William Ellery (1727 - 1820) MP

‹ Back to Ellery surname

2

匹配

0 1 1
Adds more complete burial placemiddle name.

View William Ellery's complete profile:

  • See if you are related to William Ellery
  • Request to view William Ellery's family tree

分享

Birthdate:
Birthplace: Newport, Newport, Rhode Island
Death: Died in Newport, Newport, Rhode Island, United States
Occupation: Merchant; judge
Managed by: Douglas Fagans
Last Updated:

About William Ellery

William Ellery (December 22, 1727 – February 15, 1820) was a signer of the United States Declaration of Independence as a representative of Rhode Island. In 1764, Ellery joined Stephen Hopkins, Samuel Ward, the Reverend James Manning and several others as an original fellow or trustee for the chartering of the College in the English Colony of Rhode Island and Providence Plantations (the original name for Brown University)

The son of Benjamin Ellery, William Ellery was born in Newport. He worked first as a merchant, next as a customs collector, and lastly as Clerk of the Rhode Island General Assembly. Ellery started the practice of law in 1770 and was active in the Rhode Island Sons of Liberty. After Samuel Ward's death in 1776, Ellery replaced Ward in the Continental Congress. Ellery was among the fifty-six signers of the Declaration of Independence in 1776. Ellery also served as a judge of the Supreme Court of Rhode Island and by 1785 he had become an abolitionist. He was the first customs collector of the port of Newport under the Constitution, serving there until his death. Ellery was buried in Common Burying Ground and Island Cemetery in Newport.

His descendants include Ellery Channing, William Ellery Channing, Richard Henry Dana, Sr., Edie Sedgwick, Grace, Emily, Charlotte, and Amy Loring, and Daniel Kraus. Ellery Avenue in Middletown, Rhode Island is named in his honor. He had 19 children and was married twice in his lifetime.

--------------------

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/William_Ellery

William Ellery (December 22, 1727 – February 15, 1820) was a signer of the United States Declaration of Independence as a representative of Rhode Island. In 1764, Ellery joined Stephen Hopkins, Samuel Ward, the Reverend James Manning and several others as an original fellow or trustee for the chartering of the College in the English Colony of Rhode Island and Providence Plantations (the original name for Brown University).

The son of Benjamin Ellery, William Ellery was born in Newport. He worked first as a merchant, next as a customs collector, and lastly as Clerk of the Rhode Island General Assembly. Ellery started the practice of law in 1770 and was active in the Rhode Island Sons of Liberty. After Samuel Ward's death in 1776, Ellery replaced Ward in the Continental Congress. Ellery was among the fifty-six signers of the Declaration of Independence in 1776. Ellery also served as a judge of the Supreme Court of Rhode Island and by 1785 he had become an abolitionist. He was the first customs collector of the port of Newport under the Constitution, serving there until his death. Ellery was buried in Common Burying Ground and Island Cemetery in Newport.

His descendants include Ellery Channing, William Ellery Channing, Richard Henry Dana, Sr., Edie Sedgwick, Grace, Emily, Charlotte, and Amy Loring, and Daniel Kraus. Ellery Avenue in Middletown, Rhode Island is named in his honor. He had 19 children and was married twice in his lifetime.

-------------------- William Ellery (1727-1820) was a signer of the United States Declaration of Independence as a representative of Rhode Island. In 1764 he was among the original fellows or trustees who chartered Brown University, known then as the College in the English Colony of Rhode Island and Providence Plantations.

< : < : < : < : < : < : < : < : < : < : < : < : < : < : < : < : < : < : < : < : < : < : < : < :

William Ellery (December 22, 1727 – February 15, 1820) was a signer of the United States Declaration of Independence as a representative of Rhode Island. In 1764, Ellery joined Stephen Hopkins, Samuel Ward, the Reverend James Manning and several others as an original fellow or trustee for the chartering of the College in the English Colony of Rhode Island and Providence Plantations (the original name for Brown University).[1]

Contents

   * 1 Biography
   * 2 Family and legacy
   * 3 Images
   * 4 References
   * 5 External links

Biography

The second son of William Ellery Sr. and Elizabeth Almy, William Ellery was born in Newport and received his early education from his father, a merchant and Harvard College graduate. In 1747 William Ellery graduated from Harvard College where he had excelled in Greek and Latin. Ellery returned to Newport where he worked first as a merchant, next as a customs collector, and then as Clerk of the Rhode Island General Assembly. Ellery started the practicing law in 1770 at the age of 43 and became active in the Rhode Island Sons of Liberty.

After Samuel Ward's death in 1776, Ellery replaced Ward in the Continental Congress. Ellery was among the fifty-six signers of the Declaration of Independence in 1776. Ellery also served as a judge of the Supreme Court of Rhode Island and by 1785 he had become an abolitionist. He was the first customs collector of the port of Newport under the Constitution, serving there until his death. Ellery was an active worshipper at the Second Congregational Church of Newport.[2][3] After his death in 1820 at age 92, Ellery was buried in Common Burying Ground in Newport.[4]

Family and legacy

Ellery married Ann Remington of Cambridge, Massachusetts in 1750. She was the daughter of Judge Jonathan Remington. She died in 1764 in Cambridge and was buried there. He remarried in 1767 to Abigail Cary.

His descendants include Ellery Channing, William Ellery Channing, Richard Henry Dana, Sr., Edie Sedgwick, Kyra Sedgwick, Grace, Emily, Charlotte, and Amy Loring, Daniel Kraus, James Ellery, Gary Ellery, and Jadriene M. Ellery. Ellery Avenue in Middletown, Rhode Island is named in his honor. He had 19 children and was married twice in his lifetime.

Images

Ellery's tomb at Common Burying Ground and Island Cemetery in Newport

William Ellery's grave inscription Site of Ellery's house in Newport on Thames Street near his burial site William Ellery by Ole Erekson.

References

  1. ^ Charter of Brown University (PDF)
  2. ^ Charles Francis Adams, The works of John Adams, Volume 8 (Little, Brown, 1853), pg. 61 quoting "William Ellery and others to John Adams,"Newport RI 26 May, 1783 http://books.google.com/books?id=0JYsAAAAYAAJ&source=gbs_navlinks_s
  3. ^ http://www.adherents.com/gov/Founding_Fathers_Religion.html
  4. ^ Charles Augustus Goodrich "Lives of the Signers of the Declaration of Independence," (T. Mather, New York: 1840) pg. 153

External links United States portal North America portal Rhode Island portal

   * William Ellery at Find a Grave
   * Brown University Charter

Source: Downloaded 2010 from Wikipedia.

< : < : < : < : < : < : < : < : < : < : < : < : < : < : < : < : < : < : < : < : < : < : < : < :

查看全部

William Ellery, signer of the "Declaration of Independence"'s Timeline

1727
December 22, 1727
Newport, Newport, Rhode Island
1750
October 11, 1750
Age 22
Cambridge, Middlesex, Massachusetts
1751
August 13, 1751
Age 23
1752
1752
Age 24
1767
1767
Age 39
1820
February 15, 1820
Age 92
Newport, Newport, Rhode Island, United States
????
Newport, Newport, Rhode Island, United States