Col. Myles (Miles) Cary

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Miles Cary, Col.

Also Known As: "Myles Cary", "Myles Carey", "Miles Carey"
Birthdate:
Birthplace: Bristol, Gloucestershire, England
Death: Died in Warwick, Virginia
Cause of death: Killed in engagement in Hampton Roads from wounds received in the attack by the Dutch fleet upon Old Point Comfort
Place of Burial: Warwick County, now, Westmoreland, Virginia, United States
Immediate Family:

Son of John Cary Carey, Sr and Alice Cary Hobson
Husband of Anne Cary Taylor
Father of Maj Thomas Cary; Anne Cary; Henry Cary; Elizabeth Wills Cary; Bridget Bassett Cary and 5 others
Brother of Henry Cary; Matthew Cary; Richard cary; Alice Payne Hayman Cary; Honor Cary and 4 others

Managed by: Private User
Last Updated:

About Col. Myles (Miles) Cary

http://cynthiaswope.com/withinthevines/CaryFamily/TitlePage.htm

Our American Cary generational and historical study begins with the immigrant Miles CARY [AKA Hon Miles Cary, Miles Cary, Esq, Col. Miles Cary, and sometimes found as Myles Cary] of whom first record in America is found in Warwick county, Va in 1645. He was a gentleman of wealth and influence in early Virginia, Member House of Burgesses, and he settled, met his wife Anne TAYLOR, and lived in Warwick County, Va. His home involved both Magpie Swamps and Windmill Point-both of which were given to him by his father in law Thomas Taylor, and both of which remain important to direct Cary descendants for 8 generations. Miles died in 1667 at Hampton Roads [now the greater Newport News area] at the hands of the Dutch during the final throws of the second and last Dutch Anglo War; his wife survived him by at least 15 years. Miles Cary's tomb in Virginia clearly identified him and his parents, and it included upon it the coat of arms of the Devonshire, England Carys although he himself was from Bristol, England.

 See - Colonial Families of the United States of America Vol 1 p 81
   Miles Cary emigrated to England about 1645. He appears in records first on the bench of the Warwick County Court in 1652. He was a
   merchant and owned and operated a mill. Miles died from wounds received while defending Fort Comfort from a raid by the Dutch Navy.
   On 7 Feb 1645, Peter Wraxall, mariner, of Bristol, England, gave the following testimony: "He is of the company of the David [a ship] of Bristol, 200 tons, John Elson, master. On their last voyage to Virginia, there was a bill made by Miles Cary, a Bristol man, at Elizabeth City in Virginia, for delivery of 250 lbs of Virginia tobacco leaf to John Jones in Virginia on 10 November last; the tobacco was not delivered." This information appears in the Deposition Books of Bristol, 1643-1647, Abstracted by the Virginia COlonial Records Project Survey Report No. B. 1, The Virginia Library.
   This information establishes that Miles Cary (I) of Virginia was from Bristol, England and was in Virginia by 1645. Several sources state that he emigrated to Virginia in 1640. See, e.g., DuBellet, Some Prominent Virginia Families, Vol II (1907) and Kennedy, Seldens of Virginia and Allied Families. I have not been able to confirm any earlier date than 1645 by reference to primary sources.
   For a detailed study of the Cary family's English origins see the notes in Henry F. Waters' work, Genealogical Gleanings in England (1901). Waters is an extremely reputable genealogist who worked in England with English primary sources.
   There are numerous references to Miles Cary (I) in the records of the Virginia Colony after 1645. Miles Cary (I) had a son Miles Cary (II) as evidenced by a deed on 20 Nov 1862 conveying 1590 acres in Warwick County, Virginia to "Mr. Miles Cary now in possession of his mother Mrs. Anne Cary," which land had been previously sold "to Col. Miles Cary, decd, who by his will devised same to his son Miles Cary the grantee." This conveyance is one of many reprinted in The Edward Pleasant Valentine Papers, published by the Valentine Museam in Richmond. Miles Cary (I) served as Escheator General of Virginia in 1666 and had the style of Colonel and Councellor of state in 1655. See Stanard, The Colonial Virginia Register (1902) and Hening's.
   Miles Cary (II) appears in numerous Virginia records beginning in 1682 and continueing until 1702. He is known to be deceased by 17 May 1716 when his widow, Mary of Warwick County is shown as prosecuting a suit at court. Neal, Elizabeth City County Virginia Deeds, Wills and Court Orders, 1715-1721.
   He immigrated to Virginia between 1640 and 1645. He received a grant of 3,000 acres in Westmoreland Co. in 1654. Was Mayor in 1654, Lieutenant Colonel in 1657, Colonel and County Lieutenant 1659-67, Burgess 1659- 63, Escheator General of Virginia 1665, Collector of Tobacco Duties of the Lower James River and member of the King's Council 1663-67. Maintained a water-mill and mercantile business which were mentioned in his will. Presumed to have died of wounds received when the Dutch navy invaded Hampton Roads and attacked Old Point Comfort. His tomb at Windmill Point is no longer visible, but the slab is extant.
   Following is the will of the immigrant Mylles Cary, as transcribed by Guilford D. Eggleston from Warwick Co. records in 1851 and reported by Fairfax Harrison in his book The Virginia Carys; An Essay in Genealogy (New York: The Divinne Press, 1919), pp. 164-168. It was dated 9 June 1667 and proved 21 June 1667 in Warwick Co.,
   Virginia (Will Book A, 448).
   I, MYLLES CARY of Warwick County, in Virginia, being of sound and perfect memory (praysed bee God), doe make and ordain this my last will and testament, hereby renouncing all other will or testaments formerly by me made whatsoever. Imp s: I give and bequeath my soul into the hands of Almighty God, hoping through the meritte of Jesus Christ to have free remission of all my sinns; and my body to the earth with Xtian buriall to be decently interred by my Loving Wife; and for that temporall estate which it hath pleased God to endow mee withall, I give and bequeath in manner and form following:--
   I doe give and bequeath unto my sonn THOMAS CARY all that tract or parcell of land which I now reside upon, containing by the old pattent, taken by my father-in-law, Thomas Taylor, deceased, three hundred and fifty acres of land, but since surveighed and received by me 688 acres more or less, with all that tract or parcell of land, commonly knowne and called by the name of the "Magpy Swampe," according to a destrict pattent thereof taken by my father-in-law, Thomas Taylor, deceased, containing by said pattent two hundred and fifty acres of land, which quantity of two hundred and fifty acres of land is since joyned by mee unto another parcell of land bought by mee of Zacheriah Cripps, the son of Zacheriah Cripps, deceased; yet notwithstanding my will is that the said two hundred and fifty acres, more commonly knowne by the name of the "Magpy Swampe," according to the bounds of the first pattent taken up as aforesaid, be set apart and divided from the parcel of land which I bought of Zacheriah Cripps, and be and remain with the tract or parcell of land I now live upon with all the houses, aedifices, buildings, gardens, orchards, pastures, woods and underwoods, and trees growing and to bee growing, with all the rents and profits of all leases and conveighances made out of the several tracts of land with all the hereditaments and appurtenances to any or either of the aforesaid parcells of land belonging or any way thereto appertaining, unto him the said THOMAS CARY and the heyres of his body to [be] lawfully begotten.
   I doe also give and bequeath unto my sonn HENRY CARY and unto my sonn MYLLES CARY all that tract or parcell of land which I bought of Zacheriah Cripps, being according to the Ancient Pattent taken out by Zacheriah Cripps, one thousand and fifty acres, with all that tract or parcell of land taken up by mee, adjoining to that taken out of Zacheriah Cripps, but all taken into one pattent (always excepting and reserving that two hundred and fifty acres commonly knowne and called by the name of the "Magpy Swampe" to the use and purpose before expressed) which said tract of land according to the last surveigh and pattent (the said "Magpy Swampe" excepted) I give unto my sonn HENRY CARY and unto my sonn MYLLES, to be divided between them, by the runne of water which is by the great poplar in Andrew Farmers field, being the first course marked tree of the said dividend which runne of water upwards as the main runne goeth up to the dams or ponds, and so to my outward line, which runne and dams or ponds my will is shall be the dividing line between them. That is to say, I give and bequeath unto my sonn HENRY CARY all that tract or parcell of land, bee it more or less of this side of the ponds or dams, adjoining upon the lands of Capt. Thomas Bernard, deceased, with the plantation commonly knowne and called by the name of the "Forest," with all the houses, aedifices, buildings, gardens, orchards, pastures, woods, underwoods and trees growing and to be growing, with all the rents and profits of all leases and conveighances made out of the said tract or dividend of land, with all the hereditaments and appurtenances to the said parcell of land any way appertaining, unto him the said HENRY CARY and to the heyers of his body lawfully to bee begotten. And I give and bequeath unto my sonne MYLLES CARY all that tract or parcell of land, bee it more or less, of the other side of the runnes or dams soe farr as my outward line extendeth, and along the said line, adjoyning upon the lands of one Calvert, and adjoyning upon the lands of John Lewis, and soe along the outward line to the heade of Potash Creek, and adjoining upon the lands of Capt: Samuell Stephens (excepting and reserving the two hundred and fifty acres of land, commonly knowne by the name of the "Magpy Swampe," for the use and purpose afore expressed) with all the woods, underwoods, trees growing and to bee growing, with all the hereditaments and appurtenances to the said tract or parcell of land (bee it more or less) belonging or in any way thereto appertaining, unto him the said MYLLES CARY, and to the heyers of his body lawfully to bee begotten.
   I doe give and bequeath unto my sonne WILLIAM CARY all that tract or parcell of land which lyeth up Warwick River formerly belonging unto Capt: Thomas Flint, and since purchased by mee, with all the houses, aedifices, buildings, gardens, orchards, pastures, woods and underwoods, trees growing and to bee growing, with all the rents and profits of all leases or conveighances, made out of the said tract of lands, with all the hereditaments and appurtenances to the said tract or parcell thereunto belonging or in any way appertaining, unto him the said WILLIAM CARY, and the heyers of his body to bee lawfully begotten.
   I give unto ROGER DANIELL that parcell or tract of land that Goodman Heskins now lives on, and the land called "Gaole," with all the rents and profits, hereditaments and appurtenances whatsoever, whether by lease or otherwise, to all intents and purposes whatsoever in full and ample manner as I myself now enjoy it, may, might, or ever may enjoy it.
   My desire is that Mr. William Beaty may have the education and bringing up of my sonne WILLIAM, and Mr. Hurle of my son MYLLES in England.
   My will is that my two houses in England, the one in Baldwin Street, the other in St. Nicholas Street, bee sold by Mr. Hurle and Mr. Richard Deans, and the money in Mr. Hurle hands already and the money of the said two houses soe sold to be equally divided between my three daughters, ANNE, BRIDGETT and ELIZABETH, and to continue in Mr. Hurle his hands untill their dayes of marriage; and my will is that my tobacco that goes for England this year, and the bills of Exchange, I now send home, bee also in Mr. Hurle hands towards my sonne MYLLES his education. My Plate and Rings to be equally divided between my children.
   The goods in the store to be sold by my Executors, and also the houseing at Towne (which I bought of Mr. Randolph and have paid him for, as by his receipt it may appear) to be sold by my Executors, and the remainder thereof, after my debts are paid, to bee equally divided amongst my children.
   I give unto ANNE CARY a negro girl called Nan, and one boy called Harry. I give unto BRIDGETT CARY one negro girl called Bridgett.
   To ELIZABETH CARY one negro girl called Sarah. The rest of my negroes to be equally divided between my four sonns THOMAS, HENRY, MYLLES and WILLIAM; and what English servants I have I give unto my four sonns THOMAS, HENRY, MYLLES and WILLIAM.
   My will is further that my stock of sheep be equally divided between my children; as also my stock of cattle be equally divided between my said children: my horses and mares--my will is that they be equally divided between my children. My grey mare [name illegible] I give and bequeath unto Roger Daniell.
   As for my Tobacco [debts] my will is they bee equally divided between my children; as also household Stuffs.
   And my will further is that (whereas I have given and bequeathed unto my four sonnes, THOMAS, HENRY, MYLLES and WILLIAM, several tracts and parcells of land, as, by foregoing clause in this Will, may and doth appear) if any of the said Thomas, Henry, Mylles and William Cary shall happen to depart this natural life without heyers of his body lawfully begotten, that then his land goe and pass unto the next heire or brother, viz: if Thomas Cary shall happen to dy without issue of his body lawfully begotten, then his land to descend to the next brother Henry; and if Henry dy without issue of his body lawfully begotten, his land to descend to Mylles Cary; and if Mylles Cary dy without issue of his body lawfully begotten, his land to descend to William Cary; and if William Cary dy without issue of his body lawfully begotten, then his lands, and the other tracts soe falling to him, pass and descend to my three daughters, Anne, Bridgett & Elizabeth.
   My will is that my debts be equally paid by my Executors, hereafter to be named, before any division or diminution of my Estate, and that no division be made but by the joynt consent of my Executors hereafter to be named, provided that my Executors be all alive at the time of division, and [in] the Colony of Virginia--that is to say, so many of Executors as are to be had [but] that no division be made untill my eldest sonne come of age.
   My will further is that when division is made, that my Loving friend Mr. William Beaty have and keep in his possession my sonne William's Estate, and keep it for my said sonne William's use, untill he shall accomplish the age of one and twenty. My said sonne's maintenance for his education only to be deducted. And that the said Mr. William Beaty have my sonne Mylles Cary's part also of my Estate to possess and keep for the said Mylles Cary his use and behoof untill the said Mylles Cary shall accomplish the age of one and twenty. My will is that Henry Cary, when the Estate is divided, have his part and share of my Estate in his own possession, as also his land, formerly bequeathed to him in his own possession notwithstanding he bee not of full age.
   As for my three daughters' parts or shares of my Estate (when divided) my will is, that those guardians (whom my said daughters shall then choose) with the consent of Executors, shall take it into their care and custody for the proper and sole use of my said daughters until they or any of them shall accomplish the age of one and twenty, or dayes of marriage (their maintenance only excepted); that is each or any one of the said daughters to have her part or share as she accomplish the age of one and twenty or marryeth.
   I do hereby nominate and appoint my four sonnes THOMAS, HENRY, MYLLES and WILLIAM CARY, and my three daughters, ANNE, BRIDGETT and ELIZABETH CARY my joynt Executors and Executrices of this my last Will and Testament, with strict charge that they agree and act with mutual love and amity.
   I doe also hereby nominate and appoint my well-beloved friends Mr. Thomas Ludwell, Col_o: Nath: Bacon, Major Edward Grifith and Mr. William Beaty my Executors of this my last Will and Testament, earnestly requesting them to take the said charge and care upon them. And in token of my love to my said Executors I doe hereby give and bequeath to each of the five pounds sterling.
   IN WITNESS whereof I have set my hand and seal to each syde and part of this my last Will and Testament, this ninth day of June, 1667.
   MYLLES CARY [His seal]
   Signed and Sealed in the presence of us:
   FRANCIS HADDEN
   THOMAS J. KEN
   WILLIAM X TANDY.
   his marke
   Probat. in Curia XXI die Junij 1667
   Pr. Testament: THOMAS J. KEN & GULIELMUS TANDY
   Test: WM. WOYDEN, Sub. Cler.
   Recordat: XXIX die Junij 1667
   WM. WOYDEN, Sub. Cler."

--------------------

Miles Cary emigrated to Virginia about 1645. He appears in records first on the bench of the Warwick County Court in 1652. He was a merchant and owned and operated a mill. Miles died in 1667 from wounds received while defending Fort Comfort from a raid by the Dutch Navy.

He settled in Warwick County, Va., where he married Anne, daughter of Thomas Taylor, one of the earliest settlers. He lived on an estate known as "Magpy Swamps," obtained from his father-in-law, Capt. Taylor, which he devised to his son, Thomas Cary. He mentioned in his will two houses in England, presumably in Bristol, one in Baldwin Street the other in St. Nicholas Street-to be sold for the benefit of his daughters. He owned 2,000 acres of land, well stocked, and numerous slaves, a mill and a store. His children were born between 1645 and 1666."

In September 1851, Mr. Eggleston found on a farm called "Bensalls," near Warwick Inn, then occupied by Mr. Lucas, a dilapidated tombstone in five fragments. Putting the pieces together, it was found to bear a coat-of-arms and the following inscription:

"Here lyeth ye body of Miles Cary, Esq., Only son of John Cary and Alice his wife, Daughter of Henry Hobson of ye city of Bristol. Alderman, he was born in ye city and departed this life ye 10th day of June, 1667, about the forty-seventh year of his age, leaving four sons and three daughters (viz:) Thomas, Ann, Henry, Bridget, Elizabeth, Miles and William." -------------------- Miles Cary 89 SmartMatches Birth: 30 JAN 1620 in Bristol, England Death: 10 JUN 1667 in Old Point, Virginia Sex: M Father: John Richard Cary b. 10 APR 1583 in Bristol, Gloucestershire, England Mother: Alice Hobson b. 1590 in Bristol, Gloucestershire, England

Aliases: Colonel 1

Christening: 29 JAN 1620/21 in All Saints, Bristol, Gloucester, England Baptism: 30 JAN 1622 in All Saint's Occupation: 1652 in Justice, 1654 Mayor Military: 1657 in Lt. Col Occupation: BET 1659 AND 1663 in Burgess Military: BET 1659 AND 1667 in Colonel and County Lt. Occupation: 1663 in Council member Burial: Cary's Quarters, Warwick Co., VA Aka (Facts Pg): Myles Died: killed in action with the Dutch while defending the fort at Point Comfort (now Ft. Monroe) Will proved: 21 JAN 1667


Spouses & Children Anne Taylor (Wife) b. 1 MAR 1620 in Warwickshire, , VA Marriage: ABT 1645 in Warwick, Virginia Children: Thomas Cary b. 1646 in Windmill Point, Warwick, VA Anne Cary b. 1649 in Warwick, Virginia Henry Sr. Cary b. 1650 in The Forest, Warwick, VA Bridget Cary b. 1652 in Warwick, Virginia Elizabeth Cary b. 1653 in Warwick, Virginia Miles II Cary b. 1655 in *Warwick, Virginia William Cary b. 1657 in Warwick, Virginia

He was justice of Warwick County, Virginia, 1652; and member of council, 1665. He was killed in an engagement in Hampton Roads. He and his wife, Anne Taylor, inherited the original holding of Thomas Taylor and acquired much more land, ranking among the top 20 families in taxable property in Virginia. He died from wounds received in the attack by the Dutch fleet upon Old Point Comfort. He came to Virginia about 1645. At his death he had four separate plantations,"Windmill Point," "The Forest," "Magpie Swamp," and the former Thomas Flint property which "lyeth up Warwick River." He also owned a 3000 acre patent in the Northern Neck and two houses in Bristol, in Ballance Street and St. Nicholas Street, which he directed in his will be sold for the benefit of his three daughters.


Sources: 1.Title: R. Bolling Batte Papers, LVA Digital Library

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Col. Myles (Miles) Cary's Timeline

1622
January 30, 1622
Bristol, Gloucestershire, England
1645
1645
Age 22
Warwick, Virginia, United States
1647
1647
Age 24
Windmill Point, Warwick, Virginia
1649
1649
Age 26
Windmill Point, Warwick, Virginia, United States
1650
1650
Age 27
1650
Age 27
Warwick, Warwick, Virginia, United States
1652
1652
Age 29
Warwick, Warwick, Virginia, United States
1655
October 27, 1655
Age 33
Newport News, Virginia, United States
1657
1657
Age 34
Skiffs Creek, Warwick, Virginia, USA
1667
June 10, 1667
Age 45
Warwick, Virginia