Rabbi David ben Abraham Pipano

Is your surname Pipano?

Research the Pipano family

Rabbi David ben Abraham Pipano's Geni Profile

Records for David Pipano

882,986 Records

Share your family tree and photos with the people you know and love

  • Build your family tree online
  • Share photos and videos
  • Smart Matching™ technology
  • Free!

Share

David ben Abraham Pipano, Chief Rabbi of Bulgaria

Nicknames: "Rabbi David ben Abraham Pipano Av Beit Din Sofia"
Birthdate:
Death: (Date and location unknown)
Immediate Family:

Son of Abraham Ben Aharon Pipano and Buena Pipano
Husband of Suenia Pipano
Father of Dona Salmona; Meir and Albert Avraham
Brother of Aaron Shaul Pipano and Aaron Aharon Pipano

Managed by: Private User
Last Updated:

About David ben Abraham Pipano, Chief Rabbi of Bulgaria

Looks like saba Shaul a lot!

Fig 4. Rabbi ben Abraham David Pipano 1851 - 1925, formerly Chief Sofia Rabbi 1920 -1925 ( Salonica-1891-?) Author of Hagor ha-Efod (1925) and other books. …

Rabbi David Pipano

►1920- 1925 - Rab. David Pipano, formerly Sofia Rabbi ( Salonica- ??). 1925- 1945 - No Chief Rabbi. 1945- 1949 - Rab. Dr. Asher Hannanel .(Shumen 1895- Israel 1964)

[http://www.sephardicstudies.org/images/RAB-PINTO.jpg]

Fig 4. Rabbi ben Abraham David Pipano 1851 - 1925, formerly Chief Sofia Rabbi 1920 -1925 ( Salonica-1891-?) Author of Hagor ha-Efod (1925) and other books. He served as the head of the rabbinical court of Sofia.

More about Sephardim from Bulgaria Here<http://www.sephardicstudies.org/entrance.html#bulg>

Rabbis and Scholars of Bulgaria

Rabbi Isaac b. Moses of Beja (16th century), who lived in Nikopol after the Turko-Walachian war (1598), wrote the book Bayit Ne'eman (1621). Rabbi Isaiah Morenzi (d. after 1593), who also lived in Nikopol, introduced new customs into the yeshivah founded by Joseph Caro. Another rabbi of Nikopol was Abraham b. Aziz Borgil, author of the book Lehem Abbirim (1605). Moses Alfalas of Sofia, a famous preacher, published Va-Yakhel Moshe (Venice, 1597). In the 18th century Solomon Shalem of Adrianopolis and Issachar Abulafia were among the famous rabbis. Chief rabbis after Bulgarian independence (1878) were Gabriel Almosnino, Moses Tadjer, Simon Dankowitz from Czechoslovakia, Mordecai Gruenwald, and Marcus Ehrenpreis. Zemah Rabbiner was chief preacher to the Bulgarian communities. David Pipano, author of Hagor ha-Efod (1925) and other books, was head of the rabbinical court. Other scholars of Bulgaria include Solomon Rosanes, author ofDivrei Yemei Yisrael be-Togarmah, the standard history of Turkish Jewry. Mention may be made also of Saul MMzan, author of Les Juifs espagnols en Bulgarie. http://www.jewishvirtuallibrary.org/jsource/vjw/bulgaria.html