Áed, King of Scots

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Áed mac Cináeda, Rí na h'Alba

Also Known As: "Aedh", "Ædh"
Birthdate:
Birthplace: Scotland
Death: Died in Strathallan, Scotland
Place of Burial: Maiden Stone, Aberdeenshire, Scotland
Immediate Family:

Son of Kenneth I mac Alpine, King of the Picts and N.N.
Husband of N.N.
Father of Dior; Domnall II mac Aeda, King of Strathclyde; Constantín II mac Áeda, Rí na h'Alba and Doir Gioll mac Áeda, Taoiseach of Lochaber
Brother of NN ingen Cináed; Constantine I, King of the Picts and Scots; Máel Muire ni Cináeda; Mael Muire of Ireland; Cináeda MacAlpin and 5 others

Occupation: King of Scotland (877 - 878), Roi d'Ecosse de 876 à 878, King of the Picts, 4th King of Albany
Managed by: Private User
Last Updated:

About Áed, King of Scots

Áed mac Cináeda (died 878) was a son of Cináed mac Ailpín ("Kenneth MacAlpin"). He became king of the Picts in 877 when he succeeded his brother Constantín mac Cináeda. He was nicknamed Áed of the White Flowers, the Wing-footed (Latin: alipes) or the white-foot (Latin: albipes).

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/%C3%81ed_of_Scotland

http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/SCOTLAND.htm#_Toc209085735

The Chronicle of the Kings of Alba says of Áed: "Edus [Áed] held the same [i.e. the kingdom] for one year. The shortness of his reign has bequeathed nothing memorable to history. He was slain in the civitas of Nrurim." Nrurim is unidentified.

The Annals of Ulster say that in 878: "Áed mac Cináeda, king of the Picts, was killed by his associates." Tradition, reported by George Chalmers in his Caledonia (1807), and by the New Statistical Account (1834–1845), has it that the early-historic mound of the Cunninghillock by Inverurie is the burial place of Áed. This is based on reading Nrurim as Inruriu.

A longer account is interpolated in Andrew of Wyntoun's Orygynale Cronykil of Scotland. This says that Áed reigned one year and was killed by his successor Giric in Strathallan and other king lists have the same report.

It is uncertain which, if any, of the Prophecy of Berchán's kings should be taken to be Áed. William Forbes Skene presumed that the following verses referred to Áed:

   129. Another king will take [sovereignty]; small is the profit that he does not divide. Alas for Scotland thenceforward. His name will be the Furious.
   130. He will be but a short time over Scotland. The will be no [word uncertain] unplundered. Alas for Scotland, through the youth; alas for their books, alas for their bequests.
   131. He will be nine years in the kingdom. I shall tell you—it will be a tale of truth—he dies without bell, with communion, at evening, in a fatal pass.

Áed's son, Constantín mac Áeda, became king in 900. The idea that Domnall II of Strathclyde was a son of Áed, based on a confusing entry in the Chronicle of the Kings of Alba, is contested.


Áed of Scotland

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Áed mac Cináeda (d.878) was a son of Kenneth MacAlpin (Cináed mac Ailpín). He became king of the Picts in 877 when he succeeded his brother Constantine I (Causantín mac Cináeda). He was nicknamed Áed of the White Flowers, the Wing-footed (Latin: alipes) or the white-foot (Latin: albipes).

The Chronicle of the Kings of Alba says of Áed: "Edus [Áed] held the same [i.e. the kingdom] for one year. The shortness of his reign has bequeathed nothing memorable to history. He was slain in the civitas of Nrurim." Nrurim is unidentified.

The Annals of Ulster say that in 878: "Áed mac Cináeda, king of the Picts, was killed by his associates." Tradition, reported by George Chalmers in his Caledonia (1807), and by the New Statistical Account (1834–1845), has it that the early-historic mound of the Cunninghillock by Inverurie is the burial place of Áed. This is based on reading Nrurim as Inruriu.

A longer account is interpolated in Andrew of Wyntoun's Orygynale Cronykil of Scotland. This says that Áed reigned one year and was killed by his successor Giric (Giric mac Dúngail) in Strathallan and other king lists have the same report.

It is uncertain which, if any, of the Prophecy of Berchán's kings should be taken to be Áed. William Forbes Skene presumed that the following verses referred to Áed:

129. Another king will take [sovereignty]; small is the profit that he does not divide. Alas for Scotland thenceforward. His name will be the Furious.

130. He will be but a short time over Scotland. The will be no [word uncertain] unplundered. Alas for Scotland, through the youth; alas for their books, alas for their bequests.

131. He will be nine years in the kingdom. I shall tell you—it will be a tale of truth—he dies without bell, with communion, at evening, in a fatal pass.

Áed's son, Constantine II (Causantín mac Áeda), became king in 900. The idea that Domnall II of Strathclyde was a son of Áed, based on a confusing entry in the Chronicle of the Kings of Alba, is contested.

[edit]References

Anderson, Alan Orr, Early Sources of Scottish History A.D 500–1286, volume 1. Reprinted with corrections. Paul Watkins, Stamford, 1990. ISBN 1-871615-03-8

Anderson, Marjorie Ogilvie, Kings and Kingship in Early Scotland. Scottish Academic Press, Edinburgh, revised edition 1980. ISBN 0-7011-1604-8

Duncan, A.A.M., The Kingship of the Scots 842–1292: Succession and Independence. Edinburgh University Press, Edinburgh, 2002. ISBN 0-7486-1626-8

Smyth, Alfred P., Warlords and Holy Men: Scotland AD 80–1000. E.J. Arnold, London, 1984 (reprinted Edinburgh UP). ISBN 0-7486-0100-7


Áed mac Cináeda (died 878) was a son of Cináed mac Ailpín ("Kenneth MacAlpin"). He became king of the Picts in 877 when he succeeded his brother Constantín mac Cináeda. He was nicknamed Áed of the White Flowers, the Wing-footed (Latin: alipes) or the white-foot (Latin: albipes).


Aedh was the King of Alba from 876-878, following the death of his brother, Constantine I, who was killed or beheaded in a battle against the Danes at Inverdorat, the Black Cove, Angus.


Aedh

Konge av Skottland

Navn: Aedh / Aed / Aodh

Regjeringstid: 877–878

Født: Ca. 840, Skottland

Død: 878, Strathallan, Skottland

Foreldre: ?

Ektefelle‍(r): Ukjent navn

Barn: Konstantin, Donald

Aedh (også Aed eller Aodh) (født ca. 840, død 878 i Strathallan) var konge av Skottland fra 877 til sin død året etter.

Han etterfulgte sin bror Konstantin. Kort tid etter at han kom til makten ble han drept av Giric, som hadde konspirert med Aedhs nevø Eochaid. De etterfulgte ham i et samkongedømme.

Lite er kjent om ham. Det er usikkert om det var ham Konstantin utnevnte til tronfølger. Han var gift, men hans kones navn og når de giftet seg er ikke kjent. Hans sønn Konstantin ble senere konge av Skottland, og en yngre sønn, Donald, ble konge av Strathclyde i 908.

Etter at han ble drept er det mulig at han ble begravet i Maiden Stone i Aberdeenshire.


  • Name: King Eochaid of Scotland
  • Father: Run Macarthagail, King of Strathclyde
  • Mother: a daughter of Kenneth I
  • House of: MacAlpin
  • Ascended to the throne: 878
  • Married: none
  • Children: none
  • Died: 889

Succeeded by: his cousin Donald II

Eochaid (Áed mac Cináeda) was the grandson of Kenneth MacAlpin, and son of the Strathclyde ruler Rhun whose father had been slain by Constantine. He ruled jointly with Giric until they were expelled in 889 by Duncan II, ending the influence of Strathclyde which then became a Scottish sub-kingdom. Eochaid was either killed or exiled. Some reports have his burial place as the mound of Cunning hillock near Inverurie.

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Áed, King of Scots's Timeline

838
838
Scotland
858
858
Age 20
Scotland
864
864
Age 26
Scotland
870
870
Age 32
874
874
Age 36
Ruled 900-942
877
877
- 878
Age 39
King of Alba
878
878
Age 40
Strathallan, Scotland
878
Age 40
Maiden Stone, Aberdeenshire, Scotland
1938
May 17, 1938
Age 40
May 17, 1938
Age 40