Abraham I LeMaster, (LeMaitre)

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Abraham I LeMaster, (LeMaitre)

Also Known As: "ABRAHAM LEMASTERS", "Abraham Lemaster", "Abraham Lemaistre"
Birthdate:
Birthplace: Ste. Marie's Parish Isle of Chanel Islands, St Mary, Jersey
Death: December 06, 1722 (82-83)
Charles County, Maryland, United States
Place of Burial: Charles Co, MD
Immediate Family:

Son of Jean Francis Le Maistre and Sarah Lemaistre
Husband of Elizabeth Alice Lemaster (Cooksey)
Father of Sarah Tennison (Lemaster); Ann B Noe (LeMaster); Mary Mary Lemaster; Abraham Lemaistre; Alice Lemaster and 5 others

Managed by: Private User
Last Updated:

About Abraham I LeMaster, (LeMaitre)

Deposition filed by his son John--"Abraham Lemaistre, the son of John and Sarah Lemaistre, aged eighty one or thereabouts deposeth...that he was born in the Old Jerseys in the parish of Ste. Marie's, and further this deponent saith not,. Sworn before me this 27th day of June, 1720." Source--Charles Co., Md. Court and Land Records, Liber H No. 2, P. 415.

Nov. 16,1668, Abraham proved the right to 50 acres of land due for his service performed to Jon Smith. Aug. 1, 1663, Abraham is living on property called Betty's Delight and on Nov. 10, 1685, he purchased the property. Source--Lemaster USA by Howard Marshall leMaster.

Children:

Richard (b. abt 1670, MD d. Aft 1713, MD)

Daughter (b. abt 1672)

Sarah(b. abt 1674)

Anne(b. Apr 24, 1681)

John (b. abt 1682 St marie's Co MD d. abt 1740, Charles Co MD)

Isaac (b. abt 1695)



AFN: 4BMK-7B


ID: I36580

Name: Abraham LEMASTER

Sex: M

Birth: Abt 1639 in Nancy,France

Death: 06 DEC 1722 in Betty's Delight,Charles Co.,MD

Father: Francis LEMASTER b: Abt 1619 in ,,France

Marriage 1 Elizabeth COOKSEY b: Abt 1640 in ,St.Marys Co.,MD

Married: Abt 1659 in ,Charles Co.,MD

Children

Richard LEMASTER b: ,,1670 in ,Charles Co.,MD

The name Le Maistre or La Maistre is French and means "The Masters." The English version is Lemaster, LeMaster, LaMaster, LeeMaster, Leamaster. In America our first record to connect to our line is Abraham Lemaster, about 1639-1722, probably born in France and later settled in western edge of St. Mary's County, Maryland. Abraham's son, Richard was born 1670 and died after 1735. This seems to be the ancestors of about 90% of the Lemasters in America since then, regardless of how they spell their name.

Abraham LeMaistre, my 8th great grandfather and progenitor of the Lemaster clan, was born around 1639 on the Isle of Jersey, largest island of the Channel Islands, to John and Sarah LeMaister. He came to America around 1672 as an indentured servant to John Smith and settled in what is present day Charles County, Maryland.

Abraham is described as being a farmer, planter and carpenter. All trades that have carried on to present day Lemaster generations. Who Abraham was married to cannot be proven but speculation has his wife as Elizabeth. This assumption is based on a tract of land owned by Abraham named "Betty's Delight". However, this land was patented (named) by the previous owner and in those days, the patent remained, regardless of how many times the land changed ownership.

Family tradition has it that the Lemaster's of those days were big, burly, lumberjack type men. Not having much money, they bought supplies on credit and repaid their debts with appropriate pounds of tobacco.

Abraham is listed with the National Huguenot Society as being a French Protestant. Many Huguenots fled France during the French Revolution to save themselves and their families from the guillotine. I can neither verify nor deny this claim that Abraham was indeed a Huguenot.

But I do know that LeMaistre is of French origin meaning "the master". Different variations are Lemaster, LeMaster, Lamaster, Leemaster, Lemater, Delamater and many more too numerous to mention.

http://www.angelfire.com/ky/annshomeplace/lemaster.html

Additional Notes: Abraham LeMaistre was said to be born in the parish of Derval, a small village located in the province of Brittany, France, about 1639, by the book Lemasters, USA. By the request of his son John, court records say Abraham was born in St. Maries Parish in old Jersey, to John and Sarah Lemaistre. Perhaps the following statements applied to his ancestors: "The Lemaitre family has a documented existence in Brittany which extends back to the 13th Century. The LeMaitre family early came under the influence of the reform doctrines of John Calvin and the Swiss political reformer Bezanson Hugues, whose followers were called Huguenots. As Huguenots, the LeMaitres undoubtedly suffered through many of the political and religious purges which swept France thoughout the 16th Century." In the late 1650's, Abraham LeMaitre left Brittany and emigrated to England. Once there Abraham anglicized his surname to "Lemasters", an unusual transliteration since the name retains the French article and combines it with the English noun. Abraham's surname was spelled in America with many variants, including Le Master, Lemastr(s), Lemaitre, and de la Maitre. Lemaster or Lemasters is the most vommonly used among his descendants. Abraham Lemaistre arrived aboard ship in St Mary's county, Maryland, about 1661, with his wife, and perhaps one daughter. He had barely recovered his land legs when he signed an indenture with one John Smith to serve him for the next seven years as a carpenter. We see that being an indentured servant did not exclude one from civic affairs, as Benjamin witnessed a will in 1662, and in 1665 was listed as a witness in a court action. At least three children were born during this time. The privations of colonial life took a heavy toll on early Marylanders. Nearly 35,000 people immigrated to the colony between 1634 and 1680, yet only 20,000 lived in Maryland in 1680. Met with new diseases of the swampy Chesapeake Bay, and poor shelter, many immigrants perished during their first year. Maryland's greatest need in its formative years was a sturdy, reliable work force. The immediate answer to this problem was the indentured servant system. The contract offered those willing to sell their labor and broad shoulders for a chance to start a new life in America. Most indentures called for a period of bound servitude lasting seven years. When the term of service was complete the former servants received what was known as "freedom dues", which included a grant of 50 acres. After assigning his freedom dues land grant to Roger Snell, Abraham Lemasters became a tenant on a plantation of two hundred acres known locally as "Betty's Delight". Abraham and his wife farmed this land for several years, until he bought it from Edward Evans, in 1685. It was on the western edge of Zekiah Swamp, which at that time was in St. Mary's co., MD. An adjustment of the line between St. Mary's co. and Charles co., in the 1680's placed "Betty's Delight" in Charles co. MD. Zekiah Swamp was then the "Western Frontier", which those in later generations thought of as Kentucky, Indiana, Missouri, or Oregon, depending in which generation they lived. The typical plantation of early Maryland included the dwelling house; perhaps slave quarters; some outbuildings used for milkhouses, kitchens, workshops and/or storehouses. There might be corrals, a hog house and a hen house. Further from the dwelling would be cleared fields in which stands of tobacco and corn were cultivated. The plantation, by necessity, almost always contained one or more tobacco barns. Their houses were rough clapboard, which were small, dark, and drafty. They had packed dirt floors, and no glass windows. Most of these homes were uniformly dreary, unpainted, weathered gray structures. The interior was equally uninspiring, with open beams and unpainted wood or lath and plaster walls. The open fireplace was the focal point, sole sources of heat and of cooking. A person's bedding usually consisted of a mattress stuffed with cattails. However, the crude conditions in which early Maryland families lived were not out of step with the rest of the western world. Most adult males made their living wholly or partly from tobacco production. The broadleafed plant dominated every aspect of early Charles County life. Nearly all daily efforts were directed toward growing it, storing it and marketing it. In 1699 a Maryland resident noted that "tobacco is our meat, drinke, cloathing and monies.....the standard for trade, not only with the merchants but also among ourselves." Abraham secured the granting of a 50 acre property named "Toombett", for his son Richard, when the latter was only five years old. Apparently this was considered Richard's birthright, as he was not na med in Abraham's will. "Toombett" was near "Betty's Delight". Abraham Lemaster lived to be in his 80's, at a time when life expectancy of an immigrant was 49 years. His will was probated in Charles co., MD, in 1722. He left "Betty's Delight" to his son John, and son Isaac received title to a 100 acre farm adjoining. He left equal shares of another plantation known as "Berry's" to his daughters Sarah and Mary. Abraham's bequest to his daughter Anne was less definite. He willed her the right to live on his land, "during her husband's absence." Anne's husband was Stephen Noe, and it is not known where he was in 1722 that Abraham should remark on it in his will. Abraham also left property to be used by his wife during her lifetime. Her children sold this property in 1727, so it can be presumed she died before then. In 1736, "Betty's Delight" was sold by son John for 11,000 pounds of Tobacco. Although a few Lemasters lived in Zekiah Swamp in the next 100 years, many lost no time in getting away. In the 20th century, much of Zekiah Swamp had been a wilderness for many years, and was being considered for a Wildlife Preserve in 1965, because it is used by migrating wildlife. SOURCES: 1. Lemaster Family USA, by Howard M. Lemaster and Margaret Herberger, 1960. The two authors state that Abraham is the son of Claude LeMaistre of Long Island. I disagree with that because the son of Claude LeMaistre named Abraham has twenty years difference in age with this one, and secondly, because no descendant of our Abraham is named Claude. In most families, the given name of the immigrant ancestor is repeated often among descendants. Another conflict occurs when the authors assert that Charles county, Maryland was formed from St. Mary's county. The Handybook for Genealogists reports that they are both original counties. The best explanation is that the redrawing of the line between the two counties in the 1680's placed the Lemaster property in Charles county. 2. IGI for the birth date and place of Ann, and the names and birthdate and place of Abraham II, and Alice. Abraham (I) Lemaster's IGI number is 4BMK-7B. 3. Maryland General References, Wills, Vol. 1, p. 32, Sept. 21, 1662, when Abraham witnessed the will of George Houldcraft. 4. Charles co., Rent Rolls, 1639-1724, Vol. 2, p. 154, survey dated August 22, 1663, in Chingamuxon Hundred, plat named "Betty's Delight", to Edward Evans. 5. Maryland Hall of Records, Liber 11, folio 545, Nov. 16, 1668 (from Abraham Lemaster, .....all my right.....in and to service with John Smith.....50 acres, assigned to Roger Snell.) 6. Abstracts of Charles County Maryland, Court and Land Records 1694-1722, Vol. 3, by E.G. Jourdan. Liber Q, pg 107, 10 Nov. 1696, bill of sale recorded from David Jones of St. Mary's Co., sawyer, to Abraham Lemaster; cattle, written 18 Feb 1688/90 (that's the date given in the text). 7. Provincial Court Judgements, St. Mary's co., 1692-1693 Book WT #3, p. 11, 23, 27, 33, Abraham Lemaster serving on juries. 8. Abstracts of Charles County Maryland, Court and land Records, 1694-1722, Vol. 3. Liber D # 2, pg 51. 14 Jun 1713; Indenture from Abraham Lemaster to Phelemon Hemsly and Mary his wife ; for 5 shilling; a parcel of land on the east side of Zachia Swamp bounded and limited in a former deed from William Boarman to Abraham Lemaster; /s/ Abraham lemaster. Liber H # 2, page 126. 16 Aug 1717; Abram Lemaistie wit- nessed a deed of Gift from Humphrey Posey to his son Benjamin Posey. Liber H #2, page 302. 7 Dec 1719; Recorded at request of Abraham Lemaistre: Certified plat of tract called Lemaistre Delight made 29 Sep 1705. (A picture of the plat is in the Lemaster file.) Liber H #2, page 415. 9 Mar 1720/1; Recorded at request of John Lemaistre, planter: .....27 Jun 1720; Abraham Le- maistre, s/o John and Larah Lemaistre, age about 81 years, swore he was born "in the old Jerseys in the Parish of St. Maries". Liber H #2, page 468. 26 Nov 1721; Recorded at request\ of John Lemastre: 9 Sep 1721; Deed of Gift from Abraham Lemastre to his son John Lemastre; a tract called ?Bargids; /s/ Abraham Lemastre; witnessed Richard Brinn, John Lemastre; George Dent. 9. Maryland Hall of Records, Charles co., Wills, Liber 14, Folio 387, Aug. 10, 1717, daughter Mary mentioned as wife in will of Robert Barron. 10. Ibid. Liber 18, Folio 10. WILL OF ABRAHAM LEMASTER .....I give and bequeath to my loving son John Lemaster my dwelling plantation to him and male heirs of his body forever, but in case the son John should die without such heirs then it is to fall and descend to the next heir of the Lemasters. I give and bequeath to my loving son Isaac Lemaster all that tract of land whereon he now dwells, to him and his heirs forever. I give and bequeath unto my loving daughters Sarah Teneson and Mary Barrone all that I have of land called "Berry" to be divided equally to them and their heirs forever. Son John.....executor. My will is that my loving wife shall have the use of the movables of my dwelling during her natural life but not to transport or sell any part thereof only for her own maintenance. My will is that my loving daughter Anne should dwell on some part of my land during her husbands absence, where my loving son John will settle her. My will is that my loving wife shall have my now dwelling plantation during her natural life and my will that my daughter Anne should have a Milk cow out of my stock during her husbands absence. 11. Maryland Hall of Records, Annapolis, Charles co. Inventories, 1717-1735, Liber 106. dated 1722/23. ABRAHAM LEMASTER INVENTORY (While this inventory indicates a very meager estae, Abraham had been quite wealthy in land, as his will indicates .) Impv. (Don't know what this means. BB) To two year-old barrows To six Sowes and Eighteen Piggs Two Cowes and One yearling One old " . 4 barrells of Indian Corne 1 Mare and Colt 1 old mare with bridle and Saddle 1 Hand Mill 1 table 9 old Chairs 3 old Potts 3 Old wdges 1 old bed and Blanketts 1 old Clock " To parcell off Lumber 3 old Casque 3 old tobs 2 old Chests one old pail 1 piggin (for a total value of 26 Pounds Sterling.) Given under ye hands and seales of the undr named Apprs this 21st day of March, 1722/23. -----John Boarman Sl. John Highton Sl. Given undr ye hands ye undsd Isaac (his mark) Lemaster. Given under ye hands of the Undr named Creditor Richard Lemaister 1 1/2 sides. (Don't know what this means, BB). 12. Ibid. Book C, #2, p. 203, dated 1729, Charles co., where daughter Ann is mentioned as wife of Stephen Noe. 13. Ibid. Book Q#2, p. 269, dated 1729, where daughter Mary and son John lost a suit for legacy left by their father Abraham, for want of Jurisdiction. (I don't know what this means. BB) 14. Maryland General References, part 19, Accounts of Estates 1718-1777, Prerogative Court of Maryland, Liber AD 1, Book 4, p. 344, and part 1-2, p. 133, is found mention of the death of Abraham Lemaster. 15. Index to Chancery Notes and Desposition and Testamentary proceedings, by Creagar, MD Historical Society: Abraham Lemaster of Charles co., Age 70 years in 1715. 16. MD General References, part 37, Inventory of Estates, 1718-77 Perogative Court of MD, Charles Co., Deeds, Part 2, Book M2, page 275 and 276, for proof of son John's death in 1740. 17. Benjamin Lemasters of Nicholas County, WV, His Ancestry, his war Record, His Descendants, by Ronald V. Hardway, 1993. 18. Heritage Quest, Vol. #22, page 29, an article entitled "Con- ditions in Early Maryland." 19. Charles co., MD Land Records, Vol. III, 17 June 1720, Abraham Lemaistre, son of Jo hn & Sarah Lemaistre swore he born in the Old Jerseys in the Parish of St. Maries. Additional Source: "Pedigree Resource File," database, FamilySearch (http://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.2.1/SP6Z-N11 : accessed 24 August 2012), entry for ABRAHAM /LEMASTER/.


'Abraham Lemaster'

Abraham Lemaster born 1636 on the Isle of Jersey (Channel Islands, France) and died December 6, 1722 at Betty's Delight in Charles County, Maryland. He was the son of John Lemaster/LeMatre and Sarah(?)

He married Alice Cooksey in 1658.

The children of Abraham Lemaster and Alice Cooksey were:

1. Sarah Lemaster born in 1660 married John Tennyson

2. Mary Lemaster b. 1663 married Richard Barron

3. Richard Lemaster born 1670 in Charles County, Maryland, married Martha Dennis

More about the Lemaster family:

The name Le Maistre or La Maistre is French and means "The Master". Le is masculine and La is feminine. De La Maistre descended from the ancient house of Brittainy, Sieurs de la Garlaye, in the parish of Derval, in the Diocese of Nantes, in France. The first records are of Arthur Le Maistre, Sieur of Bois-Vert, who was Chamberlain to John II, Duke of Brittainy 1286-1312. John Le Maistre was President of the Parliament of Paris under Henry IV. Henry IV ruled from 1589-1610.

The mother of Antoine Le Maistre (1608-1658) was the daughter of Antoine Arnauet who was a Jansenist. The Jansenists were a religious group which started about 1650 in France, They were persecuted and many fled to the Netherlands. Many of Le Maistres were French Huguenots. This religious group of French Protestants were founded about 1512. In 1661 they were prohibited from preaching, and a religious war followed.

In 1572 the Massacre of St. Bartholomew's Day was carried out and many Huguenots were murdered. In 1598 the Edict of Nantes was issued by King Henry which gave the Huguenots religious freedom. In 1685, Louis XIV repealed the Edict, and again many Huguenots were put to death. They fled France by the thousands, going to Germany, England, Netherlands and America. Many settled in Virginia, Maryland, South Carolina, Massachusetts, and New York. Among some of these were Le Maistres. As the name LeMaistre became nationalized, it gave rise to such names as: Delamater, DeMaster, LeMaster, Limaster, Leymeister, MacMaster.

The name LeMaster became reagionalized into varations like: LaMaster, Lamasters, Lemasters, LeaMaster, Leamaster, LeeMaster. One of the Le Maistres was Claude Le Maistre who went to Holland then came to America in 1652. He settled at Flat Bush, Long Island. His wife was Hester Du Bois and they had 6 children: John born 1653; Abraham, born 1656; Isaac, born 1658; Susanna born 1660; Hester born 1662; James born 1665. In Memorials of the Huguenots, under the list of the French Nobility, families of Patrician Rank from Nobility of Normandy is listed Le Mastire immigrants as coming to America in 1688. Under the general list is John William Le Maistre, born 1690, and came to America in 1748. A second group of Le Maistres was Abraham Le Maistre born about 1637 in Ste. Marie's Parish, the Isle of Jersey in the Channel Islands to John and Sarah Le Maistre. He came to Maryland before 1669, and settled in Charles Co. in 1700. He patented Le Master's Delight, Betty's Delight, and a number of other tracts. Between 1740-1752, three Lemaster brothers came from Nancy France. However, their names are not known. They had plantations in Virginia and later on the Ohio River near the Ohio and Indiana border. One of this group, Frank Le Master, moved to Johnson Co., Kentucky. He had brothers John R. Le Master; Jessie Le Master; and Eli Le Master (1770-1775)..

A third group came to Pennsylvania before 1750. The name of the father is not known, but he came to Philadelphia County from Germany. He was a blacksmith and carried on his trade near the city. He had 2 sons, of whom Andrew Lemaster was the younger. Andrew was born in Philadelphia Co. Feb. 26 1750. After his father died, Andrew followed the blacksmith trade while his elder brother took the farm. With his share of the estate, Andrew bought a few acres of ground near Philadelphia and built a house and blacksmith shop. Later he moved to Franklin Co., Pa., married Barbara Heck, had eight children. Their son, Jacob Lemaster, was born July 8, 1775. Jacob bought land where the village of Lemaster, Pennsylvania, is now located. The village was started in 1876 by Samuel Plumb, who purchased 11 acres of land from Jacob Lemasters (Lehmasters), and built a work shop. The village of Lemaster, Pa. still exists. A fourth group of Lemasters are descended from a Lemaster who is said to have married an Indian Princess. This was probably a son of one of the early groups.

A fifth group seems to be settled in Virginia. It is known that Lemasters were in Virginia as early as 1700, when a John Lemaster came to Virginia. Wills, deeds, land grants, etc., may be found in Virginia in the early 1700's. We do not know who the first Lemaster was who settled there. The sixth group of Lemasters settled in South Carolina. Some Lemasters living there now say they are descendants of Lemasters, came as a body guard for La Fayette; other say their families came to South Carolina from Virginia. The Lemasters in Virginia seem to have moved to Georgia, Kentucky, Ohio, and Indiana. From these states on into Missouri and Arjkansas. From this movement Lemasters can be found today in practically every state in the USA. The names appears in many historical transactions, including the list of voters in the first presidential election; Knights of the Golden Horseshoe; on the Battle Monument of Point Pleasant, West Virginia (first battle of the American Revolution); land grants signed by King George III; in the Blue Book of New York City; many are listed as taking the Oath of Allegiance before and during the Revolution; Nicholas LeMaster was a seaman in Coligny's 2nd expedition to Canada in St. John's River Colony, sailed April 22, 1564 (the entire colony massacred by Indians); Le Maistre family of Orleans, France is listed as French Huguenots; some served at Valley Forge under George Washington; and a coat of arms was issued to the family. There are also many LeMasters listed as soldiers in the Revolutionary war.

Thomas, George, Richard, Benjamin, John, James, Abraham, Hugh, Isaac, Jacob are all listed as serving from Virginia, Abraham, Hugh, Isaac, and Richard are listed from Maryland. John and Frank are listed from South Carolina.

Abraham's Origins and Background.

The June 1720 record establishes Abraham's origins as Jersey in the Channel Islands. Jersey is the largest of the Channel Islands, and Ste. Marie's Parish is located on its northern coast. The Channel Islands are situated in the English Channel, but closer to France than to England.

Although originally settled by people from Normandy and Brittany, the Channel Islands have belonged to England since the Norman Conquest in 1066. Despite being part of Great Britain for over 900 years, French remained the official language there until fairly recent times. The Channel Islands were occupied by Nazi Germany during WWII. Today they are known as a tax haven.

Abraham's Channel Islands origins coincide nicely with Lord Baltimore's Amended Conditions of Plantation (discussed below) and further dispel the notion that Abraham might have been an immigrant from France.

Thus, at the time of his emigration to Maryland, Abraham was a British subject, as were virtually all the settlers in Maryland at t his time, although he was of French descent and probably spoke French in addition to English.

It would seem unlikely that Abraham came directly from Jersey to Maryland. More likely the ship he was on departed from an English port, and perhaps Abraham had a residence in England for a time prior to sailing for Maryland.

Although Abraham is generally claimed to have been a Protestant, there is really no evidence of his religious persuasion, and he may have been a Catholic. Although most of the earliest immigrants to Maryland were Catholic, by the time of Abraham's arrival, there were considerable numbers of Protestants in Maryland owing to the confluence of Lord Baltimore's practice of religious toleration, and the absence of same in Virginia.

Because of religious problems associated with t he monarchy in England, it became vey difficult to be a Catholic in Maryland after 1689 , so that even if Abraham were originally Catholic it would not be surprising if the family be came Protestant there after. The Huguenot Society (French Protestants) has accepted descendants of Abraham for membership, but I know of no basis for their decision to do so. I have the notion that French Protestants were more likely to use Old Testament names (Abraham, Isaac, Jacob) than their Catholic counterparts, but would need to have the advice of a Huguenot expert as to whether this is so. Not only did individuals, then as now, change their religious preference for reasons of conscience (or convenience), but with the unique religious status of Maryland for the first 50 years or so of its existence, there was considerable intermarriage between Catholics and Protestants.

Abraham's daughter, Sarah seems rather likely to have been a Catholic because she and her husband John Tennison named a son Ignatius, and her husband John was probably a Protestant. On the other hand, Abraham's daughter Mary was surely a Protestant because her husband was an Anglican minister. At any rate, nearly all of Abraham's later descendants were Protestants.

As to his occupation, Abraham is never called anything but "planter" (farmer). The words "planter" and "plantation" in earl y Maryland do not have the grandiose connotation we attribute to them in the Antebellum South, but applied to even small farmers barely eking out a living on their land. The records of Abraham indicate that he was literate, but some of his children were not.

Under the terms of Lord Baltimore's original Conditions of Plantation, a person received land for transporting himself and others to Maryland. Persons who were transported at someone else's expense contracted to repay the cost of their transportation by agreeing to act as a servant for a period of years, and were called "indentured servants." Indentured servants were not entitled to free land, and after completing their period of servitude they were expected to lease a tenancy.

In 1648, the Conditions of Plantation were amended to provide that indentured servants who had satisfactorily served out the contract with their transporter were entitled to claim 50 acres of land. The Amended Conditions of Plantation of 1648 also required that former indentured servant land applicants be of British or Irish lineage, that their period of servitude have been not less than 3 years, and that they apply for their land rights within one year after they finished their period of servitude.

This is the category that Abraham falls into. That is, he was an indentured servant who had come to Maryland after 1648, and having completed his period of servitude, he became entitled to 50 acres of free land. This he did in Nov. 1668. According to "The History of Charles County, Maryland," by Margaret B. Klapthor and Paul D. Brown, p. 153, the cost of passage to Maryland was about six pounds sterling, and the period of servitude (the time in which the passage cost would be worked off) depended upon the skill, ability and value of the servant.

The authors state that a period of five years was the usual indenture period for a farm worker or other unskilled person without a trade. Shorter indenture periods were generally for persons with a valuable skill, and longer indenture periods were generally for debtors, petty criminals or others being involuntarily transported to Maryland.

I did my own survey of the first 200 pages in the Skordas book and found 43 people who received land for service under the 1648 Amended Conditions of Plantation. There is a bell-shaped curve, peaking at 6 years' servitude (7 men). 4 and 5 years servitude produced 5 men each, and 7 and 8 years' service had 3 and 4 men respectively. 3 and 9 years' service had only 1 man each. The results of this survey coincide pretty well with Klapthor and Brown's conclusions.

Was this new benefit for servants after 1648 (free land) necessary because of a decrease in persons willing to serve under the former conditions, or had their numbers remained about the same, but increased immigration was wanted? And, in this regard, one wonders if the average period of servitude lengthened slightly after 1648 when free land became available to the servants.

From the 1662 and 1668 records of Abraham, we know that he had been in Maryland 6 years when he proved his land right, and if the terms of the Amended Conditions of Plantation were complied with (1 year to apply), then the end of Abraham's period of servitude would have been between Nov. 1667 and Nov. 1668, and presumably closer to the latter date, since why wait around for a year to claim your entitlement? These dates already give us a 5-6 year period for Abraham's servitude, and it seems unlikely to me that Abraham came to Maryland before 1661, and maybe not until 1662, because otherwise he would have had an unusually long period of servitude. That Abraham's occupation was as a farmer seems consistent with a period of servitude of about 5-6 years.

The John Smith who transported Abraham to Maryland ca. 1662 was entitled to 50 acres of land for having transported Abraham. This would be in addition to the 50 acres each that John was entitled to for transporting himself and any others that came with him in addition to Abraham. However, no John Smith ever claimed land for having transported Abraham. This is unfortunate for us because had John Smith claimed the 50 acres due him for transporting Abraham, we would have a better date for the transportation, know the entire group of persons that came together, and know the location of the land that was granted to John Smith, which is probably where Abraham lived during his period of servitude. Nor does it appear that John Smith assigned (sold) his right to 50 acres for Abraham's transportation to someone else because no one else ever claimed land for transporting Abraham either.

'Abraham's Wife'

We do not know the name of Abraham's wife. Despite the many records found for Abraham, none mentions his wife's name. In the past it was presumed that her name was Elizabeth because the name of Abraham's property was "Betty's Delight." However, the property was already named Betty's Delight when Abraham acquired it in 1685 from Edward Evans. Betty's Delight was patented to Edward Evans in 1673, and Evans' wife was named Elizabeth. Thus, Betty's Delight was doubtless named for Elizabeth Evans. Nor is it a useful argument to suggest that Abraham would have changed the name of Betty's Delight to something else if his wife had not also been named Elizabeth.

Land kept its original patented name indefinitely despite a series of succeeding owners. Not having any alternative system to keep track of land, land continued to be called and kept track of in official records (deeds, rent rolls, debt books, wills, etc.) by its original patented name. Betty's Delight, for example, was still so called as late as 1785, over 60 years after Abraham' s death.

Further circumstantial evidence that Abraham's wife was not an Elizabeth is that (1) Abraham did not name a daughter Elizabeth and, (2) so far as we know, none of Abraham's children name d a daughter Elizabeth. None of this, of course, establishes that Abraham's wife was not named Elizabeth; it is just not particularly likely to have been the case.

As a matter of fact, I believe it is likely that Abraham had more than one wife. This is suggested by the birth spacing of Abraham's three sons, and an insufficient number of daughters to indicate a continuous series of children by one wife. Second son John was born. 12-14 years after Richard, and third son Isaac was born another 13 years after John. Although infant mortality was high in those days, the death of women in childbirth was also high (as was mortality in general.) A large percentage of men and women married more than once because of the death of a spouse. A second, and younger, wife seems particularly likely for Abraham's last son Isaac who was not born until 1695.

Whatever the name of Abraham's (1st?) wife, I suspect that her father's name was Richard. Abraham and wife named their first son Richard, and it was not a LeMaster family name. Second son John was likely named for Abraham's father John LeMaster, and third son Isaac was perhaps given the name because in the Bible, Isaac is the son of Abraham. In those days, a father nearly always named a son after himself, but if Abraham had a son Abraham he must have died as a child. Eldest daughter Sarah was probably named for Abraham's mother.

The other daughters Mary and Ann may have been named for Abraham's wife and/or the wife's mother. Given the known and approximate dates of birth of Abraham's children, it seems quite likely that Abraham came to Maryland as a single man, and did not marry until some time after his arrival. If Abraham did have a second wife, it is likely that she was a widow since widowers more frequently married widows, and vice versa

Abraham LeMaster and Unknown had the following children:

1. SARAH2 LEMASTER (daughter of Abraham LeMaster and Unknown) was born about 1660 in Charles Co., MD. She died after 1752. She married (1) JOHN TENNISON. He was born about 1667. He died between Apr 1743-Jul 1745 in Charles Co., MD. 2. MARY LEMASTER (daughter of Abraham LeMaster and Unknown) was born about 1663 in St. Mary's Co., MD. She died after 1722. She married (1) ROBERT BARRON. He died in 1717 in St. Mary's Co., MD. 3. RICHARD LEMASTER (son of Abraham LeMaster and Unknown) was born about 1670 in St. Mary's Co., MD. He died after 1735 in Charles Co., MD. He married (1) MARTHA _____. She died in 1713. 4. ISSAC LEMASTER (son of Abraham LeMaster and Unknown) was born about 1677 in Charles Co., MD. He died after 1752. 5. ANNE LEMASTER (daughter of Abraham LeMaster and Unknown) was born about 1681 in Charles Co., MD. She married (1) JUSTINIAN NOE. 6. JOHN LEMASTER (son of Abraham LeMaster and Unknown) was born about 1682. He died about 1749. He married (1) UNKNOWN. He married (2) CHRISTIAN TENNISON after 1704.

http://www.lamasterfamily.org/PDF/Descendants%20of%20Abraham%20LeMa...

Abraham LeMaster (1639-1722) This Abraham LeMaster was the great great grandfather of Abraham LaMaster who married Letitia Tyler. Many researchers have given his wife the name of Elizabeth Alice Cooksey. As far as I can tell, the name of his wife is unknown.

The following taken from Abraham LeMaster (1638-1722) of Charles Co. MD and his Descendants – Vol. 1, by Ralph Smith, April 1997.

Abraham’s Origins and Background The June 1720 record establishes Abraham’s origins as Jersey in the Channel Islands. Jersey is the largest of the Channel Islands, and Ste. Marie’s Parish is located on its northern coast. The Channel Islands are situated in the English Channel, but closer to France than to England. Although originally settled by people from Normandy and Brittany, the Channel Islands have belonged to England since the Norman Conquest in 1066. Despite being part of Great Britain for over 900 years, French remained the official language there until fairly recent times. The Channel Islands were occupied by Nazi Germany during World War II. Today they are known as a tax haven.

Abraham’s Channel Islands origins coincide nicely with Lord Baltimore’s Amended Conditions of Plantation (discussed below) and further dispel the notion that Abraham might have been an immigrant from France. Thus, at the time of his emigration to Maryland, Abraham was a British subject, as were virtually all the settlers in Maryland at this time, although he was of French descent and probably spoke French in addition to English. It would seem unlikely that Abraham came directly from Jersey to Maryland. More likely the ship he was on departed from an English port, and perhaps Abraham had a residence in England for a time prior to sailing for Maryland.

Although Abraham is generally claimed to have been a Protestant, there is really no evidence of his religious persuasion, and he may have been a Catholic. Although most of the earliest immigrants to Maryland were Catholic, by the time of Abraham’s arrival, there were considerable numbers of Protestants in Maryland owing to the confluence of Lord Baltimore’s practice of religious toleration, and the absence of same in Virginia . Because of religious problems associated with t he monarchy in England, it became vey difficult to be a Catholic in Maryland after 1689 , so that even if Abraham were originally Catholic it would not be surprising if the family be came Protestant there after. The Huguenot Society (French Protestants) has accepted descendants of Abraham for membership, but I know of no basis for their decision to do so. I have the notion that French Protestants were more likely to use Old Testament names (Abraham, Isaac, Jacob) than their Catholic counterparts , but would need to have the advice of a Huguenot expert as to whether this is so. Not only did individuals, then as now, change their religious preference for reasons of conscience (or convenience), but with the unique religious status of Maryland for the first 50 years or so of its existence, there was considerable intermarriage between Catholics and Protestants. Abraham’s daughter, Sarah seems rather likely to have been a Catholic because she and her husband John Tennison named a son Ignatius, and her husband John was probably a Protestant. On the other hand, Abraham’s daughter Mary was surely a Protestant because her husband was an Anglican minister. At any rate, nearly all of Abraham’s later descendants were Protestants.

As to his occupation, Abraham is never called anything but “planter” (farmer). The words “planter” and “plantation” in earl y Maryland do not have the grandiose connotation we attribute to them in the Antebellum South, but applied to even small farmers barely eking out a living on their land. The records of Abraham indicate that he was literate, but some of his children were not.

When did Abraham come to Maryland? We know that Abraham was in Maryland by Sep. 1662 when he witnessed the Houldcraft will. How much earlier was he there?

Under the terms of Lord Baltimore’s original Conditions of Plantation, a person received land for transporting himself and others to Maryland. Persons who were transported at someone else’s expense contracted to repay the cost of their transportation by agreeing to act as a servant for a period of years, and were called “indentured servants.” Indentured servants were not entitled to free land, and after completing their period of servitude they were expected to lease a tenancy.

In 1648, the Conditions of Plantation were amended to provide that indentured servants who had satisfactorily served out the contract with their transporter were entitled to claim 50 acres of land. The Amended Conditions of Plantation of 1648 also required that former indentured servant land applicants be of British or Irish lineage, that their period of servitude have been not less than 3 years, and that they apply for their land rights within one year after they finished their period of servitude.

This is the category that Abraham falls into. That is, he was an indentured servant who had come to Maryland after 1648, and having completed his period of servitude, he became entitled to 50 acres of free land. This he did in Nov. 1668. According to “The History of Charles County, Maryland,” by Margaret B. Klapthor and Paul D. Brown, p. 153, the cost of passage to Maryland was about six pounds sterling, and the period of servitude (the time in which the passage cost would be worked off) depended upon the skill, ability and value of the servant. The authors state that a period of five years was the usual indenture period for a farm worker or other unskilled person without a trade. Shorter indenture periods were generally for persons with a valuable skill, and longer indenture periods were generally for debtors, petty criminals or others being involuntarily transported to Maryland.

I did my own survey of the first 200 pages in the Skordas book and found 43 people who received land for service under the 1648 Amended Conditions of Plantation. There is a bell-shaped curve, peaking at 6 years’ servitude (7 men). 4 and 5 years servitude produced 5 men each, and 7 and 8 years’ service had 3 and 4 men respectively. 3 and 9 years’ service had only 1 man each. The results of this survey coincide pretty well with Klapthor and Brown’s conclusions.

Was this new benefit for servants after 1648 (free land) necessary because of a decrease in persons willing to serve under the former conditions, or had their numbers remained about the same, but increased immigration was wanted? And, in this regard, one wonders if the average period of servitude lengthened slightly after 1648 when free land became available to the servants.

From the 1662 and 1668 records of Abraham, we know that he had been in Maryland 6 years when he proved his land right, and if the terms of the Amended Conditions of Plantation were complied with (1 year to apply), then the end of Abraham’s period of servitude would have been between Nov. 1667 and Nov. 1668, and presumably closer to the latter date, since why wait around for a year to claim your entitlement? These dates already give us a 5-6 year period for Abraham’s servitude, and it seems unlikely to me that Abraham came to Maryland before 1661, and maybe not until 1662, because otherwise he would have had an unusually long period of servitude. That Abraham’s occupation was as a farmer seems consistent with a period of servitude of about 5-6 years.

The John Smith who transported Abraham to Maryland ca. 1662 was entitled to 50 acres of land for having transported Abraham. This would be in addition to the 50 acres each that John was entitled to for transporting himself and any others that came with him in addition to Abraham. However, no John Smith ever claimed land for having transported Abraham. This is unfortunate for us because had John Smith claimed the 50 acres due him for transporting Abraham, we would have a better date for the transportation, know the entire group of persons that came together, and know the location of the land that was granted to John Smith, which is probably where Abraham lived during his period of servitude. Nor does it appear that John Smith assigned (sold) his right to 50 acres for Abraham’s transportation to someone else because no one else ever claimed land for transporting Abraham either.

I have tried to do some John Smith research in early Maryland, but the name is just too common. There are so many John Smiths who came to Maryland at an early date that we cannot even conclude which John Smith was Abraham’s transporter. One assumes that the John Smith who transported Abraham lived in St. Mary’s Co. Unfortunately, the only source that shows the various John Smiths who came to Maryland (Skordas) does not indicate which county they came to. Nor can one just turn to the records of St. Mary’s Co. to find which John Smith(s) were there at the appropriate time because the early records of St. Mary’s Co. have all been lost.

I have a suspicion that the John Smith who transported Abraham died before he was able to claim land for Abraham’s transportation, and that the John Smith of whom we have some mention in the early records of the LeMaster was his son.

Will of Abraham LeMaster Liber 18, Folio 10, Hall of Records, Annapolis, MD

In the name of God Amen; I Abraham LeMaster being weak of body but being in perfect sense and memory, thanks be to the God of the same. Knowing that the uncertainty of life and the certainty of death, do make my last Will and Testament. I give and bequeath my soul to the Almighty God that gave it to me, hoping through the death and propitiation of my Lord and Savior Jesus Christ to have eternal life. I give my body to the earth to be decently buried at the discretion of my Executors hereafter named.

I give and bequeath to my loving son John LeMaster my dwelling plantation to him and the male heirs of his body forever, but in the case the son John should die without such heirs then it to fall and descend to the next heir of the LeMasters.

I give and bequeath to my loving son Isaac LeMaster all that tract of land whereon he now dwells, to him and his heirs forever.

I give and bequeath unto my loving daughters Sarah Teneson and Mary Barrone all that I have of land called Berry to be divided equally to them and their heirs forever.

Richard LeMaster (1670-1745) Richard LeMaster was the son of Abraham LeMaster.

Richard LeMaster was born 1670 at Charles Co., Maryland where, at the age of five he was issued a patent for a 50-acre tract of land called “Toombett;” the land was secured by his father in his name. In 1690 Richard LeMaster married Martha and settled at “Toombett.” The maiden name of Richard’s wife is often given as Dennis. This, however, is probably not correct. Her surname is unknown.

Like his father, Richard LeMaster was a carpenter and a major dealer in real estate in Charles Co., between 1700 and 1740. In 1722, after the death of his mother, he bought the family plantation “Betty’s Delight” from his brother John for 5,000 pounds of tobacco; Richard LeMaster later willed the plantation to his son John who sold the plantation out of the family in 1747. Richard Lemaster is believed to have died in Charles Co., about 1745. He was predeceased by his wife who died in Charles Co., between 1713-1723.

Abraham LeMaster (1713-1778) Abraham LeMaster, the son of Richard and the grandson of Abraham, was born in Charles County, Maryland about 1713. Abraham LeMaster married Martha Kerrick about 1740. Martha was the daughter of Hugh Kerrick, Sr. Kerrick family records indicate that Martha was born about 1722. There is no direct evidence that Abraham Lemaster married Martha Kerrick. From Hugh Kerricks 1755 will, we know that Hugh’s daughter Martha Kerrick married a Lemaster. Circumstantial evidence suggests that it was Abrahamm Lemaster that Martha about 1740.

James LaMaster (1758-1831) James Lamaster was the son of Abraham and Martha (Kerrick) Lamaster and the father of Benjamin James LaMaster. The descendants of James changed the spelling of their surname to LaMaster. James is listed on an card index of Revolutionary War Soldiers in National Archives. He served in the 8th and 12th Virginia Regiment from June 10, 1777 to December 1, 1779 as a private in the Fife & Drum, the light infantry at Valley Forge and Regiment C. 541. A Bounty Warrant issued to James for three years service in 12th, VA Continental Line, signed by Capt. Swearingen dated Feb. 3, 1784. On the same day James signed to deliver his parcel of land to Wm. Stark. James is listed in Henry Co., KY census as born 1765 – 1784. Source LeMasters, USA 1965.

James Lemaster Will I James Lemaster of the County of Henry and state of Kentucky do hereby make my last will and testament in manner of form following (Viz.)

Item 1st I give & bequeath to my wife Mary & my daughter Anne for their use & benefit during the natural life of my wife the farm on which I now reside supposed to contain about three hundred acres, or the rent and profits arising therefrom, also the live or use of my negro girl Alice & her increase (all to be under the superintendence of my Exec.) and also such part of my household & kitchen furniture and stock as my Exec. may consider necessary for their use & maintenance.

Item 2nd At the death of my wife I give the said negro girl Alice & and all her increase to my daughter Anne to be hers and her children’s forever. I also give to my daughter Anne a horse to be worth fifty dollars, a good saddle & bridle & also a good feather bed, bed stead & bed cloths to be paid her as soon as it may suit the convenience of my Exec. to do so. But should my daughter die leaving no heir born of her body, it is my wish that the said negro girl Alice and all her increase descend to my don Abraham & his children.

Item 3rd It is my will and desire at the death of my wife that my Exec. make sale of the tract of land as in such manner and on such time as hey may think best calculated to promote the interest of those concerned and the proceeds thereof, I give in the following manner (Viz.) To my daughter Anne one fourth, to my son Abraham on fourth, to Alexander the eldest son of my son James three eighths of the remaining half & to my son Hugh the balance of the proceeds of the sale of land after deducting therefrom and paying over to my son Abraham the amount of a debt now due from my son Hugh to my son Abraham.

Item 4th I give to James, Harriett, Warren & Polly the four youngest children of my son James the sum of fifty dollars each to be raised out of any part of my estate not specially bequeathed, and to my son James the sum of fifteen dollars to be raised in the like manner.

Item 5th It is my wish that all my personal property not specially bequeathed be sold by my Exec. so soon as convenient & after paying all my just debts & the bequests herein specified the balance of the money arising from the sales or from claims due me by any individuals in this state I give to my son Abraham and the five children of my son James, my son Abraham to have half thereof and the balance equally divided between the said children of my son James.

Item 6th And whereas I have debts due me in the state of Virginia, it is my will & desire that whatever amount may be collected of the same shall be equally divided between all my children and in case of the death of either of them, their children (if any) to receive the proportion to which their ancestor would have been entitled had he or she been living.

And lastly I do hereby constitute & appoint my son Abraham Lemaster and my friends E. C. Drane & Barthw. Duprey Exec. of this last will and testament and vest them with the same powers that I would have my self were I living to sell & convey any of the within mentioned property either real or personal and to carry into effect all the provisions of this my last will and testament, and provided either of the within named Exec. should refuse to qualify, or in the case of the death the survivor or survivors with the same powers that they would possess were they all to qualify or all living and having sufficient confidence in the honesty & integrity of my said Exec.

I hereby request the Court to permit them to qualify without giving any security and to hereby revoke all wills heretofore made by me. In Witness whereof I have hereunto set my hand and signed in the presence of

Joseph McLain | Henry County Court May Term 1831 Geo. W. Herndon | Joseph P. Duprey |

An instrument of writing purporting to be the last will and testament of James Lemaster decd. Was this day produced into Court and proven by the oaths of Joseph Mclain and George Herndon subscribing witnesses thereto to be the act and deed of said James Lemaster whereupon it is ordered that the same be recorded.

Edwd Thomas, C

James LaMaster and the Revolutionary War 1776-1779 – James served in the Revolutionary War in the 8th and 12th Virginia Regiments (Continental Line.) He enlisted Dec. 30, 1776 for 3 years (to Dec. 1, 1779.) He served as a Private, Fife & Drum (8th Regt.) He was in the light infantry at Valley Forge (12th Regt.)

This 1776-1779 Revolutionary War summary for James is from books in the Source list for James. In “Lamaster Ancestors:1712-1870” (quoted below), Dean B. Mahin gives a 1777-1779 history of the 12th Virginia Regiment, thereby showing the specific Revolutionary activities in which James would have participated.

On June 10, 1777, James LaMaster enlisted in the 12th Virginia Regiment. He was 19 years old. The 12th Virginia was created in the fall of 1776, but was not fully operational until the spring of 1777. The regiment was recruited from the northern Shenandoah Valley, i.e., Frederick and Berkeley Counties. It was commanded by Colonel James Wood Jr.

By June 1777 the 12th Virginia regiment had joined Washington’s army near Morristown, New Jersey, where the army had been in winter quarters during the previous winter. Two weeks after James LaMaster joined the regiment, the 12th Virginia saw action in the Battle of Short Hills, New Jersey (June 26-28, 1777.) The Americans met a British force that had marched out from the British base at Amboy. After the battle, the 12th Virginia was in one of the brigades that was ordered to observe and harass the British as they returned to Amboy.

After some weeks of inaction, the 12th Virginia was with Washington’s army as it paraded through Philadelphia in August en route to meet Lord Howe’s army which had landed at the northern end of Chesapeake Bay. That fall the 12th Virginia fought in two major battles near Philadelphia, at Brandywine Creek (September 11, 1777) and Germantown (October 4, 1777).

During the winter of 1777-78 the 12th Virginia endured the privation of the army’s winter quarters at Valley Forge.

On June 28, 1778, the 12th Virginia was in the Battle of Monmouth Court House.

After the battle of Monmouth, James LaMaster remained in the 12th Virginia for nearly 18 more months of dreary duty in New Jersey and New York but was in no more battles. Monmouth was the last major battle in the northern theater of operations. He was discharged on December 1, 1779.

Feb.-Apr. 1784 – A Bounty Land Warrant was issued to James for his service in the 12th Virginia Continental Line. It was signed by Capt. Swearingen, under whom he apparently served, and was dated Feb. 3, 1784. On the same day James signed to deliver his parcel of land to William Stark. Another record says that for his Revolutionary War Service James received Warrant #2854 for 100 acres in Kentucky in Apr. 1784. It is not known whether this is the same warrant or whether James received two different warrants. Kentucky was still a part of Virginia at this time.

[The above narrative was taken from a book by Ralph D. Smith, Port Orange, FL, 2003, entitled ABRAHAM LEMASTER (1638-1722) OF CHARLES CO., MD.AND HIS DESCENDANTS.VOL. 3 Abraham LeMaster (1713-1778), wife Martha Kerrick, and Descendants.]

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Abraham I LeMaster, (LeMaitre)'s Timeline

1639
1639
Ste. Marie's Parish Isle of Chanel Islands, St Mary, Jersey
1660
1660
St. Mary's County, Maryland, United States
1661
1661
Maryland, United States
1663
1663
Charles, Maryland, USA
1666
1666
Betty's Deligh, St Marys, Zekiah Swamp, Maryland, United States
1668
1668
Zekiah Swamp, St Mary's, Maryland, USA
1668
Maryland, USA
1670
1670
Port Tobacco, Charles County, Maryland, British Colonial America
1674
1674
Zekiah Swamp, Charles, Maryland, USA