Artinecia "Artie" Chapman-Merriman (Riddle)

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About Artinecia "Artie" Chapman-Merriman (Riddle)

died at her daughter Marie’s house in Medford, OR, USA


Artinecia Chapman Riddle Birth 11 Oct 1830 in West Liberty, Logan, Ohio, United States Death 10 Jan 1917 in Medford, Jackson, Oregon, United States

Parents


William H Riddle 1805 – 1891


Maxamillia Bousman 1809 – 1868


1900 United States Federal Census about Artinecia Merriman Name: Artinecia Merriman [Arthemise Merriman] Home in 1900: Medford, Jackson, Oregon Age: 69 Birth Date: Oct 1830 Birthplace: Ohio Race: White Gender: Female Relationship to head-of-house: Head Father's Birthplace: Ohio Mother's Birthplace: Ohio Mother: number of living children: 12 Mother: How many children: 16 Marital Status: Widowed Occupation: View on Image Neighbors: View others on page Household Members: Name Age Artinecia Merriman 69 Laura A Bradley 43 <-----daughter Otto F Bradley 12 <-----grandson


Oregon Death Index, 1903-98 about Artinecia Merriman Name: Merriman, Artinecia County: Jackson Death Date: 10 Jan 1917 Certificate: 7


Artinecia Chapman Riddle Merriman 1830-1917 Artinecia Riddle was born on October 11, 1830 in West Liberty, Logan County, Ohio. Artinecia was by all respects, an amazing woman. Even to her contemporaries, she did more than the average person, and her participation in America’s history can be termed legendary. Although she is not mentioned in history books, Artinecia’s life paralleled a large portion of America’s past and she is a qualified example of a true American.

Artinecia was born on October 11, 1830 near West Liberty in Logan County, Ohio [2] [3] [4] [5]. The only source that does not agree with her date of birth is her tombstone, which lists the date of birth as November 11, 1830. This date would be considered except for the fact that it appears in no other contemporary or modern source. Also, in the obituary of Artinecia’s son George, published on November 8, 1915, there is listed “His mother, who celebrated her 85th birthday last month, survives him …” Clearly, Artinecia must have been born in October of 1830.

Artinecia’s name is another subject that has given rise to speculation and error. While her surname was indeed Riddle, there have been several researchers over the past that have incorrectly chosen to use Riddles as her surname. Artinecia had no middle name. There is one unsubstantiated source which reveals her middle name to have been Marie, but that is unlikely. In all records (she is listed on many) there is no mention of a middle name or middle initial; it is only on one (one of her children’s marriage records) that she was listed as “Mrs. M.A. Merriman.” If that is the case, her name could have been Marie Artinecia Riddle, or Artinecia Marie Riddle. Also, the fact that she had a granddaughter named Artinecia Marie Bennett is alluring, but inconclusive, as the child’s own mother was named Marie. It is possible that she had a middle name, but if she did, then why did she never use it? Also, naming children was not the same today as it was 100 years ago. Often times, babies weren’t named until they had been alive at least several months (as naming an infant that could die was seen as useless). Also, it was not unusual for a person to change their name themselves as they got older, or to add on or delete middle names. If Artinecia had a middle name, she chose to never use it.

Artinecia’s first (or given) name is derived from the ancient name Artemisia, which is a Greek name meaning “perfect”. Artemisia is a form of the name Artemis, the Greek Goddess of the hunt. It is not known how exactly Artinecia’s family named her such, as the name is not found in any direct family member. The name appears to have come from her mother’s side. Artinecia’s mother, Maxamillia Bouseman was the daughter of John Bouseman and Rebecca Stilley. Before her marriage to John Bouseman, Rebecca Stilley was married to a man named Christopher McGill. Several of Christopher’s descendants used variations of Artinecia’s name in his family. In the McGill family, the name was spelled much differently, closer to “Artenecy,” but it is essentially the same name. Finding the true spelling of Artinecia’s name has been difficult. It was found as “Arlanissa” in the 1850 census, “Artemia” in her 1849 marriage, “Artimeeria” in her obituary, and “Arluisia” in the 1870 census. Other sources list the spelling as Artinescia, Artenicia, Artemisia, Artamisia, etc. The spelling of “Artinecia” is the most prominent, it is spelled that way on her tombstone, on her death certificate, on her 1853 marriage record, in the 1860 and 1900 censuses, in her husband’s will of 1877 and in many other records. The pronunciation of her name is something that I am unaware of, as written documents give no clues. If I were to spell it phonetically, I would spell it Artineesia. Several family members (including her great-granddaughter) have pronounced it closer to Artineesa (with the “s” like the “s” in treasure). Whatever the true spelling and pronunciation of her name was, it was obviously a name hard to pronounce and spell. That is obviously why on many records she was listed as Artie or Arty, a nickname she probably had since childhood.

Artinecia’s surname Riddle is of Scottish heritage. Although I don’t know the meaning of the name, I know that it was indeed a highly and deeply Scottish surname. Artinecia’s heritage is also something that shows her as a classic American of the times. Artinecia was one-half Scottish, one-fourth German, one-fourth Swedish and a very small portion Dutch. Her ancestors had thrived in America for well over a century, where they were indeed a part of its history. Her earliest ancestor to have come to the New World was Olof Stille who migrated in 1641 from Sweden to Delaware. Olof came with his wife, his two children, his brother, and his sister and her family. Artinecia’s ancestors had lived in Kentucky, Pennsylvania, New York, and Delaware, and their lives were meshed with the histories of those regions.

Artinecia’s father was named William H. Riddle. He was born on September 1, 1805 in Bourbon County, Kentucky [5] [16]. William was by blood, a full-blooded Scottish man. His father was born in Pennsylvania and in the 1790’s and moved to Kentucky where he was married. While William was born in a slave state, his heritage and values did not coincide with that area. In 1807, when William H. was just under 2 years of age, he and his family moved north to the non-slave state of Ohio, where they settled in Logan County. It was in Logan County that William learned his blacksmithing trade.

Maxamillia Bouseman was born on January 13, 1809 in Champaign County, Ohio [16]. Maxamillia was the first child of 8 born to John Bouseman and Rebecca Stilley McGill. Before her marriage to John Bouseman, Rebecca was married to a man named Christopher McGill, who died in 1806. Maxamillia then made the 9th in a family of 16 children including the children from both marriages. Maxamillia was German, Swedish and Dutch by decent and spent her childhood and adolescence in Champaign County, Ohio.

William Riddle and Maxamillia Bouseman were married on July 13, 1826 in Champaign County, Ohio, at her parent’s home [4]. William was 20 and Maxamillia was 17. Soon after the marriage, the couple acquired a small farm near the town of West Liberty in Logan County, Ohio. It is there that they began to settle down and start raising a family. Artinecia was the second child born into this family. She had a sister, Jane, born in 1828. She was followed in 1834 by a sister named Isabella, and in 1837 by a brother named William. It is possible that she had another brother (born between 1826 and 1830) who died as a small child.

For whatever the circumstances, Artinecia’s family felt inclined to move. Whether this was because their farm was not doing well, land was expensive, or they simply did not like the area, William and Maxamillia wanted to move. The exact year of the move is subject to some argument, but most likely they moved in the year 1838 [6] (one source gives the date 1836 [5]). Whatever the exact date of the move, little Artie Riddle was about 7 years old at the time that she traveled with her parents, sisters, and brother, several hundred miles from Ohio to Illinois. At the time, Illinois was renowned as a land of fruitful farms and maybe the Riddles wanted to be a part of that. They settled down immediately in the corn farm areas of Sangamon County, Illinois, in south-central Illinois, about ten miles from the city of Springfield.

The Riddles immediately purchased a farm in what would become Williams Township in Sangamon County, Illinois. Over the years, they expanded the farm and grew to prosperity, but that was only because of the everlasting commitment of everyone in the family. Artinecia, was no doubt, a part of the family’s rise to prosperity as everyone on the family helped. According to her brother George, the boys on the farm were sent out when they were quite young to start by helping pull weeds [6]. It is more than likely that Artie and her sisters began to learn sewing, and household and farm chores when they were quite young. With that in mind, it is obvious that all of the Riddle children became hard working people, earning what they gained. They were also raised in a strict Baptist fashion, of which they probably also learned their discipline. During their stay in Illinois, Maxamillia gave birth to 6 more children; George, Abner, John, Ann (Mollie), and Tobias.

Nothing is known of Artinecia’s adolescence or teenage years. More than likely, she spent her time helping on the farm or with the house, helping to raise her younger siblings, with religious pursuits, or with her schoolings. Also, nothing is known of Artinecia’s appearance or personality as a young woman. Several photographs survive of her, but they were all in her old age, the youngest when she was between 50 and 60 years old. With that in mind, one can gain an idea of what young Artinecia looked like. Artinecia was a tall woman for the times, as her height was inherited from both parents. Although it is not known how tall Artinecia was, all of her brothers exceeded 6 feet in height, and it is probable that she was tall herself. More than likely, she stood somewhere about 5’7”, but that is purely a guess. Artinecia had thick, wavy, brown hair, and brown eyes. Her brown hair and brown eyes she inherited from her father, who was a full-blooded Scottish man. Concerning her stature, Artinecia was probably nothing more than petite; one account says that she had “very slender fingers.”[6] Artinecia was not a beauty, but it is unlikely that she could have been termed ugly. As for her personality, Artinecia appears to have been much like her mother: faithful, stern, hard working, religious, and courageous. She also seems to have inherited a little of the humorous and loving personality of her father.

Artinecia first appears in records in 1849, the year she was married. Artie was 18 years old at the time of her marriage, and virtually nothing is known of her husband. James B. Chapman was born circa 1827 in Kentucky [9], and was some 3 years Artinecia’s senior. James had moved to Illinois in his youth, and was by occupation a farmer. James and Artinecia were married in Sangamon County, Illinois, on February 22, 1849 [4], Artinecia was 18 and James was about 21. They were probably married at her parent’s home in Williams Township. Absolutely nothing is known about the couple’s married life, or Artinecia’s regard for her husband.

After the marriage, the family appears to have moved to the city of Springfield, Sangamon County, Illinois, but as they were farmers, that might not be accurate. They probably rented a small farm in or near the town of Springfield. Artinecia gave birth to her first child, John W. Chapman, on June 15, 1850 in Sangamon County, Illinois [17], she was 19 years old. As seen in later years, it was obvious that Artinecia was particularly fond of her first child, John, and probably was delighted with his birth. In 1850 (the same year John was born), the Oregon Donation Land Claims Act was passed, which virtually opened up all of the Oregon Territory for settlement, allowing large amounts of land for settlers. That very same year, a man named Isaac Constant (a figurehead in Sangamon County society) returned to Illinois from a trip he made on the Oregon Trail. Isaac began to make plans to move his family to Oregon and set about inspiring all of his neighbors to do the same. Of those most enthralled by Isaac Constant’s stories of Oregon, were Artinecia’s parents, William and Maxamillia Riddle. It took but a months for the Riddles to decide to move to Oregon.

Artinecia had at that time just turned 20, and possessing her parent’s desire for adventure and prosperity, and realizing that she and her family had nothing to lose, decided to come along. It was sometime in the winter of 1850 that Artinecia and her husband decided to make the trip with her parents. Within the next several months, Artinecia and James managed to sell the few larger things that they had, they packed up their ox cart, and began to make ready to move to Oregon. Soon, most everyone was prepared for the journey to Oregon, and they were only waiting for Spring until they could begin. While everyone was probably optimistic of their journey, Artinecia was particularly so. Nothing could cloud everyone’s optimism more than a sudden death. Artinecia’s husband James died suddenly in about March of 1851. The date of death is unknown, some sources say he died a few days before the wagon train left, and other sources say a few weeks before. The cause of death is unknown, as it was probably an accident or a sudden illness of some sort.

Whatever the circumstances, Artinecia was in a difficult situation. She was 20-years old, a widow, with a son 9-months old, and had nothing to do but bury her dead husband and continue on to Oregon with her parents. Everyone was deeply sympathetic with Artinecia, and helped her in any way that they could. Coming in the train with her were Artinecia’s middle-aged parents, her siblings, Isabella, William, George, Abner, John, Anna, and Tobias; her aunt, Lucinda McGill, and her cousin, Ann Hall. Artinecia had her own wagon and set of oxen of which was the property of her late husband. Apparently, Artinecia was the only woman in the wagon train to legally have property. The train set out from Springfield, Illinois in about March or April of 1851 and made their way quickly through the mid-west. Artinecia’s eldest sister Jane had recently married and decided to stay in Illinois. Artinecia said good-bye to Jane, and probably never saw her again.

The train Artinecia was a part of was subject to more hardships than the average wagon train. On one occasion, the train was attacked by a small band of Indians. Nobody was killed, but one of the men on the train was shot in the arm. There were no doctors on board the wagon train, and Artinecia was called on to be the person to dress the wound [6]. According to one source, the reason was because she had such slender fingers, but while that is probably accurate, the answer probably also lies in the fact that Artinecia was a brave woman, who was willing to try anything. It also shows how strong of a person she was, as it is rare that a woman who had just been widowed a few months prior could have undertaken what she did. As a result of her efforts, the man recovered well and the train continued on its journey. The wagon train had come by the southern route (through Utah, Nevada and California), and began to make its way north through Oregon.

They reached Oregon in September of 1851 [6], after about 6 months of journey on the trail. The train made several stops throughout Oregon and Artinecia’s father William became enchanted with the small, uninhabited outpost of Canyonville, in Douglas County, Oregon. While all other members of the train went on to Portland and northern Oregon, William decided he wanted to stay in Douglas County. Artinecia had no choice but to stay with her family, but was also probably a part of that decision. William immediately staked out his claim of 320 acres in the beautiful Cow Creek Valley, in Douglas County, Oregon. When the Riddles first settled in that valley in November 1851, they were the first white people to live in the Cow Creek Valley [6]. They began building their log home in the winter of 1851.

During their first few weeks in the valley, the Cow Creek Indians visited the Riddles for the first time. During the 1850’s, there were many territorial and large tribes in southern Oregon. The Cow Creek Indians though, were one of the more peaceful and smaller of the tribes in the area. Soon after meeting the Riddles, the Indians discovered just how hospitable and friendly they were. A bond was soon created between the races and they became friends. Soon, all members of the Riddle family began to learn to Chinook Indian language that the Indians spoke, and it is known that Artinecia assuredly did become fluent in that language. In times to come, the Indians would identify with the Riddles, in a time when other whites were hostile towards them. The Indians gave their own names to members of the Riddle family, William was called “Lom-tu” (Old Man) and Maxamillia was called “Mulagolan” (Mother). Artinecia's husband was called "Shindonah" (Long Nose). Artinecia probably had a name herself, but it is unknown.

Soon after settling in the Cow Creek Valley, Artinecia and her son John lived with the Riddles in their home. It was to become a very lonely time, as reputedly, the nearest neighbor was 8 miles away. According to her brother George, this was unheard of to Artinecia and her sister Isabella, who both cried and complained that they had endured all of the hardships of the Oregon Trail to move to a place where they would never see anyone. But more settlers started arriving in the area, and the scene became livelier.

In an 1852 wagon train, a man named William Merriman arrived in Canyonville. William was also from Sangamon County, Illinois, and probably knew Artinecia in his youth. William’s wife had died during the trip, and upon his arrival in the fall of 1852, he took an immediate liking to Artinecia. It is said that the two courted for several months before she agreed to marry him, but that probably happened much sooner. Both realized that marrying one another would be highly advantageous. Both had recently lost spouses, each had one young child, both were Baptists, and both were raised near each other in Illinois. William and Artinecia were married on February 10, 1853 at her parent’s home in the Cow Creek Valley, Douglas County, Oregon [3][7]. Very soon after the marriage, William staked out his land claim next to Artie’s parents, of 320 acres. He began building their home in that same year and they brought to the family both children by previous marriages, John Chapman and Auletta Merriman.

William Harrison Merriman was born on March 4, 1825 in Scott County, Kentucky to Reuben and Betsy Merriman [1] [5]. When he was 4 years old (in1829) [5], he moved with his family to Illinois, where they settled in Williams Township, Sangamon County, Illinois. William was raised as a Baptist like Artinecia, and probably met her when she moved to the area in 1838. William was married to a woman named Mary Lewis in 1847. The two had a daughter Auletta in 1848. In 1850, William also decided to come to Oregon, but wasn’t able to until the next year (his sister was married to Isaac Constant, the same Isaac Constant who persuaded the Riddles to travel to Oregon). Shortly before the train left in Spring of 1852, they had a son, Joseph. It was during the course of the train, that both William’s wife Mary and his son Joseph died. This was highly distressing to William, but he had to go on. He arrived in Oregon and immediately sought out a new wife, out of economical and emotional necessity.

William and Artinecia appear to have made a couple well suited to one another. The first few years of marriage seems to have done well for the Merrimans. Artinecia gave birth to her first child by the second marriage in 1854, when her daughter Lucinda was born. In 1855, she gave birth to a third child, George. Although things seemed to be going well, the peace in the area began to diminish. Starting in the early 1850’s, the miners in Jackson County began constant physical quarrels with the Rogue River Indian tribe. Soon, all of the Indian tribes in southern Oregon allied with one another, seeing that it was inevitable that a war would take place.

Eventually, the Cow Creek Indian tribe joined with the Rogue River Indians. This was at about the time of the start of the second Rogue River Indian War, in 1855. During this time, the situation became unsafe for both whites and Indians in southern Oregon. Probably at this same time, was when Artinecia was chosen by the government to be an interpreter between the Indians and the military. It was probably her gender (which was seen as a token of peace), her knowledge of the language and the tribe, and her bravery that allowed her the position that she gained. It is amazing that Artinecia (who was 25 years of age, with 4 young children to care for and many household chores) would have risked her life in being an interpreter. But, Artinecia was confident that the Indians would not harm her, she simply wanted to do her part for her country, and to help the Indians if she could, who were her friends.

By 1857, the war was over and the Cow Creek Indians were completely annihilated from the area. The whites appeared the victors, but the end did not seem that victorious to Artinecia and her family. It was at this time that Artinecia and William decided to move. Maybe they were disgusted at their neighbor’s treatment of the Indians, or maybe their farm was not doing well. What is probably nearer to the truth is that William was a blacksmith, and there was gold discovered south of them in Jackson County, Oregon, and the Merrimans probably figured they would have more business there.

There are conflicting sources as to the date of the move, but most point to the year 1857. In that year, William, Artinecia, and their 4 children moved their belongings south to Jackson County, Rogue River Valley, and they bought from Jesse Robinson (the husband of William’s niece Lavinia Constant) 120 acres in what was then known as Manzanita Precinct, between the towns of Medford and Central Point. What they grew on the farm is unknown, but they were apparently successful. According to an inventory of the estate in 1877, most of the animals that they kept were meat pigs. By the year 1900, the farm's speciality was chickens and by the 1930's, it had become a prized dairy. Although the original farm is probably long since gone, the area it was located in is still largely farmland. Manzanita Precinct (where the farm was located) became defunct sometime between 1880 and 1900 and in 1900 was located in Pooh Bah Precinct. In 1910, the farm was in Central Point Precinct and in 1920 in South Central Point Precinct. Today, the location is probably within the city limits of either Central Point or Medford. According to Artinecia herself, when she moved to Jackson County in 1857, she brought to the valley the first sewing machine, of which was much interest to the women living there.

Artinecia was a religious woman, but at the same time, she was also a motherly figure, and loved children. After the move to Jackson County, Artinecia seems to have never stopped having children. There came Laura in 1857, Marie in 1858, Ann in 1860, Isaac in 1861, Charles in 1863, Mary in 1865, Walter in 1866, Isabel in 1867, Prudence in 1868, Effie in 1870, Marjorie in 1871, William in 1872 and Winifred in 1874. At the birth of her 16th and last child Winifred, in 1874, Artinecia was 44 years of age. During this period, 4 of her children (Charles, Walter, Prudence, and Winifred) died in infancy. Artinecia was comforted by her children, and seems to have loved them all equally, even her stepdaughter. It is also amazing, that after going through 16 pregnancies, her health did not suffer more. But even after her last child was born, Artinecia remained a healthy and vigorous woman.

By the 1870’s, the Merrimans had established themselves as pillars of the community. They had a successful farm, a large family, and were model citizens. Both William and Artinecia were of Republican (anti-slavery) views and during the Civil War, they took on a decidedly pro-Union stance. They were both present at many town activities, and were active members of the Baptist church. Artinecia also remained close to her family, who lived many miles north of them in Douglas County. In 1868, Artinecia’s mother Maxamillia died after a short illness. This came as a loss to the entire family. Yet even though Artinecia's family members were starting to die off, her sister Mollie Riddle Beall moved to Jackson County in 1864 and her cousin, Ann Hall Beall moved to Jackson County in about 1859.

In the summer of 1877, Artinecia’s husband William suffered an illness and believed he would die. He wrote his will on August 29, 1877, in which he devised the whole of his estate to his wife Artinecia. He also stated that after her death, it would pass to his son Isaac and his heirs. It also mentioned that his other 11 children would have none of his estate. Why he chose 16-year old Isaac (who was neither his oldest or youngest son) as the inheritor of his estate is unknown. Nonetheless, William H. Merriman died on September 16, 1877 at their farm in Manzanita Precinct, Jackson County, Oregon [1]. At the time of his death, William was 52 years of age. At the same time, Artinecia was 46 years old, and it was probably the opinion of many that she would not be long to follow her husband to the grave, but they would be wrong in that assumption.

By this time, Artinecia had become accustomed to death, and the death of her second husband probably was saddening, but not overwhelming. After his death, Artinecia continued to run the farm, and spent her time raising her children. She watched each of her children grow up and get married, the last, Will Merriman, was married in 1894, when Artinecia was 63 years of age. After that time, she lived on the family’s farm with her son, Isaac, his wife and 4 sons.

Sometime between 1894 and 1900, Artinecia had moved away from her farm built some 40 years earlier, and went to live in a house in the city of Medford. During the year 1900, Artinecia’s daughter Laura Merriman Bradley lived with her. Sometime between 1900 and 1910, probably closer to 1910, Artinecia moved once more. This time to the home of her daughter, Marie Merriman Bennett in Medford. Artie spent her last years at her daughter’s home at 531 South Riverside Avenue in Medford.

In her old age, she spent the majority of her time visiting children and grandchildren and making them feel loved. During the summer, she traveled to Washington, California, Montana, and across Oregon to visit her children who had moved there. She said on one occasion that she liked going to Seattle, Washington, because it was so cool there.

Starting in the early 1900’s, Americans became fascinated by the tales of the Oregon Trail. But as the original emigrants were disappearing, people acted fast to preserve the stories. Probably in 1914 or 1915, Artinecia was interviewed on her knowledge of the Oregon Trail and early life in Oregon. A photograph of Artinecia in the interview was flashed on the screen in the Oregon Building at the San Francisco Exposition of 1915. At that time, Artinecia was in Portland, Oregon, visiting her daughter Mollie Merriman Houston. One of Artinecia’s granddaughters was at the Exposition and told her grandmother about it. Artinecia was just as surprised as her granddaughter, and pleased to hear about her picture.

During her last few years, Artinecia was generally in ill health, but mentally she was still very much aware. According to a later interview, "her mind was bright and active.” In her old age, Artinecia wore glasses, and was by all accounts, "a sweet old lady with a fine sense of humor." It was noted that Artie was called “Grandma”, even by people who were not related to her. Artinecia Riddle Chapman Merriman died at her daughter Marie’s house in Medford, Jackson County, Oregon on January 10, 1917 [1] [2] [3]. At the time of her death, Artinecia was 86 years of age. Her death certificate listed the cause of death simply as "old age." This tired old lady had accomplished so much and probably felt ready to pass on. Artinecia was buried on January 12, 1917 beside her husband and 4 of her children who died as infants in the Jacksonville Cemetery, Jacksonville, Oregon [2]. She was highly mourned, and afterwards her estate passed to her son Isaac, as willed by her husband 40 years earlier. Isaac continued to cultivate the Merriman farm that Artinecia and William had purchased in 1857. The farm had by that time become a prized dairy in southern Oregon until it was eventually sold to a man named Lester Gilman in 1930.

Artinecia’s name lives on as almost a legend. Historians in the Jackson County area remember her as someone who “populated the Rogue River Valley,” and her descendants remember her with fondness and amazement. Her life is subject to many fascinations, as it surpasses even most tales of pioneer Americans. Artinecia possessed the same body as any other woman of the times, but she was able to withstand the deaths of 2 husbands, the deaths of 5 children in her lifetime, 16 pregnancies, being an interpreter in an Indian war, her trip on the Oregon Trail, her surgical knowledge that saved a man’s life, and more importantly, not failing to make her huge family of 17 feel loved. She clearly succeeded in life, doing more than most people are capable of.

Sources:

1. Tombstone Inscriptions, Jacksonville Cemetery, Jacksonville, Jackson Co., OR 2. Death Certificate of Artinecia Merriman, Jackson Co., OR, #7 3. Obituary of Artinecia Merriman, Medford Mail Tribune, January 12, 1917 4. Ridlon, G. T., History of the Ancient Ryedales, (Manchester, NH, 1884). 5. Powell, John C. Early Settlers of Sangamon County. (Edwin A. Wilson & Co., Springfield, IL, 1876). 6. Riddle, George W. Early Days in Oregon. 1851-1861 History of the South Umpqua Valley. (South Umpqua Historical Society, Inc., Canyonville, OR, 1993). Originally written in 1920. 7. Talbert, Eileen & Smart, Roselea, Umpqua & Douglas County Oregon Marriage Records Volume One, (The Genealogical Society of Douglas County, 1986). 8. Illinois Statewide Marriage Index, 1763-1900, Illinois State Archives, http://www.sos.state.il.us/departments/archives/marriage.html 9. 1850 Census, James Chapman Household, Sangamon Co., IL, Pg. 188 10. 1860 Census, William Merriman Household, Manzanita Pct., Jackson Co., OR, Pg. 195 11. 1870 Census, William Merriman Household, Jacksonville P.O., Jackson Co., OR, Pg. 404 12. 1880 Census, Arty Merriman Household, Manzanita Pct., Jackson Co., OR, Pg. 67 13. 1900 Census, Artie Merriman Household, E. Medford Pct., Jackson Co., OR, Pg. 251 14. 1910 Census, Samuel Bennett Household, S. Medford Pct., Jackson Co., OR, Pg. 4B 15. Various newspaper articles, Medford Mail Tribune and The Jacksonville Democratic Times. 16. Tombstone Inscriptions, Riddle Cemetery, Riddle, Douglas Co., OR

17. Merriman family birth and death records, written by Marie Merriman Bradley Manly from information supplied by her mother, Laura Merriman Bradley. Here are some highlights about Artinecia's life:

Was widowed at the age of 20. Was the mother of 16 children and 1 step-daughter. Traveled on the Oregon Trail in the year 1851, her train was attacked by Indians. Was a "surgeon" on the Oregon Trail and helped to dress wounds. She and her family were the first white family to settle in the Cow Creek Valley, Douglas County, Oregon. She could speak the Chinook Indian language. Was an interpreter between the Indians and the government in the Rogue River Indian War. Had the first sewing machine in the Rogue River Valley. Her interview about pioneer experiences was displayed at the Panama-Pacific Exposition in San Francisco.


Artinecia "Artie" Riddle Merriman Memorial Photos Flowers Edit Learn about sponsoring this memorial... Birth: Oct. 11, 1830 West Liberty (Logan County) Logan County Ohio, USA Death: Jan. 10, 1917 Medford Jackson County Oregon, USA

Mrs. Artenecia Riddle Merriman, sister of G. W. and Abner Riddle, of this place, died at Medford January 9 [sic 10] at the home of her daughter, Mrs. Samuel Bennet [sic Bennett], at the age of 88 years. Funeral services were held yesterday at the Jacksonville cemetery, where her husband, William H. Merriman, was buried in 1877.

Mrs. Merriman had been ill with uremic poisoning and bedfast for three months. For a time she was at the Good Samaritan Hospital, at Portland. Mrs. Merriman was born in Cleveland, Ohio, and was married in Illinois to John W. Chapman, who died in that state. After his death she crossed the plains to Oregon in the same train as Mr. Merriman.

In 1856 Mrs. Merriman, with her husband, moved to Jackson County and settled two miles north of Medford, the old family home, which is now held by Isaac Merriman, one of her sons.

Mrs. Merriman was the mother of 16 children, nearly all of whom are living.

Source: Oregonian (OR), 13 Jan 1917


One of Southern Oregon's noted pioneers, Mrs. Artimeeria [sic] Merriman, who died January 10, at the home of her daughter in Medford, Mrs. S. L. Bennett, was born at West Liberty, O., October 11, 1830.

At the age of 18 she was married to John Chapman, and for a few years made her home at Springfield, Ill. In 1851 her parents made preparations to leave Illinois for Oregon, and but a few days before their departure John Chapman died, leaving his widow with a child, John Chapman, and the young woman accompanied her parents to Oregon, coming by the southern trail, where they suffered from the usual Indian attacks, and settled finally at their future home on the Umpqua River, the town of Riddle being named for Mrs. Meriman's father.

On February 10, 1853, she married William H. Merriman, who was a member of the party crossing the plains with her, and in 1857 the family removed to Jackson County, where the Merriman farm on the Pacific Highway, southeast of Central Point, is still in possession of the family.

Mrs. Merriman was the mother of 16 children, of whom 11 are still living. A daughter of her husband by a prior marriage, Mrs. Lettie Harvey, of Ashland, also survives. John Chapman, the eldest son, lives at Red Lodge, Mont., and with his wife had the privilege of being with his mother at the end.

Mrs. Lucinda J. Prather, the next in age, lives at Big Timber, Mont.; Laura A. Bradley, at Washington, D. C.; Mrs. Marie Bennett, Mrs. Annie Clark and I. A. Merriman, in Medford; Mrs. Mollie Houston, in Portland, Or.; Mrs. Isabel Frank in Minneapolis, Minn.; Mrs. Effie Hill and Mrs. Josephine Beek in Seattle; Will Merriman in Oakland, Cal. Five children are now deceased: George Merriman, Charles, Walter, Prudence and Winnifred. Mrs. R. V. Beall, of Central Point, is a sister. George and Abner Riddle, of Riddle, in Douglas County, and also Stilly Riddle, of Hardin, Mont., brothers, also are living.

Thirty-seven grandchildren and a number of the fourth generation do her honor.

Source: Oregonian (OR), 21 Jan 1917


Submitted by: Martin Burrell, #46932334

Artie spent the first part of her life at West Liberty, Ohio. In 1836, when she was nearly 6 years old, the family moved out west to Sangamon County, Illinois. Here, Artie spent the remainder of her childhood and adolescence. Her family were successful corn farmers and were also faithful adherents to the Baptist denomination. In 1849, when she was 18 years old, Artie married a local man named James Chapman. They lived together in the nearby city of Springfield, Illinois and had one child named John. In 1851, her parents decided to move to Oregon and Artie and her husband made the decision to go with them. Sadly, her husband James died shortly before the wagon train was scheduled to leave.

Despite the sudden death, Artie and her infant son left Illinois with her family in a covered wagon over the Oregon Trail. At one point during the trek, Artie was called upon to remove a bullet from the wound of a man who had been shot. The train arrived in southern Oregon in September of 1851. Artie settled with her parents on their land claim in the Cow Creek Valley in Douglas County, Oregon. In 1852, a young widower named William Merriman arrived in the area. He was also from Sangamon County, Illinois and probably knew Artie from her youth. He courted her for several months until they were eventually married in February 1853. After the marriage, William and Artinecia settled a land claim of 320 acres in the Cow Creek Valley near her parents. On this farm, Artie had 2 children: Lucinda and George. It was while living in Douglas County that the Rogue River Indian War took place and Artie served as Interpreter between Indians and whites in the area. She and her husband did not remain in Douglas County long and in 1857, sold their land claim and moved to Jackson County, Oregon, where they purchased a 120-acre ranch a few miles northeast of Jacksonville, Oregon (it is now mostly within the city limits of Medford, Oregon).

William and Artinecia were influential citizens. They ran a successful ranch and also a blacksmith shop out of their home. They identified with the Republican party in politics and were faithful Baptists. Artinecia had 13 more children while living in Jackson County: Laura, Marie, Ann, Isaac, Charles, Mary, Walter, Isabel, Prudence, Effie, Marjorie, William and Winnifred. In total, Artie and her husband raised 13 children to adulthood. In 1877, Artie's husband died after a short illness and she continued to run the family ranch (they raised stock - pigs, chickens, cows). In the mid to late 1890's, Artie left the ranch with her son Isaac and moved herself into a house at an unknown location in the city of Medford, Oregon. In about 1908, old age probably compelled her to move in with her daughter Marie Bennett, who also lived in a house in Medford. Artie spent her last days at her daughters house on Riverside Avenue in Medford, where she died on January 10, 1917, at the age of 87.

Artinecia married first to James B. Chapman on February 22, 1849 in Springfield, Sangamon Co., Illinois . He was born circa 1827 in Kentucky. He died about March 1851 in Sangamon Co., Illinois.

They had the following child:

John William Chapman was born on June 15, 1850 in Springfield, Sangamon Co., Illinois 18. He died on December 18, 1933 in Red Lodge, Carbon Co., Montana. He married Alphia Chapman on April 20, 1881 in Douglas Co., Oregon. (She was born in September 1861 in Oregon and died in 1950 in Red Lodge, Carbon Co., Montana.) They had no children.

Artinecia married second William Harrison Merriman on February 10, 1853 in Riddle, Douglas Co., Oregon.

[Nore - William married first Mary Ann Lewis on September 30, 1847 in Sangamon Co., Illinois 18. She was born on April 19, 1824 in New Jersey 32. She died in April 1852 on the Oregon Trail, probably in Kansas.]

They [Artie] had the following children:

1 Lucinda Jane Merriman was born on May 22, 1852 in Riddle, Douglas Co., Oregon. She died on June 9, 1919 in Seattle, King Co., Washington. She is buried in the Mountain View Cemetery, Big Timber, Sweet Grass Co., Montana. She married Thomas Theodore Prather on February 22, 1872 in Medford, Jackson Co., Oregon.

2 George Francis Merriman was born on September 16, 1855 in the Cow Creek Valley, Douglas County, Oregon. He died on November 6, 1915 in Medford, Jackson Co., Oregon. He is buried in the Eastwood I.O.O.F. Cemetery, Medford, Jackson Co., Oregon.

3 Laura Alice Merriman was born on July 8, 1857 in Medford, Jackson Co., Oregon. She died on November 24, 1938 in Washington, District of Columbia. She is buried in the Eastwood I.O.O.F. Cemetery, Medford, Jackson Co., Oregon.

4 Marie (Maria) Elizabeth Merriman was born on December 9, 1858 in Medford, Jackson Co., Oregon. She died on July 5, 1943 in Medford, Jackson Co., Oregon. She is buried in the Eastwood I.O.O.F. Cemetery, Medford, Jackson Co., Oregon. She married Samuel Louis Bennett on November 23, 1881 in Medford, Jackson Co., Oregon.

5 Ann (Anna) Adelaide Merriman was born on March 28, 1860 in Medford, Jackson Co., Oregon. She died on May 16, 1935 in Medford, Jackson Co., Oregon. She is buried in the Siskiyou Memorial Park, Medford, Jackson Co., Oregon. She married Joseph Cicero Clark on November 23, 1881 in Medford, Jackson Co., Oregon.

6 Isaac (Ike) Albert Merriman was born on September 11, 1861 in Medford, Jackson Co., Oregon. He died on December 18, 1922 in Medford, Jackson Co., Oregon. He is buried in the Jacksonville Cemetery, Jacksonville, Jackson Co., Oregon. He married Emma Leora Bellinger on April 27, 1887 in Jacksonville, Jackson Co., Oregon. She was born on May 10, 1868 in Jacksonville, Jackson Co., Oregon and died on June 15, 1950 in Lakeport, Lake Co., California.

7 Charles (Charlie) Harrison Merriman was born on March 29, 1863 in Medford, Jackson Co., Oregon. He died on September 19, 1865 in Medford, Jackson Co., Oregon. He is buried in the Jacksonville Cemetery, Jacksonville, Jackson Co., Oregon. He died from blood poisoning.

8 Mary (Mollie) Bell Merriman was born on August 4, 1864 in Medford, Jackson Co., Oregon. She died on July 23, 1926 in Portland, Multnomah Co., Oregon. She is buried in the Riverview Cemetery, Portland, Multnomah Co., Oregon. She married Joseph Gatch Houston on April 6, 1891 in Portland, Multnomah Co., Oregon. He was born on November 13, 1861 in New Richmond, Clermont Co., Ohio and died on November 24, 1930 in Portland, Multnomah Co., Oregon. He is buried in the Riverview Cemetery, Portland, Multnomah Co., Oregon.

9 Walter Thomas Merriman was born on February 26, 1866 in Medford, Jackson Co., Oregon. He died on May 15, 1866 in Medford, Jackson Co., Oregon. He is buried in the Jacksonville Cemetery, Jacksonville, Jackson Co., Oregon. He died from an abscess of the brain.

10 Isabel (Belle) Merriman was born on June 28, 1867 in Medford, Jackson Co., Oregon. She died on December 19, 1953 in Portland, Multnomah Co., Oregon. She is buried in the Riverside Cemetery, Albany, Linn Co., Oregon. She married Charles K. Fronk on December 30, 1885 in Medford, Jackson Co., Oregon. He was born on June 24, 1857 in Yuba City, Yuba Co., California and died on December 15, 1918. He is buried in the Riverside Cemetery, Albany, Linn Co., Oregon.

11 Prudence Merriman was born on November 22, 1868 in Medford, Jackson Co., Oregon. She died on December 30, 1870 in Medford, Jackson Co., Oregon. She is buried in the Jacksonville Cemetery, Jacksonville, Jackson Co., Oregon. Prudence died from "congestion of the stomach."

12 Effie (Bess) Merriman was born on March 25, 1870 in Medford, Jackson Co., Oregon. She died on February 7, 1960 in Seattle, King Co., Washington. She is buried in the Acacia Memorial Park, Seattle, King Co., Washington. She married first John H. Bellinger on September 28, 1887 in Medford, Jackson Co., Oregon. He was born on February 4, 1866 in Jackson Co., Oregon and died on December 14, 1918 in Jackson Co., Oregon. He is buried in the Jacksonville Cemetery, Jacksonville, Jackson Co., Oregon. They divorced sometime between 1887-1899

She married second Joseph Crosby Hill circa 1899 in Oregon or Washington. He was born on October 16, 1866 in Smithfield, Cache Co., Utah and died on February 28, 1945 in Seattle, King Co., Washington. He is buried in the Acacia Memorial Park, Seattle, King Co., Washington.

13 Marjorie Josephine Merriman was born on June 4, 1871 in Medford, Jackson Co., Oregon. She died on January 6, 1940 in Seattle, King Co., Washington. She is buried in the Acacia Memorial Park, Seattle, King Co., Washington. She married John Beek on December 21, 1892 in Medford, Jackson Co., Oregon. He was born on May 16, 1866 in Cowlitz Co., Washington and died on January 24, 1953 in Seattle, King Co., Washington. He is buried in the Acacia Memorial Park, Seattle, King Co., Washington.

14 William (Will) Harrison Merriman was born on July 7, 1872 in Medford, Jackson Co., Oregon. He died on May 28, 1942 in Berkeley, Alameda Co., California. He married first, Rose M. Luy on July 29, 1894 in Jacksonville, Jackson Co., Oregon. She was born in November 1875 in Jacksonville, Jackson Co., Oregon and died on January 20, 1932 in Alameda Co., California. He married second, Minnie Mae Stephens, widow of a Mr. Finch, circa 1935 in California. She was born on December 31, 1899 in Arkansas and died on January 17, 1994 in San Diego Co., California.

15 Winnifred (Winnie) Merriman was born on November 30, 1874 in Medford, Jackson Co., Oregon. She died on January 14, 1875 in Medford, Jackson Co., Oregon. She is buried in the Jacksonville Cemetery, Jacksonville, Jackson Co., Oregon. She died from strangulation of the bowels.

Source: www.ryanwadleigh.com, Ryan Wadleigh the information contained herein is being used with the permission of the said compiler and author of who we wish to thank.



Family links: Parents: William Hamilton Riddle (1805 - 1891) Maximilia Bouseman Riddle (1809 - 1868)


Spouse: William Harrison Merriman (1825 - 1877)*


Children: Laura Alice Merriman Bradley (1857 - 1938)* Marie Elisabeth Merriman Bennett (1858 - 1943)*


  • Point here for explanation

Burial: Jacksonville Cemetery Jacksonville Jackson County Oregon, USA Plot: City Section, Block 249


Mrs. Artenecia Riddle Merriman, sister of G. W. and Abner Riddle, of this place, died at Medford January 9 [sic 10] at the home of her daughter, Mrs. Samuel Bennet [sic Bennett], at the age of 88 years. Funeral services were held yesterday at the Jacksonville cemetery, where her husband, William H. Merriman, was buried in 1877.

Mrs. Merriman had been ill with uremic poisoning and bedfast for three months. For a time she was at the Good Samaritan Hospital, at Portland. Mrs. Merriman was born in Cleveland, Ohio, and was married in Illinois to John W. Chapman, who died in that state. After his death she crossed the plains to Oregon in the same train as Mr. Merriman.

In 1856 Mrs. Merriman, with her husband, moved to Jackson County and settled two miles north of Medford, the old family home, which is now held by Isaac Merriman, one of her sons.

Mrs. Merriman was the mother of 16 children, nearly all of whom are living.

Source: Oregonian, The (Portland, OR), 13 Jan 1917


One of Southern Oregon's noted pioneers, Mrs. Artimeeria [sic] Merriman, who died January 10, at the home of her daughter in Medford, Mrs. S. L. Bennett, was born at West Liberty, O., October 11, 1830.

At the age of 18 she was married to John Chapman, and for a few years made her home at Springfield, Ill. In 1851 her parents made preparations to leave Illinois for Oregon, and but a few days before their departure John Chapman died, leaving his widow with a child, John Chapman, and the young woman accompanied her parents to Oregon, coming by the southern trail, where they suffered from the usual Indian attacks, and settled finally at their future home on the Umpqua River, the town of Riddle being named for Mrs. Meriman's father.

On February 10, 1853, she married William H. Merriman, who was a member of the party crossing the plains with her, and in 1857 the family removed to Jackson County, where the Merriman farm on the Pacific Highway, southeast of Central Point, is still in possession of the family.

Mrs. Merriman was the mother of 16 children, of whom 11 are still living. A daughter of her husband by a prior marriage, Mrs. Lettie Harvey, of Ashland, also survives. John Chapman, the eldest son, lives at Red Lodge, Mont., and with his wife had the privilege of being with his mother at the end.

Mrs. Lucinda J. Prather, the next in age, lives at Big Timber, Mont.; Laura A. Bradley, at Washington, D. C.; Mrs. Marie Bennett, Mrs. Annie Clark and I. A. Merriman, in Medford; Mrs. Mollie Houston, in Portland, Or.; Mrs. Isabel Frank in Minneapolis, Minn.; Mrs. Effie Hill and Mrs. Josephine Beek in Seattle; Will Merriman in Oakland, Cal. Five children are now deceased: George Merriman, Charles, Walter, Prudence and Winnifred. Mrs. R. V. Beall, of Central Point, is a sister. George and Abner Riddle, of Riddle, in Douglas County, and also Stilly Riddle, of Hardin, Mont., brothers, also are living.

Thirty-seven grandchildren and a number of the fourth generation do her honor.

Source: Oregonian, The (Portland, OR), 21 Jan 1917


Submitted by: Martin Burrell, #46932334

Artie spent the first part of her life at West Liberty, Ohio. In 1836, when she was nearly 6 years old, the family moved out west to Sangamon County, Illinois. Here, Artie spent the remainder of her childhood and adolescence. Her family were successful corn farmers and were also faithful adherents to the Baptist denomination. In 1849, when she was 18 years old, Artie married a local man named James Chapman. They lived together in the nearby city of Springfield, Illinois and had one child named John. In 1851, her parents decided to move to Oregon and Artie and her husband made the decision to go with them. Sadly, her husband James died shortly before the wagon train was scheduled to leave.

Despite the sudden death, Artie and her infant son left Illinois with her family in a covered wagon over the Oregon Trail. At one point during the trek, Artie was called upon to remove a bullet from the wound of a man who had been shot. The train arrived in southern Oregon in September of 1851. Artie settled with her parents on their land claim in the Cow Creek Valley in Douglas County, Oregon. In 1852, a young widower named William Merriman arrived in the area. He was also from Sangamon County, Illinois and probably knew Artie from her youth. He courted her for several months until they were eventually married in February 1853. After the marriage, William and Artinecia settled a land claim of 320 acres in the Cow Creek Valley near her parents. On this farm, Artie had 2 children: Lucinda and George. It was while living in Douglas County that the Rogue River Indian War took place and Artie served as Interpreter between Indians and whites in the area. She and her husband did not remain in Douglas County long and in 1857, sold their land claim and moved to Jackson County, Oregon, where they purchased a 120-acre ranch a few miles northeast of Jacksonville, Oregon (it is now mostly within the city limits of Medford, Oregon).

William and Artinecia were influential citizens. They ran a successful ranch and also a blacksmith shop out of their home. They identified with the Republican party in politics and were faithful Baptists. Artinecia had 13 more children while living in Jackson County: Laura, Marie, Ann, Isaac, Charles, Mary, Walter, Isabel, Prudence, Effie, Marjorie, William and Winnifred. In total, Artie and her husband raised 13 children to adulthood. In 1877, Artie's husband died after a short illness and she continued to run the family ranch (they raised stock - pigs, chickens, cows). In the mid to late 1890's, Artie left the ranch with her son Isaac and moved herself into a house at an unknown location in the city of Medford, Oregon. In about 1908, old age probably compelled her to move in with her daughter Marie Bennett, who also lived in a house in Medford. Artie spent her last days at her daughters house on Riverside Avenue in Medford, where she died on January 10, 1917, at the age of 87.

Artinecia married first to James B. Chapman on February 22, 1849 in Springfield, Sangamon Co., Illinois . He was born circa 1827 in Kentucky. He died about March 1851 in Sangamon Co., Illinois.

They had the following child:

John William Chapman was born on June 15, 1850 in Springfield, Sangamon Co., Illinois 18. He died on December 18, 1933 in Red Lodge, Carbon Co., Montana. He married Alphia Chapman on April 20, 1881 in Douglas Co., Oregon. (She was born in September 1861 in Oregon and died in 1950 in Red Lodge, Carbon Co., Montana.) They had no children.

Artinecia married second William Harrison Merriman on February 10, 1853 in Riddle, Douglas Co., Oregon.

[Nore - William married first Mary Ann Lewis on September 30, 1847 in Sangamon Co., Illinois 18. She was born on April 19, 1824 in New Jersey 32. She died in April 1852 on the Oregon Trail, probably in Kansas.]

They [Artie] had the following children:

1 Lucinda Jane Merriman was born on May 22, 1852 in Riddle, Douglas Co., Oregon. She died on June 9, 1919 in Seattle, King Co., Washington. She is buried in the Mountain View Cemetery, Big Timber, Sweet Grass Co., Montana. She married Thomas Theodore Prather on February 22, 1872 in Medford, Jackson Co., Oregon. 
2 [http://www.findagrave.com/cgi-bin/fg.cgi?page=gr&GRid=43746074 George Francis Merriman] was born on September 16, 1855 in the Cow Creek Valley, Douglas County, Oregon. He died on November 6, 1915 in Medford, Jackson Co., Oregon. He is buried in the Eastwood I.O.O.F. Cemetery, Medford, Jackson Co., Oregon. 
3 [http://www.findagrave.com/cgi-bin/fg.cgi?page=gr&GRid=50698874 Laura Alice Merriman] was born on July 8, 1857 in Medford, Jackson Co., Oregon. She died on November 24, 1938 in Washington, District of Columbia. She is buried in the Eastwood I.O.O.F. Cemetery, Medford, Jackson Co., Oregon.
4 [http://www.findagrave.com/cgi-bin/fg.cgi?page=gr&GRid=63597228 Marie (Maria) Elizabeth Merriman] was born on December 9, 1858 in Medford, Jackson Co., Oregon. She died on July 5, 1943 in Medford, Jackson Co., Oregon. She is buried in the Eastwood I.O.O.F. Cemetery, Medford, Jackson Co., Oregon. She married [http://www.findagrave.com/cgi-bin/fg.cgi?page=gr&GRid=63597293 Samuel Louis Bennett] on November 23, 1881 in Medford, Jackson Co., Oregon.
5 [http://www.findagrave.com/cgi-bin/fg.cgi?page=gr&GRid=59794520 Ann (Anna) Adelaide Merriman] was born on March 28, 1860 in Medford, Jackson Co., Oregon. She died on May 16, 1935 in Medford, Jackson Co., Oregon. She is buried in the Siskiyou Memorial Park, Medford, Jackson Co., Oregon.
  She married Joseph Cicero Clark on November 23, 1881 in Medford, Jackson Co., Oregon. 
6 Isaac (Ike) Albert Merriman was born on September 11, 1861 in Medford, Jackson Co., Oregon. He died on December 18, 1922 in Medford, Jackson Co., Oregon. He is buried in the Jacksonville Cemetery, Jacksonville, Jackson Co., Oregon.  He married Emma Leora Bellinger on April 27, 1887 in Jacksonville, Jackson Co., Oregon. She was born on May 10, 1868 in Jacksonville, Jackson Co., Oregon and died on June 15, 1950 in Lakeport, Lake Co., California. 
7 Charles (Charlie) Harrison Merriman was born on March 29, 1863 in Medford, Jackson Co., Oregon. He died on September 19, 1865 in Medford, Jackson Co., Oregon. He is buried in the Jacksonville Cemetery, Jacksonville, Jackson Co., Oregon. He died from blood poisoning. 
8 Mary (Mollie) Bell Merriman was born on August 4, 1864 in Medford, Jackson Co., Oregon. She died on July 23, 1926 in Portland, Multnomah Co., Oregon. She is buried in the Riverview Cemetery, Portland, Multnomah Co., Oregon. She married Joseph Gatch Houston on April 6, 1891 in Portland, Multnomah Co., Oregon. He was born on November 13, 1861 in New Richmond, Clermont Co., Ohio and died on November 24, 1930 in Portland, Multnomah Co., Oregon. He is buried in the Riverview Cemetery, Portland, Multnomah Co., Oregon.
9 Walter Thomas Merriman was born on February 26, 1866 in Medford, Jackson Co., Oregon. He died on May 15, 1866 in Medford, Jackson Co., Oregon. He is buried in the Jacksonville Cemetery, Jacksonville, Jackson Co., Oregon. He died from an abscess of the brain. 

10 Isabel (Belle) Merriman was born on June 28, 1867 in Medford, Jackson Co., Oregon. She died on December 19, 1953 in Portland, Multnomah Co., Oregon. She is buried in the Riverside Cemetery, Albany, Linn Co., Oregon. She married Charles K. Fronk on December 30, 1885 in Medford, Jackson Co., Oregon. He was born on June 24, 1857 in Yuba City, Yuba Co., California and died on December 15, 1918. He is buried in the Riverside Cemetery, Albany, Linn Co., Oregon.

11 Prudence Merriman was born on November 22, 1868 in Medford, Jackson Co., Oregon. She died on December 30, 1870 in Medford, Jackson Co., Oregon. She is buried in the Jacksonville Cemetery, Jacksonville, Jackson Co., Oregon. Prudence died from "congestion of the stomach."

12 Effie (Bess) Merriman was born on March 25, 1870 in Medford, Jackson Co., Oregon. She died on February 7, 1960 in Seattle, King Co., Washington. She is buried in the Acacia Memorial Park, Seattle, King Co., Washington. She married first John H. Bellinger on September 28, 1887 in Medford, Jackson Co., Oregon. He was born on February 4, 1866 in Jackson Co., Oregon and died on December 14, 1918 in Jackson Co., Oregon. He is buried in the Jacksonville Cemetery, Jacksonville, Jackson Co., Oregon. They divorced sometime between 1887-1899

  She married second [http://www.findagrave.com/cgi-bin/fg.cgi?page=gr&GRid=30446493 Joseph Crosby Hill] circa 1899 in Oregon or Washington. He was born on October 16, 1866 in Smithfield, Cache Co., Utah and died on February 28, 1945 in Seattle, King Co., Washington. He is buried in the Acacia Memorial Park, Seattle, King Co., Washington.

13 Marjorie Josephine Merriman was born on June 4, 1871 in Medford, Jackson Co., Oregon. She died on January 6, 1940 in Seattle, King Co., Washington. She is buried in the Acacia Memorial Park, Seattle, King Co., Washington. She married John Beek on December 21, 1892 in Medford, Jackson Co., Oregon. He was born on May 16, 1866 in Cowlitz Co., Washington and died on January 24, 1953 in Seattle, King Co., Washington. He is buried in the Acacia Memorial Park, Seattle, King Co., Washington.

14 William (Will) Harrison Merriman was born on July 7, 1872 in Medford, Jackson Co., Oregon. He died on May 28, 1942 in Berkeley, Alameda Co., California. He married first, Rose M. Luy on July 29, 1894 in Jacksonville, Jackson Co., Oregon. She was born in November 1875 in Jacksonville, Jackson Co., Oregon and died on January 20, 1932 in Alameda Co., California. He married second, Minnie Mae Stephens, widow of a Mr. Finch, circa 1935 in California. She was born on December 31, 1899 in Arkansas and died on January 17, 1994 in San Diego Co., California.

15 Winnifred (Winnie) Merriman was born on November 30, 1874 in Medford, Jackson Co., Oregon. She died on January 14, 1875 in Medford, Jackson Co., Oregon. She is buried in the Jacksonville Cemetery, Jacksonville, Jackson Co., Oregon. She died from strangulation of the bowels.

Source: www.ryanwadleigh.com, Ryan Wadleigh the information contained herein is being used with the permission of the said compiler and author of who we wish to thank. Inscription: Artinecia Merriman Nov. 11, 1830 Jan. 10, 1917

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Artinecia "Artie" Chapman-Merriman (Riddle)'s Timeline

1830
November 11, 1830
West Liberty, Logan County, Ohio, United States
1850
June 15, 1850
Sangamon, IL, United States
1854
May 22, 1854
Jackson County, Oregon, United States
1855
September 16, 1855
1857
July 8, 1857
Jacksonville, Jackson County, Oregon, United States
1858
December 9, 1858
Jackson County, Oregon, United States
1860
1860
1861
September 11, 1861
Medford, Jackson, OR, United States
1863
March 29, 1863
Medford, Jackson, OR, United States