Richard Warren, "Mayflower" Passenger

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Richard Warren

Also Known As: "Mayflower", "Master Richard Warren"
Birthdate:
Birthplace: Shoreditch, Middlesex, England
Death: Died in Plymouth, Massachusetts
Place of Burial: Burial Hill Cemetery, Plymouth, Plymouth, Massachusetts, United States
Immediate Family:

Son of Christopher Warren, of Ashburton; unknown father of Richard Warren, of the "Mayflower"; Alice Warren and Unknown mother of Richard Warren, of the "Mayflower"
Husband of Elizabeth Warren
Father of Mary Bartlett; Ann Little (Warren); Sarah Cooke; Elizabeth Church; Abigail Snow and 2 others
Brother of John Warren; Christopher Warren, of London; William Warren, of London; Ann Warren and Richard Waring

Occupation: "Merchant of London", 1623 Richard received his acres of land in the Division of Land & his family shared in the Division of Cattle, Mayflower Pilgrim in 1620
Managed by: Private User
Last Updated:

About Richard Warren, "Mayflower" Passenger

Richard Warren (c. 1580–1628) was a passenger on the Mayflower (old "May Floure") in 1620. He was born between 1580 and 1590 and died in Plymouth Colony in 1628. [1][2]

Parents: not known. See Christopher Warren Discredited pedigree

Married:

  1. on 14 April 1610 in Great Amwell, Hertfordshire, England to Elizabeth Walker, the daughter of Augustine Walker of Great Amwell, Hertford; she was baptised 1583 in Baldock, Hertfordshire, England and died October 2, 1673. [3] She and his first five children, all daughters, came to America in the ship Anne in 1623. Once in America, they then had two sons before Richard's death in 1628.[1][2]
  • > marriage cited in The American Genealogist, Vol 78, no. 2, p. 82. 1

Elizabeth and Richard Warren's seven children, with their spouses, were:[8][9]

  1. Mary (c1610- 27 March 1683) married Robert Bartlett;
  2. Anna (c1612- aft 19 February 1676) married Thomas Little;
  3. Sarah (c1613- 15 July 1696) married John Cooke, who, along with his father, Francis Cooke were Mayflower passengers;
  4. Elizabeth (c1616- 9 March 1670) married Richard Church;
  5. Abigail (c1618- 3 January 1693) married Anthony Snow;
  6. Nathaniel (c1625-1667) married Sarah Walker; and
  7. Joseph (1627 - 4 May 1689) married Priscilla Faunce (1634- 15 May 1707).[8]
  • > the birth of the five daughters in England are sourced from the Parish Register, Great Amwell, Hertfordshire, England.

All of Richard Warren's children survived to adulthood, married and had large families. It is claimed that Warren is the Mayflower passenger with most descendants, numbering over 14 million [10] including: President Ulysses S. Grant, President Franklin D. Roosevelt, former Alaska Governor Sarah Palin,[4] astronaut Alan Shepard, author Laura Ingalls Wilder (Little House on the Prairie series), actor Richard Gere, Lavinia Warren, also known as Mrs. Tom Thumb, [5] educator and poet Henry Wadsworth Longfellow,[6][7] and the Wright brothers.[1]

said of him

In Mourt's Relation Edward Winslow lists ten men on an early expedition at Cape Cod, including Richard Warren, who were from London. According to Nathaniel Morton in 1669 book, New England's Memorial:

"This year [1628] died Mr. Richard Warren, who hath been mentioned before in this book, and was a useful instrument;; and during his life bore a deep share in the difficulties and troubles of the first settlement of the plantation of New Plimouth."

This is the only record of his death.

* >from Nathaniel Morton, New England's Memorial (Boston : John Usher, 1669)

His life

Richard Warren was a merchant of London, Middlesex, England and considered a 'stranger,' not a 'Saint;' he became associated with the Pilgrims through the Merchant Adventurers. He was not of the Leiden, Holland, Pilgrim group but joined them in Southampton, England to sail on the Mayflower.

Warren was the 12th signer of the Mayflower Compact" and was among ten passengers of the Mayflower landing party with Myles Standish at Cape Cod on November 11, 1620. He was one of the nineteen (among 41) signers who survived the first winter.

He's one of the less documented of the Mayflower pioneers. Clearly a man of rank, Warren was accorded by Governor William Bradford the prefix "Mr.," pronounced Master, used in those times to distinguish someone because of birth or achievement. From his widow's subsequent land transactions, we can assume that he was among the wealthier of the original Plymouth settlers. And yet, Bradford did not mention him in his History of the Plimouth Plantation except in the List of Passengers.

Although the details are limited, Richard Warren and wife, Elizabeth, and children were mentioned in official records or books of the time period.

In Mourt's Relation, published in 1622, we learn that Warren was chosen, when the Mayflower stopped at Cape Cod before reaching Plymouth, to be a member of the exploring party among 10 passengers (and 8 crew), and he was described as being "of London" among 3 men.

Richard Warren received his acres in the Division of Land in 1623. In the 1627 Division of Lands and Cattle, in May of 1627, "RICHARD WARREN of the Mayflower" was given "one of the black heifers, 2 she-goats, and a grant of 400 acres (1.6 km²) of land" [2] at the Eel River (Plymouth, Massachusetts).

The Warren house built in that year (1627) stood at the same location as the present house; it was re-built about 1700, at the head of Clifford Road, with its back to the sea, and later owned by Charles Strickland (in 1976).

widow lived a long and Godly life

Judging from land transactions of his widow, Elizabeth, the family appears to have been one of the wealthier ones at Plymouth. In the division of cattle in 1627 shares were given to him, to his wife Elizabeth, and to their children.

It is agreed upon by the consent of the whole Court That Elizabeth Warren Widdow the relict of Mr. Richard Warren Deceased shall be entered and stand and bee Purchaser instead of her said husband as well because that (hee dying before he had performed the said bargaine) the said Elizabeth prformed the same after his decease as also for the establishing of the Lotts of land given formerly by her unto her sonnes in law Richard Church, Robert Bartlett, and Thomas Little in marriage wth their wives her daughters. [Court Orders, I:107]

Mistris Elizabeth Warren an aged widdow aged above 90 yeares Deceased on the second of October 1673 whoe haveing lived a Godly life Cam to her Grave as a shok of Corn fully Ripe shee was honorabley buried on the 24th of October aforsaid. [Ply. Col. Rcds, Miscellaneous, p. 39]


Caveat Emptor

Charles Edward Banks, in Ancestry and Homes of the Pilgrim Fathers writes: "Richard Warren came from London and was called a merchand of that city (by Mourt) Extensive research in every available source of information -- registers, chancery, and probate, in the London courts, proved fruitless in an attempt to identify him."

From Caleb Johnson's website:

More erroneous information has been published about Richard Warren than any other Mayflower passenger, probably because he has so many descendants (note that all seven of his children grew up and married). The only concrete things we know about Richard Warren's ancestry are that he was a merchant of London--whether he was born there or not is an entirely different question. We also know that his wife was named Elizabeth Walker.

It is time here to debunk many of the mistakes that have been published over the past hundred years.

Richard Warren is not a proven descendant of any royalty, whether it be Sir John de Warrene or Charlemagne. Richard Warren's parents have not even been identified, despite extensive searches in the records of England (see the Mayflower Quarterly, 51:109-112 for a summary of one such search).

Some of the mistakes that have been published over the past hundred years include:

Common mistake #1: Richard Warren's wife is not Elizabeth (Jewett/Jonatt/Juett) Marsh. This is easily disproven. Elizabeth (Jewett) Marsh was born in 1614, which makes her not only younger than Richard Warren's two oldest children, but also makes her only fourteen years old when Richard Warren died. [Mayflower Descendant 2:63].

Common mistake #2: Richard Warren is not a proven descendant of any royalty, whether it be Sir John de Warrene or Charlemagne. Richard Warren's parents have not even been identified, despite extensive searches in the records of England (see the Mayflower Quarterly, 51:109-112 for a summary of one such search).

Common mistake #3: Richard Warren is not a proven relation to General Joseph Warren of Revolutionary War fame. Joseph Warren's ancestor, Christopher Warren, was not the father of Richard Warren that came over on the Mayflower or John Warren.[7]

Although William T. Davis in his Genealogical Register of Plymouth Families identified the father of Richard Warren as Christopher and his mother as Alice Webb, the Mayflower Society has not verified this and the parents of Richard Warren remain unknown.

There was a Richard Warren who married an Elizabeth Evans on 1 January 1592/3 in St. Leonards, and a Richard Warren who married an Elizabeth Doucke on 1 November 1596 in Sidmouth, Devon. However, since Richard's first child was born about 1610, a marriage in 1592 or 1596 seemed most unlikely.

Richard Warren's English origins and ancestry have been subject to speculation, and many different ancestries have been published about him, without much evidence to support them. However, in December 2002, Edward Davies found the missing piece of the puzzle, in a personal will.[1] Researchers had known of the marriage of Richard Warren to Elizabeth Walker on 14 April 1610 at Great Amwell, Hertfordshire, England.[1] Since records show the Mayflower passenger had a wife named "Elizabeth" and a first child born about 1610, this was a promising record.[1] Yet, no children were found for this couple in the parish registers, and no further evidence beyond the names and timing, until the will of Augustine Walker was discovered. In the will of Augustine Walker, dated April 1613, he mentions "my daughter Elizabeth Warren wife of Richard Warren," and "her three Children Marey, Ann and Sarey Warren". The record shows that the Mayflower passenger's first three children were named Mary, Ann, and Sarah (in that birth order). Also, the will of the father Augustine Walker states, "my daughter Elizabeth Warren wife..." hence, the maiden name "Walker" is confirmed for "Elizabeth (Walker) Warren" as the wife of Richard Warren.

Bartlett Connections

Bartlett Connections and then Belcher

daughter Mary::: b:c1610, England 27 March 1683, Plymouth ::Married: Robert Bartlett, after 22 May 1627

The Bartlett Connections are also through marriages of other Bartlett family lines:

as far as we know, at present since , Tabithas Father has not been identified as yet:

daughter Elizabeth c1616, England 9 March 1669/70, Hingham, Ma.::Married: Richard Church, before 14 March 1635, Plymouth son:::Nathaniel Warren, Mercy Warren: Lt. Jonathan Delano (son of Phillip Delano): Thomas Delano, Capt. Ephraim Delano, Capt. Warren Delano,Warren Delano Jr.,Sarah Delano Roosevelt, Franklin D. Roosevelt:

Richards grandaughter Elizzabeth also married Samuel Delano making this line twice.

Richard Warren is an ancestor to many famous Americans. Among them are Presidents Ulysses S. Grant and Franklin D. Roosevelt; and Alan B. Shepard, Jr., the first American in space and fifth man to walk on the moon. Others include Orson Wells, Henry David Thoreau, Henry Wadsworth Longfellow, Mercy Bump (wife of General Tom Thumb), Henrietta Chamberlaine (wife of the founder of the King Ranch of Texas), Joanne Woodward, Laura Ingalls Wilder, and Julia Child.

There is a published lineage showing Winston Churchill as a descendant of Richard Warren but the only evidence of Winston Churchill being related to Richard Warren that we found is indirectly, through other families.

London Records

Miscellaneous London records relating to men named Richard Warren - not proven to be Richard of the Mayflower: London Rent Subsidy Rolls 1582,

271. ST BENNET AND ST PANCRASH PARRISHES Richard Warren gentleman (£200) [ass. £4 8s. in Mddx.] £10

315 ST DUNSTONES PARISHE Farringdon Ward Within: Richard Warren (£5) 5s

County of Middlesex. Calendar to the sessions records: new series, volume 1

January, 11 James I [A.D. 1613–14].

Robert Ball, Thomas Farmor [Farmer], Thomas Pyper [Piper], William Radforde, Richard Banister [Bannester], John Cross, Robert Burte, William Vanner, Thomas Squyre [Squire], James Gullye [Gulley] and Nicholas Burte, all of Field Lane, butchers; and of William Scrogges, Edward Marshall, Richard Warren, Edward Harford [Harfull], Thomas Trotton, William Hallet, Hugh Warren, John Rogers, George Preist and Simon Neale, all of Smithfield Bar, butchers: all bound in £20 each, to appear at the next Sessions of the peace to answer for their uttering and putting their meat to sale openly upon the Sabbath day. They were brought and bound over by virtue of a warrant under the hands of divers justices bearing date 8 September, A.D. 1613.

Came and each was discharged.

Sess. Roll 527/137, 138.

Sess. Reg. 2/35.

10 November, 11 James I [A.D. 1613].

Inquisition taken at the gaol of Newgate in the parish of Christ Church in the Ward of Farringdon within London before Robert Lawe, coroner, on view of the body of Richard Anoven of London, yeoman, late prisoner within the gaol aforesaid, by the oaths of John Grindle, Edward Jarratt, Richard Morley, Thomas Fysher, Thomas Spurryer, John Chappelle, Roger Woods, Richard Warren, William Davyes, John Mason, Robert Reynolds and Ralph Allen, lawful men of the said ward and of three other wards adjoining; who say that the said Richard Anoven was ill of the pining sickness for twenty days and died on 8 November last past in the gaol aforesaid by divine visitation and not otherwise.

Sess. Roll 526/318. Abbrev: Great Amswell Parish

Notes

"Richard came to America on the Mayflower. He was not one of the Puritans fleeing religious persecution for Leyden Holland, but rather was one of the "strangers" picked up in London by the ship (the "strangers", over 30 men and families, comprised more than half the Mayflower passengers). The Mayflower, having departed Plymouth, England, on 6 September 1620, landed in America later that year. Richard's wife and five daughters came later aboard the Anne in 1623.

He was not one of the Leyden, Holland Pilgrims, but instead had been a merchant at Greenwich, county of Kent, England. He joined the Pilgrims in Southampton and, upon their landing at Plymouth, was one of ten men chosen to be in the exploring party, and was one of those surprised by the Indians in "The First Encounter". Though Warren appears to have been all but excluded from some Pilgrim histories such as Bradford's, it appears he was among the more important and accomplished of the Pilgrims. Richard was one of the signers of the Mayflower Compact, the first establishment of civil government in America. He was given the prefix "Mr.", or Master, by Governor William Bradford, which indicates one of high birth or achievement. He may have had a period of illness before his death in 1628. Even so, he appears as a leader of one of twelve groups formed to own cattle in 1627. In that same year, he is listed as one of the 58 sole proprietors of land in Plymouth Colony."

  • >Three Hundred Colonial Ancestors & War Service states that Richard Warren of the Mayflower had the following lineage.

This was given to me by Jean Clark, wife of James Grafton Carter, and I am putting it here for interest only. I do not know if it has truly been proven, (from my own personal research/study) but it was accepted at one time by the Magna Carta Dames Society:

Richard Warren m Elizabeth Marsh His parents were: Christopher of Scrooby married Alice Webb His parents were: William of Devon m Alice Marble His parents were : John of Devon m __________ His parents were: John of Nottingham m Elizabeth His parents were: William Warren m Ann His parents were: Sir Lawrence Warren m Isabel Leigh His parents were: John Warren m Isabel, Dau Sir John Stanley K.G. His parent were: Sir Lawrence Warren m Margaret Staffor His parents were: Edward Warren m Cicely De Eton His parents were: Sir Edward Warren m Maud De Skeleton His parents were: Sir John Warren m Joan de Port de Etwal His parents were:Sir John Warren m Alice De Townshend His parents were: William Warren m Isabel de Haydon His parents were: Reginald Warren m Adelia De Mowbray His parents were: William, 2nd Earl of Surrey, m Isabel His parents were: William De Warrene, 1st Earl of Warren, m Gundreda His parents were:Ralph, Seuer D Guerrene, m Daughter of Ralph De Torta Neice of Gonorra m Nicholas De Bocqueville Gonnorra M Baldric Teutonicus Goom Del Ganmel m Eadred Harold Parkinus m Daugther of Ethelred Goom Eddka m Ethelred Hilda m Frada, King of Danes Hilderus m _____________ Constantine m _________________ Drusus m Antonia, dau of Marc Antony Tiberius, B.C., 10

This is called "The order of the First Crusade" and "The Roman-Norman Line to Richard Warren"

About Plymouth Colony

  • >History of the Plymouth Colony from Micrsoft, "Encarta" 96 Encyclopedia, 1993-1995, Microsoft, Corp/Funk & Wagnalls Corp. says:
 

"The foundation of the Plymouth Colony was one of the major events in the early history of the British colonies in North American. In the reign of Elizabeth I, queen of England, one of the sects of Puritans known as "Brownists", separated from the new Church of England and after much persecution took refuge in the Netherlands. They finally determined to emigrate to America (after 11 years in Leiden, the Netherlands). A group of London investors financed them in exchange for most of their produce from American during their first six years.

Their ship, the Mayflower, taking on many other passengers (such as Richard Warren), to fill the boat, sailed from Plymouth, England, for America on September 16, 1620. (Mayflower Quarterly Publications indicate originally they went from Leiden, Holland, to England, planning on taking the "Mayflower" and the "Goodspeed", both named for wild flowers, to the New World.

However, the Goodspeed was leaking badly by the time they reached Londen, so they sold it, and continued on in only the Mayflower. The new owners of the Goodspeed replaced the sails with smaller ones, which stopped the leakage, and they continued using the Goodspeed in the shipping industry of England for many more years.) When the Pilgrim "Saints" (Brownists), and "Strangers" (like Richard Warren), reached the American coast, strong winds drove the Mayflower into what is now Provincetown harbour, at the end of Cape Cod rather than their original destination in Virginia. They wrote and signed the Mayflower Compact, forming the first constitutional political democracy in the Americas. After some exploration they settled on the site of what is now Plymouth, Massachusetts. The Plymouth Colony later united with other New England colonies to form the Massachusetts Bay Colony in 1691.

of Pilgrims and Clothing

How do we know what the Pilgrims actually wore? The Pilgrims were certainly knowledgeable of fabrics and clothing construction. In looking at the occupations of the Pilgrims we find that Isaac Allerton and James Chilton were tailors, William Bradford was a fustian-maker, Edward Tilley was a cloth-maker, John Tilley was a silk worker, Francis Cooke and William White were wool combers or carders, and Digory Priest had been a hatter in London. In addition to those clothing-related trades we know that William Mullins was a boot and shoe merchant, and Thomas Rogers was a camlet merchant. Other merchants who may have dealt in similar goods were John Carver, John Turner and Richard Warren.

Links

Sources

  • [4399] Richard Warren arrived in the New World aboard the "Mayflower" in 1620. His wife Elizabeth brought their daughters aboard the "Ann" in 1623.
  • "Richard Warren of the Mayflower and Some of His Descendants" Roebling, Emily Warren Boston: Press of D. Clapp & Son, 1901, 42 pgs. (also NEHGR v55 p74; Jan 1901)
  • "Mayflower Families Through Five Generations...Vol. 18, Pt. 1: Richard Warren--4 Generations" Robert S. Wakefield & Judith H. Swan Plymouth, MA: General Society of Mayflower Descendants, 2004; p5
  • "A Genealogical Dictionary of the First Settlers of New England" James Savage Pub. Boston, 1860-1862, v1, p445 "...m. 28 Mar. 1634, Sarah, d. of Richard Warren, had four ch. liv. in 1650, says Bradford..."
  • Ruth Berg Walsh, "The Search for Pilgrim Richard Warren's Parentage," Mayflower Quarterly, 51:109-112.
  • Eugene Aubrey Stratton, Plymouth Colony, Its History and Its People, 1620-1691 (Salt Lake City: Ancestor Publishers, 1986).
  • Nathaniel Morton, New England's Memorial (Cambridge, 1669).
  • William Bradford, Of Plymouth Plantation, ed. Samuel Morison (New York: Random House, 1952).
  • Mayflower Web Pages. Caleb Johnson

Citations

  1. "Richard Warren" (research since 2002), 2006, MayflowerHistory.com webpage: MayflowerHistory-RWarren.
  2. "EEL RIVER VALLEY" (of 1627 land grants, 400 acres (1.6 km²) to Warren), by Victoria B. Engstrom, Pilgrim Society Notes, Series One, Number 23, 1976, PilgrimHall.org webpage: PilgrimHall-EelRiverValley-RWarren-1976.
  3. "Richard & Elizabeth Warren in the records of the 17th century" (with wife), Pilgrim Hall Museum, Plymouth, MA, 1998-07-14, PilgrimHall.org webpage: PilgrimHall-WarrenRecords-1998: 1628 death of Richard at middle (Morton book); 1673 death of Elizabeth at bottom.
  4. "Individuals from Chrisman Pedigree, page 25" (genealogy), Source: NGSQ 74:87, and "Faunce Family" by James Freer Faunce, in NEHGR 114:115 (1960), 2004-08-30, Chrisman.org/Pedigree webpage (accessed 2006-11-20): Chrisman-pedigree-out25.
  5. "Family Tree: Richard Warren" (genealogy), AOL Research & Learn, 2006, Ancestry. Families.AOL.com webpage: AOL-Tree-RWarren.
  6. "Mormon Pioneer Genealogy Library Acquired by NEHGS". New England Historical Genealogical Society. Retrieved on 2007-01-23.

References

  • Edward Davies, "The Marriage of Richard Warren of the Mayflower" (research), The American Genealogist 78 (April 2003), pages 81-86.
  • Mayflower Families Through Five Generations (Vol. 18, Pt. 1: Richard Warren); edited by Robert S. Wakefield.
  • Mayflower Families Through Five Generations (Vol. 18, Pt. 2: Richard Warren--Fifth Generation Descendants of Mary2, Anna2 and Elizabeth2); edited by Robert S. Wakefield.
  • Mayflower Families Through Five Generations (Vol. 18, Pt. 3 Richard Warren) Fifth Generation Descendants of Abigail 2, Nathaniel 2, and Joseph 2; edited by Robert S. Wakefield.
  • The Mount Vernon Street Warrens, Martin Green, Simon & Schuster, 1989 ISBN 0684191091

-------------------- NOTE: We are decended from his daughter Mary

Born: Probably in Hertford, England. Mayflower Families: Richard Warren for Four Generations, contains the best, most thorough and completely researched genealogy on Richard Warren. It covers every descendant of his for the first four generations.

RICHARD WARREN, PART 2:

Mayflower Families: Richard Warren's Fifth Generation for children Mary, Ann, and Elizabeth.


Marriage:

Elizabeth Walker, 14 April 1610, Great Amwell, Hertford, England, daughter of Augustine Walker.


Death: 1628, Plymouth.

Children: Mary, Ann, Sarah, Elizabeth, Abigail, Nathaniel, and Joseph.

Biographical Information

Richard Warren's English origins and ancestry have been the subject of much speculation, and countless different ancestries have been published for him, without a shred of evidence to support them. Luckily in December 2002, Edward Davies discovered the missing piece of the puzzle. Researchers had long known of the marriage of Richard Warren to Elizabeth Walker on 14 April 1610 at Great Amwell, Hertford. Since we know the Mayflower passenger had a wife named Elizabeth, and a first child born about 1610, this was a promising record. But no children were found for this couple in the parish registers, and no further evidence beyond the names and timing, until the will of Augustine Walker was discovered. In the will of Augustine Walker, dated April 1613, he mentions "my daughter Elizabeth Warren wife of Richard Warren", and "her three children Mary, Ann and Sarah." We know that the Mayflower passenger's first three children were named Mary, Ann, and Sarah (in that birth order).

Very little is known about Richard Warren's life in America. He came alone on the Mayflower in 1620, leaving behind his wife and five daughters. They came to him on the ship Anne in 1623, and Richard and Elizabeth subsequently had sons Nathaniel and Joseph at Plymouth. He received his acres in the Division of Land in 1623, and his family shared in the 1627 Division of Cattle. But he died a year later in 1628, the only record of his death being found in Nathaniel Morton's 1669 book New England's Memorial, in which he writes: "This year [1628] died Mr. Richard Warren, who was an useful instrument and during his life bare a deep share in the difficulties and troubles of the first settlement of the Plantation of New Plymouth."

All of Richard Warren's children survived to adulthood, married, and had large families: making Richard Warren one of the most common Mayflower passengers to be descended from. Richard Warren's descendants include such notables as Civil War general Ulysses S. Grant, President Franklin D. Roosevelt, and Alan B. Shepard, Jr. the first American in space and the fifth person to walk on the moon.


Quoted From:

http://mayflowerhistory.com/Passengers/RichardWarren.php

More Info at:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Richard_Warren -------------------- Signatory to the Mayflower compact.

He was one of the nineteen signers of the Compact who survived the first winter. A contemporaneous authority described him as 'grave Richard Warren,' 'a man of integrity, justice and uprightness, or piety and serious religion,' and as 'a useful instrument during the short time he lived, bearing a deep share in the difficulties and troubles of the plantation.'

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mayflower_Compact

When he came over on the Mayflower, he left behind his wife and five daughters, planning to have them sent over after things were more settled in the Colony. His wife and daughters arrived in America in 1623, on the ship Anne.

http://freepages.genealogy.rootsweb.ancestry.com/~barbpretz/PS03/PS03_210.HTM

More erroneous information has been published about Richard Warren than any other Mayflower passenger, probably because he has so many descendants (note that all seven of his children grew up and married). It is time here to debunk many of the mistakes that have been published over the past hundred years. The only concrete things we know about Richard Warren's ancestry are that he was a merchant of London--whether he was born there or not is an entirely different question. We also know that his wife was named Elizabeth. He had five daughters baptized in England somewhere, and perhaps the true records will some day be brought to light.

-------------------- Arrived on Ship Mayflower 1620 Richard arrived in Plymouth. Buried Burial Hill Plymouth, Massachusetts.

London Merchant. Mort's Relation (1622): Richard Warren "of London" New England's Memorial,1669, Nathaniel Morton; "This year (1638) died Mr. Richard Warren, who was an useful instrument and during his life bare a deep share in the difficulties and troubles of the first settlement of the Plantation of New Plymouth." Rest In Peace My GrandFather. -------------------- Came to America on the Mayflower in 1620. May have been descended from John Warren of Hedbury, England. He and his wife were of Greenwich, in Co. Kent and Richard was a haberdasher in London. He sailed without his wife and five daughters who later joined him in 1623 via the ship "Ann". -------------------- Birth: 1580, England Death: 1628 Plymouth Plymouth County Massachusetts, USA

Mayflower Passenger. He was part of the official landing party on Cape Cod on November 11, 1620 and was one of the signers of the Mayflower Compact. His family joined him in Plymouth, Massachusetts, in 1623. Little is known about him from the offical histories, except that he was a major landholder in the early colony, yet his name is well known due to his numerous decendants, as all 7 of his children survived to adulthood and had large families. (bio by: Kenneth Gilbert)

http://www.mayflowerhistory.com/Passengers/passengers.php

Richard Warren's English origins and ancestry have been the subject of much speculation, and countless different ancestries have been published for him, without a shred of evidence to support them. Luckily in December 2002, Edward Davies discovered the missing piece of the puzzle. Researchers had long known of the marriage of Richard Warren to Elizabeth Walker on 14 April 1610 at Great Amwell, Hertford. Since we know the Mayflower passenger had a wife named Elizabeth, and a first child born about 1610, this was a promising record. But no children were found for this couple in the parish registers, and no further evidence beyond the names and timing, until the will of Augustine Walker was discovered. In the will of Augustine Walker, dated April 1613, he mentions "my daughter Elizabeth Warren wife of Richard Warren", and "her three children Mary, Ann and Sarah." We know that the Mayflower passenger's first three children were named Mary, Ann, and Sarah (in that birth order).

Very little is known about Richard Warren's life in America. He came alone on the Mayflower in 1620, leaving behind his wife and five daughters. They came to him on the ship Anne in 1623, and Richard and Elizabeth subsequently had sons Nathaniel and Joseph at Plymouth. He received his acres in the Division of Land in 1623, and his family shared in the 1627 Division of Cattle. But he died a year later in 1628, the only record of his death being found in Nathaniel Morton's 1669 book New England's Memorial, in which he writes: "This year [1628] died Mr. Richard Warren, who was an useful instrument and during his life bare a deep share in the difficulties and troubles of the first settlement of the Plantation of New Plymouth."

All of Richard Warren's children survived to adulthood, married, and had large families: making Richard Warren one of the most common Mayflower passengers to be descended from. Richard Warren's descendants include such notables as Civil War general Ulysses S. Grant, President Franklin D. Roosevelt, and Alan B. Shepard, Jr. the first American in space and the fifth person to walk on the moon.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Richard_Warren

He was not of the Leiden, Holland, Pilgrims, but joined them in Southampton, England to sail on the Mayflower.

In Mourt's Relation, published in 1622, we learn that Warren was chosen, when the Mayflower stopped at Cape Cod before reaching Plymouth, to be a member of the exploring party among 10 passengers (and 8 crew), and he was described as being "of London" among 3 men. Charles Edward Banks, in Ancestry and Homes of the Pilgrim Fathers writes: "Richard Warren came from London and was called a merchand of that city (by Mourt) Extensive research in every available source of information -- registers, chancery, and probate, in the London courts, proved fruitless in an attempt to identify him."

And some distant relatives...

http://www.mayflowerhistory.com/Genealogy/famousdescendants.php -------------------- Richard Warren (c. 1580–1628) was a passenger on the Mayflower (old "May Floure") in 1620. He was born between 1580 and 1590 and died in Plymouth Colony in 1628. [1][2]

Parents: not known

Married:

1.on 14 April 1610 in Great Amwell, Hertfordshire, England to Elizabeth Walker, the daughter of Augustine Walker of Great Amwell, Hertford; she was baptised 1583 in Baldock, Hertfordshire, England and died October 2, 1673. [3] She and his first five children, all daughters, came to America in the ship Anne in 1623. Once in America, they then had two sons before Richard's death in 1628.[1][2] •> marriage cited in The American Genealogist, Vol 78, no. 2, p. 82. 1 Elizabeth and Richard Warren's seven children, with their spouses, were:[8][9]

1.Mary (c1610- 27 March 1683) married Robert Bartlett; 2.Anna (c1612- aft 19 February 1676) married Thomas Little; 3.Sarah (c1613- 15 July 1696) married John Cooke, who, along with his father, Francis Cooke were Mayflower passengers; 4.Elizabeth (c1616- 9 March 1670) married Richard Church; 5.Abigail (c1618- 3 January 1693) married Anthony Snow; 6.Nathaniel (c1625-1667) married Sarah Walker; and 7.Joseph (1627 - 4 May 1689) married Priscilla Faunce (1634- 15 May 1707).[8] •> the birth of the five daughters in England are sourced from the Parish Register, Great Amwell, Hertfordshire, England. All of Richard Warren's children survived to adulthood, married and had large families. It is claimed that Warren is the Mayflower passenger with most descendants, numbering over 14 million [10] including: President Ulysses S. Grant, President Franklin D. Roosevelt, former Alaska Governor Sarah Palin,[4] astronaut Alan Shepard, author Laura Ingalls Wilder (Little House on the Prairie series), actor Richard Gere, Lavinia Warren, also known as Mrs. Tom Thumb, [5] educator and poet Henry Wadsworth Longfellow,[6][7] and the Wright brothers.[1]

said of him In Mourt's Relation Edward Winslow lists ten men on an early expedition at Cape Cod, including Richard Warren, who were from London. According to Nathaniel Morton in 1669 book, New England's Memorial:

"This year [1628] died Mr. Richard Warren, who hath been mentioned before in this book, and was a useful instrument;; and during his life bore a deep share in the difficulties and troubles of the first settlement of the plantation of New Plimouth."

This is the only record of his death.

  • >from Nathaniel Morton, New England's Memorial (Boston : John Usher, 1669)

His life Richard Warren was a merchant of London, Middlesex, England and considered a 'stranger,' not a 'Saint;' he became associated with the Pilgrims through the Merchant Adventurers. He was not of the Leiden, Holland, Pilgrim group but joined them in Southampton, England to sail on the Mayflower.

Warren was the 12th signer of the Mayflower Compact" and was among ten passengers of the Mayflower landing party with Myles Standish at Cape Cod on November 11, 1620. He was one of the nineteen (among 41) signers who survived the first winter.

He's one of the less documented of the Mayflower pioneers. Clearly a man of rank, Warren was accorded by Governor William Bradford the prefix "Mr.," pronounced Master, used in those times to distinguish someone because of birth or achievement. From his widow's subsequent land transactions, we can assume that he was among the wealthier of the original Plymouth settlers. And yet, Bradford did not mention him in his History of the Plimouth Plantation except in the List of Passengers.

Although the details are limited, Richard Warren and wife, Elizabeth, and children were mentioned in official records or books of the time period.

In Mourt's Relation, published in 1622, we learn that Warren was chosen, when the Mayflower stopped at Cape Cod before reaching Plymouth, to be a member of the exploring party among 10 passengers (and 8 crew), and he was described as being "of London" among 3 men.

Richard Warren received his acres in the Division of Land in 1623. In the 1627 Division of Lands and Cattle, in May of 1627, "RICHARD WARREN of the Mayflower" was given "one of the black heifers, 2 she-goats, and a grant of 400 acres (1.6 km²) of land" [2] at the Eel River (Plymouth, Massachusetts).

The Warren house built in that year (1627) stood at the same location as the present house; it was re-built about 1700, at the head of Clifford Road, with its back to the sea, and later owned by Charles Strickland (in 1976).

widow lived a long and Godly life Judging from land transactions of his widow, Elizabeth, the family appears to have been one of the wealthier ones at Plymouth. In the division of cattle in 1627 shares were given to him, to his wife Elizabeth, and to their children.

It is agreed upon by the consent of the whole Court That Elizabeth Warren Widdow the relict of Mr. Richard Warren Deceased shall be entered and stand and bee Purchaser instead of her said husband as well because that (hee dying before he had performed the said bargaine) the said Elizabeth prformed the same after his decease as also for the establishing of the Lotts of land given formerly by her unto her sonnes in law Richard Church, Robert Bartlett, and Thomas Little in marriage wth their wives her daughters. [Court Orders, I:107]

Mistris Elizabeth Warren an aged widdow aged above 90 yeares Deceased on the second of October 1673 whoe haveing lived a Godly life Cam to her Grave as a shok of Corn fully Ripe shee was honorabley buried on the 24th of October aforsaid. [Ply. Col. Rcds, Miscellaneous, p. 39]

Caveat Emptor Charles Edward Banks, in Ancestry and Homes of the Pilgrim Fathers writes: "Richard Warren came from London and was called a merchand of that city (by Mourt) Extensive research in every available source of information -- registers, chancery, and probate, in the London courts, proved fruitless in an attempt to identify him."

From Caleb Johnson's website:

More erroneous information has been published about Richard Warren than any other Mayflower passenger, probably because he has so many descendants (note that all seven of his children grew up and married). The only concrete things we know about Richard Warren's ancestry are that he was a merchant of London--whether he was born there or not is an entirely different question. We also know that his wife was named Elizabeth Walker.

It is time here to debunk many of the mistakes that have been published over the past hundred years.

Richard Warren is not a proven descendant of any royalty, whether it be Sir John de Warrene or Charlemagne. Richard Warren's parents have not even been identified, despite extensive searches in the records of England (see the Mayflower Quarterly, 51:109-112 for a summary of one such search).

Some of the mistakes that have been published over the past hundred years include:

Common mistake #1: Richard Warren's wife is not Elizabeth (Jewett/Jonatt/Juett) Marsh. This is easily disproven. Elizabeth (Jewett) Marsh was born in 1614, which makes her not only younger than Richard Warren's two oldest children, but also makes her only fourteen years old when Richard Warren died. [Mayflower Descendant 2:63].

Common mistake #2: Richard Warren is not a proven descendant of any royalty, whether it be Sir John de Warrene or Charlemagne. Richard Warren's parents have not even been identified, despite extensive searches in the records of England (see the Mayflower Quarterly, 51:109-112 for a summary of one such search).

Common mistake #3: Richard Warren is not a proven relation to General Joseph Warren of Revolutionary War fame. Joseph Warren's ancestor, Christopher Warren, was not the father of Richard Warren that came over on the Mayflower or John Warren.[7]

Although William T. Davis in his Genealogical Register of Plymouth Families identified the father of Richard Warren as Christopher and his mother as Alice Webb, the Mayflower Society has not verified this and the parents of Richard Warren remain unknown.

There was a Richard Warren who married an Elizabeth Evans on 1 January 1592/3 in St. Leonards, and a Richard Warren who married an Elizabeth Doucke on 1 November 1596 in Sidmouth, Devon. However, since Richard's first child was born about 1610, a marriage in 1592 or 1596 seemed most unlikely.

Richard Warren's English origins and ancestry have been subject to speculation, and many different ancestries have been published about him, without much evidence to support them. However, in December 2002, Edward Davies found the missing piece of the puzzle, in a personal will.[1] Researchers had known of the marriage of Richard Warren to Elizabeth Walker on 14 April 1610 at Great Amwell, Hertfordshire, England.[1] Since records show the Mayflower passenger had a wife named "Elizabeth" and a first child born about 1610, this was a promising record.[1] Yet, no children were found for this couple in the parish registers, and no further evidence beyond the names and timing, until the will of Augustine Walker was discovered. In the will of Augustine Walker, dated April 1613, he mentions "my daughter Elizabeth Warren wife of Richard Warren," and "her three Children Marey, Ann and Sarey Warren". The record shows that the Mayflower passenger's first three children were named Mary, Ann, and Sarah (in that birth order). Also, the will of the father Augustine Walker states, "my daughter Elizabeth Warren wife..." hence, the maiden name "Walker" is confirmed for "Elizabeth (Walker) Warren" as the wife of Richard Warren.

Bartlett Connections Bartlett Connections and then Belcher

daughter Mary::: b:c1610, England 27 March 1683, Plymouth ::Married: Robert Bartlett, after 22 May 1627

The Bartlett Connections are also through marriages of other Bartlett family lines:

as far as we know, at present since , Tabithas Father has not been identified as yet:

daughter Elizabeth c1616, England 9 March 1669/70, Hingham, Ma.::Married: Richard Church, before 14 March 1635, Plymouth son:::Nathaniel Warren, Mercy Warren: Lt. Jonathan Delano (son of Phillip Delano): Thomas Delano, Capt. Ephraim Delano, Capt. Warren Delano,Warren Delano Jr.,Sarah Delano Roosevelt, Franklin D. Roosevelt:

Richards grandaughter Elizzabeth also married Samuel Delano making this line twice.

Richard Warren is an ancestor to many famous Americans. Among them are Presidents Ulysses S. Grant and Franklin D. Roosevelt; and Alan B. Shepard, Jr., the first American in space and fifth man to walk on the moon. Others include Orson Wells, Henry David Thoreau, Henry Wadsworth Longfellow, Mercy Bump (wife of General Tom Thumb), Henrietta Chamberlaine (wife of the founder of the King Ranch of Texas), Joanne Woodward, Laura Ingalls Wilder, and Julia Child.

There is a published lineage showing Winston Churchill as a descendant of Richard Warren but the only evidence of Winston Churchill being related to Richard Warren that we found is indirectly, through other families.

London Records Miscellaneous London records relating to men named Richard Warren - not proven to be Richard of the Mayflower: London Rent Subsidy Rolls 1582,

271. ST BENNET AND ST PANCRASH PARRISHES Richard Warren gentleman (£200) [ass. £4 8s. in Mddx.] £10

315 ST DUNSTONES PARISHE Farringdon Ward Within: Richard Warren (£5) 5s

County of Middlesex. Calendar to the sessions records: new series, volume 1

January, 11 James I [A.D. 1613–14].

Robert Ball, Thomas Farmor [Farmer], Thomas Pyper [Piper], William Radforde, Richard Banister [Bannester], John Cross, Robert Burte, William Vanner, Thomas Squyre [Squire], James Gullye [Gulley] and Nicholas Burte, all of Field Lane, butchers; and of William Scrogges, Edward Marshall, Richard Warren, Edward Harford [Harfull], Thomas Trotton, William Hallet, Hugh Warren, John Rogers, George Preist and Simon Neale, all of Smithfield Bar, butchers: all bound in £20 each, to appear at the next Sessions of the peace to answer for their uttering and putting their meat to sale openly upon the Sabbath day. They were brought and bound over by virtue of a warrant under the hands of divers justices bearing date 8 September, A.D. 1613.

Came and each was discharged.

Sess. Roll 527/137, 138.

Sess. Reg. 2/35.

10 November, 11 James I [A.D. 1613].

Inquisition taken at the gaol of Newgate in the parish of Christ Church in the Ward of Farringdon within London before Robert Lawe, coroner, on view of the body of Richard Anoven of London, yeoman, late prisoner within the gaol aforesaid, by the oaths of John Grindle, Edward Jarratt, Richard Morley, Thomas Fysher, Thomas Spurryer, John Chappelle, Roger Woods, Richard Warren, William Davyes, John Mason, Robert Reynolds and Ralph Allen, lawful men of the said ward and of three other wards adjoining; who say that the said Richard Anoven was ill of the pining sickness for twenty days and died on 8 November last past in the gaol aforesaid by divine visitation and not otherwise.

Sess. Roll 526/318. Abbrev: Great Amswell Parish

Notes •>From the Web Site: http://aleph0.clarku.edu/~djoyce/gen/Scituate/RR01/RR01_018.htm#P1284 "Richard came to America on the Mayflower. He was not one of the Puritans fleeing religious persecution for Leyden Holland, but rather was one of the "strangers" picked up in London by the ship (the "strangers", over 30 men and families, comprised more than half the Mayflower passengers). The Mayflower, having departed Plymouth, England, on 6 September 1620, landed in America later that year. Richard's wife and five daughters came later aboard the Anne in 1623.

He was not one of the Leyden, Holland Pilgrims, but instead had been a merchant at Greenwich, county of Kent, England. He joined the Pilgrims in Southampton and, upon their landing at Plymouth, was one of ten men chosen to be in the exploring party, and was one of those surprised by the Indians in "The First Encounter". Though Warren appears to have been all but excluded from some Pilgrim histories such as Bradford's, it appears he was among the more important and accomplished of the Pilgrims. Richard was one of the signers of the Mayflower Compact, the first establishment of civil government in America. He was given the prefix "Mr.", or Master, by Governor William Bradford, which indicates one of high birth or achievement. He may have had a period of illness before his death in 1628. Even so, he appears as a leader of one of twelve groups formed to own cattle in 1627. In that same year, he is listed as one of the 58 sole proprietors of land in Plymouth Colony."

•>Three Hundred Colonial Ancestors & War Service states that Richard Warren of the Mayflower had the following lineage. This was given to me by Jean Clark, wife of James Grafton Carter, and I am putting it here for interest only. I do not know if it has truly been proven, (from my own personal research/study) but it was accepted at one time by the Magna Carta Dames Society:

Richard Warren m Elizabeth Marsh His parents were: Christopher of Scrooby married Alice Webb His parents were: William of Devon m Alice Marble His parents were : John of Devon m __________ His parents were: John of Nottingham m Elizabeth His parents were: William Warren m Ann His parents were: Sir Lawrence Warren m Isabel Leigh His parents were: John Warren m Isabel, Dau Sir John Stanley K.G. His parent were: Sir Lawrence Warren m Margaret Staffor His parents were: Edward Warren m Cicely De Eton His parents were: Sir Edward Warren m Maud De Skeleton His parents were: Sir John Warren m Joan de Port de Etwal His parents were:Sir John Warren m Alice De Townshend His parents were: William Warren m Isabel de Haydon His parents were: Reginald Warren m Adelia De Mowbray His parents were: William, 2nd Earl of Surrey, m Isabel His parents were: William De Warrene, 1st Earl of Warren, m Gundreda His parents were:Ralph, Seuer D Guerrene, m Daughter of Ralph De Torta Neice of Gonorra m Nicholas De Bocqueville Gonnorra M Baldric Teutonicus Goom Del Ganmel m Eadred Harold Parkinus m Daugther of Ethelred Goom Eddka m Ethelred Hilda m Frada, King of Danes Hilderus m _____________ Constantine m _________________ Drusus m Antonia, dau of Marc Antony Tiberius, B.C., 10

This is called "The order of the First Crusade" and "The Roman-Norman Line to Richard Warren"

About Plymouth Colony •>History of the Plymouth Colony from Micrsoft, "Encarta" 96 Encyclopedia, 1993-1995, Microsoft, Corp/Funk & Wagnalls Corp. says:


"The foundation of the Plymouth Colony was one of the major events in the early history of the British colonies in North American. In the reign of Elizabeth I, queen of England, one of the sects of Puritans known as "Brownists", separated from the new Church of England and after much persecution took refuge in the Netherlands. They finally determined to emigrate to America (after 11 years in Leiden, the Netherlands). A group of London investors financed them in exchange for most of their produce from American during their first six years.

Their ship, the Mayflower, taking on many other passengers (such as Richard Warren), to fill the boat, sailed from Plymouth, England, for America on September 16, 1620. (Mayflower Quarterly Publications indicate originally they went from Leiden, Holland, to England, planning on taking the "Mayflower" and the "Goodspeed", both named for wild flowers, to the New World.

However, the Goodspeed was leaking badly by the time they reached Londen, so they sold it, and continued on in only the Mayflower. The new owners of the Goodspeed replaced the sails with smaller ones, which stopped the leakage, and they continued using the Goodspeed in the shipping industry of England for many more years.) When the Pilgrim "Saints" (Brownists), and "Strangers" (like Richard Warren), reached the American coast, strong winds drove the Mayflower into what is now Provincetown harbour, at the end of Cape Cod rather than their original destination in Virginia. They wrote and signed the Mayflower Compact, forming the first constitutional political democracy in the Americas. After some exploration they settled on the site of what is now Plymouth, Massachusetts. The Plymouth Colony later united with other New England colonies to form the Massachusetts Bay Colony in 1691.

of Pilgrims and Clothing How do we know what the Pilgrims actually wore? The Pilgrims were certainly knowledgeable of fabrics and clothing construction. In looking at the occupations of the Pilgrims we find that Isaac Allerton and James Chilton were tailors, William Bradford was a fustian-maker, Edward Tilley was a cloth-maker, John Tilley was a silk worker, Francis Cooke and William White were wool combers or carders, and Digory Priest had been a hatter in London. In addition to those clothing-related trades we know that William Mullins was a boot and shoe merchant, and Thomas Rogers was a camlet merchant. Other merchants who may have dealt in similar goods were John Carver, John Turner and Richard Warren.

Links •http://www.mayflowerhistory.com/Passengers/RichardWarren.phphttp://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Richard_Warrenhttp://jrm.phys.ksu.edu/genealogy/needham/d0000/I3235.htmlhttp://homepages.rootsweb.ancestry.com/~sam/rwarren.htmlhttp://www.citereh.com/p3.htm#i130Richard Warren •http://www.angelfire.com/la2/gen/pilgrimsandpuritans.htmlhttp://aleph0.clarku.edu/~djoyce/gen/Scituate/RR01/RR01_018.htm#P1284 Sources •[4399] Richard Warren arrived in the New World aboard the "Mayflower" in 1620. His wife Elizabeth brought their daughters aboard the "Ann" in 1623. •"Richard Warren of the Mayflower and Some of His Descendants" Roebling, Emily Warren Boston: Press of D. Clapp & Son, 1901, 42 pgs. (also NEHGR v55 p74; Jan 1901) •"Mayflower Families Through Five Generations...Vol. 18, Pt. 1: Richard Warren--4 Generations" Robert S. Wakefield & Judith H. Swan Plymouth, MA: General Society of Mayflower Descendants, 2004; p5 •"A Genealogical Dictionary of the First Settlers of New England" James Savage Pub. Boston, 1860-1862, v1, p445 "...m. 28 Mar. 1634, Sarah, d. of Richard Warren, had four ch. liv. in 1650, says Bradford..." •Ruth Berg Walsh, "The Search for Pilgrim Richard Warren's Parentage," Mayflower Quarterly, 51:109-112. •Eugene Aubrey Stratton, Plymouth Colony, Its History and Its People, 1620-1691 (Salt Lake City: Ancestor Publishers, 1986). •Nathaniel Morton, New England's Memorial (Cambridge, 1669). •William Bradford, Of Plymouth Plantation, ed. Samuel Morison (New York: Random House, 1952). •Mayflower Web Pages. Caleb Johnson Citations 1."Richard Warren" (research since 2002), 2006, MayflowerHistory.com webpage: MayflowerHistory-RWarren. 2."EEL RIVER VALLEY" (of 1627 land grants, 400 acres (1.6 km²) to Warren), by Victoria B. Engstrom, Pilgrim Society Notes, Series One, Number 23, 1976, PilgrimHall.org webpage: PilgrimHall-EelRiverValley-RWarren-1976. 3."Richard & Elizabeth Warren in the records of the 17th century" (with wife), Pilgrim Hall Museum, Plymouth, MA, 1998-07-14, PilgrimHall.org webpage: PilgrimHall-WarrenRecords-1998: 1628 death of Richard at middle (Morton book); 1673 death of Elizabeth at bottom. 4."Individuals from Chrisman Pedigree, page 25" (genealogy), Source: NGSQ 74:87, and "Faunce Family" by James Freer Faunce, in NEHGR 114:115 (1960), 2004-08-30, Chrisman.org/Pedigree webpage (accessed 2006-11-20): Chrisman-pedigree-out25. 5."Family Tree: Richard Warren" (genealogy), AOL Research & Learn, 2006, Ancestry. Families.AOL.com webpage: AOL-Tree-RWarren. 6."Mormon Pioneer Genealogy Library Acquired by NEHGS". New England Historical Genealogical Society. Retrieved on 2007-01-23. References •Edward Davies, "The Marriage of Richard Warren of the Mayflower" (research), The American Genealogist 78 (April 2003), pages 81-86. •Mayflower Families Through Five Generations (Vol. 18, Pt. 1: Richard Warren); edited by Robert S. Wakefield. •Mayflower Families Through Five Generations (Vol. 18, Pt. 2: Richard Warren--Fifth Generation Descendants of Mary2, Anna2 and Elizabeth2); edited by Robert S. Wakefield. •Mayflower Families Through Five Generations (Vol. 18, Pt. 3 Richard Warren) Fifth Generation Descendants of Abigail 2, Nathaniel 2, and Joseph 2; edited by Robert S. Wakefield. •The Mount Vernon Street Warrens, Martin Green, Simon & Schuster, 1989 ISBN 0684191091 -------------------- NOTE: We are decended from his daughter Mary

Born: Probably in Hertford, England. Mayflower Families: Richard Warren for Four Generations, contains the best, most thorough and completely researched genealogy on Richard Warren. It covers every descendant of his for the first four generations.

RICHARD WARREN, PART 2:

Mayflower Families: Richard Warren's Fifth Generation for children Mary, Ann, and Elizabeth.

Marriage:

Elizabeth Walker, 14 April 1610, Great Amwell, Hertford, England, daughter of Augustine Walker.

Death: 1628, Plymouth.

Children: Mary, Ann, Sarah, Elizabeth, Abigail, Nathaniel, and Joseph.

Biographical Information

Richard Warren's English origins and ancestry have been the subject of much speculation, and countless different ancestries have been published for him, without a shred of evidence to support them. Luckily in December 2002, Edward Davies discovered the missing piece of the puzzle. Researchers had long known of the marriage of Richard Warren to Elizabeth Walker on 14 April 1610 at Great Amwell, Hertford. Since we know the Mayflower passenger had a wife named Elizabeth, and a first child born about 1610, this was a promising record. But no children were found for this couple in the parish registers, and no further evidence beyond the names and timing, until the will of Augustine Walker was discovered. In the will of Augustine Walker, dated April 1613, he mentions "my daughter Elizabeth Warren wife of Richard Warren", and "her three children Mary, Ann and Sarah." We know that the Mayflower passenger's first three children were named Mary, Ann, and Sarah (in that birth order).

Very little is known about Richard Warren's life in America. He came alone on the Mayflower in 1620, leaving behind his wife and five daughters. They came to him on the ship Anne in 1623, and Richard and Elizabeth subsequently had sons Nathaniel and Joseph at Plymouth. He received his acres in the Division of Land in 1623, and his family shared in the 1627 Division of Cattle. But he died a year later in 1628, the only record of his death being found in Nathaniel Morton's 1669 book New England's Memorial, in which he writes: "This year [1628] died Mr. Richard Warren, who was an useful instrument and during his life bare a deep share in the difficulties and troubles of the first settlement of the Plantation of New Plymouth."

All of Richard Warren's children survived to adulthood, married, and had large families: making Richard Warren one of the most common Mayflower passengers to be descended from. Richard Warren's descendants include such notables as Civil War general Ulysses S. Grant, President Franklin D. Roosevelt, and Alan B. Shepard, Jr. the first American in space and the fifth person to walk on the moon.

Quoted From:

http://mayflowerhistory.com/Passengers/RichardWarren.php

More Info at:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Richard_Warren -------------------- Signatory to the Mayflower compact.

He was one of the nineteen signers of the Compact who survived the first winter. A contemporaneous authority described him as 'grave Richard Warren,' 'a man of integrity, justice and uprightness, or piety and serious religion,' and as 'a useful instrument during the short time he lived, bearing a deep share in the difficulties and troubles of the plantation.'

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mayflower_Compact

When he came over on the Mayflower, he left behind his wife and five daughters, planning to have them sent over after things were more settled in the Colony. His wife and daughters arrived in America in 1623, on the ship Anne.

http://freepages.genealogy.rootsweb.ancestry.com/~barbpretz/PS03/PS03_210.HTM

More erroneous information has been published about Richard Warren than any other Mayflower passenger, probably because he has so many descendants (note that all seven of his children grew up and married). It is time here to debunk many of the mistakes that have been published over the past hundred years. The only concrete things we know about Richard Warren's ancestry are that he was a merchant of London--whether he was born there or not is an entirely different question. We also know that his wife was named Elizabeth. He had five daughters baptized in England somewhere, and perhaps the true records will some day be brought to light.

-------------------- Arrived on Ship Mayflower 1620 Richard arrived in Plymouth. Buried Burial Hill Plymouth, Massachusetts.

London Merchant. Mort's Relation (1622): Richard Warren "of London" New England's Memorial,1669, Nathaniel Morton; "This year (1638) died Mr. Richard Warren, who was an useful instrument and during his life bare a deep share in the difficulties and troubles of the first settlement of the Plantation of New Plymouth." Rest In Peace My GrandFather. -------------------- Came to America on the Mayflower in 1620. May have been descended from John Warren of Hedbury, England. He and his wife were of Greenwich, in Co. Kent and Richard was a haberdasher in London. He sailed without his wife and five daughters who later joined him in 1623 via the ship "Ann".

-------------------- Came over on the Mayflower and was one of the signers of the Mayflower Compact. --------------------

>SOURCE< descendants of RICHARD WARREN in MD 3: 105-17 and Moore Anc 60-72 by Paul W. Prindle

-------------------- He was a signer of the Mayflower Compact

view all 69

Richard Warren, "Mayflower" Passenger's Timeline

1579
1579
Greenwich, Kent, England, United Kingdom
1580
January 24, 1580
St Peter Cornhil, London, England
January 24, 1580
St Peter Cornhil,London,England
January 24, 1580
St Peter Cornhil,London,England
January 24, 1580
St. Peter Cornhil, London, England
1585
April 12, 1585
Shoreditch, Middlesex, England
1609
1609
Age 23
London, Middlesex, England
1610
April 14, 1610
Age 25
Fordington, Dorset, England
April 14, 1610
Age 25
Great Amwell, Hertford, England
1612
1612
Age 26
Shoreditch (within present London), Middlesex, England, UK