Enrique I el Gordo, rey de Navarra

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Henri I 'el Gordo' de Champagne, roi de Navarre

Also Known As: "Henry the Fat", "Henri I Count of Champagne and of Brie", "King Henry I of Navarre", "le Gros", "The Fat", "Henry I the Fat (French: Henri le Gros", "Spanish: Enrique el Gordo)"
Birthdate:
Death: Died in Pamplona, Navarre, Navarre, Spain
Place of Burial: Pamplona, Navarre, Navarre, Spain
Immediate Family:

Son of Teobaldo I el Cantautor, rey de Navarra and Marguerite de Bourbon, reina de Navarra
Husband of Blanche de Navarre et d'Artois
Father of Thibaut (Teobaldo) Prince Of Navarre; Juana I, reina de Navarra and Princess Jeanne of n Plantagenet
Brother of Eleonora de Champaña; Teobaldo II el Joven, rey de Navarra; Margareta de Champaña, infanta de Navarra; Pedro de Navarra, señor de Muruzábal and Beatriz de Champaña, infanta de Navarra
Half brother of Inés de Navarra; Elida de Navarra; Abd. Guillermo de Navarra; Berenguela de Navarra, priora de Sant Pere de Ribes and Blanca de Champaña, infanta de Navarra

Occupation: Roi de Navarre, Count of Champagne and Brie (as Henry III) and King of Navarre, Rey de Navarre, Count of Champagne and Brie (as Henry III), Kung i Navarra 1270-74, greve i Champagne och Brie, King
Managed by: Private User
Last Updated:

About Enrique I el Gordo, rey de Navarra

King Henri - succeeded his eldest brother Theobald III. as king of Navarre and count of Champagne in December 1270. His proclamation at Pamplona, however, did not take place till March of the following year, and his coronatioi~ was delayed until May 1273. After a brief reign, characterized, it is said, by dignity and talent, he died in July 1274, suffocated, according to the generally received accounts, by his own fat. In him the male line of the counts of Champagne and kings of Navarre, became extinct.

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Henry I the Fat (French: Henri le Gros, Spanish: Enrique el Gordo) (c. 1244 – 22 July 1274) was the Count of Champagne and Brie (as Henry III) and King of Navarre from 1270. After a brief reign, characterised, it is said, by dignity and talent, he died in July 1274, suffocated, according to the generally received accounts, by his own fat.

Henry was the youngest son of Theobald I of Navarre and Margaret of Bourbon. In 1269 Henry had married Blanche of Artois, daughter of Robert I of Artois and niece of Louis IX of France.

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Enrique I, el Gordo (n. 1238 - m. 22 de julio de 1274), rey de Navarra, conde de Champaña y Brie (como Enrique III) (1270-1274).

Hijo de Teobaldo I y hermano de Teobaldo II, se hace cargo del reino a la muerte de su hermano al morir éste sin sucesión.

Tras jurar los Fueros de Navarra se desplazó a Francia para prestar homenaje feudal a Felipe el Atrevido por sus dominios de Champaña.

Murió a los tres años de su reinado debido a la obesidad, lo que no permite formarnos una idea acertada de la personalidad de este monarca. Parece que mostró interés por el pueblo llano de Navarra. Permitió que la Navarrería se desvinculase de la unión de los burgos de San Cernin y San Nicolás, acordada en 1266 (ver Los burgos de Pamplona). Concedió privilegios a pueblos y ciudades como Estella, Los Arcos y Viana y mantuvo relaciones cordiales con la nobleza, con la que negoció compraventas y cesiones de patrimonio.

Al morir dejó una hija de un año de edad, Juana, pues su primogénito, Teobaldo, había muerto al caer desde una almena del castillo de Estella.

Intentó mantener la paz a toda costa, lo que le llevó a desechar las pretensiones del infante de Castilla, Felipe, sublevado contra Alfonso X el Sabio.

thePeerage.com:

Enrique I (III), Rey de Navarre1

d. 1274

    Enrique I (III), Rey de Navarre was the son of Thibaut I (IV), Rey de Navarre and Marguerite de Bourbon.2 

He married Blanche d'Artois, daughter of Robert I de France, Comte d'Artois and Matilde de Brabant, in 1269.1

He died in 1274.1 He was also reported to have died on 22 July 1276.

    

Enrique I (III), Rey de Navarre also went by the nick-name of Henri 'le Gros' (or in English, 'the Fat').2 He succeeded to the title of Comte Henri III de Champagne in 1270.1,2

He gained the title of Roi Enrique I de Navarre in 1270.1

Children of Enrique I (III), Rey de Navarre and Blanche d'Artois

   * Thibaut de Navarre d. 12731
   * Jeanne I, Reina de Navarre+ b. c 1271, d. 2 Apr 13051

Citations

  1. [S11] Alison Weir, Britain's Royal Family: A Complete Genealogy (London, U.K.: The Bodley Head, 1999), page 75. Hereinafter cited as Britain's Royal Family.
  2. [S38] John Morby, Dynasties of the World: a chronological and genealogical handbook (Oxford, Oxfordshire, U.K.: Oxford University Press, 1989), page 85. Hereinafter cited as Dynasties of the World.

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http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Henry_I_of_Navarre

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Henry I the Fat (French: Henri le Gros, Spanish: Enrique el Gordo) (c.1244–1274) was the count of Champagne and Brie (as Henry III) and king of Navarre from 1270 until his death in 1274.

He was the youngest son of Theobald I and Margaret of Bourbon. In December 1270, Henry succeeded his eldest brother Theobald II as King of Navarre and Count of Champagne.

His proclamation at Pamplona, however, did not take place till March of the following year, and his coronation was delayed until May 1273. After a brief reign, characterized, it is said, by dignity and talent, he died in July 1274, suffocated, according to the generally received accounts, by his own fat.

After his death with no male heir, the male line of the counts of Champagne and kings of Navarre became extinct.

In 1269 Henry married Blanche of Artois, daughter of Robert I of Artois, Count of Artois, and niece of King Louis IX. He was succeeded by his only legitimate child, Joan I of Navarre; her 1284 marriage to Philip IV (who became King of France in the same year) united the crown of Navarre to that of France, with Champagne becoming part of the French royal domain.

In the Divine Comedy, Dante sees Henry's spirit outside the gates of Purgatory, where he is grouped with a number of other European monarchs of the 13th century. Henry is not named directly, but is referred to as "the kindly-faced" and "the father in law of the Pest of France".

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Henry I the Fat (French: Henri le Gros, Spanish: Enrique el Gordo) (c. 1244 – 22 July 1274) was the Count of Champagne and Brie (as Henry III) and King of Navarre from 1270. After a brief reign, characterised, it is said, by dignity and talent, he died in July 1274, suffocated, according to the generally received accounts, by his own fat.

Henry was the youngest son of Theobald I of Navarre and Margaret of Bourbon. During the reign of his older brother Theobald II he held the regency during many of Theobald's numerous absences and was declared heir by his childless brother, whom he succeeded in December 1270. His proclamation at Pamplona, however, did not take place till March of the following year (1271), and his coronation was delayed until May 1273. His first act was the swear to uphold the Fueros of Navarre and then go to perform homage to Philip III of France for Champagne.

In 1269 Henry had married Blanche of Artois, daughter of Robert I of Artois and niece of Louis IX of France. He was thus in the "Angevin" circle in international politics. He came to the throne at the height of an economic boom in Navarre that was not happening elsewhere in Spain at as great a rate. But by the Treaty of Paris (1259), the English had been ceded rights in Gascony that effectively cut off Navarrese access to the ocean (since France, Navarre's ally, was at odds with England).

Henry allowed the Pamplonese burg of Navarrería to disentangle itself from the union of San Cernin and San Nicolás, effected in 1266. He also granted privileges to the towns of Estella, Arcos, and Viana, fostering urban growth. His relations with the nobility were, on the whole, friendly, though he was prepared to maintain the peace of his realm at nearly any cost.

Henry initially sought to recover territory lost to Castile by assisting the revolt of Philip, brother of Alfonso X of Castile, in 1270, but eventually declined, preferring to establish an alliance with Castile through the marriage of his son Theobald to a daughter of Alfonso X. This failed with the death of the young Theobald in after he fell from a battlement at the castle of Estella in 1273.

Henry did not long outlive his son. He died with no male heir; the male line of the house of Champagne became extinct. He was thus succeeded by his only legitimate child, a one-year-old daughter named Joan, under the regency of her mother Blanche. Joan's 1284 marriage to Philip the Fair, the future King of France, in the same year united the crown of Navarre to that of France and saw Champagne devolve to the French royal domain.

In the Divine Comedy, Dante Alighieri, a younger contemporary, sees Henry's spirit outside the gates of Purgatory, where he is grouped with a number of other European monarchs of the 13th century. Henry is not named directly, but is referred to as "the kindly-faced" and "the father-in-law of the Pest of France".

[edit] References

Suárez Fernández, Luis. Historia de España: Edad Media. Madrid: Editorial Gredos, 1970.

Foundation for Medieval Genealogy: Henry I, King of Navarre

Preceded by

Theobald II/V King of Navarre

1270 – 1274 Succeeded by

Joan I

Count of Champagne

1270 – 1274

Retrieved from "http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Henry_I_of_Navarre"

Categories: 1244 births | 1274 deaths | Navarrese monarchs | Counts of Champagne

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Henry I the Fat (French: Henri le Gros, Spanish: Enrique el Gordo) (c. 1244 – 22 July 1274) was the Count of Champagne and Brie (as Henry III) and King of Navarre from 1270. After a brief reign, characterised, it is said, by dignity and talent, he died in July 1274, suffocated, according to the generally received accounts, by his own fat.

Henry was the youngest son of Theobald I of Navarre and Margaret of Bourbon. During the reign of his older brother Theobald II he held the regency during many of Theobald's numerous absences and was declared heir by his childless brother, whom he succeeded in December 1270. His proclamation at Pamplona, however, did not take place till March of the following year (1271), and his coronation was delayed until May 1273. His first act was the swear to uphold the Fueros of Navarre and then go to perform homage to Philip III of France for Champagne.

In 1269 Henry had married Blanche of Artois, daughter of Robert I of Artois and niece of Louis IX of France. He was thus in the "Angevin" circle in international politics. He came to the throne at the height of an economic boom in Navarre that was not happening elsewhere in Spain at as great a rate. But by the Treaty of Paris (1259), the English had been ceded rights in Gascony that effectively cut off Navarrese access to the ocean (since France, Navarre's ally, was at odds with England).

Henry allowed the Pamplonese burg of Navarrería to disentangle itself from the union of San Cernin and San Nicolás, effected in 1266. He also granted privileges to the towns of Estella, Arcos, and Viana, fostering urban growth. His relations with the nobility were, on the whole, friendly, though he was prepared to maintain the peace of his realm at nearly any cost.

Henry initially sought to recover territory lost to Castile by assisting the revolt of Felipe, brother of Alfonso X of Castile, in 1270, but eventually declined, preferring to establish an alliance with Castile through the marriage of his son Theobald to a daughter of Alfonso X. This failed with the death of the young Theobald in after he fell from a battlement at the castle of Estella in 1273.

Henry did not long outlive his son. He died with no male heir; the male line of the house of Champagne became extinct. He was thus succeeded by his only legitimate child, a one-year-old daughter named Joan, under the regency of her mother Blanche. Joan's 1284 marriage to Philip the Fair, the future King of France, in the same year united the crown of Navarre to that of France and saw Champagne devolve to the French royal domain.

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Henry I of Navarre

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Henry I the Fat (French: Henri le Gros, Spanish: Enrique el Gordo) (c. 1244 – 22 July 1274) was the Count of Champagne and Brie (as Henry III) and King of Navarre from 1270. After a brief reign, characterised, it is said, by dignity and talent, he died in July 1274, suffocated, according to the generally received accounts, by his own fat.

Henry was the youngest son of Theobald I of Navarre and Margaret of Bourbon. During the reign of his older brother Theobald II he held the regency during many of Theobald's numerous absences and was declared heir by his childless brother, whom he succeeded in December 1270. His proclamation at Pamplona, however, did not take place till March of the following year (1271), and his coronation was delayed until May 1273. His first act was the swear to uphold the Fueros of Navarre and then go to perform homage to Philip III of France for Champagne.

In 1269 Henry had married Blanche of Artois, daughter of Robert I of Artois and niece of Louis IX of France. He was thus in the "Angevin" circle in international politics. He came to the throne at the height of an economic boom in Navarre that was not happening elsewhere in Spain at as great a rate. But by the Treaty of Paris (1259), the English had been ceded rights in Gascony that effectively cut off Navarrese access to the ocean (since France, Navarre's ally, was at odds with England).

Henry allowed the Pamplonese burg of Navarrería to disentangle itself from the union of San Cernin and San Nicolás, effected in 1266. He also granted privileges to the towns of Estella, Arcos, and Viana, fostering urban growth. His relations with the nobility were, on the whole, friendly, though he was prepared to maintain the peace of his realm at nearly any cost.

Henry initially sought to recover territory lost to Castile by assisting the revolt of Felipe, brother of Alfonso X of Castile, in 1270, but eventually declined, preferring to establish an alliance with Castile through the marriage of his son Theobald to a daughter of Alfonso X. This failed with the death of the young Theobald in after he fell from a battlement at the castle of Estella in 1273.

Henry did not long outlive his son. He died with no male heir; the male line of the house of Champagne became extinct. He was thus succeeded by his only legitimate child, a one-year-old daughter named Joan, under the regency of her mother Blanche. Joan's 1284 marriage to Philip the Fair, the future King of France, in the same year united the crown of Navarre to that of France and saw Champagne devolve to the French royal domain.

In the Divine Comedy, Dante Alighieri, a younger contemporary, sees Henry's spirit outside the gates of Purgatory, where he is grouped with a number of other European monarchs of the 13th century. Henry is not named directly, but is referred to as "the kindly-faced" and "the father-in-law of the Pest of France".

References

Suárez Fernández, Luis. Historia de España: Edad Media. Madrid: Editorial Gredos, 1970.

Foundation for Medieval Genealogy: Henry I, King of Navarre

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BIOGRAPHY: b. c. 1210

d. July 22, 1274, Pamplona, Navarre

byname HENRY THE FAT, Spanish ENRIQUE EL GORDO, French HENRI LE GROS, king of Navarre (1270-74) and count (as Henry III) of Champagne. Henry was the youngest son of Theobald I of Navarre by Margaret of Foix. He succeeded his eldest brother, Theobald II (Thibaut V), in both kingdom and countship in December 1270. By his marriage (1269) to Blanche, daughter of Robert I of Artois and niece of Louis IX of France, he had one daughter, Joan, whom, by the Convention of Bonlieu (Nov. 30, 1273), he promised to one of the two sons of Edward I of England, Henry and Alfonso. This would have led to a union of his dominions with English Gascony, but it came to nothing. King Henry died in 1274; both the English princes died in the next decade, and Joan was married in 1284 to the future Philip IV of France.

Copyright © 1994-2001 Encyclopædia Britannica, Inc.

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BIOGRAPHY: b. c. 1244

d. July 22, 1274, Pamplona, Navarre

byname HENRY THE FAT, Spanish ENRIQUE EL GORDO, French HENRI LE GROS, king of Navarre (1270-74) and count (as Henry III) of Champagne. Henry was the youngest son of Theobald I of Navarre by Margaret of Foix. He succeeded his eldest brother, Theobald II (Thibaut V), in both kingdom and countship in December 1270. By his marriage (1269) to Blanche, daughter of Robert I of Artois and niece of Louis IX of France, he had one daughter, Joan, whom, by the Convention of Bonlieu (Nov. 30, 1273), he promised to one of the two sons of Edward I of England, Henry and Alfonso. This would have led to a union of his dominions with English Gascony, but it came to nothing. King Henry died in 1274; both the English princes died in the next decade, and Joan was married in 1284 to the future Philip IV of France.

Copyright © 1994-2001 Encyclopædia Britannica, Inc.

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http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Henry_I_of_Navarre

Henry I of Navarre

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Jump to: navigation, search

Henry I the Fat (French: Henri le Gros, Spanish: Enrique el Gordo) (c. 1244 – 22 July 1274) was the Count of Champagne and Brie (as Henry III) and King of Navarre from 1270. After a brief reign, characterised, it is said, by dignity and talent, he died in July 1274, suffocated, according to the generally received accounts, by his own fat.

Henry was the youngest son of Theobald I of Navarre and Margaret of Bourbon. During the reign of his older brother Theobald II he held the regency during many of Theobald's numerous absences and was declared heir by his childless brother, whom he succeeded in December 1270. His proclamation at Pamplona, however, did not take place till March of the following year (1271), and his coronation was delayed until May 1273. His first act was the swear to uphold the Fueros of Navarre and then go to perform homage to Philip III of France for Champagne.

In 1269 Henry had married Blanche of Artois, daughter of Robert I of Artois and niece of Louis IX of France. He was thus in the "Angevin" circle in international politics. He came to the throne at the height of an economic boom in Navarre that was not happening elsewhere in Spain at as great a rate. But by the Treaty of Paris (1259), the English had been ceded rights in Gascony that effectively cut off Navarrese access to the ocean (since France, Navarre's ally, was at odds with England).

Henry allowed the Pamplonese burg of Navarrería to disentangle itself from the union of San Cernin and San Nicolás, effected in 1266. He also granted privileges to the towns of Estella, Arcos, and Viana, fostering urban growth. His relations with the nobility were, on the whole, friendly, though he was prepared to maintain the peace of his realm at nearly any cost.

Henry initially sought to recover territory lost to Castile by assisting the revolt of Philip, brother of Alfonso X of Castile, in 1270, but eventually declined, preferring to establish an alliance with Castile through the marriage of his son Theobald to a daughter of Alfonso X. This failed with the death of the young Theobald in after he fell from a battlement at the castle of Estella in 1273.

Henry did not long outlive his son. He died with no male heir; the male line of the house of Champagne became extinct. He was thus succeeded by his only legitimate child, a one-year-old daughter named Joan, under the regency of her mother Blanche. Joan's 1284 marriage to Philip the Fair, the future King of France, in the same year united the crown of Navarre to that of France and saw Champagne devolve to the French royal domain.

In the Divine Comedy, Dante Alighieri, a younger contemporary, sees Henry's spirit outside the gates of Purgatory, where he is grouped with a number of other European monarchs of the 13th century. Henry is not named directly, but is referred to as "the kindly-faced" and "the father-in-law of the Pest of France".

[edit] References

   * Suárez Fernández, Luis. Historia de España: Edad Media. Madrid: Editorial Gredos, 1970.
   * Foundation for Medieval Genealogy: Henry I, King of Navarre

Preceded by

Theobald II/V King of Navarre

1270 – 1274 Succeeded by

Joan I

Count of Champagne

1270 – 1274

This page was last modified on 31 March 2010 at 00:19.

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Sources:

The book, 'Kings & Queens of Great Britain'.

Funk & Wagnalls New Encyclopedia'

The book, 'Kings & Queens of Europe'.

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Henry I the Fat (French: Henri le Gros, Spanish: Enrique el Gordo) (c. 1244 – 22 July 1274) was the Count of Champagne and Brie (as Henry III) and King of Navarre from 1270. After a brief reign, characterised, it is said, by dignity and talent, he died in July 1274, suffocated, according to the generally received accounts, by his own fat.

Henry was the youngest son of Theobald I of Navarre and Margaret of Bourbon. During the reign of his older brother Theobald II he held the regency during many of Theobald's numerous absences and was declared heir by his childless brother, whom he succeeded in December 1270. His proclamation at Pamplona, however, did not take place till March of the following year (1271), and his coronation was delayed until May 1273. His first act was the swear to uphold the Fueros of Navarre and then go to perform homage to Philip III of France for Champagne.

In 1269 Henry had married Blanche of Artois, daughter of Robert I of Artois and niece of Louis IX of France. He was thus in the "Angevin" circle in international politics. He came to the throne at the height of an economic boom in Navarre that was not happening elsewhere in Spain at as great a rate. But by the Treaty of Paris (1259), the English had been ceded rights in Gascony that effectively cut off Navarrese access to the ocean (since France, Navarre's ally, was at odds with England).

Henry allowed the Pamplonese burg of Navarrería to disentangle itself from the union of San Cernin and San Nicolás, effected in 1266. He also granted privileges to the towns of Estella, Arcos, and Viana, fostering urban growth. His relations with the nobility were, on the whole, friendly, though he was prepared to maintain the peace of his realm at nearly any cost.

Henry initially sought to recover territory lost to Castile by assisting the revolt of Felipe, brother of Alfonso X of Castile, in 1270, but eventually declined, preferring to establish an alliance with Castile through the marriage of his son Theobald to a daughter of Alfonso X. This failed with the death of the young Theobald in after he fell from a battlement at the castle of Estella in 1273.

Henry did not long outlive his son. He died with no male heir; the male line of the house of Champagne became extinct. He was thus succeeded by his only legitimate child, a one-year-old daughter named Joan, under the regency of her mother Blanche. Joan's 1284 marriage to Philip the Fair, the future King of France, in the same year united the crown of Navarre to that of France and saw Champagne devolve to the French royal domain.

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Enrique I el Gordo, rey de Navarra's Timeline

1238
1238
1269
1269
Age 31
1270
1270
Age 32
Pampeluna, Navarra, Spain
1272
1272
Age 34
France
1273
January 14, 1273
Age 35
Bar-sur-Seine, Aube, Champagne-Ardenne, France
1274
July 22, 1274
Age 36
Pamplona, Navarre, Navarre, Spain
1940
June 22, 1940
Age 36
June 22, 1940
Age 36
June 22, 1940
Age 36
June 22, 1940
Age 36