Ragnar "Lodbrok" Sigurdsson

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Ragnar "Lodbrok" Sigurdsson, King of Denmark & Norway

Nicknames: "Regner", "Lodbrog", ""Hairy-Breeks"", "Sigurdsson", "Lodbrok", "Loðbrók", "Ragnar "Lodbrok" /Sigurdsson/", "/Lodbrok/", "King of Dacia (Denmark)", "'Lodbrok'", "Lodbrok (Hairy Breeches)", "Hairy-Breeks", ""Lodbrok"", "King of Denmark", "Ragnar "Hairy-Breeks"", "King of Sweden", "Loth..."
Birthdate:
Birthplace: Uppsala, Sweden
Death: Died in Snake Pit, Northumberland, , England
Place of Burial: Vikinghovding
Immediate Family:

Son of Sigurd "Ring" Randversson, Danish king and Álfhildr Ingild Gandálfsdóttir
Husband of Þóra "borgarhjörtr"; ?? daughter of Esbern; Randalin Corvinus; Lathgertha Queen of Seeland and Aslaug Kraka Sigurdsdatter
Father of Eric Ragnarsson; Sward III de Jutlandia; Erik; Agnar; Sweyn/Svein and 17 others
Brother of Sigurd Sigurdsson Ringslinger; Aslaug Sigurdsdotter; Thora av Seeland Herodsdotter; Geva Sigurdsdotter Ringslinger; Ruric Sigurdson Lodbrock and 5 others
Half brother of Unknown Daughter and Unknown Daughter, Daughter

Occupation: Pirate, raider and legendary Danish King, Konge/viking, Vikingakung, konge i Sverige og Danmark, King of Denmark and Sweden, Roi des Danois et de Lethra, King of Denmark/Sweden, Vikingkonge etter sagaen, død etter 845, konge, Roi, de Lethra, Konge, Jarl
Managed by: Private User
Last Updated:

About Ragnar "Lodbrok" Sigurdsson, King of Denmark & Norway

Ragnar Lodbrok is a fictional person made up of 2-5 different persons in the different stories that talks about him. For more information (Some in English some in Norwegian): http://www.scangen.se/medieval/ragnar.htm (English) http://no.wikisource.org/wiki/Det_norske_Folks_Historie/1/52 (Norwegian written as early as 1853!)

(Remi Pedersen)

----------------------------------------------------

Lodbrok "Hairy Britches" Sigurdsson, King of Denmark & Norway

⚪ c765 ⚫ c845

Parents: ♂ Sigurd Ring and ♀ Alfhild Gandolfsdottir

-------------------------------

Ragnar was according to the sagas married to or had children with five women, and first wife according to Völsungasaga was semi-legendary female Danish viking and shieldmaiden Lathgertha, and they had the son:

  1. Fridleiv Ragnarsson

His second wife was Åslaug Sigurdsdatter (also called Kråka) and they had the children:

  1. Ivar Ragnarsson «the Boneless» Beinlause, - (Wikipedia)
  2. Sigurd Ragnarsson «Snake-in-the-Eye» Orm-i-Øje, - (WIkipedia)
  3. Ubbe Ragnarsson (uncertain mother, could be the son of a nameless wife)

The third wife was Tora Borgarhjort ...

  1. Björn «Ironside» Järnsida

-------------------------------

Relationships:

⚭1 Lathgertha

  • ♂ Fridleiv Ragnarsson
  • ♂ Gudrødr of Lochlainn (Mother assumed)

⚭2 Åslaug Kråka Sigurdsdatter (Randalin)

  1. Ivar the Boneless
  2. Björn Ironside
  3. ♀ Ragnhild Ragnarsdottir
  4. ♀ Alof Ragnarsdottir

⚭3 Tora

  1. ♂ Eiríkr ?
  2. ♂ Agnar
  3. ♂ Rathbarth Ragnarsson
  4. ♂ Dunyat Ragnarsson,

⚭4 Svanloga

-------------------------------

Currently linked but Possibly wrong: (Anyone can jump in any time and help fix please)

  • Rognvald Ragnarsson;
  • Olof
  • Ragnvald
  • Dtr of King Ragnar of Skjoldung;
  • Gudrødr of Lochlainn;

Brother of

  • N Of "Ring" Sigurdsdatter (n.n.);
  • RING II SIGURDSSON KING OF DENMARK;
  • Eysteinn Halfdansson;
  • Gudrod Halfdansson;
  • Sineus; Trouvor (le Fidèle);
  • Ring
  • Ragnhilde Sigurdsdottir

Notes/Assumptions/Decisions:

  • According to xx Tora was the mother of Halvdan Kvitserk Ragnarsson and Björn Ironside.
  • There is a note that Thora was also known as Aslaug or Kraka. The different online sources seem to confirm this. Could any expert on Ladbok please assist to confirm and fix if required.

Last Validated by: John Smith 22/10/2012 About me reviewed by: English John Smith 22/10/2012 English

Sources:

  • List them all here..
  • List them all here..
===============================

Ragnar Lodbrok (Ragnar "Hairy-Breeks", Old Norse: Ragnarr Loðbrók) was a Norse legendary hero from the Viking Age who was thoroughly reshaped in Old Norse poetry and legendary sagas.

Although he is something of a hero in his native Scandinavia, reliable accounts of his life are very sketchy and heavily based on ancient Viking sagas. Even the dating of his reign is not certain; there are sources that date it from 750–794, and others from 860–865.[citation needed] Neither really matches with what is known of him, though he may perhaps have held power as a warlord from approximately 835 to his death in 865, perhaps only being recognized as king in the last five years of his life.

A historic Ragnar Lodbrok is held to have been an earl at the court of the Danish king Horik I (814-854), and this Ragnar participated in the Viking plunderings of Paris in 845.

A certain Reginheri attacked Paris with a fleet of 120 ships. The warriors belonging to the army of Charles the Bald, were placed to guard the monastery in St. Denis, but fled when the Danish Vikings executed their prisoners ferociously in front of their eyes.

After receiving a tribute of 7000 pounds of silver from Charles the Bald, Ragnar went back. By mysterious circumstances, many men in Ragnar's army died during the journey and Ragnar died soon after his return.

Ragnar apparently spent most of his life as a pirate and raider, invading one country after another. One of his favorite tactics was to attack Christian cities on church feast days, knowing that many soldiers would be in church. He would generally accept a huge payment to leave his victims alone, only to come back later and demand more riches in exchange for leaving.

But as the extent of his supposed realm shows, he was also a gifted military leader. By 845, he was a powerful man and most likely a contemporary of the first ruler of Russia, the Viking Rurik. It is said he was always seeking new adventures because he was worried that his freebooting sons would do things that would outshine his own achievements.

It was in 845 that he is said to have sailed southward, looking for new worlds to conquer. With 120 ships and 5,000 Viking warriors, he landed in what is now France, probably at the Seine estuary, and ravaged West Francia, as the westernmost part of the Frankish Empire was then known. Rouen was ravaged and then Carolivenna, a mere 20 km from St. Denis. The raiders then attacked and captured Paris. The traditional date for this is 28 March, which is today referred to as Ragnar Lodbrok Day by certain followers of the Asatru religion.

The King of West Francia, Charlemagne's grandson Charles the Bald, paid him a fantastic amount of money not to destroy the city. Ragnar Lodbrok, according to Viking sources, was satisfied with no less than 7,000 pounds of silver in exchange for sparing the city. However, that did not stop Ragnar from attacking other parts of France, and it took a long time for the Franks to drive him out.

Later, Ragnar's sons were to return for more booty. Among their feats was destroying the city of Rouen several times. Ultimately, many of them settled there permanently, in a land that became known as Normandy (for "Northmen", as the Franks called the Scandinavians or the Nordmenn as the Norwegians called themselves (which is much more likely).

After he was done with France, and after his supposed death in 845, he turned his attention to England. In 865, he landed in Northumbria on the north-east coast of England. It is claimed that here he was defeated in battle for the only time, by King Aelle II of Northumbria.

Aelle's men captured Ragnar, and the King ordered him thrown into a pit filled with poisonous snakes. As he was slowly being bitten to death, he is alleged to have exclaimed "How the little pigs would grunt if they knew the situation of the old boar!", referring to the vengeance he hoped his sons would wreak when they heard of his death.

Alternative versions of the story say that he landed by accident in East Anglia and there befriended King Edmund before being killed by a jealous courtier. The murderer escaped to Denmark and blamed Edmund for Lodbrok's demise.

As he was thrown into the snake pit, Ragnar was said to have uttered his famous death song: "It gladdens me to know that Balder’s father makes ready the benches for a banquet. Soon we shall be drinking ale from the curved horns. The champion who comes into Odin’s dwelling does not lament his death. I shall not enter his hall with words of fear upon my lips. The Æsir will welcome me. Death comes without lamenting… Eager am I to depart. The Dísir summon me home, those whom Odin sends for me from the halls of the Lord of Hosts. Gladly shall I drink ale in the high-seat with the Æsir. The days of my life are ended. I laugh as I die."

One Viking saga states that when his four sons heard the manner of his death, they all reacted in great sorrow. Hvitserk, who was playing tafl, gripped the piece so hard that he bled from his fingernails. Björn Ironside grabbed a spear so tightly that he left an impression in it, and Sigurd Snake-in-the-Eye, who was trimming his nails, cut straight through to the bone.

Although these stories may not be accurate, like virtually all tales concerning Ragnar Lodbrok, his death had serious consequences. His other sons, Ivar the Boneless (alias Hingwar) and Ubbe soon learned the details of their father's death and swore that they would avenge his killing, in time-honoured Viking tradition. In 866, Ivar and Ubbe crossed the North Sea with a large army (The Great Heathen Army), sacked York, met King Aelle in battle, and captured him. He was sentenced to die according to the custom of Rista Blodörn (Blood eagle), an exceedingly painful death.

They then moved south to East Anglia, on the way attacking the monasteries of Bardney, Croyland and Medeshampstede where, according to tradition, their army slew 80 monks. Eventually they captured King Edmund and had him shot by archers and beheaded. These wars were a prelude to the long struggle of the Saxons of Alfred the Great against the Danes a generation later.

He was said at one point to be married to the infamous Viking pirate Lathgertha.

--------------------

Född 765 i Uppsala. Död 845 i England.

http://no.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ragnar_Lodbrok

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ragnar_Lodbrok

http://lind.no/nor/index.asp?lang=gb&emne=asatru&person=Ragnar%20Lodbrok&list=&vis=

--------------------

Ragnar Sigurdsson - also known as: Lodbrok - was born about 0765 in Uppsala, Uppsala, Sweden and died in 0845 in England . He was the son of King Sigrud Randversson and Alfhild Gandolfsdatter.

Ragnar married Aslaug Sigurdsatter about 0763 while living in Denmark. Aslaug was born about 0765, lived in Denmark. She is the daughter of Sigrud "Fafnisbana" Sigmundsson and Brunhild Budlasdatter.

Children:

i. Sigurd "Snake-Eye" Ragnarsson was born about 0786 in Denmark. See #5. below.

ii. Bjorn Ragarsson was born about 0777 in Denmark.

--------------------

Flourished in the 9th century

Viking whose life passed into legend in medieval European literature.

In the Anglo-Saxon Chronicle, Ragnar was said to be the father of three sons, Halfdan, Inwaer (Ivar the Boneless), and Hubba (Ubbe), who led a Viking invasion of East Anglia in 865 seeking to avenge Ragnar's murder. In the European literature of the several centuries following Ragnar's death, his name is surrounded with considerable legend. In the Gesta Danorum (c. 1185) of the Danish historian Saxo Grammaticus, he was a 9th-century Danish king whose campaigns included a battle with the Holy Roman emperor Charlemagne. According to Saxo's legendary history, Ragnar was eventually captured by the Anglo-Saxon king Aella of Northumbria and thrown into a snake pit to die. This story is also recounted in the later Icelandic works Ragnars saga lodbrókar and Tháttr af Ragnarssonum. The 12th-century Icelandic poem Krákumál provides a romanticized description of Ragnar's death and links him in marriage with a daughter of Sigurd (Siegfried) and Brynhild (Brunhild), figures from the heroic literature of the ancient Teutons. The actions of Ragnar and his sons are also recounted in the Orkney Islands' poem Háttalykill.

____________________________________

Ragnarr Loðbrók or Ragnar Lodbrok was a semi-legendary King of Denmark and Sweden who reigned sometime in the eighth or ninth centuries. Although he is something of a hero in his native Scandinavia, reliable accounts of his life are very sketchy and heavily based on ancient Viking sagas. Even the dating of his reign is not certain; there are sources that date it from 750–794, and others from 860–865. Neither matches with what we know of him, and he probably held power as a warlord from approximately 835 to his death in 865, perhaps only being recognized as king in the last five years of his life.

Life

Ragnar was a pagan who claimed to be a direct descendant of the god Odin. One of his favorite strategies was to attack Christian cities on holy feast days, knowing that many soldiers would be in church.

Raids

He spent most of his life as a pirate and raider, invading one country after another. He would generally accept a huge payment to leave his victims alone, only to come back later and demand more riches in exchange for leaving. But as the extent of his realm shows, he was also a gifted military leader.

France

By 845, he was a powerful ruler, and most likely a contemporary of the first ruler of Russia, the Viking Rurik. It is said he was always seeking new adventures because he was worried that his freebooting sons would do things that outshined his own achievements.

In that year, he sailed southward, looking for new worlds to conquer. With 120 ships and 5,000 Viking warriors, he landed in modern France, probably at the Seine estuary, and ravaged West Francia, as the westernmost part of the Frankish empire was then known.

Also in 845, Paris was captured and held ransom by a Viking raider, whom the sagas say was Ragnar Lodbrok. The traditional date for this is March 28, which is today referred to as Ragnar Lodbrok Day by many Scandinavians. The King of West Francia, Charlemagne’s son Charles II "The Bald", paid him a fantastic amount of money not to destroy the city. Ragnar Lodbrok, according to Viking sources, was satisfied with no less than 7,000 pounds of silver in exchange for sparing the city. However, that did not stop Ragnar from attacking other parts of France, and it took a long time for the Franks to drive him out.

England

After he was done with France, he turned his attention to England. In 865, he landed in Northumbria on the northeast coast of England. It is claimed that here he was defeated in battle for the only time, by King Aelle of Northumbria. Ella’s men captured Ragnar, and the King ordered him thrown into a pit filled with poisonous snakes. As he was slowly being bitten to death, he was alleged to have exclaimed "How the little pigs would grunt if they knew the situation of the old boar!"

Legacy

One Viking saga states that when his four sons heard the manner of his death, they all reacted in great sorrow. Hvitserk, who was playing chess, gripped the piece so hard that he bled from his fingernails. Björn Ironside grabbed a spear so tightly that he left an impression in it, and Sigurd Snake-Eye, who was trimming his nails, cut straight through to the bone.

Ragnar’s fourth son, Ivar the Boneless soon learned the details of his father’s death and swore that he would avenge his father’s killing, in time-honored Viking tradition. In 866, Ivar crossed the North Sea with a large army, met King Ella in battle, and captured him. He sentenced him to die according to the custom of Rista Blodörn, an exceedingly painful death. Although this story may not be accurate, like virtually all tales concerning Ragnar Lodbrok, his death had serious consequences. Ivor was the mastermind behind the attacks on the English mainland in the final quarter of the ninth century. He invaded East Anglia, and the following year attacked York. He was aided by the internal struggle for power in Northumbria—which he was of course responsible for by killing Ella. These wars were a prelude to the long struggle of the Saxons of Alfred the Great against the "Danes" a generation later.

Meanwhile, in France, the Vikings kept coming back for more booty. Among their feats was destroying the city of Rouen several times. Ultimately, many of them settled there permanently, in a land that became known as Normandy (for "Northmen", as the Franks called the Vikings).

Ragnar married Aslaug Sigurdsdottir, daughter of Sigurd Wolsung and Unknown

--------------------

http://lind.no/nor/index.asp?lang=gb&emne=asatru&person=Ragnar%20Lodbrok&list=&vis=

--------------------

  1. ID: I21817
  2. Name: Ragnar "Lodbrok" SIGURDSON
  3. Sex: M
  4. Birth: ABT 0750 in Uppsala, Sweden
  5. Death: 0845 in Northumberland, England (France )
  6. Note:
   Note: Notes:
   See Snorre's Saga and the Icelandic Landnamobok (Book ofSettlment).
   Many historians regard much of the genealogy at this point to bepurely
   legendary, or even mythical.
   Subject: Ragnar LothbrokFrom: sbald@auburn.campus.mci.net(Stewart Baldwin)Date: Fri, 13 Dec 1996996 20:46:28 GMTSometimein 1995 (I don't have the date), I posted an earlier versionofthe articlecle below in answer to an item asking whether or notRagnarLothbrok existed. Since Anders Berg hass asked me if hecan put thisitem on his web page, I decided to update it andsubmit it again, andssolicit comments, before making any finalcorrections. The section"Could RAGNALL and LOTHBROK haveve beenthe same person?" is new, andwas not in last year's posting. Therest is essentially the ssame aslast year's version, with someminor changes.Any comments?StewartBaldwin------------------------------------------------WasRAGNAR LOTHBROK historical?One of the things that makes this adif difficult question to discuss isthat the question "WasRagnar Lothbrok historical?" is itselfsomemewhat ambiguous.Thus, before the question can be discussed, thequestion has tofirst be more cleearly defined. To mention twooppositeextremes, a skeptic could ask whether or not everything whicchissaid about the character of Ragnar Lothbrok ishistoricallyaccurate, observe that the answer i is certainly"no", and then claimvictory. At the other extreme, a proponentof a historical RagnaarLothbrok could ask if a Viking by thename of Ragnar ever existed,point out that a Viking having g thecorrect name ("Reginheri") appearsin the Frankish annals, andclaim that Ragnar Lothbrok wass thereforehistorical. Neither ofthese two extremes is acceptable in a seriousargument on thesububject, so I will discuss the subject from thefollowingmiddle ground. The criteria which I will uuse are that inorderfor Ragnar Lothbrok to be considered as historical, thereshouldbe a historicacally documented person of that name whoactuallyperformed a significant number of the deeds attribbutedto thelegendary Ragnar Lothbrok. I think these are reasonablecriteria, andthe remainder ofof this discussion is based onthese principles. Now,to answer the question: No, RagnarLothbrok does not appear to be ahistorical figure, based on theabove criteria. I will give somecomments a as to why I havethis opinion, and then mention some readingmaterial for thosewho want more.RAGNAGNARThe contemporary historical records ofthe ninth century (when RagnarLothbrok supposedly lived)ed) showonly one Viking of the correct name, aViking named "Reginheri"(a Latin form equivalent too the name Ragnar)in France WHO DIEDIN THE YEAR 845, according to the contemporaryFrankish annals.s.The emphasized words in the previous sentence areoftenconveninetly overlooked by those who wissh to use Reginheri asahistorical prototype for Ragnar Lothbrok. Since Reginheri diedinFrance inin the year 845, he cannot have participated in thelaterevents which form the principal part of tthe legendaryRagnarLothbrok's exploits. In addition, there is no goodevidence thatReginheri was s the father of any of theindividuals who later came tobe regarded as sons of RagnarLothbrok. Thhus, Reginheri fails tosatisfy the criterionmentioned above. No other historical Norsemannamed RaRagnar isknown for the appropriate time period.LOTHBROKNo contemporaryrecord gives this name, and and it is significant thatwhen thename finally does make it appearance in the records 200yearslalater, it stands alone. (Ari, writing in the twelfthcentury, was thefirst known writer to make Raagnar and Lothbrokthe same person.) Thename first appears (as "Lothbroc") in"Gesta Normannorum DDucum", byWilliam of Jumieges, writing about1070, in which Lothbroc is calledhe father of Bjorn IrIronside.(A Viking named Bjorn is verified by thecontemporary chronicles,but without the nicknamme.) Adam of Bremen,writing soonafterward, called Ivar the son of "Lodparchus". Besidesthe factt that this Lothbrok is not attested in any of thecontemporarysources, there seems to be another pproblem, andthat is that the name("Lothbroka") appears to be a women's name.See the article onRaRagnars saga" by Rory McTurk in "MedievalScandinavia: anencyclopedia" (New York and London, 1993)). Ifthis argument based onphilology is correct, then thisLothbrok(a), if historical at all,woululd be a women, andclearly not identical with the legendary RagnarrLothbrok. (I donot have the bbackground in linguistics to commentfurther onthis gender argument.)RAGNALLThe "Fragmentary Annalsnnals ofIreland" (edited and translated by Joan N.Radner, Dublin, 1978,formerly called "Three Fraagments") has an itemof interest whichhas frequently been pointed out as possibly relatingto the llegend of Ragnar Lothbrok. In it, a certain Ragnall(Rognvald)son of Alpdan (Halfdan), king of Noorway, ismentioned, and hisexploits prior to the fall of York to theDanes are given, in acontext t in which it is at least arguablethat Ragnall and RagnarLothbrok were the same person. Therearee two problem with thisinterpretation. First, Ragnar andRagnall are not the same name, eventhoughgh they look similar.Second, and more important, the FragmentaryAnnals are themselvesnot a conteemporary source, and there is goodreason to besuspicious about them. However, even if we were to allowthatthe events given there are historical (a concession whichmanyhistorians would be unwilllling to make), and then concedefurther thatthese events form the basis of the Ragnar legend,thenn we would stillhave that the person on whom the legend wasbased did not have theright name.Could uld RAGNALL and LOTHBROKhave been the same person?We have already seen that the onlyhistorically y attested Ragnar(Reginheri) cannot reasonably beregarded as a historical prototypefor Ragnar Loththbrok. Thus,it appears that the best attempt to arguefor a historical RagnarLothbrok is to proppose (as has been done onnumerous occasions)that Ragnall and Lothbrok were both the sameperson, anand thenassume that the similar (but different) names Ragnalland Ragnarwere accidently confused. Thus, let us see whatassumptions areneeded in order to assume that Ragnall and Lothbrokwere the esame person, assuming that they existed at all. In orderforthis to be the case, we must make thhe followingassumptions:(1) We must assume that Adam of Bremen (lateeleventh century) wascorrectect in giving "Lodparchus" (i.e.,Lothbrok) as the name of thefather of Ivar (late ninthcentury).((2) We must assume that the "Coghad Gaedhel reGallaibh" ("The War ofthe Gaedhil with the Gaill", ", ed. byTodd, London, 1867), a twelfthcentury Irish source, is correctin stating that Halfdan off Dublin(killed in Ireland in 877,according to the Annals of Ulster) was theson of a certainRagnanall, and that this Ragnall was the same as theRagnall whoappears in the Fragmentary Annals of Ireeland.(3) We mustassume that the Anglo-Saxon Chronicle is correct instating thata brother (unnamnamed, but called Ubbe in later sources)ofHalfdan and Ivar was killed in England in 878, despitetthecontradictory testimony of Aethelweard which gives a verydifferentreading for the same event (s(see 4).(4) We mustassume that the chronicle of Aethelweard is wrong instating thatHalfdan brothother of Ivar was killed in England in 878,forotherwise that would prove that Halfdan of Dublin (dd. 877 inIreland)was a different person from Halfdan brother of Ivar.(5)In addition to assuming ng that Halfdan of Dublin was thesameperson as Halfdan brother of Ivar, we must also assume thattthis Ivarwas the same person as Adam of Bremen's Ivar, keepingin mind thatAethelweard's chronicle,e, if correct, would implythe existence of twoIvars in the British isles at this time.(6)We mustust assume that the philological argument makingLothbrok(a)a feminine name is incorrect.(7) If Ar Ari, theearliest author to mention Ragnar Lothbrok, is to beconsidered areliable source on this matter, then we must also assumethatHalfdan of Dublin was the same person as the Halfdan brotherofSigifrid who appears in the Annals of Fulda for the year 873,despitethe severe chronological prproblems which that wouldcause with Ari'sgenealogies.Of the above assumptions, numbers(1) throughugh (6) are crucial if onewishes to argue thatRagnall and Lothbrok were the same, and (7) isneededed also ifit is to be assumed that the information given by Ariisaccurate. Given the noncontempoorary nature of the first twoitems,along with the contradictions present some of the others,theree is avery small chance that all six of the crucialassumptions are correct.However, if any one of f the first sixitems is false, then the case forRagnall being the same asLothbrok collapses, and we must concludethat the "RagnallLothbrok" attempt for a historical Ragnar Lothbrokisunsatisfactctory. [Note: See R. W. McTurk's article"RagnarrLothbrok in the Irish Annals?" (Proceedings of ttheSeventh VikingCongress, 1976, pp. 93-123), where a different,but much more rigid,list of the s same type isgiven.]CONCLUSIONSSince all of the above attempts to find ahistorical Ragnar Lothbrohbrokfail to satisfy the mentionedcriteria, Lothbrok and Ragnall come fromnoncontemporary sourcess which are themselves open to suspicion, andthe historicalrecords show nobody else (as far as I kknow) who couldbeplausibly identified with Ragnar Lothbrok, it must beconcludedthat Ragnar Lothbrbrok is not historical according tothe termsdescribed above. In fact, if there is any historicalbasis to RagnarLothbrok legend, it is quite likely that RagnarLothbrok is the resultof combining g two or more distinctindividuals into a single characterhaving the attributes ofboth, in much thhe same way as RagnarLothbrok's legendary"father" Sigurd Ring is in fact a composite oftwo differerentmen who fought against each other for the Danish thronein theyear 814, Sigifridus ("Sigurd") and Anulo (of which "Ring" isatranslation of Latin "Annulus"). However, such compositecharacterrscannot be considered as historical, and there is noevidence whichcomes close to being contemporarary which showsthat either Lothbrok orRagnall existed.FURTHER READINGThe mostambitious attempt tmpt to portray Ragnar Lothbrok as ahistoricalfigure is "Scandinavian Kings in the British Isles8550-880" by AlfredP. Smyth (Oxford University Press, 1977). Fora very criticalexamination of Smythth's views, see "High-kings,Vikings and otherkings", by Donnchadh O' Corrain, in IrishHistorical Review, vol 21(1979), pp. 283-323 (very highlyrecommended). Both of these sourcescite numerous o otherrelevant sources for those who are interested infurtherdetails.[Note: The usual apologiesies if my transliterationsfrom the Old Norsealphabet into the alphabet available to me isa bit slloppy.]Stewart Baldwin.
  1. Change Date: 1 APR 1999

Father: Sigurd I "Ring" b: ABT 0710 in Denmark

Mother: Alfhild b: ABT 0714 in Alfheim, Norway

Marriage 1 Aslaug of Denmark SIGURDSDOTTIR b: ABT 0755 in Denmark

Children

  1. Has Children Sigurd II Snodoye (or Eric II) RAGNARSSON King of Denmark b: ABT 0782 in Denmark
  2. Has Children Alof RAGNARSDOTTIR
  3. Has Children Ivar "the Boneless" RAGNARSSON King of Dublin
  4. Has No Children Halfdan RAGNARSSON

--------------------

Flourished in the 9th century, was a Viking whose life passed into legend in medieval European literature.

In the Anglo-Saxon Chronicle, Ragnar was said to be the father of three sons, Halfdan, Inwaer (Ivar the Boneless), and Hubba (Ubbe), who led a Viking invasion of East Anglia in 865 seeking to avenge Ragnar's murder. In the European literature of the several centuries following Ragnar's death, his name is surrounded with considerable legend. In the Gesta Danorum (c. 1185) of the Danish historian Saxo Grammaticus, he was a 9th-century Danish king whose campaigns included a battle with the Holy Roman emperor Charlemagne. According to Saxo's legendary history, Ragnar was eventually captured by the Anglo-Saxon king Aella of Northumbria and thrown into a snake pit to die. This story is also recounted in the later Icelandic works Ragnars saga lodbrókar and Tháttr af Ragnarssonum. The 12th-century Icelandic poem Krákumál provides a romanticized description of Ragnar's death and links him in marriage with a daughter of Sigurd (Siegfried) and Brynhild (Brunhild), figures from the heroic literature of the ancient Teutons. The actions of Ragnar and his sons are also recounted in the Orkney Islands' poem Háttalykill.2

Note* Other children given by Hull are: (1) female, Ragnhildir: (2) Ragnarsdottir, Alof and (3)Ragnarsson, Ubbe. He may have had a wife named Thora who MAY have been the mother of Alof.

Bjørn Ironside certainly played an important role in France. His father Ragnar Lodbrok can be identified in contemporary Frankish annals with his nickname Lodbrok translated to Hoseri (in German language Hosen), meaning fur or leather breeches. Variations are Ogier and Oschery. He operated from the Seine to the border of Spain from 840 to 851. He conquered Aquitania from the Franks, and he used Bordeaux as his stronghold for years. This conquer, one out of more, included Poitou, which in the sagas is called Peita. Saxo is saying Petiæ and that Ragnar conquered Petiæ. this is confirmed in annals. This is the district in the Loire area. In Western Europe his sons are more reported. Ragnar Lodbrok himself were operating more in East Europe

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Ægteskab (1): Ukendt

Ægteskab (2): Svanloge N.N.

Ægteskab (3): Thora Af Sverige

Anteckningar:

Se Snorre saga och den isländska Landnamobok (Book of Settlment).

Många historiker gäller mycket av släktforskning i detta skede att vara rent

legendariska, eller till och med mytiska.

Far: Ring, Sigurd

Gift med Sigurdsdottir, Aslög

Barn 1: Ragnarsson, Ivar "den Benfritt, kung av Dublin

Barn 2: Ragnarsson, Halfdan "vit skjorta", kung av Dublin

Barn 3: Ragnarson, Sigurd "Snake-i-ögat"

Barn 4: Ragnarson, Björn "Järnsida"

Barn 5: Ragnardottir, Ragnhildir

Barn 6: Ragnarsdottir, Alof

Barn 7: Ragnarsson, Ubbe

Noteringar

Som den AV Gammalt Har brukat refereras i English historieböcker Känner jag mig sminkad Sagan om Ragnar Lodbrok en sammanställning AV episoder fran Saxo OCH de isländska källorna. Den Börjar SOM ren folksaga MED Berättelsen OM Tora Borgarhjort, dotter till en jarl i Östergötland OCH Vacker SOM En dag. Jarlen hade dock Lovat Att den SOM dödade en Lindorm, SOM besvärade huset, skulle fa dottern. Ragnar lyckades Döda lindormen MED ETT spjut, OCH efter This bragd Fick Han tillnamnet Lodbrok Eller Ludenbyxa. De FN: s generalförsamling tu levde mycket Lyckliga Nagra ÅR OCH Fick Aven ETT par Söner, DARPA män sjuknade Tora OCH hund. (Källa: En nordisk kronologi, Alf Henriksson)

Ragnar Lodbrok var ute in vikingafärd FÖR Att fördriva Sorgen Över Tora Borgarhjort, OCH en kväll löpte Han i MED SINA Skepp i den Norska fjorden VID vilken Spangarhed var beläget. Hans folk Fick syn In Kraka OCH blev fascinerade AV Hennes Skönhet. Ragnar Fann Henne såväl Skön SOM Klok OCH ihop MED Henne till Danmark OCH firade Bröllop MED Henne. De Fick manga barn, OCH Nagra AV sönerna blev MED eller hur mycket berömda. Den äldste hette Ivar Benlös, ty Han hade dock Bara brosk i Stallet för Ben i Kroppen; Han var emellertid mycket vis. Den andre kallades Björn Järnsida, Den tredje bar namnet Vitsärk, den Fjärde hette Sigurd Ormöga. Sönerna kämpade väldeliga bad i Västeuropa OCH i Sverige. En dag Fick Han hora Att Ingen Kunde jämföras MED Hans Söner i mod OCH mandom, varför Han beslöt Att visum världen Att Han Heller integ gick AV för hackor. Med Nagra Skepp begav Han SIG till England, dödad män blev where AV kung Ethelred Tillsammans MED synd Skara. (Källa: En nordisk kronologi, Alf Henriksson)


Biografi

Vikingakung enligt flera sagor. Född 770 i Upplands artilleriregemente (C). Död 845 i England. Som den av gammalt har brukat refereras i svenska historieböcker är sagan om Ragnar Lodbrok en sammanställning av episoder från Saxo och de isländska källorna. Den börjar som ren folksaga med berättelsen om Tora Borgarhjort, dotter till en jarl i Östergötland och vacker som en dag. Jarlen hade lovat att den som dödade en lindorm, som besvärade huset, skulle få dottern. Ragnar lyckades döda lindormen med ett spjut, och efter denna bragd fick han tillnamnet Lodbrok eller Ludenbyxa. De unga tu levde mycket lyckliga några år och fick även ett par söner, men därpå sjuknade Tora och dog. (Källa: En nordisk kronologi, Alf Henriksson) Ragnar Lodbrok var ute på vikingafärd för att fördriva sorgen över Tora Borgarhjort, och en kväll löpte han in med sina skepp i den norska fjord vid vilken Spangarhed var beläget. Hans folk fick syn på Kraka och blev fascinerade av hennes skönhet. Ragnar fann henne såväl skön som klok och tog med henne till Danmark och firade bröllop med henne. De fick många barn, och några av sönerna blev med åren mycket berömda. Den äldste hette Ivar Benlös, ty han hade bara brosk i stället för ben i kroppen; han var emellertid mycket vis. Den andre kallades Björn Järnsida, den tredje bar namnet Vitsärk, den fjärde hette Sigurd Ormöga. Sönerna kämpade väldeliga både i Västeuropa och i Sverige. En dag fick han höra att ingen kunde jämföras med hans söner i mod och mandom, varför han beslöt att visa världen att han heller inte gick av för hackor. Med några skepp begav han sig till England, men blev där dödad av kung Ethelred tillsammans med sin skara. (Källa: En nordisk kronologi, Alf Henriksson) -------------------------------------------------------------------------------- Källor 1) Högskolan, Luleå

Gifte och barn

Aslög "Kraka" Sigurdsdotter.

--------------------

Ragnar Lodbrok was a semi-legendary King of Denmark and Sweden who reigned sometime in the eighth or ninth centuries. Although he is something of a hero in his native Scandinavia, reliable accounts of his life are very sketchy and heavily based on ancient Viking sagas. Even the dating of his reign is not certain; there are sources that date it from 750 -794 , and others from 860 -865 . Neither jibes with what we know of him, and he probably held power as a warlord from approximately 835 to his death in 865 , perhaps only being recognized as king in the last five years of his life.

He was probably born in modern Norway, and later became part of the ruling class in Denmark. At some point, he became king there, and later gained control of Sweden and Finland (then a part of Sweden), as well. He was given the nickname "hairy breeches" because he favored trousers made from animal skin by his wife.

He spent most of his life as a pirate and raider, invading one country after another. He would generally accept a huge payment to leave his victims alone, only to come back later and demand more riches in exchange for leaving. But as the extent of his realm shows, he was also a gifted military leader.

By 845 , he was a powerful ruler, and most likely a contemporary of the first ruler of Russia , the Viking Rurik . It is said he was always seeking new adventures because he was worried that his freebooting sons would do things that outshined his own achievements.

In that year, he sailed southward, looking for new worlds to conquer. With 120 ships and 5,000 Viking warriors, he landed in modern France , probably at the Seine estuary, and ravaged West Francia, as the westernmost part of the Frankish empire was then known.

Also in 845, Paris was captured and held ransom by a Viking raider, whom the sagas say was Ragnar Lodbrok. The traditional date for this is March 28 , which is today referred to as Ragnar Lodbrok Day by many Scandinavians. The King of West Francia, Charlemagne ’s son Charles II "The Bald", paid him a fantastic amount of money not to destroy the city. Ragnar Lodbrok, according to Viking sources, was satisfied with no less than 7,000 pounds of silver in exchange for sparing the city. However, that did not stop Ragnar from attacking other parts of France, and it took a long time for the Franks to drive him out.

Ragnar was a pagan who claimed to be a direct descendant of the god Odin . One of his favorite strategies was to attack Christian cities on holy feast days, knowing that many soldiers would be in church.

After he was done with France, he turned his attention to England . In 865 , he landed in Northumbria on the northeast coast of England. Here, it is claimed that he was defeated in battle for the only time, by King Ella of Northumbria. Ella’s men captured Ragnar, and the King ordered him thrown into a snake pit filled with poisonous snakes. As he was slowly being bitten to death, he was alleged to have exclaimed "How the little pigs would grunt if they knew the situation of the old boar!"

One Viking saga states that when his four sons heard the manner of his death, they all reacted in great sorrow. Hvitserk, who was playing chess, gripped the piece so hard that he bled from his fingernails. Bjorn grabbed a spear so tightly that he left an impression in it, and Sigurd, who was trimming his nails, cut straight through to the bone.

Ragnar’s fourth son, Ivor “the Boneless”, soon learned the details of his father’s death and swore that he would avenge his father’s death and subsequent killing, in time-honored Viking tradition. In 866 , Ivor crossed the North Sea with a large army, met King Ella in battle, and captured him. He sentenced him to die according to the custom of the “blood red eagle”, which was to cut the ribs of the victim out and the lungs removed by grasping them and spreading them over the body. He then avenged his father’s death in exactly this manner.

Although this story, like virtually all tales concerning Ragnar Lodbrok, may or may not be accurate, his death had serious consequences. Ivor was the mastermind behind the attacks on the English mainland in the final quarter of the ninth century. He invaded East Anglia, and the following year attacked York. He was aided by the internal struggle for power in Northumbria--which he was of course responsible for by killing Ella. These wars were a prelude to the long struggle of the Saxons of Alfred the Great against the "Danes" a generation later.

Meanwhile, in France, the Vikings kept coming back for more booty. Among their feats was destroying the city of Rouen several times. Ultimately, many of them settled there permanently, in a land that became known as Normandy (for "Northmen", as the Franks called the Vikings).

--------------------

Ragnar was a pagan who claimed to be a direct descendant of the god Odin. One of his favorite strategies was to attack Christian cities on holy feast days, knowing that many soldiers would be in church.

Ragnar Lodbrok (Ragnar "Hairy-Breeks", Old Norse: Ragnarr Loðbrók) was a Norse legendary hero from the Viking Age who was thoroughly reshaped in Old Norse poetry and legendary sagas.

Although he is something of a hero in his native Scandinavia, reliable accounts of his life are very sketchy and heavily based on ancient Viking sagas. Even the dating of his reign is not certain; there are sources that date it from 750–794, and others from 860–865.[citation needed] Neither really matches with what is known of him, though he may perhaps have held power as a warlord from approximately 835 to his death in 865, perhaps only being recognized as king in the last five years of his life.

A historic Ragnar Lodbrok is held to have been an earl at the court of the Danish king Horik I (814-854), and this Ragnar participated in the Viking plunderings of Paris in 845.

A certain Reginheri attacked Paris with a fleet of 120 ships. The warriors belonging to the army of Charles the Bald, were placed to guard the monastery in St. Denis, but fled when the Danish Vikings executed their prisoners ferociously in front of their eyes.

After receiving a tribute of 7000 pounds of silver from Charles the Bald, Ragnar went back. By mysterious circumstances, many men in Ragnar's army died during the journey and Ragnar died soon after his return.

Ragnar apparently spent most of his life as a pirate and raider, invading one country after another. One of his favorite tactics was to attack Christian cities on church feast days, knowing that many soldiers would be in church. He would generally accept a huge payment to leave his victims alone, only to come back later and demand more riches in exchange for leaving.

But as the extent of his supposed realm shows, he was also a gifted military leader. By 845, he was a powerful man and most likely a contemporary of the first ruler of Russia, the Viking Rurik. It is said he was always seeking new adventures because he was worried that his freebooting sons would do things that would outshine his own achievements.

It was in 845 that he is said to have sailed southward, looking for new worlds to conquer. With 120 ships and 5,000 Viking warriors, he landed in what is now France, probably at the Seine estuary, and ravaged West Francia, as the westernmost part of the Frankish Empire was then known. Rouen was ravaged and then Carolivenna, a mere 20 km from St. Denis. The raiders then attacked and captured Paris. The traditional date for this is 28 March, which is today referred to as Ragnar Lodbrok Day by certain followers of the Asatru religion.

The King of West Francia, Charlemagne's grandson Charles the Bald, paid him a fantastic amount of money not to destroy the city. Ragnar Lodbrok, according to Viking sources, was satisfied with no less than 7,000 pounds of silver in exchange for sparing the city. However, that did not stop Ragnar from attacking other parts of France, and it took a long time for the Franks to drive him out.

Later, Ragnar's sons were to return for more booty. Among their feats was destroying the city of Rouen several times. Ultimately, many of them settled there permanently, in a land that became known as Normandy (for "Northmen", as the Franks called the Scandinavians or the Nordmenn as the Norwegians called themselves (which is much more likely).

After he was done with France, and after his supposed death in 845, he turned his attention to England. In 865, he landed in Northumbria on the north-east coast of England. It is claimed that here he was defeated in battle for the only time, by King Aelle II of Northumbria.

Aelle's men captured Ragnar, and the King ordered him thrown into a pit filled with poisonous snakes. As he was slowly being bitten to death, he is alleged to have exclaimed "How the little pigs would grunt if they knew the situation of the old boar!", referring to the vengeance he hoped his sons would wreak when they heard of his death.

Alternative versions of the story say that he landed by accident in East Anglia and there befriended King Edmund before being killed by a jealous courtier. The murderer escaped to Denmark and blamed Edmund for Lodbrok's demise.

As he was thrown into the snake pit, Ragnar was said to have uttered his famous death song: "It gladdens me to know that Balder’s father makes ready the benches for a banquet. Soon we shall be drinking ale from the curved horns. The champion who comes into Odin’s dwelling does not lament his death. I shall not enter his hall with words of fear upon my lips. The Æsir will welcome me. Death comes without lamenting… Eager am I to depart. The Dísir summon me home, those whom Odin sends for me from the halls of the Lord of Hosts. Gladly shall I drink ale in the high-seat with the Æsir. The days of my life are ended. I laugh as I die."

One Viking saga states that when his four sons heard the manner of his death, they all reacted in great sorrow. Hvitserk, who was playing tafl, gripped the piece so hard that he bled from his fingernails. Björn Ironside grabbed a spear so tightly that he left an impression in it, and Sigurd Snake-in-the-Eye, who was trimming his nails, cut straight through to the bone.

Although these stories may not be accurate, like virtually all tales concerning Ragnar Lodbrok, his death had serious consequences. His other sons, Ivar the Boneless (alias Hingwar) and Ubbe soon learned the details of their father's death and swore that they would avenge his killing, in time-honoured Viking tradition. In 866, Ivar and Ubbe crossed the North Sea with a large army (The Great Heathen Army), sacked York, met King Aelle in battle, and captured him. He was sentenced to die according to the custom of Rista Blodörn (Blood eagle), an exceedingly painful death.

They then moved south to East Anglia, on the way attacking the monasteries of Bardney, Croyland and Medeshampstede where, according to tradition, their army slew 80 monks. Eventually they captured King Edmund and had him shot by archers and beheaded. These wars were a prelude to the long struggle of the Saxons of Alfred the Great against the Danes a generation later.

He was said at one point to be married to the infamous Viking pirate Lathgertha.

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Född 765 i Uppsala. Död 845 i England.

http://no.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ragnar_Lodbrok

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ragnar_Lodbrok

http://lind.no/nor/index.asp?lang=gb&emne=asatru&person=Rag...=

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Ragnar Sigurdsson - also known as: Lodbrok - was born about 0765 in Uppsala, Uppsala, Sweden and died in 0845 in England . He was the son of King Sigrud Randversson and Alfhild Gandolfsdatter.

Ragnar married Aslaug Sigurdsatter about 0763 while living in Denmark. Aslaug was born about 0765, lived in Denmark. She is the daughter of Sigrud "Fafnisbana" Sigmundsson and Brunhild Budlasdatter.

Children:

i. Sigurd "Snake-Eye" Ragnarsson was born about 0786 in Denmark. See #5. below.

ii. Bjorn Ragarsson was born about 0777 in Denmark.

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Flourished in the 9th century

Viking whose life passed into legend in medieval European literature.

In the Anglo-Saxon Chronicle, Ragnar was said to be the father of three sons, Halfdan, Inwaer (Ivar the Boneless), and Hubba (Ubbe), who led a Viking invasion of East Anglia in 865 seeking to avenge Ragnar's murder. In the European literature of the several centuries following Ragnar's death, his name is surrounded with considerable legend. In the Gesta Danorum (c. 1185) of the Danish historian Saxo Grammaticus, he was a 9th-century Danish king whose campaigns included a battle with the Holy Roman emperor Charlemagne. According to Saxo's legendary history, Ragnar was eventually captured by the Anglo-Saxon king Aella of Northumbria and thrown into a snake pit to die. This story is also recounted in the later Icelandic works Ragnars saga lodbrókar and Tháttr af Ragnarssonum. The 12th-century Icelandic poem Krákumál provides a romanticized description of Ragnar's death and links him in marriage with a daughter of Sigurd (Siegfried) and Brynhild (Brunhild), figures from the heroic literature of the ancient Teutons. The actions of Ragnar and his sons are also recounted in the Orkney Islands' poem Háttalykill.

____________________________________

Ragnarr Loðbrók or Ragnar Lodbrok was a semi-legendary King of Denmark and Sweden who reigned sometime in the eighth or ninth centuries. Although he is something of a hero in his native Scandinavia, reliable accounts of his life are very sketchy and heavily based on ancient Viking sagas. Even the dating of his reign is not certain; there are sources that date it from 750–794, and others from 860–865. Neither matches with what we know of him, and he probably held power as a warlord from approximately 835 to his death in 865, perhaps only being recognized as king in the last five years of his life.

Life

Ragnar was a pagan who claimed to be a direct descendant of the god Odin. One of his favorite strategies was to attack Christian cities on holy feast days, knowing that many soldiers would be in church.

Raids

He spent most of his life as a pirate and raider, invading one country after another. He would generally accept a huge payment to leave his victims alone, only to come back later and demand more riches in exchange for leaving. But as the extent of his realm shows, he was also a gifted military leader.

France

By 845, he was a powerful ruler, and most likely a contemporary of the first ruler of Russia, the Viking Rurik. It is said he was always seeking new adventures because he was worried that his freebooting sons would do things that outshined his own achievements.

In that year, he sailed southward, looking for new worlds to conquer. With 120 ships and 5,000 Viking warriors, he landed in modern France, probably at the Seine estuary, and ravaged West Francia, as the westernmost part of the Frankish empire was then known.

Also in 845, Paris was captured and held ransom by a Viking raider, whom the sagas say was Ragnar Lodbrok. The traditional date for this is March 28, which is today referred to as Ragnar Lodbrok Day by many Scandinavians. The King of West Francia, Charlemagne’s son Charles II "The Bald", paid him a fantastic amount of money not to destroy the city. Ragnar Lodbrok, according to Viking sources, was satisfied with no less than 7,000 pounds of silver in exchange for sparing the city. However, that did not stop Ragnar from attacking other parts of France, and it took a long time for the Franks to drive him out.

England

After he was done with France, he turned his attention to England. In 865, he landed in Northumbria on the northeast coast of England. It is claimed that here he was defeated in battle for the only time, by King Aelle of Northumbria. Ella’s men captured Ragnar, and the King ordered him thrown into a pit filled with poisonous snakes. As he was slowly being bitten to death, he was alleged to have exclaimed "How the little pigs would grunt if they knew the situation of the old boar!"

Legacy

One Viking saga states that when his four sons heard the manner of his death, they all reacted in great sorrow. Hvitserk, who was playing chess, gripped the piece so hard that he bled from his fingernails. Björn Ironside grabbed a spear so tightly that he left an impression in it, and Sigurd Snake-Eye, who was trimming his nails, cut straight through to the bone.

Ragnar’s fourth son, Ivar the Boneless soon learned the details of his father’s death and swore that he would avenge his father’s killing, in time-honored Viking tradition. In 866, Ivar crossed the North Sea with a large army, met King Ella in battle, and captured him. He sentenced him to die according to the custom of Rista Blodörn, an exceedingly painful death. Although this story may not be accurate, like virtually all tales concerning Ragnar Lodbrok, his death had serious consequences. Ivor was the mastermind behind the attacks on the English mainland in the final quarter of the ninth century. He invaded East Anglia, and the following year attacked York. He was aided by the internal struggle for power in Northumbria—which he was of course responsible for by killing Ella. These wars were a prelude to the long struggle of the Saxons of Alfred the Great against the "Danes" a generation later.

Meanwhile, in France, the Vikings kept coming back for more booty. Among their feats was destroying the city of Rouen several times. Ultimately, many of them settled there permanently, in a land that became known as Normandy (for "Northmen", as the Franks called the Vikings).

Ragnar married Aslaug Sigurdsdottir, daughter of Sigurd Wolsung and Unknown

--------------------

http://lind.no/nor/index.asp?lang=gb&emne=asatru&person=Rag...=

--------------------

  1. ID: I21817
  2. Name: Ragnar "Lodbrok" SIGURDSON
  3. Sex: M
  4. Birth: ABT 0750 in Uppsala, Sweden
  5. Death: 0845 in Northumberland, England (France )
  6. Note:

Note: Notes:

See Snorre's Saga and the Icelandic Landnamobok (Book ofSettlment).

Many historians regard much of the genealogy at this point to bepurely

legendary, or even mythical.

Subject: Ragnar LothbrokFrom: sbald@auburn.campus.mci.net(Stewart Baldwin)Date: Fri, 13 Dec 1996996 20:46:28 GMTSometimein 1995 (I don't have the date), I posted an earlier versionofthe articlecle below in answer to an item asking whether or notRagnarLothbrok existed. Since Anders Berg hass asked me if hecan put thisitem on his web page, I decided to update it andsubmit it again, andssolicit comments, before making any finalcorrections. The section"Could RAGNALL and LOTHBROK haveve beenthe same person?" is new, andwas not in last year's posting. Therest is essentially the ssame aslast year's version, with someminor changes.Any comments?StewartBaldwin------------------------------------------------WasRAGNAR LOTHBROK historical?One of the things that makes this adif difficult question to discuss isthat the question "WasRagnar Lothbrok historical?" is itselfsomemewhat ambiguous.Thus, before the question can be discussed, thequestion has tofirst be more cleearly defined. To mention twooppositeextremes, a skeptic could ask whether or not everything whicchissaid about the character of Ragnar Lothbrok ishistoricallyaccurate, observe that the answer i is certainly"no", and then claimvictory. At the other extreme, a proponentof a historical RagnaarLothbrok could ask if a Viking by thename of Ragnar ever existed,point out that a Viking having g thecorrect name ("Reginheri") appearsin the Frankish annals, andclaim that Ragnar Lothbrok wass thereforehistorical. Neither ofthese two extremes is acceptable in a seriousargument on thesububject, so I will discuss the subject from thefollowingmiddle ground. The criteria which I will uuse are that inorderfor Ragnar Lothbrok to be considered as historical, thereshouldbe a historicacally documented person of that name whoactuallyperformed a significant number of the deeds attribbutedto thelegendary Ragnar Lothbrok. I think these are reasonablecriteria, andthe remainder ofof this discussion is based onthese principles. Now,to answer the question: No, RagnarLothbrok does not appear to be ahistorical figure, based on theabove criteria. I will give somecomments a as to why I havethis opinion, and then mention some readingmaterial for thosewho want more.RAGNAGNARThe contemporary historical records ofthe ninth century (when RagnarLothbrok supposedly lived)ed) showonly one Viking of the correct name, aViking named "Reginheri"(a Latin form equivalent too the name Ragnar)in France WHO DIEDIN THE YEAR 845, according to the contemporaryFrankish annals.s.The emphasized words in the previous sentence areoftenconveninetly overlooked by those who wissh to use Reginheri asahistorical prototype for Ragnar Lothbrok. Since Reginheri diedinFrance inin the year 845, he cannot have participated in thelaterevents which form the principal part of tthe legendaryRagnarLothbrok's exploits. In addition, there is no goodevidence thatReginheri was s the father of any of theindividuals who later came tobe regarded as sons of RagnarLothbrok. Thhus, Reginheri fails tosatisfy the criterionmentioned above. No other historical Norsemannamed RaRagnar isknown for the appropriate time period.LOTHBROKNo contemporaryrecord gives this name, and and it is significant thatwhen thename finally does make it appearance in the records 200yearslalater, it stands alone. (Ari, writing in the twelfthcentury, was thefirst known writer to make Raagnar and Lothbrokthe same person.) Thename first appears (as "Lothbroc") in"Gesta Normannorum DDucum", byWilliam of Jumieges, writing about1070, in which Lothbroc is calledhe father of Bjorn IrIronside.(A Viking named Bjorn is verified by thecontemporary chronicles,but without the nicknamme.) Adam of Bremen,writing soonafterward, called Ivar the son of "Lodparchus". Besidesthe factt that this Lothbrok is not attested in any of thecontemporarysources, there seems to be another pproblem, andthat is that the name("Lothbroka") appears to be a women's name.See the article onRaRagnars saga" by Rory McTurk in "MedievalScandinavia: anencyclopedia" (New York and London, 1993)). Ifthis argument based onphilology is correct, then thisLothbrok(a), if historical at all,woululd be a women, andclearly not identical with the legendary RagnarrLothbrok. (I donot have the bbackground in linguistics to commentfurther onthis gender argument.)RAGNALLThe "Fragmentary Annalsnnals ofIreland" (edited and translated by Joan N.Radner, Dublin, 1978,formerly called "Three Fraagments") has an itemof interest whichhas frequently been pointed out as possibly relatingto the llegend of Ragnar Lothbrok. In it, a certain Ragnall(Rognvald)son of Alpdan (Halfdan), king of Noorway, ismentioned, and hisexploits prior to the fall of York to theDanes are given, in acontext t in which it is at least arguablethat Ragnall and RagnarLothbrok were the same person. Therearee two problem with thisinterpretation. First, Ragnar andRagnall are not the same name, eventhoughgh they look similar.Second, and more important, the FragmentaryAnnals are themselvesnot a conteemporary source, and there is goodreason to besuspicious about them. However, even if we were to allowthatthe events given there are historical (a concession whichmanyhistorians would be unwilllling to make), and then concedefurther thatthese events form the basis of the Ragnar legend,thenn we would stillhave that the person on whom the legend wasbased did not have theright name.Could uld RAGNALL and LOTHBROKhave been the same person?We have already seen that the onlyhistorically y attested Ragnar(Reginheri) cannot reasonably beregarded as a historical prototypefor Ragnar Loththbrok. Thus,it appears that the best attempt to arguefor a historical RagnarLothbrok is to proppose (as has been done onnumerous occasions)that Ragnall and Lothbrok were both the sameperson, anand thenassume that the similar (but different) names Ragnalland Ragnarwere accidently confused. Thus, let us see whatassumptions areneeded in order to assume that Ragnall and Lothbrokwere the esame person, assuming that they existed at all. In orderforthis to be the case, we must make thhe followingassumptions:(1) We must assume that Adam of Bremen (lateeleventh century) wascorrectect in giving "Lodparchus" (i.e.,Lothbrok) as the name of thefather of Ivar (late ninthcentury).((2) We must assume that the "Coghad Gaedhel reGallaibh" ("The War ofthe Gaedhil with the Gaill", ", ed. byTodd, London, 1867), a twelfthcentury Irish source, is correctin stating that Halfdan off Dublin(killed in Ireland in 877,according to the Annals of Ulster) was theson of a certainRagnanall, and that this Ragnall was the same as theRagnall whoappears in the Fragmentary Annals of Ireeland.(3) We mustassume that the Anglo-Saxon Chronicle is correct instating thata brother (unnamnamed, but called Ubbe in later sources)ofHalfdan and Ivar was killed in England in 878, despitetthecontradictory testimony of Aethelweard which gives a verydifferentreading for the same event (s(see 4).(4) We mustassume that the chronicle of Aethelweard is wrong instating thatHalfdan brothother of Ivar was killed in England in 878,forotherwise that would prove that Halfdan of Dublin (dd. 877 inIreland)was a different person from Halfdan brother of Ivar.(5)In addition to assuming ng that Halfdan of Dublin was thesameperson as Halfdan brother of Ivar, we must also assume thattthis Ivarwas the same person as Adam of Bremen's Ivar, keepingin mind thatAethelweard's chronicle,e, if correct, would implythe existence of twoIvars in the British isles at this time.(6)We mustust assume that the philological argument makingLothbrok(a)a feminine name is incorrect.(7) If Ar Ari, theearliest author to mention Ragnar Lothbrok, is to beconsidered areliable source on this matter, then we must also assumethatHalfdan of Dublin was the same person as the Halfdan brotherofSigifrid who appears in the Annals of Fulda for the year 873,despitethe severe chronological prproblems which that wouldcause with Ari'sgenealogies.Of the above assumptions, numbers(1) throughugh (6) are crucial if onewishes to argue thatRagnall and Lothbrok were the same, and (7) isneededed also ifit is to be assumed that the information given by Ariisaccurate. Given the noncontempoorary nature of the first twoitems,along with the contradictions present some of the others,theree is avery small chance that all six of the crucialassumptions are correct.However, if any one of f the first sixitems is false, then the case forRagnall being the same asLothbrok collapses, and we must concludethat the "RagnallLothbrok" attempt for a historical Ragnar Lothbrokisunsatisfactctory. [Note: See R. W. McTurk's article"RagnarrLothbrok in the Irish Annals?" (Proceedings of ttheSeventh VikingCongress, 1976, pp. 93-123), where a different,but much more rigid,list of the s same type isgiven.]CONCLUSIONSSince all of the above attempts to find ahistorical Ragnar Lothbrohbrokfail to satisfy the mentionedcriteria, Lothbrok and Ragnall come fromnoncontemporary sourcess which are themselves open to suspicion, andthe historicalrecords show nobody else (as far as I kknow) who couldbeplausibly identified with Ragnar Lothbrok, it must beconcludedthat Ragnar Lothbrbrok is not historical according tothe termsdescribed above. In fact, if there is any historicalbasis to RagnarLothbrok legend, it is quite likely that RagnarLothbrok is the resultof combining g two or more distinctindividuals into a single characterhaving the attributes ofboth, in much thhe same way as RagnarLothbrok's legendary"father" Sigurd Ring is in fact a composite oftwo differerentmen who fought against each other for the Danish thronein theyear 814, Sigifridus ("Sigurd") and Anulo (of which "Ring" isatranslation of Latin "Annulus"). However, such compositecharacterrscannot be considered as historical, and there is noevidence whichcomes close to being contemporarary which showsthat either Lothbrok orRagnall existed.FURTHER READINGThe mostambitious attempt tmpt to portray Ragnar Lothbrok as ahistoricalfigure is "Scandinavian Kings in the British Isles8550-880" by AlfredP. Smyth (Oxford University Press, 1977). Fora very criticalexamination of Smythth's views, see "High-kings,Vikings and otherkings", by Donnchadh O' Corrain, in IrishHistorical Review, vol 21(1979), pp. 283-323 (very highlyrecommended). Both of these sourcescite numerous o otherrelevant sources for those who are interested infurtherdetails.[Note: The usual apologiesies if my transliterationsfrom the Old Norsealphabet into the alphabet available to me isa bit slloppy.]Stewart Baldwin.

  1. Change Date: 1 APR 1999

Father: Sigurd I "Ring" b: ABT 0710 in Denmark

Mother: Alfhild b: ABT 0714 in Alfheim, Norway

Marriage 1 Aslaug of Denmark SIGURDSDOTTIR b: ABT 0755 in Denmark

Children

1. Has Children Sigurd II Snodoye (or Eric II) RAGNARSSON King of Denmark b: ABT 0782 in Denmark

2. Has Children Alof RAGNARSDOTTIR

3. Has Children Ivar "the Boneless" RAGNARSSON King of Dublin

4. Has No Children Halfdan RAGNARSSON

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Flourished in the 9th century, was a Viking whose life passed into legend in medieval European literature.

In the Anglo-Saxon Chronicle, Ragnar was said to be the father of three sons, Halfdan, Inwaer (Ivar the Boneless), and Hubba (Ubbe), who led a Viking invasion of East Anglia in 865 seeking to avenge Ragnar's murder. In the European literature of the several centuries following Ragnar's death, his name is surrounded with considerable legend. In the Gesta Danorum (c. 1185) of the Danish historian Saxo Grammaticus, he was a 9th-century Danish king whose campaigns included a battle with the Holy Roman emperor Charlemagne. According to Saxo's legendary history, Ragnar was eventually captured by the Anglo-Saxon king Aella of Northumbria and thrown into a snake pit to die. This story is also recounted in the later Icelandic works Ragnars saga lodbrókar and Tháttr af Ragnarssonum. The 12th-century Icelandic poem Krákumál provides a romanticized description of Ragnar's death and links him in marriage with a daughter of Sigurd (Siegfried) and Brynhild (Brunhild), figures from the heroic literature of the ancient Teutons. The actions of Ragnar and his sons are also recounted in the Orkney Islands' poem Háttalykill.2

Note* Other children given by Hull are: (1) female, Ragnhildir: (2) Ragnarsdottir, Alof and (3)Ragnarsson, Ubbe. He may have had a wife named Thora who MAY have been the mother of Alof.

Bjørn Ironside certainly played an important role in France. His father Ragnar Lodbrok can be identified in contemporary Frankish annals with his nickname Lodbrok translated to Hoseri (in German language Hosen), meaning fur or leather breeches. Variations are Ogier and Oschery. He operated from the Seine to the border of Spain from 840 to 851. He conquered Aquitania from the Franks, and he used Bordeaux as his stronghold for years. This conquer, one out of more, included Poitou, which in the sagas is called Peita. Saxo is saying Petiæ and that Ragnar conquered Petiæ. this is confirmed in annals. This is the district in the Loire area. In Western Europe his sons are more reported. Ragnar Lodbrok himself were operating more in East Eur

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Ragnar was a pagan who claimed to be a direct descendant of the god Odin. One of his favorite strategies was to attack Christian cities on holy feast days, knowing that many soldiers would be in church.

Ragnar Lodbrok (Ragnar "Hairy-Breeks", Old Norse: Ragnarr Loðbrók) was a Norse legendary hero from the Viking Age who was thoroughly reshaped in Old Norse poetry and legendary sagas.

Although he is something of a hero in his native Scandinavia, reliable accounts of his life are very sketchy and heavily based on ancient Viking sagas. Even the dating of his reign is not certain; there are sources that date it from 750–794, and others from 860–865.[citation needed] Neither really matches with what is known of him, though he may perhaps have held power as a warlord from approximately 835 to his death in 865, perhaps only being recognized as king in the last five years of his life.

A historic Ragnar Lodbrok is held to have been an earl at the court of the Danish king Horik I (814-854), and this Ragnar participated in the Viking plunderings of Paris in 845.

A certain Reginheri attacked Paris with a fleet of 120 ships. The warriors belonging to the army of Charles the Bald, were placed to guard the monastery in St. Denis, but fled when the Danish Vikings executed their prisoners ferociously in front of their eyes.

After receiving a tribute of 7000 pounds of silver from Charles the Bald, Ragnar went back. By mysterious circumstances, many men in Ragnar's army died during the journey and Ragnar died soon after his return.

Ragnar apparently spent most of his life as a pirate and raider, invading one country after another. One of his favorite tactics was to attack Christian cities on church feast days, knowing that many soldiers would be in church. He would generally accept a huge payment to leave his victims alone, only to come back later and demand more riches in exchange for leaving.

But as the extent of his supposed realm shows, he was also a gifted military leader. By 845, he was a powerful man and most likely a contemporary of the first ruler of Russia, the Viking Rurik. It is said he was always seeking new adventures because he was worried that his freebooting sons would do things that would outshine his own achievements.

It was in 845 that he is said to have sailed southward, looking for new worlds to conquer. With 120 ships and 5,000 Viking warriors, he landed in what is now France, probably at the Seine estuary, and ravaged West Francia, as the westernmost part of the Frankish Empire was then known. Rouen was ravaged and then Carolivenna, a mere 20 km from St. Denis. The raiders then attacked and captured Paris. The traditional date for this is 28 March, which is today referred to as Ragnar Lodbrok Day by certain followers of the Asatru religion.

The King of West Francia, Charlemagne's grandson Charles the Bald, paid him a fantastic amount of money not to destroy the city. Ragnar Lodbrok, according to Viking sources, was satisfied with no less than 7,000 pounds of silver in exchange for sparing the city. However, that did not stop Ragnar from attacking other parts of France, and it took a long time for the Franks to drive him out.

Later, Ragnar's sons were to return for more booty. Among their feats was destroying the city of Rouen several times. Ultimately, many of them settled there permanently, in a land that became known as Normandy (for "Northmen", as the Franks called the Scandinavians or the Nordmenn as the Norwegians called themselves (which is much more likely).

After he was done with France, and after his supposed death in 845, he turned his attention to England. In 865, he landed in Northumbria on the north-east coast of England. It is claimed that here he was defeated in battle for the only time, by King Aelle II of Northumbria.

Aelle's men captured Ragnar, and the King ordered him thrown into a pit filled with poisonous snakes. As he was slowly being bitten to death, he is alleged to have exclaimed "How the little pigs would grunt if they knew the situation of the old boar!", referring to the vengeance he hoped his sons would wreak when they heard of his death.

Alternative versions of the story say that he landed by accident in East Anglia and there befriended King Edmund before being killed by a jealous courtier. The murderer escaped to Denmark and blamed Edmund for Lodbrok's demise.

As he was thrown into the snake pit, Ragnar was said to have uttered his famous death song: "It gladdens me to know that Balder’s father makes ready the benches for a banquet. Soon we shall be drinking ale from the curved horns. The champion who comes into Odin’s dwelling does not lament his death. I shall not enter his hall with words of fear upon my lips. The Æsir will welcome me. Death comes without lamenting… Eager am I to depart. The Dísir summon me home, those whom Odin sends for me from the halls of the Lord of Hosts. Gladly shall I drink ale in the high-seat with the Æsir. The days of my life are ended. I laugh as I die."

One Viking saga states that when his four sons heard the manner of his death, they all reacted in great sorrow. Hvitserk, who was playing tafl, gripped the piece so hard that he bled from his fingernails. Björn Ironside grabbed a spear so tightly that he left an impression in it, and Sigurd Snake-in-the-Eye, who was trimming his nails, cut straight through to the bone.

Although these stories may not be accurate, like virtually all tales concerning Ragnar Lodbrok, his death had serious consequences. His other sons, Ivar the Boneless (alias Hingwar) and Ubbe soon learned the details of their father's death and swore that they would avenge his killing, in time-honoured Viking tradition. In 866, Ivar and Ubbe crossed the North Sea with a large army (The Great Heathen Army), sacked York, met King Aelle in battle, and captured him. He was sentenced to die according to the custom of Rista Blodörn (Blood eagle), an exceedingly painful death.

They then moved south to East Anglia, on the way attacking the monasteries of Bardney, Croyland and Medeshampstede where, according to tradition, their army slew 80 monks. Eventually they captured King Edmund and had him shot by archers and beheaded. These wars were a prelude to the long struggle of the Saxons of Alfred the Great against the Danes a generation later.

He was said at one point to be married to the infamous Viking pirate Lathgertha.

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Född 765 i Uppsala. Död 845 i England.

http://no.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ragnar_Lodbrok

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ragnar_Lodbrok

http://lind.no/nor/index.asp?lang=gb&emne=asatru&person=Ragnar%20Lodbrok&list=&vis=

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Ragnar Sigurdsson - also known as: Lodbrok - was born about 0765 in Uppsala, Uppsala, Sweden and died in 0845 in England . He was the son of King Sigrud Randversson and Alfhild Gandolfsdatter.

Ragnar married Aslaug Sigurdsatter about 0763 while living in Denmark. Aslaug was born about 0765, lived in Denmark. She is the daughter of Sigrud "Fafnisbana" Sigmundsson and Brunhild Budlasdatter.

Children:

i. Sigurd "Snake-Eye" Ragnarsson was born about 0786 in Denmark. See #5. below.

ii. Bjorn Ragarsson was born about 0777 in Denmark.

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Flourished in the 9th century

Viking whose life passed into legend in medieval European literature.

In the Anglo-Saxon Chronicle, Ragnar was said to be the father of three sons, Halfdan, Inwaer (Ivar the Boneless), and Hubba (Ubbe), who led a Viking invasion of East Anglia in 865 seeking to avenge Ragnar's murder. In the European literature of the several centuries following Ragnar's death, his name is surrounded with considerable legend. In the Gesta Danorum (c. 1185) of the Danish historian Saxo Grammaticus, he was a 9th-century Danish king whose campaigns included a battle with the Holy Roman emperor Charlemagne. According to Saxo's legendary history, Ragnar was eventually captured by the Anglo-Saxon king Aella of Northumbria and thrown into a snake pit to die. This story is also recounted in the later Icelandic works Ragnars saga lodbrókar and Tháttr af Ragnarssonum. The 12th-century Icelandic poem Krákumál provides a romanticized description of Ragnar's death and links him in marriage with a daughter of Sigurd (Siegfried) and Brynhild (Brunhild), figures from the heroic literature of the ancient Teutons. The actions of Ragnar and his sons are also recounted in the Orkney Islands' poem Háttalykill.

____________________________________

Ragnarr Loðbrók or Ragnar Lodbrok was a semi-legendary King of Denmark and Sweden who reigned sometime in the eighth or ninth centuries. Although he is something of a hero in his native Scandinavia, reliable accounts of his life are very sketchy and heavily based on ancient Viking sagas. Even the dating of his reign is not certain; there are sources that date it from 750–794, and others from 860–865. Neither matches with what we know of him, and he probably held power as a warlord from approximately 835 to his death in 865, perhaps only being recognized as king in the last five years of his life.

Life

Ragnar was a pagan who claimed to be a direct descendant of the god Odin. One of his favorite strategies was to attack Christian cities on holy feast days, knowing that many soldiers would be in church.

Raids

He spent most of his life as a pirate and raider, invading one country after another. He would generally accept a huge payment to leave his victims alone, only to come back later and demand more riches in exchange for leaving. But as the extent of his realm shows, he was also a gifted military leader.

France

By 845, he was a powerful ruler, and most likely a contemporary of the first ruler of Russia, the Viking Rurik. It is said he was always seeking new adventures because he was worried that his freebooting sons would do things that outshined his own achievements.

In that year, he sailed southward, looking for new worlds to conquer. With 120 ships and 5,000 Viking warriors, he landed in modern France, probably at the Seine estuary, and ravaged West Francia, as the westernmost part of the Frankish empire was then known.

Also in 845, Paris was captured and held ransom by a Viking raider, whom the sagas say was Ragnar Lodbrok. The traditional date for this is March 28, which is today referred to as Ragnar Lodbrok Day by many Scandinavians. The King of West Francia, Charlemagne’s son Charles II "The Bald", paid him a fantastic amount of money not to destroy the city. Ragnar Lodbrok, according to Viking sources, was satisfied with no less than 7,000 pounds of silver in exchange for sparing the city. However, that did not stop Ragnar from attacking other parts of France, and it took a long time for the Franks to drive him out.

England

After he was done with France, he turned his attention to England. In 865, he landed in Northumbria on the northeast coast of England. It is claimed that here he was defeated in battle for the only time, by King Aelle of Northumbria. Ella’s men captured Ragnar, and the King ordered him thrown into a pit filled with poisonous snakes. As he was slowly being bitten to death, he was alleged to have exclaimed "How the little pigs would grunt if they knew the situation of the old boar!"

Legacy

One Viking saga states that when his four sons heard the manner of his death, they all reacted in great sorrow. Hvitserk, who was playing chess, gripped the piece so hard that he bled from his fingernails. Björn Ironside grabbed a spear so tightly that he left an impression in it, and Sigurd Snake-Eye, who was trimming his nails, cut straight through to the bone.

Ragnar’s fourth son, Ivar the Boneless soon learned the details of his father’s death and swore that he would avenge his father’s killing, in time-honored Viking tradition. In 866, Ivar crossed the North Sea with a large army, met King Ella in battle, and captured him. He sentenced him to die according to the custom of Rista Blodörn, an exceedingly painful death. Although this story may not be accurate, like virtually all tales concerning Ragnar Lodbrok, his death had serious consequences. Ivor was the mastermind behind the attacks on the English mainland in the final quarter of the ninth century. He invaded East Anglia, and the following year attacked York. He was aided by the internal struggle for power in Northumbria—which he was of course responsible for by killing Ella. These wars were a prelude to the long struggle of the Saxons of Alfred the Great against the "Danes" a generation later.

Meanwhile, in France, the Vikings kept coming back for more booty. Among their feats was destroying the city of Rouen several times. Ultimately, many of them settled there permanently, in a land that became known as Normandy (for "Northmen", as the Franks called the Vikings).

Ragnar married Aslaug Sigurdsdottir, daughter of Sigurd Wolsung and Unknown

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http://lind.no/nor/index.asp?lang=gb&emne=asatru&person=Ragnar%20Lodbrok&list=&vis=

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Äktenskap : Aslög Sigurdsdottir

Död : Cir 865

Andra namn för Ragnar var Regnar , Regner , Lodbrog , Lodbrok och Lothbrok .

 Allmänna hänvisningar: 

Blomstrade i 9: e århundradet

Viking vars liv gått till legend i medeltida europeiska litteraturen .

I den Anglosaxiska krönikan var Ragnar sägs vara far till tre söner , Halfdan , Inwaer ( Ivar Benlös ) och Hubba ( Ubbe ) , som ledde en Viking invasion av East Anglia i 865 att försöka hämnas Ragnars mord. I den europeiska litteraturen i flera århundraden efter Ragnars död , hans namn är omgiven med stor legend. I Gesta Danorum (ca 1185 ) av den danska historikern Saxo Grammaticus , han var en 9. - talet danske kungen vars kampanjer ingår ett slag mot den tysk-romerske kejsaren Karl den store. Enligt Saxo legendariska historia, Ragnar småningom fångas upp av den anglosaxiska kung Ella av England och kastades i en ormgrop att dö. Denna historia också är återberättad i senare isländska verk Ragnars saga lodbrókar och Tháttr af Ragnarssonum . Det 12 -talet isländska dikten Krákumál ger en romantiserad beskrivning av Ragnar död och länkar honom i äktenskap med en dotter till Sigurd ( Siegfried ) och Brynhild ( Brynhild ) , siffror från den hjältemodiga litteratur av de gamla germanerna . De åtgärder av Ragnar och hans söner är också berättade på Orkneyöarna " dikt Háttalykill .

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Ragnarr Lodbrok eller Ragnar Lodbrok var en semi- legendarisk kung av Danmark och Sverige som regerade någon gång i åttonde eller nionde århundradena. Även om han är något av en hjälte i sitt hemland Skandinavien, tillförlitliga räkenskaper av sitt liv är mycket knapphändiga och tungt bygger på gamla Viking sagor . Även dateringen av sin regeringstid är inte säkert , det finns källor som denna dag 750 till 794 , och andra från 860 till 865 . Varken matcher med vad vi vet om honom, och han förmodligen hade makten som en krigsherre från cirka 835 till sin död 865 , kanske bara erkänns som kung under de senaste fem åren av sitt liv .

Livet

Ragnar var en hedning som påstod sig vara en ättling till guden Oden. En av hans favorit strategier var att angripa kristna städer på helig festdagar , i vetskap om att många soldater skulle vara i kyrkan.

Raids

Han tillbringade större delen av sitt liv som en pirat och raider , invadera ett land efter land. Han skulle generellt acceptera en enorm betalning lämna sina offer ensam , bara för att komma tillbaka senare och kräva mer rikedom i utbyte mot att lämna . Men eftersom omfattningen av sitt rike visar var han också en duktig militär ledare .

Frankrike

Genom att 845 var han en mäktig härskare , och troligen samtida med den första härskaren i Ryssland, Viking Rurik . Det sägs att han var alltid söker nya äventyr eftersom han var orolig att hans freebooting söner skulle göra saker som outshined hans egna prestationer .

Samma år seglade han söderut , letar efter nya världar att erövra. Med 120 fartyg och 5.000 Viking krigare , landsteg han i det moderna Frankrike , troligen vid Seines mynning, och härjade Västfranken , som den västligaste delen av det frankiska riket då kallades .

Även i 845 , var Paris fångas in och hålls gisslan av en Viking raider , vilka sagor säga var Ragnar Lodbrok . Det traditionella datumet för detta är 28 mars, som idag kallas Ragnar Lodbrok dag av många skandinaver . Kungen av Västfranken , Karl den stores son Karl II " den skallige " , betalade honom en fantastisk summa pengar inte förstöra staden. Ragnar Lodbrok , enligt Viking källor , var nöjd med inte mindre än 7000 pounds av silver i utbyte skona staden. Detta har emellertid inte stoppa Ragnar från att angripa andra delar av Frankrike , och det tog lång tid för frankerna att köra ut honom.

England

När han var klar med Frankrike , vände han sin uppmärksamhet till England. I 865 , landade han i Northumbria i nordöstra Englands kust . Det påstås att här han blev besegrad i kampen om den enda gången , av kung Aelle av Northumbria. Ella män tillfångatagna Ragnar, och kungen beordrade honom kastades i en grop fylld med giftiga ormar . När han sakta bli biten till döds , han påstås ha utbrast " Hur små grisar skulle grymta om de kände till situationen i det gamla galten ! "

Legacy

En Viking saga att när hans fyra söner hörde hur hans död , reagerade de alla i stor sorg. Hvitserk , som spelade schack , grep verket så hårt att han blödde från hans fingernaglar. Björn Järnsida tog ett spjut så hårt att han lämnade ett avtryck i den och Sigurd Snake -Eye , som putsning sina naglar , skär rakt igenom till benet .

Ragnar fjärde son, Ivar Benlös lärde sig snart att detaljer om hans fars död och svor att han skulle hämnas sin faders mord, i en hundraårig Viking tradition. I 866 , korsade Ivar Nordsjön med en stor armé mötte kung Ella i strid, och tillfångatog honom. Han dömde honom till döden enligt den praxis för Rista Blodörn , en ytterst plågsam död. Även denna historia kanske inte är rätt , liksom nästan alla berättelser om Ragnar Lodbrok hade hans död allvarliga konsekvenser. Ivor var hjärnan bakom attackerna på det engelska fastlandet under det sista kvartalet av det nionde århundradet. Han invaderade East Anglia , och året därpå anföll York. Han hjälp av den interna maktkampen i Northumbria - som han naturligtvis ansvarig för genom att döda Ella . Dessa krig var ett förspel till den långa kampen för saxare av Alfred den store mot " danskarna " en generation senare.

Under tiden i Frankrike, höll vikingarna kommer tillbaka för mer byte. Bland deras bedrifter var att förstöra staden Rouen flera gånger. I slutändan , fast många av dem finns permanent i ett land som blev känd som Normandie ( för " nordmännen ", som frankerna kallas vikingar ).

Ragnar gifte Aslög Sigurdsdottir , dotter till Sigurd Wolsung och Okänd.


Källor

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1 Encyclopædia Britannica Online, "Ragnar Lothbrok " .

2 Wikipedia ( http://en.wikipedia.org/ ).

3 Brian C. Tompsett , Register över Royal genealogiska ( Datahttp : / / www.dcs.hull.ac.uk / public / Släktforskning / royal / catalog.html

Brian Tompsett

Institutionen för datavetenskap

University of Hull

Hull , Storbritannien, HU6 7RX

BCTompsett@dcs.hull.ac.uk ), se Snorre saga och den isländska Landnamobok ( Book of Settlment ).

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Marriage: Aslaug Sigurdsdottir

Died: Cir 865

  Other names for Ragnar were Regnar, Regner, Lodbrog, Lodbrok and Lothbrok. 
 General Notes: 

Flourished in the 9th century

Viking whose life passed into legend in medieval European literature.

In the Anglo-Saxon Chronicle, Ragnar was said to be the father of three sons, Halfdan, Inwaer (Ivar the Boneless), and Hubba (Ubbe), who led a Viking invasion of East Anglia in 865 seeking to avenge Ragnar's murder. In the European literature of the several centuries following Ragnar's death, his name is surrounded with considerable legend. In the Gesta Danorum (c. 1185) of the Danish historian Saxo Grammaticus, he was a 9th-century Danish king whose campaigns included a battle with the Holy Roman emperor Charlemagne. According to Saxo's legendary history, Ragnar was eventually captured by the Anglo-Saxon king Aella of Northumbria and thrown into a snake pit to die. This story is also recounted in the later Icelandic works Ragnars saga lodbrókar and Tháttr af Ragnarssonum. The 12th-century Icelandic poem Krákumál provides a romanticized description of Ragnar's death and links him in marriage with a daughter of Sigurd (Siegfried) and Brynhild (Brunhild), figures from the heroic literature of the ancient Teutons. The actions of Ragnar and his sons are also recounted in the Orkney Islands' poem Háttalykill.

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Ragnarr Loðbrók or Ragnar Lodbrok was a semi-legendary King of Denmark and Sweden who reigned sometime in the eighth or ninth centuries. Although he is something of a hero in his native Scandinavia, reliable accounts of his life are very sketchy and heavily based on ancient Viking sagas. Even the dating of his reign is not certain; there are sources that date it from 750–794, and others from 860–865. Neither matches with what we know of him, and he probably held power as a warlord from approximately 835 to his death in 865, perhaps only being recognized as king in the last five years of his life.

Life

Ragnar was a pagan who claimed to be a direct descendant of the god Odin. One of his favorite strategies was to attack Christian cities on holy feast days, knowing that many soldiers would be in church.

Raids

He spent most of his life as a pirate and raider, invading one country after another. He would generally accept a huge payment to leave his victims alone, only to come back later and demand more riches in exchange for leaving. But as the extent of his realm shows, he was also a gifted military leader.

France

By 845, he was a powerful ruler, and most likely a contemporary of the first ruler of Russia, the Viking Rurik. It is said he was always seeking new adventures because he was worried that his freebooting sons would do things that outshined his own achievements.

In that year, he sailed southward, looking for new worlds to conquer. With 120 ships and 5,000 Viking warriors, he landed in modern France, probably at the Seine estuary, and ravaged West Francia, as the westernmost part of the Frankish empire was then known.

Also in 845, Paris was captured and held ransom by a Viking raider, whom the sagas say was Ragnar Lodbrok. The traditional date for this is March 28, which is today referred to as Ragnar Lodbrok Day by many Scandinavians. The King of West Francia, Charlemagne’s son Charles II "The Bald", paid him a fantastic amount of money not to destroy the city. Ragnar Lodbrok, according to Viking sources, was satisfied with no less than 7,000 pounds of silver in exchange for sparing the city. However, that did not stop Ragnar from attacking other parts of France, and it took a long time for the Franks to drive him out.

England

After he was done with France, he turned his attention to England. In 865, he landed in Northumbria on the northeast coast of England. It is claimed that here he was defeated in battle for the only time, by King Aelle of Northumbria. Ella’s men captured Ragnar, and the King ordered him thrown into a pit filled with poisonous snakes. As he was slowly being bitten to death, he was alleged to have exclaimed "How the little pigs would grunt if they knew the situation of the old boar!"

Legacy

One Viking saga states that when his four sons heard the manner of his death, they all reacted in great sorrow. Hvitserk, who was playing chess, gripped the piece so hard that he bled from his fingernails. Björn Ironside grabbed a spear so tightly that he left an impression in it, and Sigurd Snake-Eye, who was trimming his nails, cut straight through to the bone.

Ragnar’s fourth son, Ivar the Boneless soon learned the details of his father’s death and swore that he would avenge his father’s killing, in time-honored Viking tradition. In 866, Ivar crossed the North Sea with a large army, met King Ella in battle, and captured him. He sentenced him to die according to the custom of Rista Blodörn, an exceedingly painful death. Although this story may not be accurate, like virtually all tales concerning Ragnar Lodbrok, his death had serious consequences. Ivor was the mastermind behind the attacks on the English mainland in the final quarter of the ninth century. He invaded East Anglia, and the following year attacked York. He was aided by the internal struggle for power in Northumbria—which he was of course responsible for by killing Ella. These wars were a prelude to the long struggle of the Saxons of Alfred the Great against the "Danes" a generation later.

Meanwhile, in France, the Vikings kept coming back for more booty. Among their feats was destroying the city of Rouen several times. Ultimately, many of them settled there permanently, in a land that became known as Normandy (for "Northmen", as the Franks called the Vikings).

Ragnar married Aslaug Sigurdsdottir, daughter of Sigurd Wolsung and Unknown.


Sources

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1 Encyclopædia Britannica Online, "Ragnar Lothbrok".

2 Wikipedia (http://en.wikipedia.org/).

3 Brian C. Tompsett, Directory of Royal Genealogical (Datahttp://www.dcs.hull.ac.uk/public/genealogy/royal/catalog.html

Brian Tompsett

Department of Computer Science

University of Hull

Hull, UK, HU6 7RX

B.C.Tompsett@dcs.hull.ac.uk), See Snorre's Saga and the Icelandic Landnamobok (Book of Settlment).

Fra Wikipedia:

Ragnar Lodbrok (norrønt Ragnarr Loðbrók) var en delvis legendarisk svensk og dansk småkonge som levde en gang på 700- og 800-tallet. I henhold til den krønikeskriver Saxo Grammaticus tilhørte Ragnar til den svenske Ynglingeætten. Både Saxo og islandske kilder har beskrevet ham som sønn av Sigurd Ring, en svensk konge som etter sigende skal ha erobret Danmark, men kildene strides om Ragnar bodde i Sverige eller i Danmark.

Myte eller historisk figur?

Selv om Ragnar Lodbrok ble betraktet som en helt i det norrøne Norden er troverdige opptegnelser om livet hans svært overfladisk og hviler tungt på legendariske fornaldersagaer. Selv en noenlunde datering av hans tid og liv hviler på stor usikkerhet: noen kilder nevner 750-794, mens andre kilder daterer betydelig senere fra 860-865. Antagelig var han en krigsherre fra antatt 835 til sin død i 865, og kanskje kun regnet som konge de siste få årene av livet. Den historiske Ragnar Lodbrok var muligens en jarl for den danske kong Hårek. [1]

Lodbrok betyr «lodden bukse», etter sigende for at Ragnars kone hadde sydd ham klær fra dyreskinn. Navnet «Lothbroc» finnes i verket Gesta Normannorum Ducum av William av Jumièges (ca 1070) hvor denne blir nevnt som far til Bjørn Jernside, sistnevnte blir bekreftet av andre kilder. Ivar Beinlause er også blitt identifisert som sønn av Ragnar Lodbrok av Adam av Bremen som kalte Ivar sønn av «Lodparchus». Det er den islandske sagaskribenten Are Torgilsson Frode (1067-1148) som er den første kjente forfatteren som knytter Lodbrok med fornavnet Ragnar, eller knytter to personer sammen til en skikkelse, Ragnar og Lodbrok. I Irlands fragmentariske annaler finnes det en opptegnelse over en «Ragnall» (Ragnvald), sønn av «Alpdan» (Halvdan), «konge av Norge», og hans bedrifter fram til York faller til danskene. Det er en av de sterkest argumenter for at Ragnall eller Ragnvald er den samme som Ragnar Lodbrok, og for krønikeskrivere på de britiske øyene var det vanskelig å skille mellom norsk eller dansk når de knapt nok gjorde det selv.

I senere foraldersagaer ble Ragnar gjort til konge av Danmark og drar på fantastiske eventyr over hele verden. Blant annet møter han den enestående vakre og trolldomskyndige Åslaug Sigurdsdatter i Norge som han gifter seg med og hun føder ham fire sønner. Åslaug, som også blir kalt for «Kråka», er en påstått datter av Sigurd Fåvnesbane, en annen legendarisk helt fra fornaldersagaene. Som Kråka er Åslaug ei norrøn Askepott, og blir hyllet i både Norge og Danmark, og hennes funksjon er å være en forbindelse mellom Odin og de norrøne fornalderkongene som krevde å nedstamme fra gudene.

To av sagaene som omhandler Ragnar Lodbrok er Ragnar Lodbroks saga (Ragnars Saga Lodbrokar) og den kortere og kanskje yngre Tætten om Ragnarsønnenes saga (Ragnarssona þáttr). Han nevnes også i Völsungasagaen og i Orknøyingenes saga som Snorre Sturlasson kaller «jarlesagaen». Det knyttes en forbindelse mellom Ragnar Lodbrok og Orkenøyene. En runestein der bærer hans navn. I henhold til De fragmentariske irske annaler ble Ragnars sønn Halvdan med sine tre sønner fordrevet til Orknøyene. Det skjedde senest i 854. Ragnar Lodbrok er også en sentral skikkelse i skaldekvadet Håttalykill (Háttalykill inn forni = Versemålnøkkelen), diktet av islenderen Hall Torarinsson og Ragnvald Orknøyjarl i fellesskap.

Røver og helt

Ragnar var en førkristen hedning som påsto at han var en direkte etterkommer av ingen ringere enn Odin selv. Ett av hans favorittstrategier var å angripe kristne byer på helligdager, vel vitende om at mange av soldatene da ville være i kirken.

Ragnar tilbrakte det meste av livet som pirat og viking, invaderte det ene landet etter det andre. Han ville vanligvis godta en høy betaling for å la være å angripe sine ofre, kun for å komme tilbake senere og forlange en enda høyere avbetaling for ikke å angripe. Omfanget av hans område tyder på at han må ha vært en dyktig hærfører.

Ravnen var Ragnar Lodbroks symbol. Han hadde fått sine døtre til å sy et banner med en ravn avbildet. Ravnen hadde i alle år vært en fugl knyttet til dårlige varsler lik Odin selv eide to ravner kalt Hugin og Munin som fortalte om det som skjedde i verden. Banneret kalte han «Reafan» og det ble sagt at når banneret flagret ville Ragnar seire, men om det hang livløst vil slaget være tapt. Også de norske kongene Harald Hårfagre og Harald Hardråde eide et tilsvarende ravnebanner.

Frankrike

I 845 var han tilsynelatende en mektig hersker og sannsynligvis samtidig med den første herskeren av Russland, den norrøne Rurik. Det er sagt at Ragnar alltid søkte nye eventyr ettersom han fryktet for at hans egne sønner ville utføre gjerninger som ville overskygge hans egne.

I dette året seilte han sørover med 120 skip og anslagsvis 5 000 krigere. Han gikk i land i dagens Frankrike, sannsynligvis ved elvemunningen Seine og herjet i «Vest-Francia», som den vestlige delen av det frankiske riket den gang var kjent som.

Det samme året ble Paris okkupert og holdt som gissel av norrøne menn, og som sagaene har identifisert som Ragnar Lodbrok. Den tradisjonelle datoen for dette er 28. mars. En fortelling forteller at de soldatene som var utplassert for å vokte klosteret i St Denis flyktet da de danske vikingene henrettet sine fanger på en særdeles grusom måte. Kongen av Vest-Francia, Karl den stores sønnesønn Karl den skallete betalte Ragnar en enorm sum penger for ikke å ødelegge byen. Ragnar Lodbrok, i henhold til sagatradisjonen, var tilfreds med ikke mindre enn 7 000 pund sølv. Det forhindret dog ikke Ragnar fra å angripe andre deler av Frankrike, og det kostet mye tid og anstrengelser for frankerne å drive ham ut.

England

Etter at han var ferdig med Frankrike dro Ragnar tilbake til Danmark hvor han senere døde. Eller han var den som vendte sin oppmerksomhet mot England og i 865 gikk i land i Northumbria på nordøstkysten av England. Det er blitt sagt at han ble beseiret for første gang i slag av kong Ælla II av Northumbria. Ælles menn tok Ragnar til fange og den angelsaksiske kongen ga ordre om at han skulle kastes i et hull som var fylt med giftige slanger. Mens han langsomt ble bitt i hjel av slangene skal han etter sigende ha erklært: «Grynte ville grisene, om de visste hva galten led!»

Ragnar blir hevnet

Ragnars siste ord er selvsagt et litterært påfunn ettersom de ble profetiske. I henhold til sagaen fikk hans fire sønner høre om hans død: Halvdan Kvitserk som spilte Hnefatafl (et brettspill kalt «Kongens bord» eller «Tablut») grep så hardt om en spillbrikke at blod tøt ut fra neglene; Bjørn Jernside grep så hardt om spydet at fingermerkene sto igjen om skaftet; og Sigurd Orm-i-auga som trimmet neglene kuttet kniven rett inn i beinet.

Kun den fjerde sønnen, Ivar Beinlause, lyttet til alle detaljene om drapet og forberedte hevnen. Brødrene samlet sammen en enorm hærstyrke, dro til Northumbria, beseiret kong Ællas hær og torturerte denne i hjel ved å skjære blodørn på ham. Det vil si at de skar opp ryggen, brettet ribbeina til side og trakk ut lungene til offeret døde. Det er opplagt overdrevet at Ragnars død skulle få såpass store konsekvenser, men Ivar Beinløse er uten tvil en historisk skikkelse som i 866 erobret først York og deretter hele nordlige England.

Ragnars antatte slekt

Ragnar Lodbrok var gift eller fikk barn med en rekke kvinner, hans første Lathgertha, hans andre hustru Åslaug Sigurdsdatter (også kalt Kråka), hans tredje hustru Tora, hans fjerde hustru Svanloga; og hans femte navnløse hustru (datter av Esbern). Av de ulike fortellingene, feilkilder og overdrivelser inkludert, fikk han følgende sønner:

Ivar Beinlause, sønn av Åslaug

Halvdan Kvitserk Ragnarsson, sønn av Tora

Sigurd Orm-i-auga Ragnarsson, sønn av Åslaug

Ubbe Ragnarsson, sønn av navnløse hustru, eller av Åslaug?

Bjørn Jernside Ragnarsson, sønn av Tora

Rathbarth Ragnarsson, sønn av Tora

Dunyat Ragnarsson, sønn av Tora

Agnar Ragnarsson, sønn av Tora

Regnald Ragnarsson, sønn av Svanloga

Eirik Vindhatt Ragnarsson, sønn av Svanloga.

Fridleiv Ragnarsson, sønn av Lathgertha.

Og følgende døtre:

Alof Ragnarsdatter

Ragnhild Ragnarsdatter

Litteratur

Smyth, Alfred P.: Scandinavian Kings in the British Isles 850-880, Oxford University Press, 1977

O' Corrain, Donnchadh: «High-kings, Vikings and other kings», i Irish Historical Review, vol 21 (1979), sidene 283-323

Humble, Richard: The Fall of Saxon England, (BCA) 1995

Jones, Gwyn: A History of the Vikings, 1983

Eksterne lenker

Was Ragnar Lothbrok historical?

Fornaldarsögur Norðurlanda fra «Kulturformidlingen Norrøne Tekster og Kvad».

Sagaen om Ragnarsønnene i engelsk oversettelse av Tunstall på Northvegr

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Ragnar Lodbrok omtales som sagnkonge, det finnes ei egen soge om ham. Hn var konge rundt Oslofjorden, på Romerike og i Vestfold helt til Langesundfjorden. Han var ofså konge i Danmark

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Reference: http://familytrees.genopro.com/318186/jarleslekt/default.htm?page=toc_families.htm

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http://no.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ragnar_Lodbrok

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Bild: Aella mördar Ragnar Lodbrok

Rag -------------------- Directory of Royal Genealogical Data, Hull, England aka: King Ragnar Lodbrok of Denmark at Lethra (Succeeding his father, Sigurd Ring. )(1

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Ragnar "Lodbrok" Sigurdsson's Timeline