John Whyte, MP (c.1511 - 1573) MP

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Nicknames: "John White the elder"
Birthplace: Farnham, Surrey, England
Death: Died in Farnham, Surrey, England
Occupation: Mayor of London, knight, grocer, Bishop of Winchester
Managed by: Bjørn P. Brox
Last Updated:

About John Whyte, MP

Sir John Whyte, born about 1511 in Farnham, Surrey, England

  • Mayor of London, England 1563-64
  • A Knight with Coat of Arms,
  • Member of Parliament for London 1563 and 1571,
  • Knighted 1564, died 9 June 1573.

Personal arms: Per fess azure and or, a pale counterchanged, three plates, two and one, each charged with two bars wavy vert, and as many lions' heads erased, one and two, gules.

Sir John White, Knight, grocer, Mayor of London, from 1563- 1564 and of Aldershot in the county of Hampshire. married 1st Sibbell, the daughter of Robert White of South Warnborow, in the county of Hampshire, He married 2nd Catherine, daughter of John Soday, of London

THE LORD MAYOR OF LONDON " The Lord Mayor of London" has certain very remarkable privileges which have been religiously guarded and must be of great antiquity. It is only necessary to mention these here, but each of the privileges requires an exhaustive examination as to its origin. they all prove the remarkable position of Old London and mark it off from other cities of modern Europe. Shortly stated, the privileges are four:

1. The closing of the Temple Bar to the sovereign.

2.The Mayor's position in the city, where he is second only to the King.

3. His summons to the Privy Council on accession of a new sovereign.

4. His position of butler at the coronation banquets.

' The terms of the judgment on a further claim are as follows: The Court considers and adjudges that the Lord Mayor has by usage a right, subject to his Majesty's pleasure to attend the Abbey during the coronation and bear the crystal mace" " The two great Military Orders, the Knight's Hospitallers of St John of Jerusalem and the Templars, followed the Augustinian rule and were both settled in London, and the original village of Clerkenwell grew up around the buildings of the Knights ( Enc, Brit, 11th Edition)

Sir Thomas White, the founder of St John's College, Oxford, was Mayor in 1553; He owned lands in Rickmansworth, Hertfordshire, England.

Sir John White, Lord Mayor of London, 1563 was buried at Aldershot, Hampshire. He was a brother of John White, Bishop of Winchester, England

Sir Thomas White, was Lord Mayor of London in 1655, and was the first of the [South Warnborough] White's to settle in Ireland. His descendant was created Earl of Bantry in 1816.

John-(A) Whyte65, born Abt. 1510 in probably at Farnham, England65; died January 11, 1559/60 in Bishop of Winchester Cathedral, England65,66 Notes for John-(A) Whyte: "John White (1510?-1560), bishop of Winchester, was the son of Robert White of Farnham, where he was born 1510-11. (His brother JOHN became Lord Mayor of London in 1563. See pedigree in Manning and Bray's History of Surrey.) In 1521, at the age of 11, he was admitted scholar at Winchester. *** His health began to fail and on July 7 he was released to live with his brother, Alderman John White, near Bartholomew Lane. He was shortly after allowed to retire to the house of his sister, wife of Thomas White, at South Warnborough, Hampshire, where he died 12 January, 1560. He was buried in Winchester Cathedral on January 15."

Copy of letter to Rev. John Holding, Esq.

"Guildhall Library, London, E. C. 17-VI, 1902.

"Dear Sir: I have much pleasure in replying to your inquiry. The Lord Mayor in 1553 was Sir Thomas White, the founder of St. John's College, Oxford.

"Sir John White was Lord Mayor 1563, and his brother was Bishop of Winchester, both brothers being named JOHN. See article on the Bishop, Dictionary of National Biography, Vol. 61, pp. 52 A.

"Yours faithfully, "C. Welch, Librarian."

(From MS. of Rev. John Holding.)

JOHN WHITE, BISHOP OF WINCHESTER. "24 January, 1460, Bishop Wainflete granted to John White and Robert White, his son, for their lives, the office of Parks and Keepers of the Old and Little Park, and of his Chace of Farnham adjoining the Parks, with a fee of two pence a day for each Park, and the usual commodities and profits to the Chase belonging." (Page 136.)

"Wood, in his Athenae, says that John Whyte, brother of Sir John Whyte, Lord Mayor of London in 1563, was son of Robert Whyte of Farnham, son of John of the same place, who was son of Thomas Whyte of Purvile in Hants; was born at Farnham, and was bred at Winchester School, of which he became Master about 1534. He was afterwards made Warden and Bishop of Lincoln on the deprivation of Dr. John Taylor, the temporalities being restored to him May 2, 1554. He was translated to Winchester on the death of Stephen Gardner, in 1557. He was a zealous Papist, and much in favor with Queen Mary. Fox has recorded several of his Discourses, and that which he held with Bishop Ridley at Oxford when he was about to be burnt in 1555. He preached a Sermon on the death of Queen Mary, taking for his text, Eccles. iv: 2, in which he spake of her virtues in the strongest terms, and was so much affected that he could not proceed. Recovering himself, he said she had left a sister to succeed her, of great worth also, whom we were bound to obey; 'for,' saith he, 'the living dog is better than the dead lion; but I must still say with my text, I have praised the dead rather than the living; for certain it is, Mary hath chosen the better part.' Queen Elizabeth was highly offended, and he, having threatened to excommunicate her, as Watson, Bishop of Lincoln, did, was deprived of the Bishoprick in June, 1559, when he retired to his sister's house at South Warnborough in Hants and died there on the 11th of January following. He was a benefactor to New College, Oxford. He is reputed to be a man of austere life, eminent for piety and learning, an eloquent orator, a solid divine, a nervous preacher, and, as Camden tells us in his Annals of Elizabeth, a tolerable poet for the time. He published two books against Peter Martyr, a book of epigrams, and Verses on the Marriage of King Philip and Queen Mary." (Manning and Bray's Hist. of Surrey, p. 177.)

JOHN WHITE (4), Bishop of Winchester, b. 1509. (Ref.: History Winchester College, p. 208.)

DR. JOHN WHITE; BISHOP OF WINCHESTER, in 1556-59. Hampshire Family. Thomas White, of Farnham and Puroyle, Hants; will proved Oct. 19, 1467. His son:

John White, of Farnham, Surrey. His son:

Robert White, of Farnham, Surrey. His sons:

i. JOHN WHITE, D.D., Lord Bishop of Winchester, 1556-1559, was b. 1509, d. 1559. ii. Sir John White, Lord Mayor of London, 1563.

JOHN WHITE, LORD BISHOP OF WINCHESTER, was born at Farnham, educated at Winchester (in Wyckham's school there), admitted perpetual fellow of New College, Oxford, in 1527; graduated to M. A. in March 23, 1533-4, being appointed in 1534 to Mastership in Winchester School in place of Richard Tuchiner. Afterwards he was Rector of Cheyton, near Winchester; then made Warden of Winchester College in 1541; sent to the Tower for his Papal proclivities in 1550 under King Edward VI., restored to liberty by Queen Mary; made Bishop, first of Lincoln in 1554, and, second, of Winchester in 1556. He preached Queen Mary's funeral sermon in 1559, and used certain expressions in it, which gave mortal offense to Elizabeth. After bestowing much praise upon Mary he proceeded to say she had left a sister to succeed her, a lady of great worth also, whom they were now bound to obey; for, saith he, "melior est canis vivus leone mortuo" (a living dog is better than a dead lion)--certainly not a very elegant compliment to Queen Elizabeth. He was again committed to custody, and actually threatened, together with another Romanizing Bishop (Watson), to excommunicate the Queen, so was deprived of his bishoprick in 1559. He was allowed to retire to his sister's house at South Warnborough in Hampshire. Strype, the historian, says, "He died of ague Jan. 12, 1559 or 1560, at Sir Thomas White's place in Hampshire, and on the 15th was carried and buried at Winchester." (Memorials, Vol. II, p. 265, Note.)

Fuller, the historian, speaks of him thus, "John White was born in this county (Hants) of a worshipful house; began on the floor and mounted up to the roof of spiritual dignity in this diocese." (Fuller's "Worthies," Vol. I, p. 405.)

"The White's of Hampshire--of Puroyle--sent their sons both to Winchester and New College, Oxford. This was usual as keeping up family, school and academical associations. Generation after generation we find the members of the same family resorting to the same public schools and colleges, as if it was the family tradition carefully to be observed, that its members should go where their fathers themselves had been educated. Another John White (Century White), born at Henlan, in Pembrokeshire, in Wales, about 1590, goes to College at Oxford, where WELSHMEN at that day invariably went, namely to Jesus College, just as they do even now." (Rev. John Holding's MS.)

NOTE.--"There is every reason to believe that the Patriarch's family was a branch of the great Roman Catholic family of Hampshire." (Mrs. Frances B. Troup.)

-------------------- John White (1510–1560) was an English bishop, a Roman Catholic who was promoted in the reign of Mary Tudor.

Life[edit source | editbeta]He was born in Farnham, Hampshire and educated at Winchester College and New College, Oxford, where he graduated B.A. in 1529, M.A. in 1534, and D.D. in 1555.[1]

He was Warden of Winchester College from 1541, and wrote verses on the marriage to Philip II of Spain.[2] He was Archdeacon of Taunton from 1551 to 1554 after which he was Bishop of Lincoln from 1554 to 1556. He was then Bishop of Winchester from 1556, but was deprived of his see in 1559 on the accession of Elizabeth I, and imprisoned. There is a memorial to him in Winchester College Chapel.[1]

He was brother to Sir John White, alderman and MP.[3]

-------------------- John White, Bishop of Winchester, who flourished under Queen Mary I but was imprisoned by Queen Elizabeth I immediately upon her accession. Tradition has it that he referred disparagingly to Elizabeth in Mary's funeral oration, citing the old adage "a live dog is better than a dead lion", and that Elizabeth (predictably) took umbrage and got even.

Personal arms: Per chevron embattled or and gules, three roses counterchanged, slipped [and leaved] vert, on a chief of the second three hour-glasses argent framed gold

http://www.british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=45541 P. 224. Funeral of the late bishop of Winchester. John White, warden of Winchester college, consecrated bishop of Lincoln 1554 (see p. 58), translated to Winchester 1556, deprived 1559. He was brother to alderman sir John White, to whose house he had been allowed to repair on coming out of the Tower (see p. 203), this being an instance (to which there are many parallels) of two brothers bearing the same Christian name. Sir Thomas White, of South Warnborough, Hampshire, was his brother-in-law, for, though not nearly related in paternal descent, there had been two marriages which connected the families, sir Thomas White having married Agnes sister to the bishop and sir John, and sir John having married for his first wife Sibell sister of sir Thomas White. See the Collectanea Topogr. et Geneal. vol. vii. p. 212.

JOHN WHITE, LORD BISHOP OF WINCHESTER, was born at Farnham, educated at Winchester (in Wyckham’s school there), admitted perpetual fellow of New College, Oxford, in 1527; graduated to M. A. in March 23, 1533-4, being appointed in 1534 to Mastership in Winchester School in place of Richard Tuchiner. Afterwards he was Rector of Cheyton, near Winchester; then made Warden of Winchester College in 1541; sent to the Tower for his Papal proclivities in 1550 under King Edward VI., restored to liberty by Queen Mary; made Bishop, first of Lincoln in 1554, and, second, of Winchester in 1556. He preached Queen Mary’s funeral sermon in 1559, and used certain expressions in it, which gave mortal offense to Elizabeth. After bestowing much praise upon Mary he proceeded to say she had left a sister to succeed her, a lady of great worth also, whom they were now bound to obey; for, saith he, “melior est canis vivus leone mortuo” (a living dog is better than a dead lion)–certainly not a very elegant compliment to Queen Elizabeth. He was again committed to custody, and actually threatened, together with another Romanizing Bishop (Watson), to excommunicate the Queen, so was deprived of his bishoprick in 1559. He was allowed to retire to his sister’s house at South Warnborough in Hampshire. Strype, the historian, says, “He died of ague Jan. 12, 1559 or 1560, at Sir Thomas White’s place in Hampshire, and on the 15th was carried and buried at Winchester.” (Memorials, Vol. II, p. 265, Note.)

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Sir John Whyte, MP, Lord Mayor of London's Timeline

1511
1511
Farnham, Surrey, England
1528
1528
Age 17
Aldershot,,Hampshire,England
1538
1538
Age 27
Aldershot, Hampshire, England
1540
1540
Age 29
1543
1543
Age 32
1545
1545
Age 34
1547
1547
Age 36
1550
1550
Age 39
1555
1555
Age 44
Farnham, Surrey, England
1558
1558
Age 47