Nicholas Noyes, Salem Witch Trials (1615 - 1701) MP

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Birthplace: Cholderton, Wiltshire, England
Death: Died in Newbury, Essex, Massachusetts
Occupation: Propr., town officer, clergyman
Managed by: Michele McAffee
Last Updated:

About Nicholas Noyes, Salem Witch Trials

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nicholas_Noyes

Nicholas Noyes was a colonial minister in Salem, Massachusetts during the time of the Salem witch trials. He was the second minister, called the "Teacher", to Rev. John Higginson. During the Salem witch trials, Noyes acted as the official minister of the trials.

Noyes spent time as the chaplain with troops in Connecticut during King Philip's War in 1675-76.

Before the execution of Sarah Good on July 19, 1692, Rev. Noyes asked her to confess. Her famous last words were, “You are a liar! I am no more a witch than you are a wizard, and if you take away my life God will give you blood to drink.” Ironically, twenty-five years later, Noyes died of a hemorrhage and literally did choke on his own blood.

On September 22, 1692, Rev. Nicholas Noyes officiated as clergyman at the final hangings of the those accused of witchcraft. It is reported that he turned toward the suspended bodies of the victims and said, “What a sad thing it is to see eight firebrands of hell hanging there.”

Later in life Rev. Noyes repented of his part in the witchcraft persecutions and did what he could to assist the dependent families.

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Nicholas Noyes is said to have been the first man to step ashore at Parker river, Newbury, in 1635.

NICHOLAS NOYES

As a young man, Nicholas Noyes (b. 1615-16) is recorded as the first of the new settlers to leap ashore at the landing site in Newbury, MA in 1635. There is an historical marker at the location, which is on the left bank of the Parker River as you look toward the Atlantic Ocean from the bridge on Route 1A that crosses the river. The site, near the spot where River bends to the right, may be reached by turning right from Route 1A onto Cottage Rd., just past the Lower Green, and following Cottage Rd. until it ends at a parking area and boat landing; the marker is a boulder on the left. Nicholas was chosen Deacon of the First Parish Church of Newbury when it was gathered. In 1637 he walked the forty miles from Newbury to Cambridge to qualify as a freeman and voter. About 1640 he married Mary Cutting, daughter of a shipmaster, Capt. John Cutting and his wife Mary.

Nicholas and Mary Noyes had ten children born in Newbury: Mary (1641), Hannah (1643), John (1645), (Reverand) Nicholas (1647), Cutting (1649), Sarah (1653), Timothy (1655), James (1657), Abigail (1659), Rachel (1661) and Thomas (1663).

He died in Newbury on 23 Nov., 1701.

Of early historical interest is the role that Rev. Nicholas (Harvard A.B., 1647), the second son of Nicholas and Mary, played in the Salem witch trials, where he officiated at the hanging of alleged witches in 1692; he later repented of his part in the persecutions and helped to provide assistance to the dependent families.

Early Noyes descendants often were ministers and teachers, and sometimes distinguished by their rectitude - for example, the Salem trials and the founding of Yale, partly motivated by the belief that Harvard College was becoming too liberal. However, descendants of the line also may be interested to know of another of their ancestors via Nicholas Noyes (Noyes Geneology (1904), cited below, vol. 1, p. 402), perhaps equally devout and committed to bringing God's Kingdom, but at the opposite end politically - Rev. John Humphrey Noyes (1811 - 1886). He was a leader of the Perfectionist movement and founded the Oneida Community, one of the great utopian socialist experiments in American history. He was an early proponent of the equality of women and of a different approach to sexuality and marriage than his Puritan ancestors (or teachers at Yale Divinity School).(For example, Alfred Kazin wrote on the book jacket of Spencer Klaw's Without Sin: The Life and Death of the Oneida Community (NY: Penguin Press, 1993): "The Oneida Community was the most practical and, because of its sexual code, the merriest of our nineteenth-century Utopias. Its founder and dictator, John Humphrey Noyes, would have fascinated Dostoyevsky.")

REFERENCES:

The basic reference for the Noyes family genealogy is the remarkable work by Col. Henry E. Noyes and Miss Harriette E. Noyes in two volumes, Geneological Record of Some of the Noyes Descendants of James, Nicholas, and Peter Noyes, published in Boston, MA in 1904. [Volume 1 covers descendants of Nicholas Noyes; vol. 2 the descendants of Rev. James Noyes and of Peter Noyes, who arrived later.] A copy is available in the second floor geneological library of the Historical Society of Old Newbury, located on 98 High St. (Route 1A) in Newburyport.

Submitted by: Biographical sketch provided by Lloyd Etheredge, 10/2001. (Descendant via Timothy Noyes, fourth son of Nicholas; grandson of Lynn Ray Noyes, vol. 1, p. 343 of the 1904 volume.) URL: www.noyes.ws re recent descendants of Lynn Ray Noyes and Ada Noyes Conrad.

Dr. Lloyd S. Etheredge

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Nicholas Noyes was born in Cholderton, co. Wilts, about 1614. In 1674 he gave his age as about 60 [Ipswich Deeds, 4:187). He married about 1641 Mary Cutting of Newbury who died before 1700. He died in Newbury on November 23, 1701.
   What was evidently a family group of six, having decided to go to New England, took the Oath of Allegiance - John Woodbridge, George Brown, Nicholas Noyes, and Richard Brown - on March 24, 1633/34, Thomas Parker and James Noyes on March 26, 1634 - and all embarked on the "<i>Mary and John</i>" at Southampton, reaching Nantasket (now Hull) near Boston sometime in May 1634 and removed to Agwam (Ipswich) where they remained during the following winter. The Rev. Parker and friends remained in Ipswich until the following spring when they applied to the General Court for liberty to settle on the Quascacunquen in an area known as Wessacucon. May 6, 1635, the following orders were passed by the General Court:
   - Wessacucon is allowed by the court to be a plantation & it is refered to Mr. Humfry, Mr. Endicott, Capt. Turner and Capt. Trask or any three of them, to sett out the bounds of Ipswich & Wessacucon or so much thereof as they can & the name of the said plantation in changed & hereafter to be called Neweberry.
   Most of the passengers who came to New England in the ship "Mary & John" were induced to remove to Newbury early in the year 1635. Tradition asserts that they came by water from Ipswich and landed on the north shore of the Quascacunquen (now Parker) river, about two or three hundred rods below the bridge that connects the "Lower Green" with the "Great Neck" and the town of Rowley. A monument marks the spot where the settlers disembarked in May or June, 1635. Tradition states that young Nicholas was the first person to leap ashore when their boat anchored in the Quascacumquen (now the Parker) River. (John J. Currier, "History of Newbury" p.312; Sarah Anna Emery "Reminiscences of a Nonagenarian" p.112) They joined 23 men and their families who formed a cattle-breeding company and were among the first settlers at Newbury where their children were born. Newbury's first minister was Thomas Parker, a cousin.
   Rev. Nicholas Noyes, in his account of his uncle, Rev. James Noyes, told of the coming of Mr. Parker, Mr. Noyes and his younger brother Nicholas Noyes, a single man, adding "between which three was more than ordinary endearment of affection, which was broken but by death."
   Nicholas took the Freeman's Oath in Cambridge on May 17, 1637 when he and eight others walked from Newbury to Cambridge to vote for Gov. Winthrop. On April 21, 1638, he was one of five men fined 2s. 6d. apiece for absence from Newbury town meeting after due warning. The meeting was called to order at eight o'clock in the morning! Two of the men (not Nicholas) had their fines remitted, having sufficient excuses.
   It must have been very soon after this that Noyes sailed on a voyage to England, possibly to settle family affairs and to report on conditions in Massachusetts Bay. He returned to New England on the "<i>Jonathan</i>" which sailed from London, probably soon after April 12, 1639, and "came to Anchor in Boston Harbor." Also on the "Jonathan" were Anthony Somerby of Newbury and Mr. Peter Noyes of Sudbury, who, having come over on the "<i>Confidence</i>" in 1638, aged 47, and found New England to his liking, had gone back to his home in Penton, near Andover, co. Hants, to fetch his family. Peter was doubtless a kinsman of Nicholas. [Register, 32:411]
   When it was proposed to remove the inhabitants of Newbury from their first settlement on the Parker river to a new site nearer the Merrimac, Nicholas Noyes was a freeholder and a deputy "for the managing of those things that concern the ordering of the New Town" on December 7, 1642.
   In 1650 Nicholas and four other men were before the court for saying that "the elders would transgress for a morsel of bread." He lost no prestige thereby for on September 30, 1651, at Ipswich he was sworn clerk of the Newbury market. In 1652 many were brought before the court for not observing the Sumptuary laws of 1651. The records say "Nicholas Noyes' wife, Hugh March's wife, and William Chandler's wife were each presented for wearing a silk hood and scarf; but were discharged on proof that their husbands were worth £200 each. John Hutchins' wife was also discharged upon testifying that she was brought up above the ordinary rank."
   The town voted on November 29, 1652, that a school house be built and that £20 a year be appropriated for the schoolmaster, and Mr. Woodman, Richard Kent, jun., Lieut. Pike and Nicholas Noyes were named the committee to carry it out.
   Thomas Noyes of Sudbury, son of Peter Noyes, had apparently settled in Newbury, but returned to live in Sudbury before 1656 when he appointed his friend Mr. Nicholas Noyes, gentleman, and Robert Long, both of Newbury, his attorneys to let his house and lands.
   Nicholas was appointed Commissioner to End Small Causes, or local justice, in 1657 and 1658. His most important service, however, was as deputy to the General Court in 1660 and in 1678 when on September 19 he was chosen by the town "to serve at the next session of the Court until it be ended," a special session having been called for October 2 at which the oath of allegiance to King Charles II was submitted and signed by the deputies; he served also 28 May 1679, 19 May 1680, and 4 Jan 1680-84.
   In the long and bitter controversy between Rev. Mr. Parker and Edward Woodman, Nicholas was one of Parker's chief supporters. He was chosen deacon of the First Parish of Newbury on March 20, 1683/4.
   Sometime before his death his son Nicholas, the Salem parson, wrote of him as "through the mercy of God yet living, and hath of children, grandchildren and great grandchildren above one hundred."
   In deed 15:41 at Salem he conveyed the property to grandson Nicholas, son of his son John April 19, 1698. Deed 27:8 Salem 1 Apr 1673 is an agreement between parents Nicholas and Mary and their son Cutting.
   The homestead of Nicholas Noyes was owned and occupied in 1885 by the heirs of Nathaniel Little. 

The Noyes family are of Korman descent. Originally ' the name was spelt "Noye. From the Conquest the race have been distinguished for scholarship and influence. In the 14th and 15th years of the reign of Henry VIII. William Noyes of Erchfort was assessed for the subsidy at £80 and paid £4 yearly. In 1540 he became possessed of the prebend of Rochford with its dependencies and died in 1557, leaving considerable property to a large family of whom John Noyes was a Member of Parliament for Laine in 1600, and Robert Noyes the elder brother who succeeded to the prebend, having purchased in 1574 for his eldest son, Robert, the manor and estate of King's Hatherdene, in Weghill near Andover. His cousin Peter Noyes was also of Weghill and Andover, Berkshire, in which county for many generations his descendants owned the estate of Trunkwell in the parish of Springfield, acquired by a marriage with Agnes, daughter and heiress of John Noyes of that place, who died in 1607.

"The Noyes Genealogy" by The Reverend James Noyes, Newbury, 1634-1656; compiled by Horatio N. Noyes; Cleveland, Ohio, 1889 (HeritageQuest)

1614c: Nicholas, younger son of the Reverend William Noyes, rector of Cholderton (Wilshire) England, was born.

"Newell Ancestry: the story of the antecedents of William Stark Newell" by Thomas Todd; p. 200; Boston, Massachusetts; 1944 (HeritageQuest)

1634c: Nicholas, with his elder brother, James Noyes and the Reverend Thomas Parker, a cousin, came to America in the ship " John and Mary". Their motive for migration was a spiritual one.

"Newell Ancestry: the story of the antecedents of William Stark Newell" by Thomas Todd; p. 200; Boston, Massachusetts; 1944 (HeritageQuest)

1634, March 24: What was evidently a family group of six, having decided to go to New England, took the Oath of Allegiance - John Woodbridge, George Brown, NICHOLAS NOYES and Richard Brown and all embarked on the "Mary and John" at Southampton, England.

1634, May: The group reached Nantasket, near Boston and removed to Agawam (Ipswich) where they remained during the following winter. The Reverend Parker and friends remained in Ipswich until the following spring when they applied to the General Court for liberty to settle on the Quascacunquen in an area known as Wessacucon.

1635c: Most of the passengers who came to New England in the ship "Mary and John" were induced to remove to Newbury. Tradition asserts that they came by water from Ipswich and landed on the north shore of the Quascacunquen (now Parker) River, about two or three hundred rods below the bridge that connects the "Lower Green" with the "Great Neck" and the town of Rowley. A monument marks the spot where the settlers disembarked in May or June, 1635. Tradition states that young Nicholas was the first person to leap ashore when their boat anchored in the Quascacunquen River

1635, May: They joined 23 men and their families who formed a cattle-breeding company and were among the first settlers at Newbury where their children were born. Newbury's first minister was Thomas Parker, a cousin. Rev. Nicholas Noyes, in his account of his uncle, Reverend James Noyes, told of the coming of Mr. Parker, Mr. Noyes and his younger brother Nicholas Noyes, a single man, adding "between which three was more than ordinary endearment of affection, which was broken but by death."

1637, May 17: Nicholas took the Freeman's Oath in Cambridge when he and eight others walked from Newbury to Cambridge to vote for Govenor Winthrop.

1638, April 21: He was one of five men fined £00-02-06 apiece for absence from Newbury town meeting after due warning. The meeting was called to order at eight o'clock in the morning! Two of the men (not Nicholas) had their fines remitted, having sufficient excuses. It must have been very soon after this that Noyes sailed on a voyage to England, possibly to settle family affairs and to report on conditions in Massachusetts Bay.

1639, (after) April 12: He returned to New England on the "Jonathan" which sailed from London and "came to Anchor in Boston Harbor." Also on the "Jonathan" were Anthony Somerby of Newbury and Mr. Peter Noyes of Sudbury, who, having come over on the "Confidence" in 1638, aged 47, and found New England to his liking, had gone back to his home in Penton, near Andover, county Hants, to fetch his family. Peter was doubtless a kinsman of Nicholas.

1642, December 7: When it was proposed to remove the inhabitants of Newbury from their first settlement on the Parker river to a new site nearer the Merrimac, Nicholas Noyes was a freeholder and a deputy "for the managing of those things that concern the ordering of the New Town".

1650c: Nicholas and four other men were before the court for saying that "the elders would transgress for a morsel of bread."

1651, September 30: He lost no prestige thereby for at Ipswich he was sworn clerk of the Newbury market.

1652c: Many were brought before the court for not observing the "Sumptuary Laws of 1651". The records say "Nicholas Noyes' wife, Hugh March's wife, and William Chandler's wife were each presented for wearing a silk hood and scarf; but were discharged on proof that their husbands were worth £200 each. John Hutchins' wife was also discharged upon testifying that she was brought up above the ordinary rank".

1652, November 29: The town voted that a school house be built and that £20 a year be appropriated for the schoolmaster, and Mr. Woodman, Richard Kent, Jun., Lieutenant Pike and Nicholas Noyes were named the committee to carry it out. Thomas Noyes of Sudbury, son of Peter Noyes, had apparently settled in Newbury, but returned to live in Sudbury before 1656 when he appointed his friend Mr. Nicholas Noyes, gentleman, and Robert Long, both of Newbury, his attorneys to let his house and lands.

1657-8: Nicholas was appointed Commissioner to End Small Causes, or local justice.

1660c: His most important service, however, was as deputy to the General Court.

1673, April 1: An agreement between parents Nicholas and Mary and their son Cutting (Salem Deed 27:8).

1674c: He gave his age as about 60 [Ipswich Deeds IV:187).

1678, September 19: He was chosen by the town "to serve at the next session of the Court until it be ended," a special session having been called for October 2 at which the oath of allegiance to King Charles II was submitted and signed by the deputies.

1679, May 28: Served as a Deputy to the General Court.

1680, May 19: Served as a Deputy to the General Court.

1680-4, January 4: Served as a Deputy to the General Court.

In the long and bitter controversy between Rev. Mr. Parker and Edward Woodman, Nicholas was one of

Parker's chief supporters.

1684, March 20: He was chosen deacon of the First Parish of Newbury.

Sometime before his death his son Nicholas, the Salem parson, wrote of him as "through the mercy of God yet living, and hath of children, grandchildren and great grandchildren above one hundred".

1698, April 19: In deed 15:41 at Salem he conveyed the property to grandson Nicholas, son of his son John.

1885c: The homestead of Nicholas Noyes was owned and occupied by the heirs of Nathaniel Little.

1700, July 4: The Last Will and Testament of Nicholas Noyes of Newbury (Essex) Massachusetts

In the Name of God and by His Assistance I, Nicholas Noyes, of Newbery, in ye County of Essex in ye Province of ye Massachusetts Bay in New England do humbly Comitt my soul body and Spirit both in life and death unto ye everlasting armes of God Al sufficient my Heavenly Father and unto Jesus Christ my alone Savior and Redeemer thro ye power and presence of his eternall Spiritt my body to ye earth whence it Originall was taken in hopes of a happy and glorious Resurrection on ye Great day of ye man Christ Jesus to him be glory both now and Ever Amen.

And for my Worldly goods I do dispose as is hereafter expressed.

Impr. To ye children of my Son John Noyes (late of Newbery Dec'ed) I give that meadow and upland wch they now posses in my neck of land (excepting only twenty acres of upland next to Henry Shorts Mills wch I do reserve to be otherwise disposed of for £50 wch he oweth me) always reserving liberty for my heirs for ever to pass and repass thro any of ye aforesd lands at Sumer or Winter on ye place or places where we ware wont to pass and repass and further with upland and meadow is contained in this my gift more than was inventorized in my said Son John his inventory I do give to my grandson Nicholas Noyes the son of my said son John Noyes over and above his portion I do also reserve to my Self all those points of upland wch run into ye said meadow and are now on my side of ye deviding fence betwene my self and my said sons childrens land.

Item, To my son Mr. Nicholas Noyes of Salem I give £00-05-00 in money besides what I have formerly done for him wch is in full of his portion to be paid by my executor. Item To my son Cutting Noyes I give £00-05-00 in money besides wt I have done formerly for him to be paid by my executors in full of his Portion. Item. To my son Timothy Noyes I give all that houseing and land that he now posseseth also one acre of plowland out of ye land that I myself now posses to be laid out by ye side of ye said Plow land that he now posseseth also about Two acres of Plow land and Swamp be it more or less wch layeth betwene ye land that Moses Little late of Newbery did posses and ye land of Joseph Knight and my owne land and ye land of Lieutenant Tristram Coffin, also all that my long point of meadow or salt marsh in my neck of land as it is bounded by ye Mill River on three sides, and ye other side by a line running streight from Henry Shorts Mill dam to ye turne of ye River yt makes ye said point of marsh, also ye one halfe of that marsh wch I formerly bought of Henry Jaques lying in ye great marshes in Newbery also ye one halfe of that twenty acres of upland on my Neck before reserved in this my Will. Also one Quarter part of all my devisions of land already laid out in ye upper Woods in Newbery to me; as also one Quarter parts of all my rights in ye undevided lands of Newbery all wch to enjoy to him and his heirs forever. Also I give unto him all my weareing apparrell I also confirm to him all yt piece of Meadow wch he bought of Peter Cheny lyeing on ye South Side of ye Mill River in Newbery. Item To ye children of my son Thomas Noyes dec'ed I give £10-00-00 to be paid by my executor in good Currant pay as it passeth from man to man (not as money) to be paid to ye children when they come of age or sooner as my executor shall see cause. Item. To my daughter Mary ye wife of John French of Salisbury besides what I have formerly given her I give her £15 in good currant pay as it passeth from man to man (not as money) to be paid by my executor with in four years after my death wch is for full of her portion. Item. To my daughter Hannah ye wife of John Atkinson Sen'r. of Newbery I give £00-05-00 money besides what I have formerly to her to be paid by my Executor wch is in full of her portion. Item. To my daughter Sarah ye wife of Matthew Pettengall of Newbery besides what I have formerly given her I do now give her £15 in good marchentable pay not as money price but as it passeth from man to man to be paid by my executor with in four years after my death wch is in full of her portion. Item To my daughter Rachel the wife of James Jackman of Newbery I give £15 besides what I formerly gave her to be paid by my Executor with in four years after my death in good marchentable pay not in or as money but as it passeth from man to man wch is in full of her portion. Item. To my daughter Abigall Noyes I give all ye linen that I shall have in the house at my decease as Table Linnen and Sheets as also ye best bed with all ye furniture, also ye parlour dureing her naturall life as also seller room for her convenciency (the house room here mentioned she shall not have it if she marry also I give her £00-15-00 per Annum dureing her naturall life to be paid to her by my Executor ten shillings of it in money or in flax or Wool at money price annually and the ye other forty shillings in provision pay at money prices annually my Executor to keep ye said Parlour in good repair at his owne charge. Also I give to her ye fruits of ten Apple trees yearly if she do not marry to be at her owne choyce out of my old orchard. I also give my said daughter one of my brass kettles at her owne choyce and one iron pot and three platters and my tankard all wch is in full of her portion. Item. I do hereby make my son James Noyes my true and lawful heir and do accordingly give and bequeath unto him and to his heirs and assignes forever all my houseing and lands with all my goods and chattles (not perticularly mentioned in this my last Will and Textamt and otherwise disposed of) together with all debts due to me by Bill Bond Book or otherwise, as also whatever may be mine and may appear due to me in time to come requireing him to pay all my honest debts and in speciall £4 in money to his brother Mr. Nicholas Noyes of Salem on the accott. of Major Thomas Noyes of Newbery Esqr. as also twenty shillings to ye First Church in Newbery, my funerall charges to be by him discharged.

Lastly. I do appoint my son James Noyes to be ye executor of this my last Will Will and Testament hereby revoaking all former wills of mine. Whereas I have in this my last Will confered certaine lands on ye children of my son John Noyes it is to be understood that Mary ye Widow of my said son John shall enjoy her thirds of said houseing and lands dureing her naturall life. In Witness whereof I, ye said Nicholas Noyes have hereto as my last Will and Testament sett to my hand and Seal this fourth day of July Anno Dom one thousand and seaven hundred.

Nicholas Noyes and a Seal.

Signed, sealed and Declared by Mr. Nicholas Noyes to be his Last Will and Testamt in presence of us:

Henry Short, Junr.; Jonathan Emory; Joseph Knight; John Short and Henry Short.

"Essex Probate; Salem, Massachusetts" 307:233, 307:236

1701, November 23: Nicholas Noyes died at Newbury Village (Essex) Province of Massachusetts Bay, aged eighty. His estate was large, the reality being valued at £1,160 and personal property at £1,531.

"Newell Ancestry: the story of the antecedents of William Stark Newell" by Thomas Todd; p. 200; Boston, Massachusetts; 1944 (HeritageQuest)

1701, December 29: The Will was proved.

"Essex Probate; Salem, Massachusetts" 307:233, 307:236

Additional Resources:

1) "History of Newbury, Massachusetts, 1635-1912" by John J. Currier; p. 312; Damrell & Upham, publishers; 1902 (974.402 N434CE ACPL)

2) "Reminiscences of a Nonagenarian" by Sarah Anna Emery; p. 112; W. H. Huse, printers; 1879 (974.402 N435E ACPL)

3) "A Genealogical Dictionary of the First Settlers of New England" by James Savage; III:298; The Genealogical Publishing Company, Inc.; Baltimore, Maryland; 1981 (929.274 S264 LAPL) (NE Sec. SR)

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Nicholas sailed on the Mary & John from London with his brother, James, and sister-in-law, Sarah. The ship was detained in the Thames where all passengers signed the oath of allegiance to the king and the church 24 Mar. 1634, before they were allowed to sail from London.

The ship landed in May, 1634 at Boston harbor, and he moved to Medford, and finally to Newbury about 1635.

Sources

  1. Descendants of Nicholas Noyes page 205
  2. The New England Historical and Genealogical Register,: Volume 23 1869 By Heritage Books. Page 215

Links

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Rev. Nicholas Noyes's Timeline

1615
November 23, 1615
Cholderton, Wiltshire, England
1633
March 26, 1633
Age 17
on Mary and John
1634
March 1634
Age 18
1634
Age 18
Newbury, MA
1637
May 17, 1637
Age 21
Newbury, Essex, Massachusetts
1639
1639
Age 23
After returned to England.
1641
October 15, 1641
Age 25
Newbury, Essex, Massachusetts, United States
1643
October 30, 1643
Age 27
Newbury, Essex, Massachusetts
1645
January 20, 1645
Age 29
Newbury, Essex, MA, USA
1647
December 22, 1647
Age 32
Newbury, Essex, Massachusetts