Hugh B. Cunningham

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Hugh B. Cunningham

Birthdate:
Birthplace: Dublin, Dublin City, Dublin, Ireland
Death: August 19, 1782 (73-74)
Robertson County, Kentucky, United States (killed in Battle of Blue Licks)
Place of Burial: Robertson County, Kentucky, United States
Immediate Family:

Son of Alexander O Cunningham and Mary "Rebecca" Cunningham
Husband of Nancy Strawbridge Cunningham
Father of Ephriam Cunningham; William Cunningham; Benjamin Cunningham; Joseph Cunningham; Mary Moore and 5 others
Brother of Benjamin Cunnyngham; Hugh Cunningham; Walter Cunningham; Mary Cunningham; Ruth Cunningham and 11 others
Half brother of Robert Cunningham and James W Cunningham, Sr.

Managed by: Ofir Friedman
Last Updated:

About Hugh B. Cunningham

DAR Ancestor #: A028628 Red Flagged: "FUTURE APPLICANTS MUST PROVE CORRECT SERVICE".

https://www.wikitree.com/wiki/Cunningham-693

https://www.findagrave.com/cgi-bin/fg.cgi?page=gr&GRid=40874301&ref...

Chapter XVI By NORMAN FESTUS KENDALL Grafton, W. Va. Undaunted by dangers, unconquered, true hearted, With ax-beaten march the brave pioneer came, And the wild tangle vine of the wilderness parted As progress swept onward willi oanners of flame. By Lee O. Harris. THE GENEALOGY AND HISTORY OF THE DISTINGUSHED CUNNlNGHAM FAMILY. What follows has been obtained after several years research in the archlives of Lonaon, and in the universities of Onord Dublin l!:denourg, the Log boo~ of Shi~ carrying colonists to America, Various histories, Old news papers, School records, Old scrap books, letters, Old Church records; tomb stone inscriptions, Old family bibles; Marriage and. death records, Wllls, Land grants, Deeds, birth records etc. CUNNlNGHAM GENEALOGY: This family is of Scotch-Irish lineage. They were, in the early days[?], very loyal to tne English government, and when Scotland and England had difficulties the Cunningnams would gather at Cunningham Head and cross the channel into Northern-Ireland. In disturbences between Ireland and England they would go back to Cunningham Head, Scotland. As citizens of England now, they are very loyal, as is evidenced by Great Britians most famous fighting Brothers, Admiral Browne Cunningham, and air-Vice-Marshal :Arthur Cunningham, and General Sir Alan Gordon Cunningham. Each commanded the three divisions of England's fighting forces, the Navy, the Air, the Army. They won crushing victories in North Africa in World War II. Cunninghams are of fighting stock. HUGH CUNNINGHAM came to America with their eight sons, Adam; Ephraim; Benjamine; Joseph; William; Walter; Edward; Thomas. Of ,these Adam, Walter, Thomas and Edward came to Harrison County, Va., locating on Cunningham's Run, near Wallace, W. Va. It was here that Thomas and Edward had their sad and awful experience with the Indians. (See Wither's ;Border Warfare).

 Ireland
 Lurgan, Armagh, Ireland Life of Adam Cunningham Adam Cunningham Born: 1714 Marriage: Catherine Unknown Died: 1797, at age 83
 General Notes: This information about Adam Cunningham is a tiny part of the abundance of information in the book, "Adam and 500 More Cunninghams of the Valley of Virginia, c. 1734-c. 1800," by Betty Cunningham Newman, copyright 2000. All researchers of this family owe Betty a debt of gratitude for her meticulous research and the amazing chronological presentation of the facts that set the record straight, at long last. - The book is available at Heritage Books and many other book stores.

• The first Adam Cunningham lived in the Shenandoah Valley of Virginia early in the records of that section. In a deposition given November 27, 1770 in the case of Jost Hite and Robert McCoy vs. Thomas Lord Fairfax and others, which case was originally filed in Williamsburg, Colony of Virginia, on October 10, 1749, Adam Cunningham stated he was 57 years old and had come to the Colony of Virginia about thirty years earlier. This would make his birth date circa 1713/14 and his arrival in Virginia about 1740."

The record reads: "The Deposition of Adam Cunningham aged fifty seven years. The Deponent being sworn saith that he came to this Colony about thirty years ago and that Joshua Job was at that time settled on the plantation whereon he now lives and further saith not. Adam Cunningham Sworn to this 27th November 1770 before James Wood."

• Adam, his brother Walter, and Adam's son's Edward and John were all members of the colonial militia, headed by Capt. Henry Speer. On 27 Oct 1758 Adam was fined 20 shillings for missing one private and one general muster and again, on 1 Nov 1760, Adam was fined 50 shillings for missing one general and four private musters. Fines for missing muster were assessed on 17 Oct 1758 against Adam's brother Walter, against Adam's son Edward, and against many of their neighbors who were enrolled in Capt. Speer's company, including Moses McCoy, Joshua Job, Daniel Stover, Henry Harden, Larkin Pearpoint, Charles Thompson, Charles Ragon, John Odell, Robert Shirley, Edward Collins, William Hughes, John Daniel and William Daniel. Capt. Speer's assessment fine list of 1 Nov 1760 additionally included Moses McCoy, Zachariah McCoy and Walter Cunningham.

• No record has been found that Adam Cunningham I served in a military capacity in the Revolutionary War, he undoubtedly being too old to be active militarily; however, Adam supported the war effort by providing supplies. On 27 Apr 1781, "Per Motion of Adam Cunningham he is allowed £15-0-5 (fifteen pounds, five pence) for the same and same order (For public service as (blurred) this day lodged which is ordered to be certified)" (Shenandoah County Order Book /78/-84, p. 24)

• A lengthy list of public service claims in connection with the Revolutionary War effort were produced in the Shenandoah County Court on 29 Aug 1782 and ordered to be "certifyed" Adam Cuningham had two entries, one on page 12 for sundries for which he was allowed ten pounds, 11shillings and ten pence and another at page 14 for "26 diets" for which he was allowed 19 shillings The National Society Daughters of the American Revolution has accepted Adam Cunningham for inclusion in their list of patriots, although in 1993 they combined Adam and his son Adam II into one person.

• Adam's brother, Walter Cunningham, died sometime between March and May 1781. On August 30, Ann Cunningham (assumed to be Walter's widow) and Adam Cunningham were granted letters to administrator Walter's estate.

• On 1 Aug 1792, Adam, Walter (son), and Walter's wife, Hannah, mortgaged much of their real estate to Joseph Ruffner, as security for monies Ruffner loaned to them. Ruffner had advanced Adam and Walter one hundred fourteen pounds, five shillings and six pence. Additionally, Ruffner was surety for Walter on a replevy bond to Louis Durell in the amount of one hundred ten pounds, which bond was payable in March, 1793. To secure these loans, Adam, Walter and Hannah pledged the 197 acres of land Adam had purchased from the Parlours in 1765 and on which was built the grist mill, the 89 acres Fairfax granted Adam in 1779, the land Walter obtained by deed from Josiah Leath in 1784, and Walter's interest in a tract of land for which he had William Shaver's bond given to Edwin Young and assigned Walter (Shenandoah Co Deed Book 1, pp.7-74).

This mortgaged property was sold to Thomas Allen 23 Nov 1793 for 230 pounds more than owed to Ruffner. Ruffner, Adam and Walter signed their names and Hannah made an "X."

• Although his place of interment cannot be proved, it seems certain that Adam died in the 1790s, after he signed the 1793 deed. No court record after this date was found in the records of Shenandoah, Harrison or Wood Counties, Virginia, bearing the name of the first Adam Cunningham, nor has any will or estate administration been found for Adam I.

• Adam had five sons that can be documented, and possibly three more whose identification is more tenuous. He may have had daughters as well, but none are named in the records. The sons are: JOHN, WALTER, ADAM, THOMAS, EDWARD and, possibly, ROBERT, JOSEPH and WILLIAM.

Adam married Catherine Unknown. (Catherine Unknown died before 1792.) All info from: http://www.lindapages.com/family/1839.htm

Hugh B Cunningham

With their 8 sons Hugh B. Cunningham and wife Nancy O'Neill (O'Neal)nbsp; took ship at Dublin, IRE for America, finally landing in Fairfax Co, VA, near Alexandria, in 1748. Adam, Walter, Edward, and Thomas came to Harrison Co, VA. Presumably d.at Battle of Blue Licks, KY during the Revolutionary War. He and his brothers settled on the banks of the Potomac, Fairfax, VA; after the Revolutionary War, they came to Harrison Co, VA and patented large tracts of land under the "tomahawk title" on Bingamon Creek. Many historical sources state that Hugh Cunningham was killed in the Battle of Blue Licks, KY, but they may be in error. Researchers who rely on only one document from the files of the VA State Archives may have ignored 2 referring to Hugh's service. But would a 74-year-old man be readily accepted into the Militia? The Battle was preceded by a 44-mile night ride through the wilderness. Not a likely feat for an elderly man. Also, there is no record of Alexander's son Hugh migrating to KY. Recent info shows that the Hugh Cunningham involved in the Blue Licks battle was a much younger man, b. abt. 1741 and dying in 1820 in Lincoln Co, KY. His will was probated Dec 1820, leaving each of his sons, Thomas, James, and John, a third of his estate. A grandson was also mentioned. His wife's name may be Elizabeth. Further records of this Cunningham family in Fayette and Woodward Cos, KY.nbsp; John, son of Hugh, had a son William N. Cunningham, who went to Indiana, settling near Martinsville. The Hugh of Blue Licks was captured, not killed. This Hugh (b. 1740, d. 1819) was probably the son of Jacob and grandson of James Cunningham. He settled in Augusta Co, VA near Solon, north of Staunton. Hugh and his family suffered two Indian raids by the Shawnees, in 1762 and 1764. His parents were killed in the 1st raid and his daughter, although scalped, lived through the ordeal. On the 2nd raid, the Indians discovered the young girl who had been scalped previously. This being quite a trophy, they took her back to camp and paraded her through various villages, wearing her scalp as a hairpiece. In this last raid, Hugh was severely wounded and his wife killed. At this time, VA extended to the Mississippi River and Hugh pushed on to Lincoln, Jefferson Co, KY. He remarried and joined the VA Militia. During the Battle of Blue Licks, Hugh was captured and taken to Canada by the British and their Indian allies. Hugh and his 11 fellow captives were released at the conclusion of the Revolutionary War and returned to Lincoln, KY. Hugh rejoined the Militia as a Ranger-Spy the day of his return. He had been officially declared dead months before and his estate turned over to his wife Elizabeth. Hugh and Elizabeth had 3 sons: James, John, and Thomas. No daughters are mentioned.nbsp; Hugh's son James had a son Henry Gibson Cunningham, who had a son James Hamilton Cunningham b. 1840, d. 1882. His son Henry Allen Cunningham b. 1878, d. 1946 was the father of Allen Cunningham of Axtell, TX, the author of this theory. Sources:nbsp; (1)Jade Treenbsp; (2)Bill Cunningham

  • *********************************** The name Cunningham in Ireland was brought to the country by settlers from Scotland who arrived into Ulster Province during the seventeenth century. The native Gaelic O'Connagain and MacCuinneagain Septs adopted Cunningham as the anglicized form of their name. There are a number of variants including Counihan and Conaghan. Scottishnbsp; Cunningham Clan Info
    Gaelic Name:nbsp; MacCuinneagainnbsp;nbsp;nbsp; --Motto:nbsp; Over fork over --Origin of Name: Placename, Ayrshire---History---The first Cunningham is believed to have been a Flemish man named Wernibald, who took on the placename as his own when he received a grant of Kilmaurs in Cunningham, Ayrshire from Hugo de Morville, the Constable of Scotland, in 1140.nbsp; Origin: Scottish--Coat of Arms: Silver with a black shakefork.nbsp; Crest: A unicorn's head.nbsp; Spelling variations include: Cunningham, Cunninghame, Cunyngham, Cunnyngham, Cunnynghame, Cummingham (with or without De...), etc. First found in Ayrshire where they were seated from very ancient times, some say well before the Norman Conquest and the arrival of Duke William at Hastings in 1066 A.D. Some of the first American settlers of this namenbsp; were: John Cunningham, his wife and son, who settled in the Barbados in 1679; Anthony, Archibald, Arthur, Barnard, Brian, Charles, Cornelius, David, Edward, Francis, Henry, George, James, Jane, John, Joseph, Margaret, Mary, Michael, Patrick, Robert, Thomas Cunningham, all arrived in Philadelphia in the first half of the 19th century. OVER FORK OVER-The Cunningham Motto-According to tradition a subject known as Malcolm, son of Friskin, helped the escaping Prince Malcolm (a mere lad of nine and named heirnbsp; to the throne by his father the late King Duncan I) by forking hay over him with a shakefork to hide him from his pursuers, Macbeth and his soldiers, who had murdered King Duncan in 1040 and wished to kill him and claim the throne for himself. This deed is said to be the origin of our motto "OVER FORK OVER," because the prince, in fear for his life, kept telling Malcolm son of Friskin to "fork over" more hay to conceal him, thus, "over, fork over." Prince Malcolm slays MacBeth at the battle of Lumphanan in 1057 and becomes Malcolm III, ofnbsp; "Canmore." Upon regaining the throne of Scotland some 17 years later, as Malcolm III, he awarded Malcolm (son of Friskin) the Thanedom of Cunningham for having saved his life. With the title came land, power, and authority. Sir George Mackenzie relates that, although this is a charming story, the Arms may actuallynbsp; referto the office of Master of the King's Stables. Another reference relates that the Cunninghams were great allies of the Comyns, whose shield bore sheaves of corn. When that great dynasty was overthrown by the Bruces, the Cunninghams adopted the shake-fork used to fork over sheaves of corn as an ingenious reference to their former allies. The Cunningham Crest-The Unicorn is the crest on the coat of arms of the Earls of Glencairn, the rightful Clan Chiefs of the Cunninghams, and is also displayed on the Clan Cunningham badge.The Unicorn in association with heraldry is usually drawn as a horse with a single long twisted horn, lion's tail and the legs of a stag. The Unicorn symbolizes extreme courage, strength and virtue.nbsp; In ancient times the crest was worn on the chief's helmet so that he could be recognized by his warriors in battle. Besides being placed on the wreath above the helmet on the coat of arms, in the case of the Earls of Glencairn, the unicorn is found within a strap-and-buckle crest badge upon which is inscribed our motto Over Fork Over.nbsp; The name of Cunningham is a place-name recorded in the early history of Scotland. The District of Cunningham is shown on an early atlas as the area now known as Renfrewshire and Ayrshire, west and southwest of Glasgow, encompassing a large area with many small towns. Several Gaelic words are tied into the meaning of this ancient name. Before the lands were inhabited by Friskin (generally considered the progenitor of the Cunninghams), they were called "Cunygan" which comes from the root words "Cunny" or "Coney" meaning rabbit and "Hame" meaning home. Hence comes the meaning "Rabbits Home." Around 500 A.D. a group of Teutonic (German) peoples had spelled the name as "Konigheim"; "Koening" (King) with "Heim" (Home); properly signifying "Cunningham" or "Konigheim" as the "Kings Home."

The name Cunningham may have originated during Roman times, as suggested by Nigel D. Cunningham, Sydney, Australia, whom claims that nbsp; the name "Cunning" originally signified "courage in battle" and came from "Cunedda" who was a king of the "Gododdin," a Celtic branch of Britons known by the Romans as the "Votadini." When the Dalriada Scots emigrated from Ireland in about 500AD, they were confronted by the Strathclyde Britons, the Gododdin Britons and the Picts. The name Cunedda eventually led to the names and words Cyning, Kynge and finally King. The "ham" seems to signify nbsp; small town (village or home) and was of Saxon or Norman origins.


Notes

Pockets of Chaos - Cunningham Connection This entry was posted on February 22, 2015

During the 17th century the Cunninghams left Scotland to become part of The Plantation of Ulster. This was an effort by English kings to control the ‘Irish problem’ by stealing lands from the Irish Catholics and giving or selling the lands to Scottish Presbyterians and some English Anglicans. The English thought that the Scots and Irish would intermarry—which they did—and the Protestant Scots would keep the Irish Catholics docile to their overlords. It didn’t work, but it did lead to the evolution of the bravest and strongest fighting men and women, the Scots-Irish, many of whom would go to the New World, fight a revolution, and create a democratic republic. ...
4.Hugh B. Cunningham was the son of 5a.Mary Rebeka Burns (1668-1749) and 5.Alexander Cunningham (b. 1653 or 1663 in Dublin, Ireland or Scotland; d. 1749 or 1747 in Ireland; married 1701 in Leinster, Ireland). Alexander was the son of 6a.Rachel Bruce (1611-1651) and 6.David Cunningham (b. 1607 in Scotland; d. 1691 in Ireland; married 1651 in Leinster, Dublin, Ireland). David and his family were evidently sent to Ireland to settle in the Ulster Plantation scheme of King James I of England (James VI of Scotland). His parents were 7a.Nancy Mary Blessington (1570-1640) and 7.Joseph Cunningham (b. 1568 in Scotland; d. 1637 in Scotland or Ireland; married 1605 in Leinster, Dublin, Ireland). Joseph’s parents were 8a.Sarah Wallace (1531-1631) and 8.John Cunningham (b. 1520 in Scotland; d. 1602 in Ireland; married in 1566 in Leinster). John was the son of 9a.Mary Robinson (1503-1528) and 9.Alexander Cunningham (b. 1498 in Kilmaurs, Ayrshire, Scotland; d. 1579 in Ireland or Scotland; married 1528 in Leinster).So, my 9th great grandfather connects our family to Kilmaurs, Ayrshire and the estates of the Earls of Glencairn, the traditional holdings of the Cunningham family. More later.


DAR Ancestor #: A028628 Red Flagged: "FUTURE APPLICANTS MUST PROVE CORRECT SERVICE".

https://www.wikitree.com/wiki/Cunningham-693

https://www.findagrave.com/cgi-bin/fg.cgi?page=gr&GRid=40874301&ref...

Chapter XVI By NORMAN FESTUS KENDALL Grafton, W. Va. Undaunted by dangers, unconquered, true hearted, With ax-beaten march the brave pioneer came, And the wild tangle vine of the wilderness parted As progress swept onward willi oanners of flame. By Lee O. Harris. THE GENEALOGY AND HISTORY OF THE DISTINGUSHED CUNNlNGHAM FAMILY. What follows has been obtained after several years research in the archlives of Lonaon, and in the universities of Onord Dublin l!:denourg, the Log boo~ of Shi~ carrying colonists to America, Various histories, Old news papers, School records, Old scrap books, letters, Old Church records; tomb stone inscriptions, Old family bibles; Marriage and. death records, Wllls, Land grants, Deeds, birth records etc. CUNNlNGHAM GENEALOGY: This family is of Scotch-Irish lineage. They were, in the early days[?], very loyal to tne English government, and when Scotland and England had difficulties the Cunningnams would gather at Cunningham Head and cross the channel into Northern-Ireland. In disturbences between Ireland and England they would go back to Cunningham Head, Scotland. As citizens of England now, they are very loyal, as is evidenced by Great Britians most famous fighting Brothers, Admiral Browne Cunningham, and air-Vice-Marshal :Arthur Cunningham, and General Sir Alan Gordon Cunningham. Each commanded the three divisions of England's fighting forces, the Navy, the Air, the Army. They won crushing victories in North Africa in World War II. Cunninghams are of fighting stock. HUGH CUNNINGHAM came to America with their eight sons, Adam; Ephraim; Benjamine; Joseph; William; Walter; Edward; Thomas. Of ,these Adam, Walter, Thomas and Edward came to Harrison County, Va., locating on Cunningham's Run, near Wallace, W. Va. It was here that Thomas and Edward had their sad and awful experience with the Indians. (See Wither's ;Border Warfare).

Ireland Lurgan, Armagh, Ireland
Life of Adam Cunningham Adam Cunningham Born: 1714 Marriage: Catherine Unknown Died: 1797, at age 83

General Notes:
This information about Adam Cunningham is a tiny part of the abundance of information in the book, "Adam and 500 More Cunninghams of the Valley of Virginia, c. 1734-c. 1800," by Betty Cunningham Newman, copyright 2000. All researchers of this family owe Betty a debt of gratitude for her meticulous research and the amazing chronological presentation of the facts that set the record straight, at long last. - The book is available at Heritage Books and many other book stores.

• The first Adam Cunningham lived in the Shenandoah Valley of Virginia early in the records of that section. In a deposition given November 27, 1770 in the case of Jost Hite and Robert McCoy vs. Thomas Lord Fairfax and others, which case was originally filed in Williamsburg, Colony of Virginia, on October 10, 1749, Adam Cunningham stated he was 57 years old and had come to the Colony of Virginia about thirty years earlier. This would make his birth date circa 1713/14 and his arrival in Virginia about 1740."

The record reads: "The Deposition of Adam Cunningham aged fifty seven years. The Deponent being sworn saith that he came to this Colony about thirty years ago and that Joshua Job was at that time settled on the plantation whereon he now lives and further saith not. Adam Cunningham Sworn to this 27th November 1770 before James Wood."

• Adam, his brother Walter, and Adam's son's Edward and John were all members of the colonial militia, headed by Capt. Henry Speer. On 27 Oct 1758 Adam was fined 20 shillings for missing one private and one general muster and again, on 1 Nov 1760, Adam was fined 50 shillings for missing one general and four private musters. Fines for missing muster were assessed on 17 Oct 1758 against Adam's brother Walter, against Adam's son Edward, and against many of their neighbors who were enrolled in Capt. Speer's company, including Moses McCoy, Joshua Job, Daniel Stover, Henry Harden, Larkin Pearpoint, Charles Thompson, Charles Ragon, John Odell, Robert Shirley, Edward Collins, William Hughes, John Daniel and William Daniel. Capt. Speer's assessment fine list of 1 Nov 1760 additionally included Moses McCoy, Zachariah McCoy and Walter Cunningham.

• No record has been found that Adam Cunningham I served in a military capacity in the Revolutionary War, he undoubtedly being too old to be active militarily; however, Adam supported the war effort by providing supplies. On 27 Apr 1781, "Per Motion of Adam Cunningham he is allowed £15-0-5 (fifteen pounds, five pence) for the same and same order (For public service as (blurred) this day lodged which is ordered to be certified)" (Shenandoah County Order Book /78/-84, p. 24)

• A lengthy list of public service claims in connection with the Revolutionary War effort were produced in the Shenandoah County Court on 29 Aug 1782 and ordered to be "certifyed" Adam Cuningham had two entries, one on page 12 for sundries for which he was allowed ten pounds, 11shillings and ten pence and another at page 14 for "26 diets" for which he was allowed 19 shillings The National Society Daughters of the American Revolution has accepted Adam Cunningham for inclusion in their list of patriots, although in 1993 they combined Adam and his son Adam II into one person.

• Adam's brother, Walter Cunningham, died sometime between March and May 1781. On August 30, Ann Cunningham (assumed to be Walter's widow) and Adam Cunningham were granted letters to administrator Walter's estate.

• On 1 Aug 1792, Adam, Walter (son), and Walter's wife, Hannah, mortgaged much of their real estate to Joseph Ruffner, as security for monies Ruffner loaned to them. Ruffner had advanced Adam and Walter one hundred fourteen pounds, five shillings and six pence. Additionally, Ruffner was surety for Walter on a replevy bond to Louis Durell in the amount of one hundred ten pounds, which bond was payable in March, 1793. To secure these loans, Adam, Walter and Hannah pledged the 197 acres of land Adam had purchased from the Parlours in 1765 and on which was built the grist mill, the 89 acres Fairfax granted Adam in 1779, the land Walter obtained by deed from Josiah Leath in 1784, and Walter's interest in a tract of land for which he had William Shaver's bond given to Edwin Young and assigned Walter (Shenandoah Co Deed Book 1, pp.7-74).

This mortgaged property was sold to Thomas Allen 23 Nov 1793 for 230 pounds more than owed to Ruffner. Ruffner, Adam and Walter signed their names and Hannah made an "X."

• Although his place of interment cannot be proved, it seems certain that Adam died in the 1790s, after he signed the 1793 deed. No court record after this date was found in the records of Shenandoah, Harrison or Wood Counties, Virginia, bearing the name of the first Adam Cunningham, nor has any will or estate administration been found for Adam I.

• Adam had five sons that can be documented, and possibly three more whose identification is more tenuous. He may have had daughters as well, but none are named in the records. The sons are: JOHN, WALTER, ADAM, THOMAS, EDWARD and, possibly, ROBERT, JOSEPH and WILLIAM.

Adam married Catherine Unknown. (Catherine Unknown died before 1792.) All info from: http://www.lindapages.com/family/1839.htm

Hugh B Cunningham With their 8 sons Hugh B. Cunningham and wife Nancy O'Neill (O'Neal)nbsp; took ship at Dublin, IRE for America, finally landing in Fairfax Co, VA, near Alexandria, in 1748. Adam, Walter, Edward, and Thomas came to Harrison Co, VA. Presumably d.at Battle of Blue Licks, KY during the Revolutionary War. He and his brothers settled on the banks of the Potomac, Fairfax, VA; after the Revolutionary War, they came to Harrison Co, VA and patented large tracts of land under the "tomahawk title" on Bingamon Creek. Many historical sources state that Hugh Cunningham was killed in the Battle of Blue Licks, KY, but they may be in error. Researchers who rely on only one document from the files of the VA State Archives may have ignored 2 referring to Hugh's service. But would a 74-year-old man be readily accepted into the Militia? The Battle was preceded by a 44-mile night ride through the wilderness. Not a likely feat for an elderly man. Also, there is no record of Alexander's son Hugh migrating to KY. Recent info shows that the Hugh Cunningham involved in the Blue Licks battle was a much younger man, b. abt. 1741 and dying in 1820 in Lincoln Co, KY. His will was probated Dec 1820, leaving each of his sons, Thomas, James, and John, a third of his estate. A grandson was also mentioned. His wife's name may be Elizabeth. Further records of this Cunningham family in Fayette and Woodward Cos, KY.nbsp; John, son of Hugh, had a son William N. Cunningham, who went to Indiana, settling near Martinsville. The Hugh of Blue Licks was captured, not killed. This Hugh (b. 1740, d. 1819) was probably the son of Jacob and grandson of James Cunningham. He settled in Augusta Co, VA near Solon, north of Staunton. Hugh and his family suffered two Indian raids by the Shawnees, in 1762 and 1764. His parents were killed in the 1st raid and his daughter, although scalped, lived through the ordeal. On the 2nd raid, the Indians discovered the young girl who had been scalped previously. This being quite a trophy, they took her back to camp and paraded her through various villages, wearing her scalp as a hairpiece. In this last raid, Hugh was severely wounded and his wife killed. At this time, VA extended to the Mississippi River and Hugh pushed on to Lincoln, Jefferson Co, KY. He remarried and joined the VA Militia. During the Battle of Blue Licks, Hugh was captured and taken to Canada by the British and their Indian allies. Hugh and his 11 fellow captives were released at the conclusion of the Revolutionary War and returned to Lincoln, KY. Hugh rejoined the Militia as a Ranger-Spy the day of his return. He had been officially declared dead months before and his estate turned over to his wife Elizabeth. Hugh and Elizabeth had 3 sons: James, John, and Thomas. No daughters are mentioned.nbsp; Hugh's son James had a son Henry Gibson Cunningham, who had a son James Hamilton Cunningham b. 1840, d. 1882. His son Henry Allen Cunningham b. 1878, d. 1946 was the father of Allen Cunningham of Axtell, TX, the author of this theory. Sources:nbsp; (1)Jade Treenbsp; (2)Bill Cunningham

  • ********************************** The name Cunningham in Ireland was brought to the country by settlers from Scotland who arrived into Ulster Province during the seventeenth century. The native Gaelic O'Connagain and MacCuinneagain Septs adopted Cunningham as the anglicized form of their name. There are a number of variants including Counihan and Conaghan. Scottishnbsp; Cunningham Clan Info

Gaelic Name:nbsp; MacCuinneagainnbsp;nbsp;nbsp; --Motto:nbsp; Over fork over --Origin of Name: Placename, Ayrshire---History---The first Cunningham is believed to have been a Flemish man named Wernibald, who took on the placename as his own when he received a grant of Kilmaurs in Cunningham, Ayrshire from Hugo de Morville, the Constable of Scotland, in 1140.nbsp; Origin: Scottish--Coat of Arms: Silver with a black shakefork.nbsp; Crest: A unicorn's head.nbsp; Spelling variations include: Cunningham, Cunninghame, Cunyngham, Cunnyngham, Cunnynghame, Cummingham (with or without De...), etc. First found in Ayrshire where they were seated from very ancient times, some say well before the Norman Conquest and the arrival of Duke William at Hastings in 1066 A.D. Some of the first American settlers of this namenbsp; were: John Cunningham, his wife and son, who settled in the Barbados in 1679; Anthony, Archibald, Arthur, Barnard, Brian, Charles, Cornelius, David, Edward, Francis, Henry, George, James, Jane, John, Joseph, Margaret, Mary, Michael, Patrick, Robert, Thomas Cunningham, all arrived in Philadelphia in the first half of the 19th century. OVER FORK OVER-The Cunningham Motto-According to tradition a subject known as Malcolm, son of Friskin, helped the escaping Prince Malcolm (a mere lad of nine and named heirnbsp; to the throne by his father the late King Duncan I) by forking hay over him with a shakefork to hide him from his pursuers, Macbeth and his soldiers, who had murdered King Duncan in 1040 and wished to kill him and claim the throne for himself. This deed is said to be the origin of our motto "OVER FORK OVER," because the prince, in fear for his life, kept telling Malcolm son of Friskin to "fork over" more hay to conceal him, thus, "over, fork over." Prince Malcolm slays MacBeth at the battle of Lumphanan in 1057 and becomes Malcolm III, ofnbsp; "Canmore." Upon regaining the throne of Scotland some 17 years later, as Malcolm III, he awarded Malcolm (son of Friskin) the Thanedom of Cunningham for having saved his life. With the title came land, power, and authority. Sir George Mackenzie relates that, although this is a charming story, the Arms may actuallynbsp; referto the office of Master of the King's Stables. Another reference relates that the Cunninghams were great allies of the Comyns, whose shield bore sheaves of corn. When that great dynasty was overthrown by the Bruces, the Cunninghams adopted the shake-fork used to fork over sheaves of corn as an ingenious reference to their former allies. The Cunningham Crest-The Unicorn is the crest on the coat of arms of the Earls of Glencairn, the rightful Clan Chiefs of the Cunninghams, and is also displayed on the Clan Cunningham badge.The Unicorn in association with heraldry is usually drawn as a horse with a single long twisted horn, lion's tail and the legs of a stag. The Unicorn symbolizes extreme courage, strength and virtue.nbsp; In ancient times the crest was worn on the chief's helmet so that he could be recognized by his warriors in battle. Besides being placed on the wreath above the helmet on the coat of arms, in the case of the Earls of Glencairn, the unicorn is found within a strap-and-buckle crest badge upon which is inscribed our motto Over Fork Over.nbsp; The name of Cunningham is a place-name recorded in the early history of Scotland. The District of Cunningham is shown on an early atlas as the area now known as Renfrewshire and Ayrshire, west and southwest of Glasgow, encompassing a large area with many small towns. Several Gaelic words are tied into the meaning of this ancient name. Before the lands were inhabited by Friskin (generally considered the progenitor of the Cunninghams), they were called "Cunygan" which comes from the root words "Cunny" or "Coney" meaning rabbit and "Hame" meaning home. Hence comes the meaning "Rabbits Home." Around 500 A.D. a group of Teutonic (German) peoples had spelled the name as "Konigheim"; "Koening" (King) with "Heim" (Home); properly signifying "Cunningham" or "Konigheim" as the "Kings Home." The name Cunningham may have originated during Roman times, as suggested by Nigel D. Cunningham, Sydney, Australia, whom claims that nbsp; the name "Cunning" originally signified "courage in battle" and came from "Cunedda" who was a king of the "Gododdin," a Celtic branch of Britons known by the Romans as the "Votadini." When the Dalriada Scots emigrated from Ireland in about 500AD, they were confronted by the Strathclyde Britons, the Gododdin Britons and the Picts. The name Cunedda eventually led to the names and words Cyning, Kynge and finally King. The "ham" seems to signify nbsp; small town (village or home) and was of Saxon or Norman origins.

Notes Pockets of Chaos - Cunningham Connection This entry was posted on February 22, 2015

During the 17th century the Cunninghams left Scotland to become part of The Plantation of Ulster. This was an effort by English kings to control the ‘Irish problem’ by stealing lands from the Irish Catholics and giving or selling the lands to Scottish Presbyterians and some English Anglicans. The English thought that the Scots and Irish would intermarry—which they did—and the Protestant Scots would keep the Irish Catholics docile to their overlords. It didn’t work, but it did lead to the evolution of the bravest and strongest fighting men and women, the Scots-Irish, many of whom would go to the New World, fight a revolution, and create a democratic republic. ...

4.Hugh B. Cunningham was the son of 5a.Mary Rebeka Burns (1668-1749) and 5.Alexander Cunningham (b. 1653 or 1663 in Dublin, Ireland or Scotland; d. 1749 or 1747 in Ireland; married 1701 in Leinster, Ireland). Alexander was the son of 6a.Rachel Bruce (1611-1651) and 6.David Cunningham (b. 1607 in Scotland; d. 1691 in Ireland; married 1651 in Leinster, Dublin, Ireland). David and his family were evidently sent to Ireland to settle in the Ulster Plantation scheme of King James I of England (James VI of Scotland). His parents were 7a.Nancy Mary Blessington (1570-1640) and 7.Joseph Cunningham (b. 1568 in Scotland; d. 1637 in Scotland or Ireland; married 1605 in Leinster, Dublin, Ireland). Joseph’s parents were 8a.Sarah Wallace (1531-1631) and 8.John Cunningham (b. 1520 in Scotland; d. 1602 in Ireland; married in 1566 in Leinster). John was the son of 9a.Mary Robinson (1503-1528) and 9.Alexander Cunningham (b. 1498 in Kilmaurs, Ayrshire, Scotland; d. 1579 in Ireland or Scotland; married 1528 in Leinster).So, my 9th great grandfather connects our family to Kilmaurs, Ayrshire and the estates of the Earls of Glencairn, the traditional holdings of the Cunningham family. More later.

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Hugh B. Cunningham's Timeline

1708
1708
Dublin, Dublin City, Dublin, Ireland
1728
1728
United States
1732
1732
Ireland
1734
1734
Dublin, Dublin, Ireland
1734
Ireland
1736
1736
Ireland
1739
1739
Ireland
1743
1743
Dublin, Cork, Ireland
1749
1749
Ireland