Dianne Feinstein, U.S. Senator

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Dianne Emiel Feinstein (Goldman)

Hebrew: דיאן עמיאל פיינסטיין (גולדמן)
Birthdate:
Birthplace: San Francisco, San Francisco County, California, United States
Immediate Family:

Daughter of Leon Goldman and Betty Goldman
Wife of Private
Widow of Bertram Feinstein
Ex-wife of Jack Berman
Mother of Private
Sister of Private and Private

Managed by: Randy Schoenberg
Last Updated:
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Immediate Family

About Dianne Feinstein, U.S. Senator

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dianne_Feinstein

Dianne Goldman Berman Feinstein, born Dianne Emiel Goldman[2] (/ˈfaɪnstaɪn/; born June 22, 1933) is the senior United States Senator from California. A member of the Democratic Party, she has served in the Senate since 1992. She also served as 38th Mayor of San Francisco from 1978 to 1988.

Born in San Francisco, Feinstein graduated from Stanford University. In the 1960s she worked in city government, and in 1970 she was elected to the San Francisco Board of Supervisors. She served as the board's first female president in 1978, during which time the assassinations of Mayor George Moscone and City Supervisor Harvey Milk drew national attention to the city. Feinstein succeeded Moscone as mayor. During her tenure as San Francisco's first female mayor she led a revamp of the city's cable car system and oversaw the 1984 Democratic National Convention.

After a failed gubernatorial campaign in 1990, she won a 1992 special election to the U.S. Senate. Feinstein was first elected on the same ballot as her peer Barbara Boxer, and the two became California's first female U.S. Senators. Feinstein has been re-elected four times since then and in the 2012 election, she claimed the record for the most popular votes in any U.S. Senate election in history, having received 7.75 million votes.[3]

Feinstein was the author of the 1994 Federal Assault Weapons Ban which expired in 2004. In 2013 she introduced a new assault weapons bill, which failed to pass. Feinstein formerly chaired the Senate Rules Committee (2007–09) and has chaired the Select Committee on Intelligence since 2009. She is also the first woman to have presided over a U.S. presidential inauguration.[4][5]

At the age of 80, Feinstein is the oldest currently serving United States Senator.

Contents [hide] 1 Early life 2 Personal life 3 Early political career 3.1 President of the San Francisco Board of Supervisors 3.2 Mayor of San Francisco 3.3 Gubernatorial election 4 U.S. Senate career 4.1 Elections 4.2 Approval ratings 4.3 Committees 4.4 Political positions and votes 4.4.1 Assault weapons ban 4.4.2 NSA surveillance programs 4.5 2008 presidential politics 5 Awards and honors 6 Offices held 7 Electoral history 8 See also 9 Notes 10 References 11 Further reading 12 External links Early life[edit] Feinstein was born Dianne Emiel Goldman[2] in San Francisco, to Betty (née Rosenburg), a former model, and Leon Goldman, a nationally renowned surgeon. Feinstein's paternal grandparents were Jewish emigrants from Poland, while her maternal grandparents, who were of the Russian Orthodox faith, were from Saint Petersburg, Russia.[6][7] Her mother also had either German or Jewish ancestry.[7][8]

Personal life[edit] Feinstein graduated from Convent of the Sacred Heart High School (California) in 1951 and from Stanford University in 1955 with a B.A. in History.

In 1956, she married Jack Berman (died 2002), a colleague in the San Francisco District Attorney's Office. Feinstein and Berman divorced three years later. Their daughter, Katherine Feinstein Mariano (b. 1957), has been the presiding judge of the San Francisco Superior Court for twelve years, through 2012.[9][10]

In 1962, shortly after beginning her career in politics, Feinstein married neurosurgeon Bertram Feinstein; her second husband died of colon cancer in 1978.

In 1980, Feinstein married Richard C. Blum, an investment banker. In 2003, Feinstein was ranked the fifth-wealthiest senator, with an estimated net worth of $26 million.[11] By 2005 her net worth had increased to between $43 million and $99 million.[12] Her 347-page financial-disclosure statement[13] – characterized by the San Francisco Chronicle as "nearly the size of a phone book" – draws clear lines between her assets and those of her husband, with many of her assets in blind trusts.[14]

Early political career[edit] In 1961, Feinstein worked to end housing discrimination in San Francisco.[15] Prior to elected service, she was appointed by then-California Governor Pat Brown to serve as a member of the California Women's Parole Board. Feinstein also served as a fellow at the Coro Foundation in San Francisco.

President of the San Francisco Board of Supervisors[edit] In 1969, Feinstein was elected to the San Francisco Board of Supervisors. She remained on the Board for nine years.

During her tenure on the Board of Supervisors, she unsuccessfully ran for mayor of San Francisco twice, in 1971 against mayor Joseph Alioto, and in 1975, when she lost the contest for a runoff slot (against George Moscone) by one percentage point, to supervisor John Barbagelata.

Because of her position, Feinstein became a target of the New World Liberation Front, who placed a bomb on her window sill which failed to explode and who later shot out the windows of a beach house which she owned.[16]

She was elected president of the San Francisco Board of Supervisors in 1978 with initial opposition from Quentin Kopp.

On November 27, 1978, San Francisco mayor George Moscone and supervisor Harvey Milk were assassinated by a rival politician, Dan White, who had resigned from the Board of Supervisors only two weeks prior. Feinstein was close by in City Hall at the time of the shootings, and discovered Milk's body after hearing the gunshots and going to investigate. Later that day at a press conference originally organized by Moscone to announce White's successor, Feinstein announced the assassinations to the stunned public, stating: "As president of the board of supervisors, it's my duty to make this announcement. Both Mayor Moscone and Supervisor Harvey Milk have been shot and killed."[17]

Feinstein appears in archival footage and is credited in the Academy Award-winning documentary film The Times of Harvey Milk (1984). She appears again briefly in archival footage, announcing the death of Moscone and Milk in the 2008 film Milk. Feinstein and her position as President of the San Francisco Board of Supervisors are also alluded to several times in the movie, and a portrayal of her character has a few off-screen lines.

As president of the Board of Supervisors upon the death of Mayor Moscone, Feinstein succeeded to the mayoralty on December 4, 1978.

Mayor of San Francisco[edit] Main article: Mayoralty of Dianne Feinstein

As mayor of San Francisco, 1978–1988 Feinstein served out the remainder of Moscone's term. She made no staffing changes to his team until she was elected in her own right in 1979. She was re-elected in 1983 and served a full second term.

One of the first challenges to face Feinstein as mayor was the state of the San Francisco cable car system. In late 1979, the system had to be shut down for emergency repairs, and an engineering evaluation concluded that it needed comprehensive rebuilding at a cost of $60 million. Feinstein took charge of the effort, and helped win federal funding for the bulk of the rebuilding job. The system closed for rebuilding in 1982 and reopened in 1984 in time for the Democratic National Convention that was held in the city that year.[18] Feinstein also oversaw planning policies to increase the number of high rise buildings in San Francisco.[19]

Perhaps because of her statewide ambitions, Feinstein was seen as a relatively moderate Democrat in one of the country's most liberal cities. As a supervisor, she was considered part of the centrist bloc that included Dan White and was generally opposed to Moscone. As mayor, Feinstein angered the city's large gay community by refusing to march in a gay rights parade and by vetoing domestic partner legislation in 1983. In the 1980 presidential election, while a majority of Bay Area Democrats continued to support Senator Ted Kennedy's primary challenge to President Jimmy Carter even after it was clear Kennedy could not win, Feinstein was a strong supporter of the Carter–Mondale ticket. She was given a high profile speaking role on the opening night of the August Democratic National Convention, urging delegates to reject the Kennedy delegates' proposal to "open" the convention, thereby allowing delegates to ignore their states' popular vote, a proposal that was soundly defeated.

In the run up to the 1984 Democratic National Convention, there was considerable media and public speculation that Democratic presidential nominee Walter Mondale might pick Feinstein as his running mate. However, he chose Geraldine Ferraro instead. Also in 1984, Feinstein proposed banning handguns in San Francisco, and became subject to a recall attempt organized by the White Panther Party. She won the recall election and finished her second term as mayor on January 8, 1988.

In 1985, at a press conference, Feinstein revealed details about the hunt for serial killer Richard Ramírez, and in so doing angered detectives by giving away details of his crimes.[20]

In 1987, City and State magazine named Feinstein the nation's "Most Effective Mayor." Feinstein served on the Trilateral Commission during the 1980s while mayor of San Francisco.

Gubernatorial election[edit] In 1990, Feinstein made an unsuccessful bid for Governor of California. Although she won the Democratic Party's nomination for the office, she then lost in the general election to Republican Senator Pete Wilson, who vacated his seat in the Senate to assume the governorship. In 1992, she was fined $190,000 for failure to properly report campaign contributions and expenditures associated with that campaign.[21]

U.S. Senate career[edit] Elections[edit]

Official Senate photo from 2003

Feinstein in 2010, as she hosted an event at her home attended by 5 members of the U.S. Senate See also: United States Senate special election in California, 1992 See also: United States Senate election in California, 2012 On November 3, 1992, Feinstein won a special election to fill the Senate seat vacated a year earlier when Senator Pete Wilson resigned to become governor. The election was held at the same time as the general election for U.S. President and other offices. Barbara Boxer was elected at the same time for the Senate seat to be vacated by Alan Cranston. Because Feinstein was elected to an unexpired term, she became a senator as soon as the election was certified in November while Boxer would not take office until the expiration of Cranston's term in January; thus Feinstein became California's senior senator, even though she was elected at the same time as Boxer and Boxer had previous congressional service. Feinstein was re-elected in 1994, 2000, 2006, and 2012. In 2012, Feinstein claimed the record for the most popular votes in any U.S. Senate election in history, having received 7.75 million votes.[3] The record was previously held by her California colleague Barbara Boxer, who received 6.96 million votes in her 2004 re-election.

Approval ratings[edit] Source Date Approve Disapprove Undecided Survey USA January 17, 2011 43% 48% 10% Public Policy Polling at the Wayback Machine (archived May 15, 2011) February 2, 2011 50% 39% 11% The Field Poll February 2, 2011 48% 33% 19% The Field Poll June 21, 2011 46% 31% 23% The Field Poll September 16, 2011 41% 39% 20% Public Policy Polling November 16, 2011 51% 38% 11% Committees[edit] Committee on Appropriations Subcommittee on Agriculture, Rural Development, Food and Drug Administration, and Related Agencies Subcommittee on Commerce, Justice, Science, and Related Agencies Subcommittee on Defense Subcommittee on Energy and Water Development (Chair) Subcommittee on Interior, Environment, and Related Agencies Subcommittee on Transportation, Housing and Urban Development, and Related Agencies Committee on the Judiciary Subcommittee on Crime and Terrorism Subcommittee on Immigration, Border Security, and Refugees Subcommittee on Privacy, Technology and the Law Committee on Rules and Administration Select Committee on Intelligence (Chair) Political positions and votes[edit] Main article: Political positions of Dianne Feinstein

Anti-war activist Todd Chretien protests outside of Senator Feinstein's office in San Francisco Feinstein voted for the extension of the PATRIOT ACT and the FISA provisions.[22]

Feinstein cosponsored (along with Tom Coburn, an Oklahoman Republican) an amendment through the Senate to the Economic Development Revitalization Act of 2011 that eliminated the Volumetric Ethanol Excise Tax Credit. The Senate passed the amendment on June 16, 2011. Introduced in 2004, the subsidy provided a 45-cent-per-gallon credit on pure ethanol and a 54-cent-per-gallon tariff on imported ethanol. These subsidies had resulted in an annual expenditure of $6 billion.[23][24]

On May 12, 2011, Feinstein cosponsored PIPA.[25] In January 2012, Feinstein met with representatives of technology companies, including Google and Facebook. According to a spokesperson, Feinstein "is doing all she can to ensure that the bill is balanced and protects the intellectual property concerns of the content community without unfairly burdening legitimate businesses such as Internet search engines."[26]

Assault weapons ban[edit] Feinstein introduced the Federal Assault Weapons Ban, which became law in 1994 and expired in 2004.[27] In January 2013, about one month after the Sandy Hook Elementary School shooting, Feinstein, along with Representative Carolyn McCarthy from New York, proposed a bill that would "ban the sale, transfer, manufacturing or importation of 150 specific firearms including semiautomatic rifles or pistols that can be used with a detachable or fixed ammunition magazines that hold more than 10 rounds and have specific military-style features, including pistol grips, grenade launchers or rocket launchers." The bill would have exempted 900 models of guns used for sport and hunting.[27][28] Feinstein commented on the bill, saying, "The common thread in each of these shootings is the gunman used a semi-automatic assault weapon or large capacity ammunition magazines. Military assault weapons only have one purpose and in my opinion, it's for the military."[29] The bill failed on a Senate vote of 60 to 40.[30]

NSA surveillance programs[edit] After the 2013 mass surveillance disclosures involving the National Security Agency (NSA), Feinstein took measures to continue the collection programs. Foreign Policy wrote that she had a "reputation as a staunch defender of NSA practices and the White House's refusal to stand by collection activities targeting foreign leaders."[31] In October 2013 she criticized the NSA for monitoring telephone calls of foreign leaders friendly to the US.[32] In November 2013 she promoted the Fisa Improvements Act bill which included a "backdoor search provision" that allows intelligence agencies to continue certain warrantless searches as long as they are logged and "available for review" to various agencies.[33]

In June 2013 Feinstein labeled Edward Snowden a traitor after his leaks went public. In October of that year she stated that she stood by those comments.[34]

2008 presidential politics[edit]

The line for unclaimed tickets to the inauguration outside Feinstein's office As a superdelegate, Feinstein had declared that she would support Hillary Clinton for the Democratic presidential nomination. However, once Barack Obama became the presumptive nominee for the party, she fully backed his candidacy. Days after Obama amassed enough delegates to win the Democratic Party nomination, Feinstein lent her Washington, D.C., home to both Clinton and Obama to have a private one-on-one meeting.[35] Feinstein did not attend the 2008 Democratic National Convention in Denver because she had fallen and broken her ankle earlier in the month.[36]

She chaired the United States Congress Joint Committee on Inaugural Ceremonies, and acted as mistress of ceremonies, introducing each participant at the 2009 presidential inauguration.[37]

Awards and honors[edit] Feinstein was presented with the Woodrow Wilson Award for public service by the Woodrow Wilson Center of the Smithsonian Institution on November 3, 2001, in Los Angeles.


GEDCOM Note

Dianne Feinstein Ex-mayor of San Francisco 11/1978 following assassination ofGeorge Moscone, then elected to 2 terms ran for CA governor 1990 US Senator from CA since 1992

About Dianne Feinstein, U.S. Senator (עברית)

דיאן גולדמן ברמן פיינסטיין

' (באנגלית: Dianne Goldman Berman Feinstein); נולדה ב-22 ביוני 1933 היא פוליטיקאית יהודייה אמריקאית חברת המפלגה הדמוקרטית, המכהנת כסנאטורית מטעם מדינת קליפורניה, מאז 1992. בעבר כיהנה כראש עיריית סן פרנסיסקו בשנים 1978 – 1988.

תוכן עניינים 1 ראשית חייה 2 תחילת דרכה הפוליטית 2.1 ראש עיריית סן פרנסיסקו 2.2 המירוץ למשרת המושלת 3 הקריירה בסנאט 3.1 הגבלות על נשק 3.2 המזרח התיכון 3.3 תוכנית הציתותים 3.4 חוק הפטריוט 3.5 איכות הסביבה 3.6 חופש הביטוי 4 קישורים חיצוניים 5 הערות שוליים

ראשית חייה פיינסטיין נולדה ב-1933 בסן פרנסיסקו, בשם דיאן עמיאל גולדמן, הבכורה משלוש בנותיהם של בטי רוזנבורג, דוגמנית, וליאון גולדמן, רופא מנתח ידוע, פרופסור לרפואה באוניברסיטת קליפורניה בסן פרנסיסקו. סבה וסבתה מצד אביה היו מהגרים יהודים מפולין. סבה וסבתה מצד אמה היו נוצרים אורתודוקסים שהיגרו מסנקט פטרבורג, בירת רוסיה, לאחר המהפכה הבולשביקית ב-1917, ואף הם ממוצא יהודי.

פיינסטיין למדה בבית ספר "מנזר הלב הקדוש" וקיבלה חינוך קתולי דתי, אבל למדה גם בבית ספר יהודי והוכרה כיהודייה בגיל 13, וכפי שהיא ניסחה זאת, "תמיד ראיתי בעצמי יהודייה". בהמשך סיימה פיינסטיין לימודי תואר ראשון בהיסטוריה מאוניברסיטת סטנפורד ב-1955.

בשנת 1956 התחתנה עם ג'ק ברמן, שעבד במשרד התובע המחוזי של סן פרנסיסקו. לאחר שלוש שנים הם התגרשו. בתם, קתרין פיינסטיין מריאנו, היא שופטת בבית המשפט המחוזי של סן פרנסיסקו. מיד לאחר שהחלה בקריירה הפוליטית שלה, התחתנה ב-1962 עם הנוירוכירורג ברטרם פיינסטיין, אשר נפטר ב-1978. לאחר מכן התחתנה ב-1980 עם ריצ'רד סי. בלום, בנקאי השקעות אמיד.

תחילת דרכה הפוליטית תפקידה הציבורי הראשון היה מינויה על ידי מושל קליפורניה פט בראון למועצת החנינה לנשים של קליפורניה. ב-1969 נבחרה למועצת עיריית סן פרנסיסקו ("San Francisco Board of Supervisors"). היא כיהנה במועצה במשך תשע שנים והייתה לאישה הראשונה שכיהנה כנשיאת המועצה.

בעת כהונתה במועצת העירייה היא התמודדה פעמיים, ללא הצלחה, על תפקיד ראש עיריית סן פרנסיסקו: ב-1971 מול ראש העיר ג'וזף אליטיו, וב-1975, אז הפסידה במאבק לעלייה לסיבוב השני (מול ג'ורג' מוסקונה) באחוז אחד בלבד לחבר המועצה ג'ון ברבג'לטה.

ראש עיריית סן פרנסיסקו

פיינסטיין כראש עיריית סן פרנסיסקו, 1978-1988 ב-27 בנובמבר 1978, דן וייט, יריבם הפוליטי של ראש עיריית סן פרנסיסקו ג'ורג' מוסקונה ושל חבר המועצה הארווי מילק, התנקש בהם ורצח אותם בבניין העירייה. פיינסטיין, ששהתה בבניין ושמעה את היריות, הייתה מי שמצאה את גופתו של מילק וזיהתה את גופתו של מוסקונה, ואחר כך הודיעה לציבור על הרצח.

מתוקף היותה נשיאת מועצת העירייה מונתה אוטומטית לראש העירייה ב-4 בדצמבר. היא כיהנה את שארית הכהונה ונבחרה בזכות עצמה ב-1979. לאחר מכן התמודדה שוב בשנת 1983 וזכתה מחדש באמון הבוחר.

אחד האתגרים הראשונים של פיינסטיין כראש עירייה היה מצב מערכת קרונות הכבל, אחד מסמליה של סן פרנסיסקו. בסוף 1979 המערכת הושבתה כליל בשל צורך בשיפוץ דחוף. הערכת המהנדסים הייתה שצריך לבנות את קרון הכבל מחדש בעלות של כ-60 מיליון דולר. פיינסטיין עזרה בקבלת מימון פדרלי למרבית עבודות הבנייה מחדש. השיפוצים הסתיימו בשנת 1984.

לקראת ועידת המפלגה הדמוקרטית ב-1984 עלו השערות שהמועמד הדמוקרטי לנשיאות, וולטר מונדייל, יבחר בפיינסטיין כמועמדת לסגנית הנשיא. אולם הוא בחר בסופו של דבר בג'רלדין פרארו. כמו כן ב-1984, פיינסטיין העלתה הצעה לאסור על החזקת אקדחים בסן פרנסיסקו. הצעה זו הייתה העילה המרכזית להצעת מפלגת הפנתר הלבן להדיחה בבחירות מיוחדות, אך היא זכתה שוב וסיימה את מלוא הקדנציה.

המירוץ למשרת המושלת ב-1990 התמודדה פיינסטיין למשרת מושלת קליפורניה, אך הפסידה לסנאטור הרפובליקני פיט וילסון, שפינה את כסאו בסנאט כדי להיכנס לתפקיד המושל. ב-1992, היא נקנסה בסכום של 190,000 דולר על כך שלא דיווחה כראוי על תרומות לקמפיין והוצאות הקשורות לקמפיין זה[1].

הקריירה בסנאט ב-3 בנובמבר 1992 פיינסטיין ניצחה בבחירות המיוחדות למושב בסנאט שהתפנה ב-1990 כשפט וילסון נבחר למושל (וילסון מינה אז את ג'ון פ. סיימור למלא את המושב). הסנאטורית היהודיה ברברה בוקסר נבחרה באותן בחירות למושב השני של קליפורניה. פיינסטיין נבחרה מחדש ב-1994, 2000, 2006, 2012 ו-2018.

בשנים 2007–2009 עמדה בראש ועדת הכללים של הסנאט, ובשנים 2009–2015 בראש ועדת המודיעין של הסנאט של ארצות הברית. החל מ-2017 היא הדמוקרטית הבכירה ביותר בועדת המשפט.

בשנת 2014 היא יזמה חוק CISA.

פיינסטיין, דיוקן רשמי הגבלות על נשק נושא ההגבלות על בעלות ונשיאה של כלי נשק בידי אזרחים הוא אחד הנושאים השנויים ביותר במחלוקת בפוליטיקה האמריקאית. פיינסטיין היא מהבולטות בהובלת המאבק למען ההגבלות, כנגד הלחץ של איגוד הרובאים הלאומי (NRA).

ב-1993, יחד עם צ'אק שומר שהיה אז בבית הנבחרים, הובילה את המאבק לאיסור מכירה ואחזקה של כלי נשק חצי אוטומטיים והגבלה על מחסניות לכלי נשק היכולים להפוך לאוטומטיים. האיסור עבר בחוק כחלק מ"החוק לפיקוח על פשעים אלימים ואכיפת החוק 1994", אולם נקבע שהוא יפוג אוטומטית כעבור עשור. ב-2004, כשתוקפו של האיסור עמד לפוג, פיינסטיין יזמה תקנה להארכתו ב-10 שנים נוספות, אולם כשלה בכך.

ב-2013, לאחר שהטבח בבית הספר היסודי סנדי הוק העלה שוב את הדרישה הציבורית להטלת מגבלות כאלהף העלתה עם חברת הקונגרס קארולין מקארתי הצעה לאיסור קבוע על מכירת ואחזקת כלי נשק חצי אוטומטיים.

המזרח התיכון פיינסטיין תמכה בהחלטה של ה-11 באוקטובר 2002, לצאת למלחמת עיראק. היא טענה שהולכה שולל על ידי הנשיא בוש בקשר לסיבות ליציאה למלחמה בעיראק. למרות זאת, פקח הנשק לשעבר בעיראק מטעם האו"ם, סקוט ריטר, הצהיר שפיינסטיין הודתה בפניו שהיא ידעה שממשל בוש לא סיפק מודיעין משכנע לגבות את הטיעונים לגבי נשק להשמדה המונית בעיראק[2].

בניגוד לעמדת ממשל בוש, פיינסטיין תמכה בקיום דיאלוג ישיר עם המשטר האיראני.

פיינסטיין היא פרו-ישראלית, תומכת נלהבת של ישראל וחברה בשדולה למען ישראל בקונגרס – איפא"ק. הובילה את התיקון להצעת החוק שגרירות ארצות הברית בירושלים שמעניק לנשיא סמכות לעכב את ביצוע החוק [1].

באפריל 2019 הייתה חתומה על הצעת חוק שהגישו קבוצה של סנאטורים דמוקרטים שמטרתה להשיב את הסיוע האמריקני לפלסטינים, לאחר שנשיא ארצות הברית דונלד טראמפ עצר את הסיוע. פיינסטיין טענה כי עצירת הסיוע מחזקת ארגונים קיצוניים כמו חמאס ומרחיקה את השלום.

תוכנית הציתותים באוגוסט 2007 הצטרפה לרפובליקנים בסנאט בהצבעה על ההצעה לתיקון "חוק ציתות מודיעין החוץ" (FISA) (Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Act), על ידי צמצום ההגבלות החוקיות על יכולת הממשל לפקח על שיחות טלפון ומסרי דואר אלקטרוני של אזרחים אמריקנים. פיינסטיין הצביעה בעד הענקת סמכויות לתובע הכללי ולמנהל המודיעין הלאומי לאשר ציתותים פנימיים של תקשורת פנים אמריקאית בהחלטה מנהלית, ללא הצורך באישור של בית משפט מיוחד למודיעין שמבוסס על ידי FISA.

חוק הפטריוט פיינסטיין נמנתה עם יוזמי החוק להרחבת "חוק הפטריוט". בהצהרה בדצמבר 2005, אמרה "אני מאמינה שחוק הפטריוט הוא חיוני להגנה על העם האמריקני"[3].

איכות הסביבה פיינסטיין וקודמה בתפקיד, אלן קרנסטון, עבדו במשך 10 שנים כדי להעביר את "החוק להגנת מדבר קליפורניה". החקיקה אושרה בידי הנשיא ביל קלינטון ב-1994. החוק הגן על 31,000 קמ"ר של אדמות מדבר קליפורניה, והיה חוק הסביבתי עם ההשלכות הגדולות ביותר בהיסטוריה של קליפורניה.

הסנאטוריות פיינסטיין וברברה בוקסר היו מיוזמות ומקדמות "החוק לשמירת הטבע של חוף צפון קליפורניה", שאושר ב-17 באוקטובר 2006 על ידי הנשיא בוש. החוק הגן על 34 ק"מ של נחלים ונהרות, כולל אזורים פופולריים כמו "רכס קינג" ו-"נקיק קש".

חופש הביטוי הייתה אחת מהנציגים הדמוקרטים המרכזיים שתמכו ב"תקנת חילול הדגל", תיקון לחוקה האמריקאית האוסר על שריפתו של דגל ארצות הברית כביטויי פוליטי (במהלך הפגנה וכדומה). התיקון לא השיג את שני השלישים הדרושים, ונפל על חודו של קול בסנאט. כמו כן תמכה ב"חקיקת מקיין-פיינגולד" הידוע גם בשם "חוק רפורמת הבחירות הדו-מפלגתי", בנוגע לתיקון בפיקוח על תרומות בכספי בחירות.

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באתר המדריך הביוגרפי של הקונגרס של ארצות הברית (באנגלית)

https://he.wikipedia.org/wiki/%D7%93%D7%99%D7%90%D7%9F_%D7%A4%D7%99%D7%99%D7%A0%D7%A1%D7%98%D7%99%D7%99%D7%9F

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http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dianne_Feinstein

Dianne Goldman Berman Feinstein, born Dianne Emiel Goldman[2] (/ˈfaɪnstaɪn/; born June 22, 1933) is the senior United States Senator from California. A member of the Democratic Party, she has served in the Senate since 1992. She also served as 38th Mayor of San Francisco from 1978 to 1988.

Born in San Francisco, Feinstein graduated from Stanford University. In the 1960s she worked in city government, and in 1970 she was elected to the San Francisco Board of Supervisors. She served as the board's first female president in 1978, during which time the assassinations of Mayor George Moscone and City Supervisor Harvey Milk drew national attention to the city. Feinstein succeeded Moscone as mayor. During her tenure as San Francisco's first female mayor she led a revamp of the city's cable car system and oversaw the 1984 Democratic National Convention.

After a failed gubernatorial campaign in 1990, she won a 1992 special election to the U.S. Senate. Feinstein was first elected on the same ballot as her peer Barbara Boxer, and the two became California's first female U.S. Senators. Feinstein has been re-elected four times since then and in the 2012 election, she claimed the record for the most popular votes in any U.S. Senate election in history, having received 7.75 million votes.[3]

Feinstein was the author of the 1994 Federal Assault Weapons Ban which expired in 2004. In 2013 she introduced a new assault weapons bill, which failed to pass. Feinstein formerly chaired the Senate Rules Committee (2007–09) and has chaired the Select Committee on Intelligence since 2009. She is also the first woman to have presided over a U.S. presidential inauguration.[4][5]

At the age of 80, Feinstein is the oldest currently serving United States Senator.

Contents [hide] 1 Early life 2 Personal life 3 Early political career 3.1 President of the San Francisco Board of Supervisors 3.2 Mayor of San Francisco 3.3 Gubernatorial election 4 U.S. Senate career 4.1 Elections 4.2 Approval ratings 4.3 Committees 4.4 Political positions and votes 4.4.1 Assault weapons ban 4.4.2 NSA surveillance programs 4.5 2008 presidential politics 5 Awards and honors 6 Offices held 7 Electoral history 8 See also 9 Notes 10 References 11 Further reading 12 External links Early life[edit] Feinstein was born Dianne Emiel Goldman[2] in San Francisco, to Betty (née Rosenburg), a former model, and Leon Goldman, a nationally renowned surgeon. Feinstein's paternal grandparents were Jewish emigrants from Poland, while her maternal grandparents, who were of the Russian Orthodox faith, were from Saint Petersburg, Russia.[6][7] Her mother also had either German or Jewish ancestry.[7][8]

Personal life[edit] Feinstein graduated from Convent of the Sacred Heart High School (California) in 1951 and from Stanford University in 1955 with a B.A. in History.

In 1956, she married Jack Berman (died 2002), a colleague in the San Francisco District Attorney's Office. Feinstein and Berman divorced three years later. Their daughter, Katherine Feinstein Mariano (b. 1957), has been the presiding judge of the San Francisco Superior Court for twelve years, through 2012.[9][10]

In 1962, shortly after beginning her career in politics, Feinstein married neurosurgeon Bertram Feinstein; her second husband died of colon cancer in 1978.

In 1980, Feinstein married Richard C. Blum, an investment banker. In 2003, Feinstein was ranked the fifth-wealthiest senator, with an estimated net worth of $26 million.[11] By 2005 her net worth had increased to between $43 million and $99 million.[12] Her 347-page financial-disclosure statement[13] – characterized by the San Francisco Chronicle as "nearly the size of a phone book" – draws clear lines between her assets and those of her husband, with many of her assets in blind trusts.[14]

Early political career[edit] In 1961, Feinstein worked to end housing discrimination in San Francisco.[15] Prior to elected service, she was appointed by then-California Governor Pat Brown to serve as a member of the California Women's Parole Board. Feinstein also served as a fellow at the Coro Foundation in San Francisco.

President of the San Francisco Board of Supervisors[edit] In 1969, Feinstein was elected to the San Francisco Board of Supervisors. She remained on the Board for nine years.

During her tenure on the Board of Supervisors, she unsuccessfully ran for mayor of San Francisco twice, in 1971 against mayor Joseph Alioto, and in 1975, when she lost the contest for a runoff slot (against George Moscone) by one percentage point, to supervisor John Barbagelata.

Because of her position, Feinstein became a target of the New World Liberation Front, who placed a bomb on her window sill which failed to explode and who later shot out the windows of a beach house which she owned.[16]

She was elected president of the San Francisco Board of Supervisors in 1978 with initial opposition from Quentin Kopp.

On November 27, 1978, San Francisco mayor George Moscone and supervisor Harvey Milk were assassinated by a rival politician, Dan White, who had resigned from the Board of Supervisors only two weeks prior. Feinstein was close by in City Hall at the time of the shootings, and discovered Milk's body after hearing the gunshots and going to investigate. Later that day at a press conference originally organized by Moscone to announce White's successor, Feinstein announced the assassinations to the stunned public, stating: "As president of the board of supervisors, it's my duty to make this announcement. Both Mayor Moscone and Supervisor Harvey Milk have been shot and killed."[17]

Feinstein appears in archival footage and is credited in the Academy Award-winning documentary film The Times of Harvey Milk (1984). She appears again briefly in archival footage, announcing the death of Moscone and Milk in the 2008 film Milk. Feinstein and her position as President of the San Francisco Board of Supervisors are also alluded to several times in the movie, and a portrayal of her character has a few off-screen lines.

As president of the Board of Supervisors upon the death of Mayor Moscone, Feinstein succeeded to the mayoralty on December 4, 1978.

Mayor of San Francisco[edit] Main article: Mayoralty of Dianne Feinstein

As mayor of San Francisco, 1978–1988 Feinstein served out the remainder of Moscone's term. She made no staffing changes to his team until she was elected in her own right in 1979. She was re-elected in 1983 and served a full second term.

One of the first challenges to face Feinstein as mayor was the state of the San Francisco cable car system. In late 1979, the system had to be shut down for emergency repairs, and an engineering evaluation concluded that it needed comprehensive rebuilding at a cost of $60 million. Feinstein took charge of the effort, and helped win federal funding for the bulk of the rebuilding job. The system closed for rebuilding in 1982 and reopened in 1984 in time for the Democratic National Convention that was held in the city that year.[18] Feinstein also oversaw planning policies to increase the number of high rise buildings in San Francisco.[19]

Perhaps because of her statewide ambitions, Feinstein was seen as a relatively moderate Democrat in one of the country's most liberal cities. As a supervisor, she was considered part of the centrist bloc that included Dan White and was generally opposed to Moscone. As mayor, Feinstein angered the city's large gay community by refusing to march in a gay rights parade and by vetoing domestic partner legislation in 1983. In the 1980 presidential election, while a majority of Bay Area Democrats continued to support Senator Ted Kennedy's primary challenge to President Jimmy Carter even after it was clear Kennedy could not win, Feinstein was a strong supporter of the Carter–Mondale ticket. She was given a high profile speaking role on the opening night of the August Democratic National Convention, urging delegates to reject the Kennedy delegates' proposal to "open" the convention, thereby allowing delegates to ignore their states' popular vote, a proposal that was soundly defeated.

In the run up to the 1984 Democratic National Convention, there was considerable media and public speculation that Democratic presidential nominee Walter Mondale might pick Feinstein as his running mate. However, he chose Geraldine Ferraro instead. Also in 1984, Feinstein proposed banning handguns in San Francisco, and became subject to a recall attempt organized by the White Panther Party. She won the recall election and finished her second term as mayor on January 8, 1988.

In 1985, at a press conference, Feinstein revealed details about the hunt for serial killer Richard Ramírez, and in so doing angered detectives by giving away details of his crimes.[20]

In 1987, City and State magazine named Feinstein the nation's "Most Effective Mayor." Feinstein served on the Trilateral Commission during the 1980s while mayor of San Francisco.

Gubernatorial election[edit] In 1990, Feinstein made an unsuccessful bid for Governor of California. Although she won the Democratic Party's nomination for the office, she then lost in the general election to Republican Senator Pete Wilson, who vacated his seat in the Senate to assume the governorship. In 1992, she was fined $190,000 for failure to properly report campaign contributions and expenditures associated with that campaign.[21]

U.S. Senate career[edit] Elections[edit]

Official Senate photo from 2003

Feinstein in 2010, as she hosted an event at her home attended by 5 members of the U.S. Senate See also: United States Senate special election in California, 1992 See also: United States Senate election in California, 2012 On November 3, 1992, Feinstein won a special election to fill the Senate seat vacated a year earlier when Senator Pete Wilson resigned to become governor. The election was held at the same time as the general election for U.S. President and other offices. Barbara Boxer was elected at the same time for the Senate seat to be vacated by Alan Cranston. Because Feinstein was elected to an unexpired term, she became a senator as soon as the election was certified in November while Boxer would not take office until the expiration of Cranston's term in January; thus Feinstein became California's senior senator, even though she was elected at the same time as Boxer and Boxer had previous congressional service. Feinstein was re-elected in 1994, 2000, 2006, and 2012. In 2012, Feinstein claimed the record for the most popular votes in any U.S. Senate election in history, having received 7.75 million votes.[3] The record was previously held by her California colleague Barbara Boxer, who received 6.96 million votes in her 2004 re-election.

Approval ratings[edit] Source Date Approve Disapprove Undecided Survey USA January 17, 2011 43% 48% 10% Public Policy Polling at the Wayback Machine (archived May 15, 2011) February 2, 2011 50% 39% 11% The Field Poll February 2, 2011 48% 33% 19% The Field Poll June 21, 2011 46% 31% 23% The Field Poll September 16, 2011 41% 39% 20% Public Policy Polling November 16, 2011 51% 38% 11% Committees[edit] Committee on Appropriations Subcommittee on Agriculture, Rural Development, Food and Drug Administration, and Related Agencies Subcommittee on Commerce, Justice, Science, and Related Agencies Subcommittee on Defense Subcommittee on Energy and Water Development (Chair) Subcommittee on Interior, Environment, and Related Agencies Subcommittee on Transportation, Housing and Urban Development, and Related Agencies Committee on the Judiciary Subcommittee on Crime and Terrorism Subcommittee on Immigration, Border Security, and Refugees Subcommittee on Privacy, Technology and the Law Committee on Rules and Administration Select Committee on Intelligence (Chair) Political positions and votes[edit] Main article: Political positions of Dianne Feinstein

Anti-war activist Todd Chretien protests outside of Senator Feinstein's office in San Francisco Feinstein voted for the extension of the PATRIOT ACT and the FISA provisions.[22]

Feinstein cosponsored (along with Tom Coburn, an Oklahoman Republican) an amendment through the Senate to the Economic Development Revitalization Act of 2011 that eliminated the Volumetric Ethanol Excise Tax Credit. The Senate passed the amendment on June 16, 2011. Introduced in 2004, the subsidy provided a 45-cent-per-gallon credit on pure ethanol and a 54-cent-per-gallon tariff on imported ethanol. These subsidies had resulted in an annual expenditure of $6 billion.[23][24]

On May 12, 2011, Feinstein cosponsored PIPA.[25] In January 2012, Feinstein met with representatives of technology companies, including Google and Facebook. According to a spokesperson, Feinstein "is doing all she can to ensure that the bill is balanced and protects the intellectual property concerns of the content community without unfairly burdening legitimate businesses such as Internet search engines."[26]

Assault weapons ban[edit] Feinstein introduced the Federal Assault Weapons Ban, which became law in 1994 and expired in 2004.[27] In January 2013, about one month after the Sandy Hook Elementary School shooting, Feinstein, along with Representative Carolyn McCarthy from New York, proposed a bill that would "ban the sale, transfer, manufacturing or importation of 150 specific firearms including semiautomatic rifles or pistols that can be used with a detachable or fixed ammunition magazines that hold more than 10 rounds and have specific military-style features, including pistol grips, grenade launchers or rocket launchers." The bill would have exempted 900 models of guns used for sport and hunting.[27][28] Feinstein commented on the bill, saying, "The common thread in each of these shootings is the gunman used a semi-automatic assault weapon or large capacity ammunition magazines. Military assault weapons only have one purpose and in my opinion, it's for the military."[29] The bill failed on a Senate vote of 60 to 40.[30]

NSA surveillance programs[edit] After the 2013 mass surveillance disclosures involving the National Security Agency (NSA), Feinstein took measures to continue the collection programs. Foreign Policy wrote that she had a "reputation as a staunch defender of NSA practices and the White House's refusal to stand by collection activities targeting foreign leaders."[31] In October 2013 she criticized the NSA for monitoring telephone calls of foreign leaders friendly to the US.[32] In November 2013 she promoted the Fisa Improvements Act bill which included a "backdoor search provision" that allows intelligence agencies to continue certain warrantless searches as long as they are logged and "available for review" to various agencies.[33]

In June 2013 Feinstein labeled Edward Snowden a traitor after his leaks went public. In October of that year she stated that she stood by those comments.[34]

2008 presidential politics[edit]

The line for unclaimed tickets to the inauguration outside Feinstein's office As a superdelegate, Feinstein had declared that she would support Hillary Clinton for the Democratic presidential nomination. However, once Barack Obama became the presumptive nominee for the party, she fully backed his candidacy. Days after Obama amassed enough delegates to win the Democratic Party nomination, Feinstein lent her Washington, D.C., home to both Clinton and Obama to have a private one-on-one meeting.[35] Feinstein did not attend the 2008 Democratic National Convention in Denver because she had fallen and broken her ankle earlier in the month.[36]

She chaired the United States Congress Joint Committee on Inaugural Ceremonies, and acted as mistress of ceremonies, introducing each participant at the 2009 presidential inauguration.[37]

Awards and honors[edit] Feinstein was presented with the Woodrow Wilson Award for public service by the Woodrow Wilson Center of the Smithsonian Institution on November 3, 2001, in Los Angeles.


GEDCOM Note

Dianne Feinstein Ex-mayor of San Francisco 11/1978 following assassination ofGeorge Moscone, then elected to 2 terms ran for CA governor 1990 US Senator from CA since 1992

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Dianne Feinstein, U.S. Senator's Timeline

1933
June 22, 1933
San Francisco, San Francisco County, California, United States