Amaury II, King of Jerusalem and Cyprus

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Amalric II (Amaury) de Lusignan, King of Cyprus

Also Known As: "Amalryk II Lusignan", "Amalric I of Cyprus", "born Amalric of Lusignan; of Jerusalem", "KIng Amalric II of Jerusalem"
Birthdate: (57)
Birthplace: Château de Lusignan, Lusignan, France
Death: April 1, 1205 (53-61)
Acre, Israel
Immediate Family:

Son of Hugues VIII de Lusignan, comte de La Marche and Bourgogne de Rançon, dame de Fontenay
Husband of Eschive of Ibelin and Isabella I of Jerusalem
Father of Bourgogne de Lusignan; Guy de Lusignan; Jean de Lusignan; Alice de Lusignan; Helvis de Lusignan and 5 others
Brother of Geoffrey I de Lusignan, Comte de Jaffa et d'Ascalon; Hugues de Lusignan; Guy I de Lusignan, King of Jerusalem, Lord of Cyprus; Guillaume de Lusignan, seigneur de Valence; Pierre de Lusignan and 1 other

Occupation: King of Jerusalem, Comte, de Jaffa, Connétable, de Jérusalem, Sieur, Roi, de Chypre
Managed by: Private User
Last Updated:

About Amaury II, King of Jerusalem and Cyprus

Amalric II of Jerusalem

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Amalric II of Jerusalem or Amalric I of Cyprus, born Amalric of Lusignan (1145 – April 1, 1205), King of Jerusalem 1197–1205, was an older brother of Guy of Lusignan.

The Lusignan family was noted for its many Crusaders. Amalric and Guy were sons of Hugh VIII of Lusignan, who had himself campaigned in the Holy Land in the 1160s. After being expelled from Poitou by their overlord, Richard the Lion-hearted, for the murder of Patrick of Salisbury, 1st Earl of Salisbury, Amalric arrived in Palestine c. 1174, Guy possibly later. Amalric married Eschiva, daughter of Baldwin of Ibelin. He then took service with Agnes of Courtenay, wife of Reginald of Sidon and mother of Baldwin IV of Jerusalem. The pro-Ibelin Chronicle of Ernoul later claimed that he was her lover, but it is likely that she and Baldwin IV were attempting to separate him from the political influence of his wife's family. He was appointed Constable of Jerusalem soon after April 22, 1179. Guy married the king's widowed older sister, Sibylla of Jerusalem in 1180, and so gained a claim to the kingdom of Jerusalem.

Amalric was among those captured with his brother after the disastrous Battle of Hattin in 1187. In 1194, on the death of Guy, he became King of Cyprus as Amalric I. By his first wife, Eschiva of Ibelin, he was the father of Hugh I of Cyprus and was crowned in Nicosia on September 22, 1197. After Eschiva's death in October, 1197 he married Isabella, the daughter of Amalric I of Jerusalem by his second marriage, and became King of Jerusalem in right of his wife and crowned at Acre in January, 1198.

In 1198 he was able to procure a five years' truce with the Muslims, owing to the struggle between Saladin's brothers and his sons for the inheritance of his territories. The truce was disturbed by raids on both sides, but in 1204 it was renewed for six years.

Amalric died of dysentery (allegedly brought on by "a surfeit of white mullet") or even poisoned at Saint Jean d' Acre in 1205, just after his son Amalric and just before his wife, and was buried at Saint Sophia, Nicosia. The kingdom of Cyprus passed to Hugh, his son by Eschiva, while the kingdom of Jerusalem passed to Maria, the daughter of Isabella by her previous marriage with Conrad of Montferrat.

[edit]Wives and Children

His first wife, married before October 29, 1174, was Éschive d'Ibelin (c. 1160 – Cyprus in Winter, 1196/1197), daughter of Baldwin of Ibelin and first wife Richilde de Bethsan or Bessan. They had six children:

Bourgogne de Lusignan (1176-1180 or c. 1178 – c. 1210), married as his third wife Raymond VI of Toulouse 1193, repudiated and divorced 1194 or 1196 without issue, married Gauthier I de Montfaucon aka Walter of Montbéliard (killed in action at the Battle of Satalia, June 20, 1212) 1197 or bef. 1205

Guy de Lusignan, died young 1197-1205

Jean de Lusignan, died young 1197-1205

Hugues I de Lusignan (c. 1194-1218)

Héloise/Helvis de Lusignan (c. 1190 – 1216-1219, 1216/1219 or c. 1217), married firstly c. 1205 Eudes de Dampierre sur Salon, Lord of Chargey-le-Grey, div. 1210, married secondly before 1210 or in September, 1210 Raymond-Roupen of Antioch

Alix de Lusignan, died young 1197-1205

His second wife was Queen Isabella of Jerusalem, married January, 1198 in Acre. They had three children:

Sybille de Lusignan (October/November, 1198-c. 1230 or 1252), married King Leo II of Armenia

Mélissende de Lusignan (c. 1200 – aft. 1249), married January 1, 1218 Bohemund IV of Antioch

Amalric or Amaury de Lusignan (1201 – February 2, 1205, Acre)

References

This article incorporates text from the Encyclopædia Britannica Eleventh Edition, a publication now in the public domain.


Aimery of Jerusalem or Aimery of Cyprus, born Aimery of Lusignan (1145 – 1 April 1205), King of Jerusalem 1197–1205, was an older brother of Guy of Lusignan.[1]

Note: Older scholarship mistook the two names Amalric and Aimery as variant spellings of the same name, so these historians erroneously added numbers: Amalric I, r. 1163-1174 and Amalric II, r. 1197-1205. Now scholars recognize that the two names were not the same and no longer add the number for either king: Amalric, r. 1163-1174 and Aimery, r. 1197-1205.

The Lusignan family was noted for its many Crusaders. Aimery and Guy were sons of Hugh VIII of Lusignan, who had himself campaigned in the Holy Land in the 1160s. After being expelled from Poitou by their overlord, Richard the Lion-hearted, for the murder of Patrick of Salisbury, 1st Earl of Salisbury, Aimery arrived in Palestine c. 1174, Guy possibly later. Aimery married Eschiva, daughter of Baldwin of Ibelin. He then took service with Agnes of Courtenay, wife of Reginald of Sidon and mother of Baldwin IV of Jerusalem. The pro-Ibelin Chronicle of Ernoul later claimed that he was her lover, but it is likely that she and Baldwin IV were attempting to separate him from the political influence of his wife's family. He was appointed Constable of Jerusalem soon after 22 April 1179. Guy married the king's widowed older sister, Sibylla of Jerusalem in 1180, and so gained a claim to the kingdom of Jerusalem.

Aimery was among those captured with his brother after the disastrous Battle of Hattin in 1187. In 1194, on the death of Guy, he became King of Cyprus. By his first wife, Eschiva of Ibelin, he was the father of Hugh I of Cyprus and was crowned in Nicosia on 22 September 1197. After Eschiva's death in October 1197 he married Isabella, the daughter of Amalric of Jerusalem by his second marriage, and became King of Jerusalem in right of his wife and was crowned at Acre in January 1198. This was only possible, because the candidacy for the crown of Aimery, who was a vassal of Roman-German Emperor Henry VI., was supported by the German crusaders.

In 1198, at the end of the Crusade of 1197, he was able to procure a five years' truce with the Muslims, owing to the struggle between Saladin's brothers and his sons for the inheritance of his territories. The truce was disturbed by raids on both sides, but in 1204 it was renewed for six years.

Many members of the royal family died in rapid succession in early 1205, including Aimery himself. Aimery's two older sons, Guy and John, boys of about eight years of age, died early in 1205. Aimery died of dysentery (allegedly brought on by "a surfeit of white mullet") or even poisoned at Saint Jean d'Acre on 1 April 1205, just after his son Aimery and four days before his wife, and was buried at Saint Sophia, Nicosia. The kingdom of Cyprus passed to Hugh, his only surviving son, while the Kingdom of Jerusalem passed to Maria, the daughter of Isabella by her previous marriage with Conrad of Montferrat.

Wives and children[edit]

His first wife, married before 29 October 1174, was Eschiva of Ibelin (c. 1160 – Cyprus in Winter 1196–1197), daughter of Baldwin of Ibelin and first wife Richilde de Bethsan or Bessan. They had six children: 1.Bourgogne of Lusignan (1176–1180 or c. 1178 – c. 1210); married as his third wife Raymond VI of Toulouse 1193, repudiated and divorced 1194 or 1196 without issue, married Gauthier I de Montfaucon aka Walter of Montbéliard (killed in action at the Battle of Satalia, 20 June 1212) 1197 or bef. 1205, by whom she had issue. 2.Guy of Lusignan (1197–1205); died young 3.John of Lusignan (1197–1205); died young 4.Hugh I of Lusignan (c. 1194–1218) 5.Héloise/Helvis of Lusignan (c. 1190 – 1216–1219, 1216/1219 or c. 1217); married firstly c. 1205 Eudes de Dampierre sur Salon, Lord of Chargey-le-Grey, div. 1210, married secondly before 1210 or in September 1210 Raymond-Roupen of Antioch 6.Alix de Lusignan (1197–1205), died young

His second wife was Queen Isabella of Jerusalem, married January 1198 in Acre. They had three children: 1.Sybilla of Lusignan (October–November 1198 – c. 1230 or 1252), married King Leo I of Armenia 2.Melisende of Lusignan (c. 1200 – aft. 1249), married 1 January 1218 Bohemund IV of Antioch 3.Aimery or Amaury of Lusignan (1201 – 2 February 1205, Acre)


http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/AQUITAINE%20NOBILITY.htm#AmauryIKingCyprusdied1205

HUGUES [VIII] "le Brun" de Lusignan, son of HUGUES [VII] "le Brun" Seigneur de Lusignan & his first wife --- (-[in Palestine after 1164]). ... m (before 1147) BOURGOGNE de Rancon, daughter of GEOFFROY [III] de Rancon Seigneur de Taillebourg & his wife --- (-after 11 Apr 1169). ... Hugues [VIII] & his wife had seven children:

  • ...
  • 5. AMAURY de Lusignan ([1145]-murdered Acre 1 Apr 1205). The Chronicle of Alberic de Trois-Fontaines names "Gaufridum, Henricum [error for Haimericum] regem Cypri et Guidonem regem Ierosolimorum" as brothers of "Hugo de Lisegnen"[317]. "…Aimericus de Lisenian…" subscribed a charter dated 13 Dec 1174 under which Baudouin IV King of Jerusalem donated property to the Knights Hospitallers[318], which appears to be the first mention of his name in the Levant. Baudouin IV King of Jerusalem appointed him as Constable of Jerusalem in 1181[319]. He supported the rebellion of the Pisans at Tyre in May 1192, was arrested by Henri de Champagne King of Jerusalem, but retired to Jaffa on his release. King Henri, considering that Amaury had thereby forfeited his office of Constable, appointed Jean of Ibelin as Constable in his place[320]. Amaury's younger brother Guy Lord of Cyprus had bequeathed his authority in Cyprus to their older brother Geoffroy de Lusignan but, as the latter had returned to France in [1192], the Franks in Cyprus summoned Amaury to succeed as Lord of Cyprus in 1194[321]. The rivalry with the kingdom of Jerusalem was suspended when Henri de Champagne King of Jerusalem visited Cyprus in 1194, the new alliance being sealed by the betrothal of Amaury's three young sons to Queen Isabelle's three young daughters[322]. Amaury did homage to Emperor Heinrich VI, through his ambassador Renier of Jebail, at Gelnhausen in Oct 1195, in return being recognised by the emperor as AMAURY I King of Cyprus. He was crowned in Sep 1197 at Nicosia, where he did homage once more to the emperor's representative Konrad von Querfurt, Bishop of Hildesheim, who was present at the ceremony as Imperial Chancellor[323]. On the death of Henri de Champagne King of Jerusalem in Sep 1197, King Amaury was proposed by the German leaders, headed by Konrad von Wittelsbach Archbishop of Mainz, as the best candidate to become Queen Isabelle's fourth husband. King Amaury arrived at Acre in Jan 1198, married Isabelle and was crowned with his wife a few days later as AMAURY II King of Jerusalem. The two kingdoms were linked only by the person of the monarch, as each retained its own administrative identity[324]. After the collapse of the German crusade in early 1198, King Amaury opened negotiations with al-Adil (Saladin's brother) although the six year peace treaty was not signed until Sep 1204, under the terms of which Beirut, Sidon, Jaffa and Ramleh were transferred back to the kingdom of Jerusalem[325]. "Aymericus…Latinorum Jerusalem rex nonus et rex Cipri" donated property to the church of the Holy Sepulchre, Jerusalem by charter dated Mar 1201 which names "frater meus rex Guido"[326]. On the death of King Amaury in 1205, the two kingdoms of Jerusalem and Cyprus were separated once more.

http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/CYPRUS.htm#AmauryICyprusB

AMAURY de Lusignan, son of HUGUES [VIII] "le Brun" Sire de Lusignan & his wife Bourgogne de Rancon ([1145]-Acre 1 Apr 1205). The Chronicle of Alberic de Trois-Fontaines names "Gaufridum, Henricum [error for Haimericum] regem Cypri et Guidonem regem Ierosolimorum" as brothers of "Hugo de Lisegnen"[75]. Amaury rebelled against his suzerain in Poitou, Henry II King of England, in 1168, probably leaving France for Palestine soon afterwards[76]. "…Aimericus de Lisenian…" subscribed a charter dated 13 Dec 1174 under which Baudouin IV King of Jerusalem donated property to the Knights Hospitallers[77], which appears to be the first mention of his name in the Levant. King Baudouin IV appointed him as Constable of Jerusalem in 1181[78]. He supported the rebellion of the Pisans at Tyre in May 1192, was arrested by Henri de Champagne King of Jerusalem, but retired to Jaffa on his release. King Henri, considering that Amaury had thereby forfeited his office of Constable, appointed Jean of Ibelin as Constable in his place[79]. Amaury's younger brother Guy Lord of Cyprus had bequeathed his authority in Cyprus to their older brother Geoffroy de Lusignan but, as the latter had returned to France in [1192], the Franks in Cyprus summoned Amaury to succeed as Lord of Cyprus in 1194[80]. The rivalry with the kingdom of Jerusalem was suspended when Henri de Champagne King of Jerusalem visited Cyprus in 1194, the new alliance being sealed by the betrothal of Amaury's three young sons to Queen Isabelle's three young daughters[81]. "Aymericus de Lizinaco…dominus Cipri" donated property to the abbot of the Temple-Domini, with the consent of "uxoris mee Eschive", by charter dated 29 Sep 1195[82]. Amaury did homage to Emperor Heinrich VI, through his ambassador Renier of Jebail, at Gelnhausen in Oct 1195, in return being recognised by the emperor as AMAURY I King of Cyprus. He was crowned in Sep 1197 at Nicosia, where he did homage once more to the emperor's representative Konrad von Querfurt Bishop of Hildesheim, who was present at the ceremony in his capacity as Imperial Chancellor[83]. On the death of Henri de Champagne King of Jerusalem in Sep 1197, King Amaury was proposed by the German leaders, headed by Konrad von Wittelsbach Archbishop of Mainz, as the best candidate to become Queen Isabelle's fourth husband. King Amaury arrived at Acre in Jan 1198, married Isabelle and was crowned with his wife a few days later as AMAURY II King of Jerusalem. The two kingdoms were linked only by the person of the monarch, as each retained its own administrative identity[84]. After the collapse of the German crusade in early 1198, King Amaury opened negotiations with al-Adil (Saladin's brother) although the six year peace treaty was not signed until Sep 1204. Under the terms of the agreement Beirut, Sidon, Jaffa and Ramleh were transferred back to the kingdom of Jerusalem[85]. "Aymericus…Jerusalem Latinorum rex nonus et rex Cypri" granted rights to the commune of Marseille, with the consent of "Ysabelis uxoris mee…quamdam regis Amalrici filia", by charter dated Oct 1198[86]. "Aymericus…Latinorum Jerusalem rex nonus et rex Cipri" donated property to the church of the Holy Sepulchre, Jerusalem by charter dated Mar 1201 which names "frater meus rex Guido"[87]. The Chronicle of Amadi records the death of "il re Almerico" at Acre[88]. The archbishop of Cæsarea records the death "c purificacionem B. Mariæ" of "regis Amalrici II filium" and the death 1 Apr of the king himself, by charter dated [May] 1205[89]. On the death of King Amaury in 1205, the two kingdoms of Jerusalem and Cyprus were separated once more. m firstly (before 29 Oct 1175) ESCHIVA of Ibelin, daughter of BAUDOUIN of Ibelin Lord of Rama & his first wife Richilde of Bethsan (-[1196/97]). ... m secondly (Acre Jan 1198) as her fourth husband, ISABELLE Queen of Jerusalem, formerly wife of HONFROY [IV] of Toron, widow of CORRADO Marchese di Monferrato King of Jerusalem and of HENRI II Comte de Champagne King of Jerusalem, daughter of AMAURY I King of Jerusalem & his second wife Maria Komnene (1172-[1206]). ... [Possible mistress: AGNES de Courtenay, widow firstly of RENAUD of Marash, secondly of AMAURY I King of Jerusalem, thirdly of HUGUES of Ibelin Lord of Rama, daughter of JOSCELIN II Count of Edessa & his wife Béatrice --- ([1133]-1185). King Amaury I & his first wife had six children: ...

  • 1. BOURGOGNE de Lusignan (-after 1205). ...
  • 2. GUY of Cyprus (-before 1205). ...
  • 3. JEAN of Cyprus (-before 1205). ...
  • 4. ALIX de Lusignan (-young). ...
  • 5. HELOISE of Cyprus ([1185/93]-[7 Feb 1216/Mar 1219]). ...
  • 6. HUGUES of Cyprus ([1193/94]-Tripoli 10 Jan 1218, bur Tripoli, Church of the Hospital of St John, transferred to Cyprus, Church of the Hospital of St John). ... see below

King Amaury I & his second wife had three children:

  • 7. SIBYLLE of Cyprus ([1199/1200]-after 1225). ...
  • 8. AMAURY of Cyprus ([1200]-2 Feb 1205). ...
  • 9. MELISENDE of Cyprus (after [1200/01]-after 24 Mar 1249). ...
view all 16

Amaury II, King of Jerusalem and Cyprus's Timeline

1148
1148
Château de Lusignan, Lusignan, France
1175
1175
Age 27
Cyprus
1178
1178
Age 30
Cyprus
1180
1180
Age 32
Cyprus
1180
Age 32
Cyprus, Italy
1182
1182
Age 34
Cyprus
1185
1185
Age 37
1194
1194
Age 46
Cyprus, Italy