Raymond Bérenger IV, comte de Provence

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Ramón Berenguer IV de Provenza, conde de Provenza

Nicknames: "Raymond IV Bérenger Count of Provence", "Raymond Count of Provence", "Raimond IV Berengar", "Raymond Barenger V IV Of /PROVENCE FORCALQUIER/", "**Raymond //", "Raymond Bérenger IV", "comte de Provence", "**Raymond // (Geni Tree Match)"
Birthdate:
Death: Died in Aix-en-Provence, Bouches-du-Rhone, Provence-Alpes-Côte d'Azur, France
Place of Burial: Église Saint-Jean-de-Malte, Aix-en-Provence, Bouches-du-Rhone, Provence-Alpes-Côte d'Azur, France
Immediate Family:

Son of Alphonse II Bérenger, comte de Provence and Garsende de Sabran, comtesse de Forcalquier
Husband of Béatrice de Savoie, comtesse consort de Provence
Father of Marguerite de Provence, reine consort de France; Eleanor of Provence, Queen consort of England; Sanchia of Provence, Queen of the Romans; Beatrice di Provenza, regina consorte di Sicilia; Raymond de Provence and 1 other
Brother of Gersende de Provence, infante d'Aragon

Occupation: Count of Provence, Conde de Provença, Count of Provence and Forcalquier, COUNT OF PROVENCE IV, COUNT OF BARCELONA V, France, last and most illustrious of the Royal Provençal Counts, Рамон Беренгер, граф на Прованс, of Provence
Managed by: Sally Gene Cole
Last Updated:

About Ramón Berenguer IV de Provenza, conde de Provenza

Ramon Berenguer IV (1195 – 19 August 1245), Count of Provence and Forcalquier, was the son of Alfonso II of Provence and Garsenda of Sabran, heiress of Forcalquier. After his father's death (1209), Ramon was imprisoned in the castle of Monzón, in Aragon until he was able to escape in 1219 and claim his inheritance. He was a powerful and energetic ruler who added Forcalquier to his domain.

On 5 June 1219, Ramon married Beatrice of Savoy, daughter of Thomas I of Savoy. She was a shrewd and politically astute woman, whose beauty was likened by Matthew Paris to that of a second Niobe. Along with two stillborn sons (1220 & 1225), Ramon and Beatrice had four daughters, all of whom married kings.

Marguerite of Provence (1221–1295), wife of Louis IX of France

Eleanor of Provence (1223–1291), wife of Henry III of England

Sanchia of Provence (1228–1261), wife of Richard, Earl of Cornwall

Beatrice of Provence (1234–1267), wife of Charles I of Sicily

Ramon Berenguer IV died in Aix-en-Provence.

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Raymond Bberenger V Provence & Forcalquier

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Ramon Berenguer IV, Count of Provence

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Ramon Berenguer IV (1195 – 19 August 1245), Count of Provence and Forcalquier, was the son of Alfonso II of Provence and Garsenda of Sabran, heiress of Forcalquier. After his father's death (1209), Ramon was imprisoned in the castle of Monzón, in Aragon until he was able to escape in 1219 and claim his inheritance. He was a powerful and energetic ruler who added Forcalquier to his domain. Giovanni Villani in his Nuova Cronica had this to say about Raymond:

Count Raymond was a lord of gentle lineage, and kin to them of the house of Aragon, and to the family of the count of Toulouse, By inheritance Provence, this side of the Rhone, was his; a wise and courteous lord was he, and of noble state and virtuous, and in his time did honourable deeds, and to his court came all gentle persons of Provence and of France and of Catalonia, by reason of his courtesy and noble estate, and he made many Provençal coblas and canzoni of great worth.[1]

On 5 June 1219, Ramon married Beatrice of Savoy, daughter of Thomas I of Savoy. She was a shrewd and politically astute woman, whose beauty was likened by Matthew Paris to that of a second Niobe. Along with two stillborn sons (1220 & 1225), Ramon and Beatrice had four daughters, all of whom married kings.

1.Marguerite of Provence (1221–1295), wife of Louis IX of France

2.Eleanor of Provence (1223–1291), wife of Henry III of England

3.Sanchia of Provence (1228–1261), wife of Richard, Earl of Cornwall

4.Beatrice of Provence (1234–1267), wife of Charles I of Sicily

Ramon Berenguer IV died in Aix-en-Provence. At least two planhs (Occitan funeral laments) of uncertain authorship (one possibly by Aimeric de Peguilhan and one falsely attributed to Rigaut de Berbezilh) were written in his honour.

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Ramon Berenguer IV, Count of Provence

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Jump to: navigation, search

Raimond-Berenger IV, church Saint-Jean-de-Malte at Aix-en-Provence

Ramon Berenguer IV (1195 – 19 August 1245), Count of Provence and Forcalquier, was the son of Alfonso II of Provence and Garsenda of Sabran, heiress of Forcalquier. After his father's death (1209), Ramon was imprisoned in the castle of Monzón, in Aragon until he was able to escape in 1219 and claim his inheritance. He was a powerful and energetic ruler who added Forcalquier to his domain. Giovanni Villani in his Nuova Cronica had this to say about Raymond:

   Count Raymond was a lord of gentle lineage, and kin to them of the house of Aragon, and to the family of the count of Toulouse, By inheritance Provence, this side of the Rhone, was his; a wise and courteous lord was he, and of noble state and virtuous, and in his time did honourable deeds, and to his court came all gentle persons of Provence and of France and of Catalonia, by reason of his courtesy and noble estate, and he made many Provençal coblas and canzoni of great worth.[1]

On 5 June 1219, Ramon married Beatrice of Savoy, daughter of Thomas I of Savoy. She was a shrewd and politically astute woman, whose beauty was likened by Matthew Paris to that of a second Niobe. Along with two stillborn sons (1220 & 1225), Ramon and Beatrice had four daughters, all of whom married kings.

  1. Marguerite of Provence (1221–1295), wife of Louis IX of France
  2. Eleanor of Provence (1223–1291), wife of Henry III of England
  3. Sanchia of Provence (1228–1261), wife of Richard, Earl of Cornwall
  4. Beatrice of Provence (1234–1267), wife of Charles I of Sicily

Ramon Berenguer IV died in Aix-en-Provence. At least two planhs (Occitan funeral laments) of uncertain authorship (one possibly by Aimeric de Peguilhan and one falsely attributed to Rigaut de Berbezilh) were written in his honour.

[edit] Sources

   * Howell, Margaret. Eleanor of Provence: Queenship in Thirteenth-Century England, 2001
   * FMG on Raymond Berenger de Provence, the fourth Count of Provence

[edit] Notes

  1. ^ Giovanni Villani, Rose E. Selfe, ed. (1906), "§90—Incident relating to the good Count Raymond of Provence.", Villani's Chronicle, Being Selections from the First Nine Books of the Croniche Fiorentine of Giovanni Villani (London: Archibald Constable & Co.), 196. The Provençal coblas and cansos referred to do not survive and Ramon Berenguer is not listed among the troubadours, though he was their patron.

Retrieved from "http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ramon_Berenguer_IV,_Count_of_Provence"

Categories: House of Aragon | Counts of Provence | 1195 births | 1245 deaths

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Ramon Berenguer IV (1195 – 19 August 1245), Count of Provence and Forcalquier, was the son of Alfonso II of Provence and Garsenda of Sabran, heiress of Forcalquier. After his father's death (1209), Ramon was imprisoned in a castle in Aragon until he was able to escape in 1219 and claim his inheritance. He was a powerful and energetic ruler who added Forcalquier to his domain.

On 5 June 1219, Ramon married Beatrice of Savoy, daughter of Thomas I of Savoy. She was a shrewd and politically astute woman, whose beauty was likened by Matthew Paris to that of a second Niobe. Along with two stillborn sons (1220 & 1225), Ramon and Beatrice had four daughters, all of whom married kings.

Marguerite of Provence (1221–1295), wife of Louis IX of France

Eleanor of Provence (1223–1291), wife of Henry III of England

Sanchia of Provence (1228–1261), wife of Richard, Earl of Cornwall

Beatrice of Provence (1234–1267), wife of Charles I of Sicily

Ramon Berenguer IV died in Aix, France.

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Ramon Berenguer IV (1195 – 19 August 1245), Count of Provence and Forcalquier, was the son of Alfonso II of Provence and Garsenda of Sabran, heiress of Forcalquier. After his father's death (1209), Ramon was imprisoned in the castle of Monzón, in Aragon until he was able to escape in 1219 and claim his inheritance. He was a powerful and energetic ruler who added Forcalquier to his domain. Giovanni Villani in his Nuova Cronica had this to say about Raymond:

   Count Raymond was a lord of gentle lineage, and kin to them of the house of Aragon, and to the family of the count of Toulouse, By inheritance Provence, this side of the Rhone, was his; a wise and courteous lord was he, and of noble state and virtuous, and in his time did honourable deeds, and to his court came all gentle persons of Provence and of France and of Catalonia, by reason of his courtesy and noble estate, and he made many Provençal coblas and canzoni of great worth.[1]

On 5 June 1219, Ramon married Beatrice of Savoy, daughter of Thomas I of Savoy. She was a shrewd and politically astute woman, whose beauty was likened by Matthew Paris to that of a second Niobe. Along with two stillborn sons (1220 & 1225), Ramon and Beatrice had four daughters, all of whom married kings.

  1. Marguerite of Provence (1221–1295), wife of Louis IX of France
  2. Eleanor of Provence (1223–1291), wife of Henry III of England
  3. Sanchia of Provence (1228–1261), wife of Richard, Earl of Cornwall
  4. Beatrice of Provence (1234–1267), wife of Charles I of Sicily

Ramon Berenguer IV died in Aix-en-Provence. At least two planhs (Occitan funeral laments) of uncertain authorship (one possibly by Aimeric de Peguilhan and one falsely attributed to Rigaut de Berbezilh) were written in his honour.

Sources

   * Howell, Margaret. Eleanor of Provence: Queenship in Thirteenth-Century England, 2001
   * FMG on Raymond Berenger de Provence, the fourth Count of Provence

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Ramon Berenguer IV (1195 – 19 August 1245), Count of Provence and Forcalquier, was the son of Alfonso II of Provence and Garsenda of Sabran, heiress of Forcalquier. After his father's death (1209), Ramon was imprisoned in the castle of Monzón, in Aragon until he was able to escape in 1219 and claim his inheritance. He was a powerful and energetic ruler who added Forcalquier to his domain. Giovanni Villani in his Nuova Cronica had this to say about Raymond:

Count Raymond was a lord of gentle lineage, and kin to them of the house of Aragon, and to the family of the count of Toulouse, By inheritance Provence, this side of the Rhone, was his; a wise and courteous lord was he, and of noble state and virtuous, and in his time did honourable deeds, and to his court came all gentle persons of Provence and of France and of Catalonia, by reason of his courtesy and noble estate, and he made many Provençal coblas and canzoni of great worth.[1]

On 5 June 1219, Ramon married Beatrice of Savoy, daughter of Thomas I of Savoy. She was a shrewd and politically astute woman, whose beauty was likened by Matthew Paris to that of a second Niobe. Along with two stillborn sons (1220 & 1225), Ramon and Beatrice had four daughters, all of whom married kings.

Marguerite of Provence (1221–1295), wife of Louis IX of France

Eleanor of Provence (1223–1291), wife of Henry III of England

Sanchia of Provence (1228–1261), wife of Richard, Earl of Cornwall

Beatrice of Provence (1234–1267), wife of Charles I of Sicily

Ramon Berenguer IV died in Aix-en-Provence. At least two planhs (Occitan funeral laments) of uncertain authorship (one possibly by Aimeric de Peguilhan and one falsely attributed to Rigaut de Berbezilh) were written in his honour.

Sources

Howell, Margaret. Eleanor of Provence: Queenship in Thirteenth-Century England, 2001

FMG on Raymond Berenger de Provence, the fourth Count of Provence

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Ramon Berenguer IV (1195 – 19 August 1245), Count of Provence and Forcalquier, was the son of Alfonso II of Provence and Gersenda II of Sabran. After his father's death (1209), Ramon was imprisoned in a castle in Aragon until he was able to escape in 1219 and claim his inheritance. He was a powerful and energetic ruler who added Forcalquier to his domain.

On 5 June 1219, Ramon married Beatrice of Savoy, daughter of Thomas I of Savoy. She was a shrewd and politically astute woman, whose beauty was likened by Matthew Paris to that of a second Niobe. After two stillborn sons, Ramon and Beatrice had four daughters, who all married kings.

  1. Marguerite of Provence (1221-1295), wife of Louis IX of France
  2. Eleanor of Provence (1223-1291), wife of Henry III of England
  3. Sanchia of Provence (1228-1261), wife of Richard, Earl of Cornwall
  4. Beatrice of Provence (1231-1267), wife of Charles I of Sicily

--------------------

Ramon Berenguer IV (1195 – 19 August 1245), Count of Provence and Forcalquier, was the son of Alfonso II of Provence and Garsenda of Sabran, heiress of Forcalquier. After his father's death (1209), Ramon was imprisoned in a castle in Aragon until he was able to escape in 1219 and claim his inheritance. He was a powerful and energetic ruler who added Forcalquier to his domain.

On 5 June 1219, Ramon married Beatrice of Savoy, daughter of Thomas I of Savoy. She was a shrewd and politically astute woman, whose beauty was likened by Matthew Paris to that of a second Niobe. Along with two stillborn sons (1220 & 1225), Ramon and Beatrice had four daughters, all of whom married kings.

Marguerite of Provence (1221–1295), wife of Louis IX of France

Eleanor of Provence (1223–1291), wife of Henry III of England

Sanchia of Provence (1228–1261), wife of Richard, Earl of Cornwall

Beatrice of Provence (1234–1267), wife of Charles I of Sicily

Ramon Berenguer IV died in Aix, France.

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Ramon Berenguer IV (1195 – 19 August 1245), Count of Provence and Forcalquier, was the son of Alfonso II of Provence and Garsenda of Sabran, heiress of Forcalquier. After his father's death (1209), Ramon was imprisoned in the castle of Monzón, in Aragon until he was able to escape in 1219 and claim his inheritance. He was a powerful and energetic ruler who added Forcalquier to his domain. Giovanni Villani in his Nuova Cronica had this to say about Raymond:

   Count Raymond was a lord of gentle lineage, and kin to them of the house of Aragon, and to the family of the count of Toulouse, By inheritance Provence, this side of the Rhone, was his; a wise and courteous lord was he, and of noble state and virtuous, and in his time did honourable deeds, and to his court came all gentle persons of Provence and of France and of Catalonia, by reason of his courtesy and noble estate, and he made many Provençal coblas and canzoni of great worth.

On 5 June 1219, Ramon married Beatrice of Savoy, daughter of Thomas I of Savoy. She was a shrewd and politically astute woman, whose beauty was likened by Matthew Paris to that of a second Niobe. Along with two stillborn sons (1220 & 1225), Ramon and Beatrice had four daughters, all of whom married kings.

  1. Marguerite of Provence (1221–1295), wife of Louis IX of France
  2. Eleanor of Provence (1223–1291), wife of Henry III of England
  3. Sanchia of Provence (1228–1261), wife of Richard, Earl of Cornwall
  4. Beatrice of Provence (1234–1267), wife of Charles I of Sicily

Ramon Berenguer IV died in Aix-en-Provence. At least two planhs (Occitan funeral laments) of uncertain authorship (one possibly by Aimeric de Peguilhan and one falsely attributed to Rigaut de Berbezilh) were written in his honour.

--------------------

Ramon Berenguer IV (1195 – 19 August 1245), Count of Provence and Forcalquier, was the son of Alfonso II of Provence and Garsenda of Sabran, heiress of Forcalquier. After his father's death (1209), Ramon was imprisoned in the castle of Monzón, in Aragon until he was able to escape in 1219 and claim his inheritance. He was a powerful and energetic ruler who added Forcalquier to his domain. Giovanni Villani in his Nuova Cronica had this to say about Raymond:

   Count Raymond was a lord of gentle lineage, and kin to them of the house of Aragon, and to the family of the count of Toulouse, By inheritance Provence, this side of the Rhone, was his; a wise and courteous lord was he, and of noble state and virtuous, and in his time did honourable deeds, and to his court came all gentle persons of Provence and of France and of Catalonia, by reason of his courtesy and noble estate, and he made many Provençal coblas and canzoni of great worth.

On 5 June 1219, Ramon married Beatrice of Savoy, daughter of Thomas I of Savoy. She was a shrewd and politically astute woman, whose beauty was likened by Matthew Paris to that of a second Niobe. Along with two stillborn sons (1220 & 1225), Ramon and Beatrice had four daughters, all of whom married kings.

  1. Marguerite of Provence (1221–1295), wife of Louis IX of France
  2. Eleanor of Provence (1223–1291), wife of Henry III of England
  3. Sanchia of Provence (1228–1261), wife of Richard, Earl of Cornwall
  4. Beatrice of Provence (1234–1267), wife of Charles I of Sicily

Ramon Berenguer IV died in Aix-en-Provence. At least two planhs (Occitan funeral laments) of uncertain authorship (one possibly by Aimeric de Peguilhan and one falsely attributed to Rigaut de Berbezilh) were written in his honour.

--------------------

Ramon Berenguer IV (1195 – 19 August 1245), Count of Provence and Forcalquier, was the son of Alfonso II of Provence and Garsenda of Sabran, heiress of Forcalquier. After his father's death (1209), Ramon was imprisoned in the castle of Monzón, in Aragon until he was able to escape in 1219 and claim his inheritance. He was a powerful and energetic ruler who added Forcalquier to his domain. Giovanni Villani in his Nuova Cronica had this to say about Raymond:

Count Raymond was a lord of gentle lineage, and kin to them of the house of Aragon, and to the family of the count of Toulouse, By inheritance Provence, this side of the Rhone, was his; a wise and courteous lord was he, and of noble state and virtuous, and in his time did honourable deeds, and to his court came all gentle persons of Provence and of France and of Catalonia, by reason of his courtesy and noble estate, and he made many Provençal coblas and canzoni of great worth.[1]

On 5 June 1219, Ramon married Beatrice of Savoy, daughter of Thomas I of Savoy. She was a shrewd and politically astute woman, whose beauty was likened by Matthew Paris to that of a second Niobe. Along with two stillborn sons (1220 & 1225), Ramon and Beatrice had four daughters, all of whom married kings.

Marguerite of Provence (1221–1295), wife of Louis IX of France

Eleanor of Provence (1223–1291), wife of Henry III of England

Sanchia of Provence (1228–1261), wife of Richard, Earl of Cornwall

Beatrice of Provence (1234–1267), wife of Charles I of Sicily

Ramon Berenguer IV died in Aix-en-Provence. At least two planhs (Occitan funeral laments) of uncertain authorship (one possibly by Aimeric de Peguilhan and one falsely attributed to Rigaut de Berbezilh) were written in his honour.

[edit] Sources

Howell, Margaret. Eleanor of Provence: Queenship in Thirteenth-Century England, 2001

FMG on Raymond Berenger de Provence, the fourth Count of Provence

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Thomas I or Tommaso I (c. 1176 – March 1, 1233) was Count of Savoy from 1189-1233. He was the son of Humbert III of Savoy and Beatrice of Viennois. His birth was seen as miraculous; his monkish father had despaired of having a male heir after three wives. Count Humbert sought counsel from St. Anthelm, who blessed Humbert three times, and it was seen as a prophecy come true when Thomas was born shortly before Anthelm himself died on June 26, 1178. He was named in honour of Saint Thomas Becket.

Thomas was still a minor when his father died on 4 March 1189, and a council of regency was established, comprising of his mother Beatrice, his father's cousin Boniface I of Montferrat, and the Bishop of Saint-Jean-de-Maurienne. He had reached his majority by August 1191. Thomas possessed the martial abilities, energy, and brilliance that his father lacked, and Savoy enjoyed a golden age under his leadership. Despite his youth he began the push northwest into new territories. In the same year he granted Aosta Valley the "Carta delle Franchigie", recognising the right to administrative and political autonomy. This right was maintained up until the eve of the French Revolution. Later he conquered Vaud, Bugey, and Carignano. He supported the Hohenstaufens, and was known as "Thomas the Ghibelline" because of his career as Imperial Vicar of Lombardy.

[edit] Family and children

In 1195 he ambushed the party of Count William I of Geneva, which was escorting the count's daughter, Marguerite of Geneva, to France for her intended wedding to King Philip II of France. Thomas carried off Marguerite and married her himself, producing some eight sons and six daughters.

Amedeo, his immediate successor

Umberto, d. between March and November 1223

Tommaso, lord and then count in Piedmont and founder of a line that became the Savoy-Achaea

Aimone, d. August 30, 1237, Lord of Chablais

Guglielmo (William of Savoy), Bishop of Valence and Dean of Vienne

Amadeo of Savoy, Bishop of Maurienne

Pietro, who resided much in England, became Earl of Richmond, and ultimately in 1263 became the disputed count of Savoy

Filippo, archbishop of Lyon, who resigned, through marriage became Count Palatine of Burgundy and ultimately in 1268 became the disputed count of Savoy

Bonifacio who became archbishop of Canterbury

Beatrice of Savoy, d. 1265 or 1266, married in December 1219 to Ramon Berenguer IV, Count of Provence (1209-1245) and was mother of four Queens-consort

Alasia of Savoy, abbess of the monastery of St Pierre in Lyon (d.1250)

Ágatha of Savoy, abbess of the monastery of St Pierre in Lyon (d.1245)

Margherita of Savoy, d. 1273, married in 1218 to Hartmann I of Kyburg

Avita of Savoy (1215-92) who married Baldwin de Redvers, 7th Earl of Devon and Robert Aguillon (d.1286).

[edit] Further reading

Francesco Cognasso, Il Piemonte nell’Età Sveva (Turin, 1968)

Preceded by

Humbert III Count of Savoy Succeeded by

Amadeus IV

Retrieved from "http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Thomas_I,_Count_of_Savoy"

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Ramon Berenguer IV (1195 – 19 August 1245), Count of Provence and Forcalquier, was the son of Alfonso II of Provence and Garsenda of Sabran, heiress of Forcalquier. After his father's death (1209), Ramon was imprisoned in the castle of Monzón, in Aragon until he was able to escape in 1219 and claim his inheritance. He was a powerful and energetic ruler who added Forcalquier to his domain. Giovanni Villani in his Nuova Cronica had this to say about Raymond:

   Count Raymond was a lord of gentle lineage, and kin to them of the house of Aragon, and to the family of the count of Toulouse, By inheritance Provence, this side of the Rhone, was his; a wise and courteous lord was he, and of noble state and virtuous, and in his time did honourable deeds, and to his court came all gentle persons of Provence and of France and of Catalonia, by reason of his courtesy and noble estate, and he made many Provençal coblas and canzoni of great worth.

On 5 June 1219, Ramon married Beatrice of Savoy, daughter of Thomas I of Savoy. She was a shrewd and politically astute woman, whose beauty was likened by Matthew Paris to that of a second Niobe. Along with two stillborn sons (1220 & 1225), Ramon and Beatrice had four daughters, all of whom married kings.

  1. Marguerite of Provence (1221–1295), wife of Louis IX of France
  2. Eleanor of Provence (1223–1291), wife of Henry III of England
  3. Sanchia of Provence (1228–1261), wife of Richard, Earl of Cornwall
  4. Beatrice of Provence (1234–1267), wife of Charles I of Sicily

Ramon Berenguer IV died in Aix-en-Provence. At least two planhs (Occitan funeral laments) of uncertain authorship (one possibly by Aimeric de Peguilhan and one falsely attributed to Rigaut de Berbezilh) were written in his honour.

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From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ramon_Berenguer_IV,_Count_of_Provence

Jump to: navigation, search

Raimond-Berenger IV, church Saint-Jean-de-Malte at Aix-en-Provence

Ramon Berenguer IV (1195 – 19 August 1245), Count of Provence and Forcalquier, was the son of Alfonso II of Provence and Garsenda of Sabran, heiress of Forcalquier. After his father's death (1209), Ramon was imprisoned in the castle of Monzón, in Aragon until he was able to escape in 1219 and claim his inheritance. He was a powerful and energetic ruler who added Forcalquier to his domain. Giovanni Villani in his Nuova Cronica had this to say about Raymond:

   Count Raymond was a lord of gentle lineage, and kin to them of the house of Aragon, and to the family of the count of Toulouse, By inheritance Provence, this side of the Rhone, was his; a wise and courteous lord was he, and of noble state and virtuous, and in his time did honourable deeds, and to his court came all gentle persons of Provence and of France and of Catalonia, by reason of his courtesy and noble estate, and he made many Provençal coblas and canzoni of great worth.[1]

On 5 June 1219, Ramon married Beatrice of Savoy, daughter of Thomas I of Savoy. She was a shrewd and politically astute woman, whose beauty was likened by Matthew Paris to that of a second Niobe. Along with two stillborn sons (1220 & 1225), Ramon and Beatrice had four daughters, all of whom married kings.

  1. Marguerite of Provence (1221–1295), wife of Louis IX of France
  2. Eleanor of Provence (1223–1291), wife of Henry III of England
  3. Sanchia of Provence (1228–1261), wife of Richard, Earl of Cornwall
  4. Beatrice of Provence (1234–1267), wife of Charles I of Sicily

Ramon Berenguer IV died in Aix-en-Provence. At least two planhs (Occitan funeral laments) of uncertain authorship (one possibly by Aimeric de Peguilhan and one falsely attributed to Rigaut de Berbezilh) were written in his honour.

[edit] Sources

   * Howell, Margaret. Eleanor of Provence: Queenship in Thirteenth-Century England, 2001
   * FMG on Raymond Berenger de Provence, the fourth Count of Provence

[edit] Notes

  1. ^ Giovanni Villani, Rose E. Selfe, ed. (1906), "§90—Incident relating to the good Count Raymond of Provence.", Villani's Chronicle, Being Selections from the First Nine Books of the Croniche Fiorentine of Giovanni Villani (London: Archibald Constable & Co.), 196. The Provençal coblas and cansos referred to do not survive and Ramon Berenguer is not listed among the troubadours, though he was their patron.

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From http://www.rpi.edu/~holmes/Hobbies/Genealogy/ps03/ps03_415.htm

"Ancestral Roots..." (Balt., 1992) 111-29 states he b. 1198.

Weis' "Ancestral Roots. . ." (101:28), (104:28), (111:29), (133:27).

Stuart's "Royalty For Commoners" (54:26) & (164:27).

By Ramon's time Provence had been at peace for two and a half centuries. There were few lands that had enjoyed peace and prosperity with so little interruption. Since the end of the tenth century Provence had grown more in population and wealth than any other part of Europe. Few men in history have been more successful in finding powerful and influential mates for their daughters than Ramon. His four daughters married two sets of brothers - all of them kings! Margaret married King Louis IX of France; ELEANOR married KING HENRY III OF ENGLAND; Sanchia married HENRY's brother, Richard of Cornwall, who was recognized for a

time as the German Emporer; and Beatrice, the youngest and his appointed heir, married Louis' brother, Charles of Anjou, who at one time or another held the titles King of Sicily and King of Jerusalem and was

briefly master of most of Italy and Greece. He was almost able to make an independent state of Burgundy.

Ramon bequeathed to Beatrice an administrative machine to be rivaled only by those created by the Normans in England and Sicily.

Europaische Stammtafeln ii, 190:

References: [GENSERV],[AR7],[Weis1],[PRES.GED]

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Ramon Berenguer IV, Count of Provence

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Ramon Berenguer IV (1195 – 19 August 1245), Count of Provence and Forcalquier, was the son of Alfonso II of Provence and Garsenda of Sabran, heiress of Forcalquier. After his father's death (1209), Ramon was imprisoned in a castle in Aragon until he was able to escape in 1219 and claim his inheritance. He was a powerful and energetic ruler who added Forcalquier to his domain.

On 5 June 1219, Ramon married Beatrice of Savoy, daughter of Thomas I of Savoy. She was a shrewd and politically astute woman, whose beauty was likened by Matthew Paris to that of a second Niobe. Along with two stillborn sons (1220 & 1225), Ramon and Beatrice had four daughters, all of whom married kings.

Marguerite of Provence (1221–1295), wife of Louis IX of France

Eleanor of Provence (1223–1291), wife of Henry III of England

Sanchia of Provence (1228–1261), wife of Richard, Earl of Cornwall

Beatrice of Provence (1231–1267), wife of Charles I of Sicily

Ramon Berenguer IV died in Aix, France.

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Wikipedia:

http://de.wikipedia.org/wiki/Raimund_Berengar_V._%28Provence%29

Raimund Berengar V. (Provence)

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Statue von Raimund Berenger V. von Provence in der Kirche Saint-Jean-de-Malte in Aix-en-Provence

Raimund Berengar V. von Provence (* 1205 in Aix-en-Provence; † 19. August 1245 ebenda) war ein Graf von der Provence und Forcalquier. Er war ein Sohn des Grafen Alfons II. von der Provence und der Garsinde (Gersende, Garsenda) von Sabran, Gräfin von Forcalquier. Sein Großvater war König Alfons II. von Aragon.

Nach dem Tod seines Vaters im Jahre 1209 wurde Raimund Berengar am aragonesischen Hof in Monzón erzogen, während für ihn zunächst sein großonkel, Graf Sancho von Roussillon die Regentschaft in der Provence führte. 1219 konnte er selbst die Regierung übernehmen. In seiner Absicht, die Herrschaft in der Provence zu zentralisieren, führte er eine gegen die Städte gerichtete Politik. Dabei machte er sich den Albigenserkreuzzug des französischen Königs Ludwig VIII. zunutze, der 1226 Avignon eroberte und der Stadt anschließend ihrer Privilegien entzog. Raimund Berengar schaffte ebenfalls die Konsulate in Arles und Tarascon ab, mit Marseille lag er lange im Krieg. Außenpolitisch lehnte er sich zunächst an seinen Lehnsherren, Kaiser Friedrich II., an um diesen als Verbündeten gegen den Grafen von Toulouse zu gewinnen. Den Kaiser unterstützte er im Kampf gegen die lombardischen Städte, aber nach dem Scheitern vor Brescia 1239 wechselte er auf die Seite des Papstes, wofür er vom Kaiser mit der Reichsacht belegt wurde. Dies trieb Raimund Berengar an die Seite Frankreichs, durch die Ehen seiner Töchter begann die zunehmende Entfremdung des Reichslehns Provence vom heiligen römischen Reich.

Raimund Berengar wurde nach seinem Tod in der Kirche Saint-Jean-de-Malte in Aix-en-Provence bestattet.

Nachkommen [Bearbeiten]

Am 5. Juni 1220 heiratete er mit Beatrix von Savoyen (* 1201, † 1266) eine Tochter des Grafen Thomas I. von Savoyen. Das Paar hatte vier überlebende Töchter. Die zwei ältesten wurden mit bereits regierenden Königen verheiratet, während die Ehemänner der zwei jüngeren später zu königlichen Würden gelangten. Die jüngste Tochter wurde von Raimund Berengar als Erbin seiner Ländereien eingesetzt.

   * Raimund (früh gestorben)
   * Margarete von der Provence (* 1221; † 30. Dezember 1295) heiratete mit Ludwig IX. dem Heiligen den König von Frankreich und hatte mit diesem elf Kinder, darunter den nachmaligen König von Frankreich Philipp III. sowie Robert von Clermont, den Begründer der Bourbonendynastie.
   * Eleonore von der Provence (* 1223; † 25. Juni 1291) heiratete mit Heinrich III. Plantagenet den König von England und hatte mit diesem neun Kinder, darunter den nachmaligen König von England Edward the Longshanks.
   * Sancha von der Provence (* 1225; † 9. November 1261) heiratete mit Richard von Cornwall den nachmaligen römisch-deutschen König, hatte mit diesem drei Söhne und wurde so zur Stammmutter des Hauses Cornwallis.
   * Beatrix von der Provence (* 1233; † 23. September 1267) heiratete mit Karl von Anjou ihren Schwager und König von Neapel und Sizilien und hatte mit diesem sieben Kinder, darunter den nachmaligen König von Neapel und Sizilien Karl II. von Anjou, die nachmalige lateinische Kaiserin Beatrix und die nachmalige Königin von Ungarn Isabella.

Weblinks [Bearbeiten]

   * Raimund Berengar V. (Provence). In: Biographisch-Bibliographisches Kirchenlexikon (BBKL).
   * Materialsammlung bei genealogie-mittelalter.de

Vorgänger

Alfons II.

Graf von Provence

1209–1245 Nachfolgerin

Beatrix

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Ramon Berenguer IV (1195 – 19 August 1245), Count of Provence and Forcalquier, was the son of Alfonso II of Provence and Garsenda of Sabran, heiress of Forcalquier. After his father's death (1209), Ramon was imprisoned in the castle of Monzón, in Aragon until he was able to escape in 1219 and claim his inheritance. He was a powerful and energetic ruler who added Forcalquier to his domain. Giovanni Villani in his Nuova Cronica had this to say about Raymond:

Count Raymond was a lord of gentle lineage, and kin to them of the house of Aragon, and to the family of the count of Toulouse, By inheritance Provence, this side of the Rhone, was his; a wise and courteous lord was he, and of noble state and virtuous, and in his time did honourable deeds, and to his court came all gentle persons of Provence and of France and of Catalonia, by reason of his courtesy and noble estate, and he made many Provençal coblas and canzoni of great worth.[1]

On 5 June 1219, Ramon married Beatrice of Savoy, daughter of Thomas I of Savoy. She was a shrewd and politically astute woman, whose beauty was likened by Matthew Paris to that of a second Niobe. Along with two stillborn sons (1220 & 1225), Ramon and Beatrice had four daughters, all of whom married kings.

1.Marguerite of Provence (1221–1295), wife of Louis IX of France

2.Eleanor of Provence (1223–1291), wife of Henry III of England

3.Sanchia of Provence (1228–1261), wife of Richard, Earl of Cornwall

4.Beatrice of Provence (1234–1267), wife of Charles I of Sicily

Ramon Berenguer IV died in Aix-en-Provence. At least two planhs (Occitan funeral laments) of uncertain authorship (one possibly by Aimeric de Peguilhan and one falsely attributed to Rigaut de Berbezilh) were written in his honour.

[edit] Sources

Howell, Margaret. Eleanor of Provence: Queenship in Thirteenth-Century England, 2001

FMG on Raymond Berenger de Provence, the fourth Count of Provence

[edit] Notes

1.^ Giovanni Villani, Rose E. Selfe, ed. (1906), "§90—Incident relating to the good Count Raymond of Provence.", Villani's Chronicle, Being Selections from the First Nine Books of the Croniche Fiorentine of Giovanni Villani (London: Archibald Constable & Co.), 196. The Provençal coblas and cansos referred to do not survive and Ramon Berenguer is not listed among the troubadours, though he was their patron.

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Ramon Berenguer IV (1195 – 19 August 1245), Count of Provence and Forcalquier, was the son of Alfonso II of Provence and Garsenda of Sabran, heiress of Forcalquier. After his father's death (1209), Ramon was imprisoned in a castle in Aragon until he was able to escape in 1219 and claim his inheritance. He was a powerful and energetic ruler who added Forcalquier to his domain.

On 5 June 1219, Ramon married Beatrice of Savoy, daughter of Thomas I of Savoy. She was a shrewd and politically astute woman, whose beauty was likened by Matthew Paris to that of a second Niobe. Along with two stillborn sons (1220 & 1225), Ramon and Beatrice had four daughters, all of whom married kings.

Marguerite of Provence (1221–1295), wife of Louis IX of France

Eleanor of Provence (1223–1291), wife of Henry III of England

Sanchia of Provence (1228–1261), wife of Richard, Earl of Cornwall

Beatrice of Provence (1234–1267), wife of Charles I of Sicily

Ramon Berenguer IV died in Aix, France.

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After his father's death in 1209, Ramón Berenguer IV, Count of Provence and Forcalquier, was imprisoned in the castle of Monzón, in Aragon, until he was able to escape in 1219 and claim his inheritance. He was a powerful and energetic ruler who added Forcalquier to his domain.

Giovanni Villani in his Nuova Cronica had this to say about Raymond: "Count Raymond was a lord of gentle lineage, and kin to them of the house of Aragon, and to the family of the count of Toulouse. By inheritance Provence, this side of the Rhone, was his; a wise and courteous lord was he, and of noble state and virtuous, and in his time did honorable deeds, and to his court came all gentle persons of Provence and of France and of Catalonia, by reason of his courtesy and noble estate, and he made many Provençal coblas and canzoni of great worth."

See http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ramon_Berenguer_IV,_Count_of_Provence for more information.

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Title: Count of Savoy. One of the last great Provencal poets, whose court was renowned for its patronage of the troubadours. He was a distinguished man & a vigorous warrior, but spent most of his financial resources on a never-ending series of campaigns.

Sources:

The book, 'Pedigrees of Some of the Emperor Charlemagne's Descendants'

(plus, many more) -------------------- Ramon Berenguer IV (1195 – 19 August 1245), Count of Provence and Forcalquier, was the son of Alfonso II of Provence and Garsenda of Sabran, heiress of Forcalquier. After his father's death (1209), Ramon was imprisoned in the castle of Monzón, in Aragon until he was able to escape in 1219 and claim his inheritance. He was a powerful and energetic ruler who added Forcalquier to his domain. Giovanni Villani in his Nuova Cronica had this to say about Raymond:

Count Raymond was a lord of gentle lineage, and kin to them of the house of Aragon, and to the family of the count of Toulouse, By inheritance Provence, this side of the Rhone, was his; a wise and courteous lord was he, and of noble state and virtuous, and in his time did honourable deeds, and to his court came all gentle persons of Provence and of France and of Catalonia, by reason of his courtesy and noble estate, and he made many Provençal coblas and canzoni of great worth.[1]

On 5 June 1219, Ramon married Beatrice of Savoy, daughter of Thomas I of Savoy. She was a shrewd and politically astute woman, whose beauty was likened by Matthew Paris to that of a second Niobe. Along with two stillborn sons (1220 & 1225), Ramon and Beatrice had four daughters, all of whom married kings.

-------------------- Count of Provence

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Raymond Bérenger IV, comte de Provence's Timeline

1198
1198
1209
1209
Age 11
Count of, Province, Forcalquier, France
1209
Age 11
Count of, Province, Forcalquier, France
1209
Age 11
Count of, Province, Forcalquier, France
1220
December 1220
Age 22
Chambbery, Savoie, France
1221
1221
Age 23
Saint-Maime, Provence-Alpes-Côte d'Azur, France
1223
1223
Age 25
Aix-en-Provence, Provence-Alpes-Côte d'Azur, France

Located southern France.

1225
1225
Age 27
Aix-en-Provence, Provence-Alpes-Côte d'Azur, France
1234
1234
Age 36
Aix en Provence, Bouches-du-Rhone, Provence-Alpes-Cote d'Azur, France
1245
August 19, 1245
Age 47
Aix-en-Provence, Bouches-du-Rhone, Provence-Alpes-Côte d'Azur, France