Is your surname Kollek?

Research the Kollek family

Teddy Kollek's Geni Profile

Share your family tree and photos with the people you know and love

  • Build your family tree online
  • Share photos and videos
  • Smart Matching™ technology
  • Free!

Share

Teddy Theodor Kollek, Mayor Of Jerusalem 20th-21th-22th-23th

Hebrew: תיאודור טדי קולק, ראש העיר ירושלים ה-20-ה-21-ה-22-ה-23
Also Known As: "Tivadar"
Birthdate:
Birthplace: Nagyvázsony, Veszprém County, Hungary
Death: Died in Jerusalem, Israel
Immediate Family:

Son of Alfred Abraham Kollek and Margarete (Grete) Kollek
Husband of Anna Helena Tamar Kollek
Father of <private> Kollek and Osnat Nurit Kollek Sachs
Brother of Paul Aharon Kollek

Occupation: Mayor of Jerusalem
Managed by: Private User
Last Updated:
view all

Immediate Family

About Teddy Kollek

Wikipedia:

Theodor "Teddy" Kollek (Hebrew: טדי קולק‎) (May 27, 1911 – January 2, 2007) was mayor of Jerusalem from 1965 to 1993, and founder of the Jerusalem Foundation. Kollek was re-elected five times, in 1969, 1973, 1978, 1983 and 1989. After reluctantly running for a seventh term in 1993 at the age of 82, he lost to Likud candidate and future Prime Minister of Israel Ehud Olmert . During his tenure, Jerusalem developed into a modern city, especially after its reunification in 1967. He was once called "the greatest builder of Jerusalem since Herod."


Early years

Teddy Kollek was born in Nagyvázsony, 120 km from Budapest, Hungary as Kollek Tivadar. His parents named him after Theodor Herzl. Growing up in Vienna, Kollek came to share his father Alfréd’s Zionist convictions.

In 1935, three years before the Nazis seized power in Austria, the Kollek family immigrated to Palestine, then under British mandate. In 1937, he was one of the founders of Kibbutz Ein Gev, on the shore of Lake Kinneret. That same year he married Tamar Schwarz. They had two children, a son, the film director Amos Kollek (born in 1947), and a daughter, Osnat.

In the 1940s, on behalf of the Jewish Agency (Sochnut) and as part of the "The Hunting Season" or "Saison" Teddy Kollek was the Jewish Agency's contact person with the British Mandate MI5, providing information against right-wing Jewish underground groups Irgun and Lehi (known as "Stern Gang"). He succeeded Reuven Zaslani and preceded Zeev Sherf in this function, and in doing so, the Jewish Agency's policy of fighting these groups was carried.

During World War II, Kollek tried to represent Jewish interests in Europe on behalf of the Jewish Agency. In 1947–48, he represented the Haganah in Washington, where he assisted in acquiring ammunition for Israel’s then-fledgling army. Kollek became a close ally of David Ben-Gurion, serving in the latter’s governments from 1952 as the director general of the prime minister’s office.

Mayor of Jerusalem

In 1965 Teddy Kollek succeeded Mordechai Ish-Shalom as Mayor of Jerusalem. On his motivations for seeking the mayor’s office in Jerusalem, Kollek once recalled:

I got into this by accident[...] I was bored. When the city was united, I saw this as an historic occasion. To take care of it and show better care than anyone else ever has is a full life purpose. I think Jerusalem is the one essential element in Jewish history. A body can live without an arm or a leg, not without the heart. This is the heart and soul of it.

During his tenure Jerusalem developed into a modern city, especially after its reunification in 1967. He was often called “the greatest builder of Jerusalem since Herod.”

Kollek was re-elected five times, in 1969, 1973, 1978, 1983, and 1989, serving 28 years as mayor of Jerusalem. In a reluctant seventh bid for mayor in 1993, Kollek, aged 82, lost to Likud candidate Ehud Olmert. On November 13, 1972, Kollek appeared alongside New York Mayor John Lindsay on the Tonight Show with Johnny Carson.

Relationship with the Arab community

In the Six-Day War of 1967, East Jerusalem, which had been under Jordanian control since 1948, was taken over by Israel. As mayor of a newly united Jerusalem, Kollek’s approach toward her Arab inhabitants was governed by pragmatism. Within hours of the transfer of authority, he arranged for the provision of milk for Arab children. Some Israelis considered him pro-Arab. Teddy Kollek, under the orders of Ben Gurion, ordered the destruction of the Moroccan Quarter in 1967 which made 100 Arab families homeless .

Kollek advocated religious tolerance and made numerous efforts to reach out to the Arab community during his tenure. Muslims continued to have access to al-Aqsa Mosque and al-Haram ash-Sharif (the Temple Mount) for worship, and Kollek criticized Jews for establishing new neighborhoods in contentious parts of the city. On one occasion, he protested outside the office of Prime Minister Yitzhak Shamir for this reason.

Kollek’s views toward the annexation of East Jerusalem softened after leaving office, he himself conceding that self-rule for the Palestinian community in East Jerusalem should be considered. The status of East Jerusalem has remained controversial up to the present.

Kolleck was seen by many as a bridge-builder between the Arab and the Jewish communities. Towards the end of his reign as a mayor of Jerusalem, he stated that Israel's Arab population had remained "second and third class citizens" and that neither he nor other Israeli leaders had done anything to improve the Arab's rights or quality of life:

“We said things half-mindedly and never fulfilled them. We’ve said again and again that we will make Arabs’ rights equal those of the Jews – empty words… both [PM] Eshkol and [PM] Begin promised equal rights – both broke their promises… they [Palestinians] were and remain second and third class citizens.”

Q: And this is being said by the mayor of Jerusalem, who labored for the city’s Arab citizens, built and developed their neighborhoods?

“Nonsense! Fables! Never built nor developed! I did do something for Jewish Jerusalem in the last 25 years. But for eastern Jerusalem, what did we do? Nothing! What did I do? Schools? Nothing! Pavements? Nothing! Culture centers? Not one! We did give them sewage and improved the water supply. You know why? You think [we did it] for their own good? For their quality of life? no way! There were a few cases of Cholera and the Jews were scared that it might reach them, so we installed sewage and water.” In his later years, Kollek stated: "We failed in the unification of the city."

Civic and cultural projects

Kollek dedicated himself to many cultural projects during his lengthy term in office, most notably the development and expansion of the Israel Museum. From 1965-1996, he was president of the museum, and officially designated its founder in 2000. When the museum celebrated its 25th anniversary in 1990, Kollek was named "Avi Ha-muze'on" ("father of the museum").

Kollek was also instrumental in the establishment of the Jerusalem Theater, and served as the founder and head of the Jerusalem Foundation. Through a leadership which spanned decades, Kollek raised millions of dollars from private donors for civic development projects and cultural programs. Kollek once remarked that Israel needed a strong army, but it also needed expressions of culture and civilization.

Kollek was considered the "number-one friend" of the Jerusalem Biblical Zoo, which occupied a 15-acre site in Romema from 1950-1991. Though the zoo attracted many visitors to its exhibits of animals, reptiles and birds mentioned in the Bible and was successful in breeding and protecting endangered species, it was considered small and inferior to zoos in Tel Aviv and Haifa. Kollek promoted the idea of moving the zoo to a larger location and upgrading it to a state-of-the-art institution. Around 1990, under the auspices of the Jerusalem Foundation, the Tisch family of New York agreed to underwrite the expensive undertaking. The zoo re-opened as The Tisch Family Zoological Garden in Jerusalem on a 62-acre expanse near the neighborhood of Malha in 1993. Kollek helped the zoo raise money to build the elephant enclosure and to bring in female elephants from Thailand at $50,000 apiece. The zoo named its male elephant Teddy and one of its female elephants Tamar in honor of the mayor and his wife. For Kollek's 90th birthday in 2001, the zoo feted him and the Jerusalem Foundation unveiled a new sculpture garden dedicated in his honor.

Awards and commemoration

  • In 1985, Kollek was awarded the Peace Prize of the German Book Trade.
  • In 1988, he was awarded the Israel Prize for his special contribution to society and the State of Israel.
  • In 2001, he was honoured with the title of Honorary Citizen of Vienna.
  • Teddy Stadium in Malha, Jerusalem, is named for him.
view all

Teddy Kollek's Timeline

1911
May 27, 1911
Nagyvázsony, Veszprém County, Hungary
May 27, 1911
- February 1, 2007

טדי קולק
טדי קולק
Kolek1956.jpeg

טדי קולק בתקופת כהונתו כמנכ"ל משרד ראש הממשלה, 1956
תאריך לידה 27 במאי 1911
מקום לידה באזור העיר וספרם, אוסטרו-הונגריה
תאריך עלייה 1934
תאריך פטירה 2 בינואר 2007 (בגיל 95)
עיסוק קודם מנהל משרד ראש הממשלה
תפקיד בכיר ראש עיר במשך 28 שנים
מקום וסוג רשות מקומית עיריית ירושלים
תאריך תחילת התפקיד 29 בנובמבר 1965 כראש עיריית מערב ירושלים; יוני 1967 כראש עיריית ירושלים המאוחדת
תאריך סיום התפקיד 1993
לפניו בתפקיד מרדכי איש שלום (מערב י-ם) ואמין אל-מג'ג' (מזרח)
אחריו בתפקיד אהוד אולמרט
מפלגות ירושלים אחת שהייתה חלק מתנועת העבודה, רפ"י
תפקידים אחרים ראש הקרן לירושלים
רקע מקצועי או הכשרה חלוץ, פעיל ההגנה

טדי קולק (שני מימין) בין חלוצי עין גב, שנות ה-30

קברו של טדי קולק בחלקת גדולי האומה

סטיקר הבחירות המפורסם "אוהבים אותך טדי"

ירושלים אחת, ספרו של טדי קולק בשיתוף עם בנו עמוס קולק, ספריית מעריב, 1979. 276 עמודים.
טדי קוֹלֶק (27 במאי 1911 - 2 בינואר 2007; כ"ט באייר ה'תרע"א - י"ב בטבת ה'תשס"ז) היה ראש עיריית ירושלים במשך 28 שנה, חתן פרס ישראל על תרומה מיוחדת למדינה.

תוכן עניינים [הסתרה]
1 קורות חייו
1.1 ראש עיריית ירושלים
2 הנצחתו
3 ביקורת ציבורית
4 לקריאה נוספת
5 קישורים חיצוניים
6 הערות שוליים
קורות חייו[עריכת קוד מקור | עריכה]
טדי (תיאודור) קולק נולד בשנת 1911 בעיירה קטנה בהונגריה בשם נאד'וואז'וני (Nagyvázsony), באזור העיר וספרם, לא הרחק מבודפשט, אולם את רוב שנות ילדותו העביר בווינה בירת אוסטריה. הוריו, גרטה (רחל) ואלפרד (אברהם), קראו לו בשם תיאודור, וכינויו היה טדי. לימים סיפר כי החליט לדבוק בכינוי זה, למרות צלילו הנוכרי, כאשר גילה כי להר הבית בימי בית המקדש השני היה שער צפוני שנשא את השם "שער טדי" (משנה מסכת מידות, פרק א', משנה ג). בתחילת שנות ה-20 היה פעיל בתנועת הנוער "תכלת לבן" בווינה. משנת 1931 פעל במסגרת תנועת "החלוץ" בצ'כוסלובקיה, בגרמניה ובאנגליה.

קולק עלה לארץ ישראל בשנת 1934. בשנת 1937 הצטרף לגרעין מייסדי קיבוץ עין גב. משנת 1938 פעל בשליחות "החלוץ" באנגליה והצליח לשחרר כ-3,000 צעירים יהודים ממחנות ריכוז ולהעבירם לאנגליה. במהלך מלחמת העולם השנייה מילא קולק תפקידים מרכזיים במחלקה המדינית של הסוכנות היהודית, בין היתר בקישור עם פקידים מרכזיים במשטר הנאצי על מנת להציל יהודים ולנסות להעלותם לארץ ישראל.

בשנת 1944 התמנה לראשות "המחלקה לתפקידים מיוחדים" בסוכנות היהודית. במסגרת תפקידו זה סיפק קולק, במהלך ה"סזון", מידע נרחב לארגון הביון הבריטי MI5 על האצ"ל והלח"י, כדי שישמש את שלטון המנדט במלחמתו במחתרות, זאת כחלק מהעבודה הרשמית שלו במחלקה המדינית של הסוכנות היהודית‏[1]‏[2] (ראובן שילוח עשה זאת לפני קולק, וזאב שרף המשיך אחריו‏[3]‏[4]).

בשנת 1947, יצא בראש משלחת מטעם "ההגנה" לארצות הברית, במטרה לקנות ולהעביר נשק שנועד לקרבות נגד הערבים שהיה צפוי שיפלשו עם ההכרזה על הקמת המדינה. במסגרת תפקיד זה היה אחראי גם לגיוס המח"ל שם.

לאחר קום המדינה, בשנים 1950-1952 שימש כציר בוושינגטון, שם קשר את הקשרים הראשונים בין קהילות הביון הישראלית והאמריקאית. לאחר כהונה קצרה נקרא לחזור ארצה ומונה על ידי דוד בן-גוריון, שהיה מקורב אליו, למנהל משרד ראש הממשלה. בתפקידו זה כיהן מ-1952 עד 1964, שנה שבה החל להירתם למען מוזיאון ישראל אותו הקים וניהל בירושלים. בנוסף, שימש כראש החברה הממשלתית לתיירות.

ראש עיריית ירושלים[עריכת קוד מקור | עריכה]
בשנת 1965 הצטרף טדי קולק לדוד בן-גוריון בהקמת רפ"י. באותה שנה נבחר מטעם רפ"י לכהונת ראש עיריית ירושלים, לאחר שהקים קואליציה עם מפלגות הימין והדתיים. בשנת 1967, בעקבות מלחמת ששת הימים ואיחוד ירושלים זכה להיות ראש העיר המאוחדת. איחוד העיר הכפיל את שטחה המוניציפלי ואת אוכלוסייתה. בבחירות העירוניות של 1969 עמד בראש רשימת המערך ובשנים מאוחרות יותר הקים רשימה על מפלגתית בשם "ירושלים אחת". קולק כיהן בתפקיד ראש העירייה במשך 28 שנים. לאחר איחוד העיר החל קולק בפעילות נמרצת של פיתוח העיר מבחינה תרבותית, והקים מוסדות ומרכזי חינוך. תרומתו העיקרית מתבטאת בפיתוח האורבני וביצירת "המייל התרבותי" במרכז העיר. הוא התעקש על שמירת הריאות הירוקות בעיר ועל שימור שכונות ישנות ומבנים חשובים, למעט כמה חריגים, כמו שכונת נחלת-שבעה, מיתחם עומריה, בנין טליתא קומי, ועוד. בשנת 1988 זכה קולק בפרס ישראל על תרומה מיוחדת למדינה.

בבחירות המוניציפליות ב-1993 החליט קולק שלא לרוץ לקדנציה נוספת, בין היתר מפאת גילו (82), אך לא עמד בלחצים פוליטיים של אנשי ציבור והחליט להתמודד בכל זאת. קולק הפסיד את הכהונה לאהוד אולמרט, בין היתר בגלל אי התייצבותם של הבוחרים הערבים לקלפי, בגלל אחוז הצבעה נמוך בקרב היהודים החילוניים ובשל פרישתו של המועמד החרדי - מאיר פרוש - ברגע האחרון וקריאתו של פרוש לתמוך באולמרט.

קולק נשא לאישה את תמר (אנה הלנה) (2013-1917), בתו של הרב והקודיקולוג ארתור זכריה שוורץ. לשניים נולדו שני ילדים: האמנית אסנת והקולנוען עמוס קולק.

טדי קולק נפטר בשנת 2007 בביתו בירושלים, בגיל 95. על פי החלטת הממשלה נערכה לו הלוויה ממלכתית והוא הובא למנוחות בחלקת גדולי האומה בהר הרצל.[1]

הנצחתו[עריכת קוד מקור | עריכה]
על שמו קרוי "אצטדיון טדי", האצטדיון הביתי של בית"ר ירושלים, הפועל ירושלים והפועל קטמון ירושלים בכדורגל. קולק פעל רבות לזירוז הקמתו, לאחר שנכשלה כוונתו להקים אצטדיון עירוני בלב שכונת קטמון הישנה, במקום "מגרש הפועל". כמו כן נקראה על שמו חטיבת הביניים בשכונת פסגת זאב, בצפון ירושלים. ב-2 במאי 2013 נפתח פארק ציבורי מול שער יפו שנקרא "פארק טדי" על שמו.

ביקורת ציבורית[עריכת קוד מקור | עריכה]
למרות תרומתו המרשימה של קולק לפיתוחה של העיר ירושלים, שהתבצעה על ידי מערכת גיוס הכספים שלו - "הקרן לירושלים" - הושמעה כלפיו לא פעם ביקורת על התנהלותו ה"אליטיסטית" בכל הנוגע לפיתוח מזרח ירושלים. הוא השקיע מעט מאוד בשכונות הערביות, והזניח כמעט כליל את הרובע המוסלמי. קולק טען שההבדל אינו תלוי בהחלטתו האישית, אלא הוא תוצאה ישירה של היות רוב התורמים ל"קרן ירושלים" יהודים, שדרשו כי כספם יופנה לציבור יהודי בלבד. כן תלה את הבדלי התקציב שמעבירה העירייה בפועל בשוני שבין קבוצות האוכלוסין ("ירושלים אחת", עמ' 221).

מחליפיו בתפקיד פעלו גם הם באופן דומה ואחת הסיבות המרכזיות לכך היא שרוב תושבי ירושלים הערבים מחרימים בקביעות את הבחירות לעירייה. בכך בחירתו של ראש עיריית ירושלים כמעט שאינה תלויה בהם.

ביקורת אחרת קשורה לתוכניות הפיתוח הגרנדיוזיות שהגה לאזורים שונים בירושלים, על חשבון הריסת בנינים עתיקים - חלקן יצא לפועל וחלקן נגנז. אחת התוכניות הייתה להרוס את שכונת נחלת שבעה שבמרכז העיר, ולהקים במקומה בנינים רבי-קומות. תוכנית זו נגנזה וכיום השכונה משומרת ברובה. תוכנית אחרת שלו הייתה להקים בנינים רבי קומות באזור חורשת עומריה, שבו שוכן היום גן הפעמון. רק בנין אחד מהתוכנית הוקם. הוא גם הגה תוכנית להרחיב את מגרש הפועל בקטמון לכדי קיבולת גדולה בהרבה מהמגרש שהיה קיים אז. תוכנית זו לא יצאה לפועל, לאחר התנגדות תקיפה של תושבי האזור, שחששו מההשלכות על איכות חייהם.

לקריאה נוספת[עריכת קוד מקור | עריכה]
טדי קולק (בשיתוף בנו עמוס), ירושלים אחת - סיפור חיים, ספריית מעריב, תל אביב 1979
טדי קולק, ירושלים של טדי, ספריית מעריב, ירושלים 1994
רות בקי קולודני, זהו טדי - ביוגרפיה מפי חברים, הוצאת משרד הביטחון, ירושלים 1995
טדי קולק ומשה פרלמן, ירושלים : 4000 שנות היסטוריה של עיר הנצח, תל אביב : ספרית "מעריב", שקמונה, [תשל"א], 1971.
קישורים חיצוניים[עריכת קוד מקור | עריכה]
מיזמי קרן ויקימדיה
ויקישיתוף תמונות ומדיה בוויקישיתוף: טדי קולק
טדי קולק, באנציקלופדיה ynet
דוד תדהר (עורך), "תיאודור (טדי) קולק", באנציקלופדיה לחלוצי הישוב ובוניו, כרך טז (1967), עמ' 4923
הלוויה ממלכתית לטדי קולק - לשעבר ראש העיר ירושלים, החלטה מספר 995 של ממשלת ישראל, משנת 2007, באתר של משרד ראש הממשלה
יהונתן ליס, מת ראש העיר ירושלים לשעבר טדי קולק בגיל 95, באתר הארץ, 2 בינואר 2007
טל ימין-וולבוביץ, טדי קולק הלך לעולמו בגיל 95, באתר nrg‏, 2 בינואר 2007
אפרת וייס ונטע סלע, טדי קולק הלך לעולמו בגיל 95, באתר ynet‏, 2 בינואר 2007
טדי קולק במחלקה לחינוך יהודי ציוני
על טדי קולק במרכז לטכנולוגיה חינוכית
רועי נחמיאס, "חזון איחוד ירושלים של קולק נכשל", באתר ynet‏, 2 בינואר 2007
אפרת וייס, "תמיד נזכור את האיש עם הבלורית והסיגר", באתר ynet‏, 2 בינואר 2007
מירון בנבנשתי, טדי האיש הטוב בטרגדיה ששמה ירושלים, באתר הארץ, 4 בינואר 2007
דוד קרויאנקר, הוא היה ביצועיסט, באתר הארץ, 5 בינואר 2007
נוסטלגיה במיטבה: תיעוד של טדי קולק וריקודי עם, באתר nana10‏
סרטונים טדי ותמר קולק ביום הקמת עין גב. ארכיון שפילברג (התחלה 5:00 עד 5:18)
הערות שוליים[עריכת קוד מקור | עריכה]
^ ‏סזון: הלשנות לבולשת הבריטית, ב"אנציקלופדיה יהודית" באתר "דעת"‏
^ אחרי מותו של קולק פורסם ששם-הקוד שלו אצל הבריטים היה "Scorpion" (עקרב באנגלית).‏‏‏(Ronen Bergman, Kollek was British informer, 29.3.07, ynet), אולם‏ טענה זו היא טעות. מחקר מדויק יותר על פי המסמכים של MI5 מראה שהסוכן "עקרב" כנראה היה אנטוני סימקינס, שפעל כקשר ביניים בין הסוכנות היהודית ובין אנשי MI5
^ Wagner, Steven. 2008. “Britain and the Jewish Underground, 1944–46: Intelligence, Policy and Resistance” MA Thesis. University of Calgary. Published online at University of Calgary Library. http://dspace1.acs.ucalgary.ca/handle/1880/48196. Pages 53-57.
^ Andrew, Christopher (2009) The Defence of the Realm. The Authorized History of MI5. Allen Lane. ISBN 978 0 713 99885 6. Pages 355,356.

[הסתרה]ראשי עיריית ירושלים
Flag of the Ottoman Empire.svg בתקופה העות'מאנית (1517–1917) יוסף אל-ח'אלידי • סלים אל-חוסייני • פאדי אל-עלמי • חוסיין אל-חוסייני
Palestine-Mandate-Ensign-1927-1948.svg בתקופה המנדטורית (1917–1948) עארף א-דג'אני • מוסא כאט'ם אל-חוסייני • ראע'ב נשאשיבי • חוסיין אל-ח'אלידי • דניאל אוסטר • מוסטפא אל-ח'אלידי
Flag of Jordan.svg ירושלים המזרחית (1948–1967) אנוור אל-ח'טיב • עארף אל-עארף • חנא עטאללה • עומר וואעארי • רוחי אל-ח'טיב • אמין אל-מג'ג'
Flag of Israel.svg ירושלים המערבית (1948–1967) דניאל אוסטר • שלמה זלמן שרגאי • יצחק קריב • גרשון אגרון • מרדכי איש-שלום • טדי קולק
Flag of Israel.svg ירושלים המאוחדת (1967 ואילך) טדי קולק • אהוד אולמרט • אורי לופוליאנסקי • ניר ברקת
קטגוריות: יהודים אוסטריםאנשי העלייה החמישיתמנכ"לי משרד ראש הממשלהראשי עיריית ירושליםזוכי פרס ישראל על תרומה מיוחדת לחברה ולמדינהאישים הקבורים בחלקת גדולי האומהחברי הוועד הציבורי למניעת הרס העתיקות בהר הביתזוכי פרס יגאל אלוןזוכי פרס בן-גוריוןאישים שהונצחו על בולי ישראל

Teddy Kollek
From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Teddy Kollek
Teddy Kollek during a Christmas eve cocktail party.jpg
Native name טדי קולק
Born Kollek Tivadar
May 27, 1911
Nagyvázsony, Hungary
Died January 2, 2007 (aged 95)
Known for Mayor of Jerusalem
Spouse(s) Tamar
Children 2
Awards
1985 Peace Prize of the German Book Trade
1988 Israel Prize for special contribution to society and the State of Israel
2001 title -- Honorary Citizen of Vienna
Theodor "Teddy" Kollek (Hebrew: טדי קולק‎; May 27, 1911 – January 2, 2007) was an Israeli politician who served as the mayor of Jerusalem from 1965 to 1993, and founder of the Jerusalem Foundation. Kollek was re-elected five times, in 1969, 1973, 1978, 1983 and 1989. After reluctantly running for a seventh term in 1993 at the age of 82, he lost to Likud candidate and future Prime Minister of Israel Ehud Olmert.

During his tenure, Jerusalem developed into a modern city, especially after its reunification in 1967.[1] He was once called "the greatest builder of Jerusalem since Herod."[2]

Contents [hide]
1 Biography
2 Mayor of Jerusalem
3 Relationship with the Arab community
4 Civic and cultural projects
5 Retirement
6 Awards and commemoration
7 Quotes
8 See also
9 References
10 Further reading
11 External links
Biography[edit]
Theodore (Teddy) Kollek was born in Nagyvázsony, 120 km from Budapest, Hungary as Kollek Tivadar. His parents named him after Theodor Herzl. Growing up in Vienna, Kollek came to share his father Alfréd’s Zionist convictions.

Teddy Kollek (second from the right), with the Ein Gev Pioneers (1934-39)
In 1935, three years before the Nazis seized power in Austria, the Kollek family immigrated to Israel, then under British mandate. In 1937, he was one of the founders of Kibbutz Ein Gev, on the shore of Lake Kinneret.[1] That same year he married Tamar Schwarz. They had two children, a son, the film director Amos Kollek (born in 1947), and a daughter, Osnat.[3]

In the 1940s, on behalf of the Jewish Agency (Sochnut) and as part of the "The Hunting Season" or "Saison" Teddy Kollek was the Jewish Agency's contact person with the British Mandate MI5, providing information against right-wing Jewish underground groups Irgun and Lehi (known as "Stern Gang"). He succeeded Reuven Zaslani and preceded Zeev Sherf in this function, and was carrying out the Jewish Agency's policy of assisting the British in fighting these groups.[4] In 1942 Kolleck was appointed the Jewish Agency's deputy head of intelligence. Between January 1945 and May 1946 he was the Agency's chief external liaison officer in Jerusalem and was in contact with MI5's main representative as well as members of British Military Intelligence. On 10 August 1945 he revealed to MI5 the location of a secret Irgun training camp near Binyamina. Twenty-seven Irgun members were arrested in the raid that followed.[5]

During World War II, Kollek tried to represent Jewish interests in Europe on behalf of the Jewish Agency. In 1947–48, he represented the Haganah in Washington, where he assisted in acquiring ammunition for Israel’s then-fledgling army. Kollek became a close ally of David Ben-Gurion, serving in the latter’s governments from 1952 as the director general of the prime minister’s office.[6]

Mayor of Jerusalem[edit]
In 1965 Teddy Kollek succeeded Mordechai Ish-Shalom as Mayor of Jerusalem. On his motivations for seeking the mayor’s office in Jerusalem, Kollek once recalled:[7]

I got into this by accident[...] I was bored. When the city was united, I saw this as an historic occasion. To take care of it and show better care than anyone else ever has is a full life purpose. I think Jerusalem is the one essential element in Jewish history. A body can live without an arm or a leg, not without the heart. This is the heart and soul of it.
During his tenure Jerusalem developed into a modern city, especially after its reunification in 1967[1] He was often called “the greatest builder of Jerusalem since Herod.”[2]

Kollek was re-elected five times, in 1969, 1973, 1978, 1983, and 1989, serving 28 years as mayor of Jerusalem.[8] In a reluctant seventh bid for mayor in 1993, Kollek, aged 82, lost to Likud candidate Ehud Olmert.

Relationship with the Arab community[edit]
In the Six-Day War of 1967, East Jerusalem, which had been under Jordanian control since 1948, was taken over by Israel. As mayor of a newly united Jerusalem, Kollek’s approach toward the Arab inhabitants was governed by pragmatism. Within hours of the transfer of authority, he arranged for the provision of milk for Arab children. Some Israelis considered him pro-Arab.[7] Kollek advocated religious tolerance and made numerous efforts to reach out to the Arab community during his tenure. Muslims continued to have access to al-Aqsa Mosque and Temple Mount for worship. While he was adamant that Jerusalem never be divided again and remain under Israeli sovereignty, he believed in concessions to reach a final settlement.[9]

Kollek’s views on the annexation of East Jerusalem softened after leaving office.[10]

Civic and cultural projects[edit]

Teddy the elephant at the Jerusalem Biblical Zoo, named in honor of Kollek.

Teddy Kollek Stadium
Kollek dedicated himself to many cultural projects during his lengthy term in office, most notably the development and expansion of the Israel Museum. From 1965–1996, he was president of the museum, and officially designated its founder in 2000. When the museum celebrated its 25th anniversary in 1990, Kollek was named "Avi Ha-muze'on" ("father of the museum").[11]

Kollek was also instrumental in the establishment of the Jerusalem Theater, and served as the founder and head of the Jerusalem Foundation. Through a leadership which spanned decades, Kollek raised millions of dollars from private donors for civic development projects and cultural programs. Kollek once remarked that Israel needed a strong army, but it also needed expressions of culture and civilization.[7]

Kollek was considered the "number-one friend"[12] of the Jerusalem Biblical Zoo, which occupied a 15-acre (61,000 m2) site[13] in Romema from 1950–1991. Though the zoo attracted many visitors to its exhibits of animals, reptiles and birds mentioned in the Bible and was successful in breeding and protecting endangered species,[14] it was considered small and inferior to zoos in Tel Aviv and Haifa.[15] Kollek promoted the idea of moving the zoo to a larger location and upgrading it to a state-of-the-art institution. Around 1990, under the auspices of the Jerusalem Foundation, the Tisch family of New York agreed to underwrite the expensive undertaking. The zoo re-opened as The Tisch Family Zoological Garden in Jerusalem on a 62-acre (250,000 m2) expanse near the neighborhood of Malha in 1993.[15] Kollek helped the zoo raise money to build the elephant enclosure and to bring in female elephants from Thailand at $50,000 apiece.[16] The zoo named its male elephant Teddy and one of its female elephants Tamar in honor of the mayor and his wife.[12] For Kollek's 90th birthday in 2001, the zoo feted him and the Jerusalem Foundation unveiled a new sculpture garden dedicated in his honor.[12]

Retirement[edit]

Flyers in Jerusalem mourning Teddy Kollek, January 4, 2007
Kollek continued to be active in retirement, maintaining a five-day work week into his nineties, even as he became increasingly infirm.[17] He and his wife lived in their walk-up Rehavia apartment until the mid-1990s, when they moved to Hod Yerushalayim, a retirement home in the Kiryat HaYovel neighborhood.[18] Kollek died on January 2, 2007.[19] He is buried on Mount Herzl, Jerusalem.

Awards and commemoration[edit]

Jerusalem's Teddy Stadium is named for Kollek
In 1985, Kollek was awarded the Peace Prize of the German Book Trade.
In 1988, he was awarded the Israel Prize for his special contribution to society and the State of Israel.[20]
In 1988, he received the Four Freedom Award for the Freedom of Worship[21]

In 1997, Kollek was awarded the Prize of Tolerance of the European Academy of Sciences and Arts.
In 2001, he was honoured with the title of Honorary Citizen of Vienna.
Teddy Stadium in Malha, Jerusalem, is named for him. Teddy Fountain in Jerusalem is named for him.

Quotes[edit]
"Jerusalem's people of differing faiths, cultures and aspirations must find peaceful ways to live together other than by drawing a line in the sand".[22]
See also[edit]
Portal icon Biography portal
Portal icon Politics portal
Portal icon Israel portal
Portal icon Austria portal
Portal icon Jerusalem portal
Portal icon Vienna portal
List of mayors of Jerusalem
Amos Kollek
List of Israel Prize recipients
List of honorary citizens of Vienna
References[edit]
^ Jump up to: a b c Wilson, Scott (January 2, 2007). "Longtime Mayor of Jerusalem Dies at 95". The Washington Post. p. 2. Retrieved January 2, 2007.
^ Jump up to: a b Zvielli, Alexander (January 2, 2007). "Teddy Kollek and his life-long dedication". The Jerusalem Post. Retrieved January 3, 2007.
Jump up ^ Kollek: A man with 'Viennese optimism'
Jump up ^ • Wagner, Steven. 2008. “Britain and the Jewish Underground, 1944–46: Intelligence, Policy and Resistance” MA Thesis. University of Calgary. Published online at University of Calgary Library. http://dspace1.acs.ucalgary.ca/handle/1880/48196
Jump up ^ Andrew, Christopher (2009) The Defence of the Realm. The Authorized History of MI5. Allen Lane. ISBN 978-0-7139-9885-6. Pages 355,356.
Jump up ^ "Legendary Jerusalem mayor Teddy Kollek to be laid to rest in Jerusalem". Haaretz. January 3, 2007. Retrieved January 3, 2007.
^ Jump up to: a b c Erlanger, Steven; Marilyn Berger (January 2, 2007). "Teddy Kollek, Ex-Mayor of Jerusalem, Dies at 95". The New York Times. Retrieved January 3, 2007.
Jump up ^ Rabinovich, Abraham (January 2, 2007). "How Teddy put Jerusalem back together again". The Jerusalem Post. Retrieved January 3, 2007.
Jump up ^ Teddy Kollek and his life-long dedication
Jump up ^ "Teddy Kollek, longtime mayor of Jerusalem, dies at 95". International Herald Tribune. January 2, 2007. Retrieved January 5, 2007.
Jump up ^ The Israel Museum, Jerusalem, Magazine, Winter-Spring 2007, p.3
^ Jump up to: a b c Doron, Shai (February 4, 2007). "The Zoo's No. 1 Friend". Jerusalem Post. Retrieved October 10, 2010.
Jump up ^ "The Tisch Family Biblical Zoo". Israel Ministry of Tourism. Retrieved October 31, 2010.
Jump up ^ Kammen, Michael (March 6, 1983). "Jerusalem's Modern Ark". The New York Times. Retrieved October 10, 2010.
^ Jump up to: a b Greenbaum, Avraham (August 2006). "The Jerusalem Biblical Zoo". Society of Biblical Literature. Retrieved October 10, 2010.
Jump up ^ Stromberg, David (August 22, 2010). "A Life of Its Own". The Jerusalem Post. Retrieved October 10, 2010.
Jump up ^ Lefkovitz, Etgar (January 2, 2007). "Legendary Jerusalem mayor Kollek dies at 95". The Jerusalem Post. Retrieved January 3, 2007.
Jump up ^ Kollek Teddy
Jump up ^ "Jerusalem's Longtime Mayor 'Teddy' Kollek Dies at 95". VOA News (Voice of America). January 2, 2007. Retrieved January 2, 2009. |first1= missing |last1= in Authors list (help)
Jump up ^ "Israel Prize Official Site – Recipients in 1988 (in Hebrew)". Retrieved July 1, 2009.
Jump up ^ http://www.rooseveltinstitute.org/four-freedoms-awards
Jump up ^ Boudreaux, Richard (3 January 2007). "Teddy Kollek, 95; Jerusalem mayor was a founding father of Israel". Los Angeles Times. Retrieved 23 April 2012.
Further reading[edit]
Ruth Bachi-Kolodny 2008, "Teddy Kollek. The Man, His Life and His Jerusalem", Gefen Publishing House. ISBN 978-965-229-417-3
External links[edit]
Interview on YouTube by Leon Charney on The Leon Charney Report
Wikimedia Commons has media related to Teddy Kollek.
[hide] v t e
Mayors of Jerusalem
Ottoman Empire (1517–1917)
Musa al-Alami (n/a) Ahmad Agha Duzdar (1838–63) Abdelrahman al-Dajani (1863–82) Salim al-Husayni (1882–97) Yousef al-Khalidi (1899–1907) Faidi al-Alami (1907–09) Hussein al-Husayni (1909–17)
British Mandate of Palestine (1917–48)
Aref al-Dajani (1917–18) Musa al-Husayni (1918–20) Raghib al-Nashashibi (1920–34) Hussein al-Khalidi (1934–37) Daniel Auster (1937–38) Mustafa al-Khalidi (1938–44) Daniel Auster (1944–45)
West Jerusalem, Israel (1949–67)
Daniel Auster (1949–50) Zalman Shragai (1951–52) Yitzhak Kariv (1952–55) Gershon Agron (1955–59) Mordechai Ish-Shalom (1959–65) Teddy Kollek (1965–67)
East Jerusalem, Jordan (1949–67)
Anwar Khatib (1948–50) Aref al-Aref (1950–51) Hannah Atallah (1951–52) Omar Wa'ari (1952–55) Ruhi al-Khatib (1957–67)
Israel (1967–)
Teddy Kollek (1967–93) Ehud Olmert (1993–2003) Uri Lupolianski (2003–08) Nir Barkat (2008–)
Titular East Jerusalem, Palestine (1967–)
Ruhi al-Khatib (1967–94) Amin al-Majaj (1994–98) Zaki Al-Ghul (1999–)
Authority control
WorldCat VIAF: 110087514 LCCN: n50042988 GND: 118564870 SUDOC: 026952106 BNF: cb11909946t (data) NKC: js20070105005
Categories: 1911 births2007 deathsMayors of JerusalemIsrael Prize for special contribution to society and the State recipientsJews in Mandatory PalestineIsraeli JewsIsraeli people of Hungarian-Jewish descentAustrian emigrants to Mandatory PalestineAustrian JewsHungarian JewsBurials at Mount HerzlGrand Crosses with Star and Sash of the Order of Merit of the Federal Republic of Germany

1960
February 4, 1960
Age 48
Jerusalem, Israel
2007
January 2, 2007
Age 95
Jerusalem, Israel
????