothar mördade Chlodomer s twoelder söner, skrämde tredje i tonsuring sig själv som en munk andthen gift deras mor , Guntheuca med änkan som han tog thekingdom . I 531 Clothar var på kampanj i Thüringen. I slutet OFA framgångsrika kamp han förde tillbaka sin andel av bytet : Radegund , dotter till King Bertacharius . Hon var fortfarande ett barn och Clothar omedelbart didnot gifta sig med henne , utan föredrar att ha henne som fötts upp och educatedto hans smak . Hans första hustru Ingund hade skjutits åt sidan i the520 -talet, men inte glömt . Hon befann sig i de kungliga sängen igen genom themid - 530s , Om det nu hon någonsin helt lämnade det. Genom att 537 hon wasreplaced av sin egen syster Arnegund som Ingund hade frågat Clothar tofind en värdig make för hennes syster och med fulländad ironi han hadreplied att han kunde tänka på något en värdigare än han själv. Before540 han hade ännu en älskarinna , Chunsina och vid någon stageconsummated hans äktenskap med Radegund . Om det verkar som Clotharwas wiling bort hans senare år i passion snarare än politik , är theillusion skingras av hans sista äktenskap . I 555 han fick abrief union med Waldrada , en Lombard prinsessa, men även änka ofhis austrasiske BRONS SONSON Theudebald . Desire för arvtagarna determinedsome av Clothar s fackföreningar . Vad gäller de övriga , togs hans fruar starta och gallrat ut som politiska förändringar krävde snarare än som passionsprevailed . "

-------------------- http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Chlothar_I

Chlothar I[1] (c. 497 – 29 November 561), called the Old (le Vieux), King of the Franks, was one of the four sons of Clovis. He was born circa 497, in Soissons (now in Aisne département, Picardie, France).

-------------------- Birth: abt 0497 Rheims, Marne, Champagne-Ardenne, France

Death: 10 Nov 0561 Braines, Loire-Atlantique, France

Burial: 23 Nov 0561 St Medard's Church, Soissons, France

view all 51

Chlothar I the Old, King of the Franks's Timeline

497
497
Rheims Marne Loire-Alantique France
501
501
Soissons, (Present département de l'Aisne), Neustria (Present région Picardie), Frankish Kingdom (Present France)
511
511
- 558
Age 10
513
513
Age 12
France
514
514
Age 13
King of, Picardy, flanders, Soissons
514
Age 13
King of, Picardy, flanders, Soissons
514
Age 13
King of, Picardy, flanders, Soissons
517
517
Age 16
Paris, (Present Region Seine), Neustria (within present France), Frankish Empire
520
September 21, 520
Age 19
520
Age 19
Paris, , France