James Badcock, Sr.

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James Badcock, Sr.

Also Known As: "James Babcock III", "James Badcooke", "James Badcocke", "James Badcook", "Babcock"
Birthdate:
Birthplace: Essex, England (United Kingdom)
Death: June 12, 1679 (66-67)
Portsmouth, Newport County, Rhode Island, American Colonies
Place of Burial: Westerly, Washington County, Rhode Island, United States
Immediate Family:

Husband of Sarah Badcock and Elizabeth Johnson
Father of James Babcock, Jr.; John Babcock; Mary Champlin; Job Babcock, Sr.; Nathaniel Babcock and 2 others

Occupation: blacksmith, gunsmith, farmer, town assessor
Immigration Year: Before 1638
Managed by: Private User
Last Updated:

About James Badcock, Sr.

Biography

Amended from Find A Grave Memorial# 139385934 April 2019

James Badcock

  • Birth: 1612 Essex, England
  • Death: Jun. 12, 1679 In Rhode Island
  • MARRIED:
    • 1) Sarah, m. in 1641 at Portsmouth, Newport County, Rhode Island
      • b. abt. 1613,
      • d. 1665
      • CHILDREN: James, John, Job, Mary
    • 2) Elizabeth m. abt. 1666
      • CHILDREN: Nathaniel, Joseph, Elizabeth
  • After James passed away in 1679, his probate proceedings were filed under Babcock instead of Badcock. After this, his children began to use the name Babcock. 

Comment: why does FindAGrave have a Rembrandt on his memorial?

This is not accurate information, it was disproved by Stephen Babcock:

Family lore has it that James was the oldest son of James Babcock of Wivenhoe, Essex. If that is so, then James the younger was born there about 1612. All that is known of James’ mother is that her name was Mary. When James was about eight years old, the family fled to Leyden, Holland, because of their Puritan religous beliefs. They spent three years there, and in 1623, when James was around eleven, they sailed to Plymouth Colony, possibly on the ship “Ann”. All this prior information is not proved.

This is OK:

”What is known is that by 1638, James had settled in Portsmouth, Rhode Island, where he was admitted as an inhabitant on February 25, 1642. His first wife was named Sarah, her family name was probably Brown, who was also born in Essex, about 1616. She was probably also from a Puritan family. James and Sarah had several children, all born in Portsmouth by 1650. James was a blacksmith and gunsmith. At a town meeting in 1643, James was one of two men charged to see that all arms were in good repair. The settlers must have felt threatened, for every man was ordered to have four pound of shot and two pounds of powder readily available. He was made freeman in 1648 and chosen as assessor in 1650. He represented Portsmouth in the Rhode Island legislature in 1656, 1658 & 1659.

In 1660, James was a member of a company of men who bought some land called Misquamicut from Chief Sosoa. In February 1662 he agreed to go to Misquamicut and stay there until November. That land was to become the site of Westerly, Rhode Island. James sold his land in Portsmouth in 1665 and moved his family to Westerly, on the Connectucut side of the Pawtucket River, midway between Westerly and Watch Hill. In February of 1665, the Pawcatuck Indians complained to the Council at Hartford, saying they were forced off their lands. James and other men from Westerly were forced to defend their title to Misquamicut.

Sarah died later that year. James married a second wife, Elizabeth March [??] about 1669. That same year the town of Westerly was incorporated. There were 24 freemen in the town, four of them Babcocks. At that time, Westerly comprised the present towns of Westerly, Charlestown, Hopkintown and Richmond. James made a deposition in 1670 in which he stated that he was 58, his son James was 29 and son John was 26 years old. James and Elizabeth had three children, all born in Westerly. James joined the Seventh Day Baptist Church of Newport & Westerly on March 2, 1678. James died in Westerly on June 12, 1679, and is probably buried in the James Babcock Ground in Westerly. On September 17, his sons John and Job appeared in court, claiming that James made an oral will, leaving Job his smith’s tools, daughter Mary Champlin and her daughter a cow and calf. The rest of the estate was left to wife Elizabeth, to bring up the younger children.

Information from:

  1. * A Catalogue of the Names of the First Puritan Settlers of the Colony of Connecticut, by R. R. Hinman;
  2. * The Babcock Genealogy by Stephen Babcock; Archive.Org
  3. * Babcock and Allied Families by Louis E. DeForest;
  4. * Ancestral Lines by Carl Boyer
  • Family links: 
    • Parents:
      • James Badcock (1580 - 1672)
      • Mary Richards Badcock (1584 - 1650)
    • Spouse:  Sarah Brown Badcock (1613 - 1665)
    • Children:
      • James Babcock (1641 - 1698)*
      • John Babcock (1644 - 1685)*
      • Mary Babcock Champlin (1648 - 1747)
    • Sibling:
      • Robert Babcock (1610 - 1694)*
      • James Badcock (1612 - 1679)
  • Burial: James Babcock Ground, Westerly, Washington County, Rhode Island, USA
    • James Babcock Ground: (35 people buried there): http://www.findagrave.com/cgi-bin/fg.cgi?page=gsr&GScid=2284471&CSc...
    • Cemetery notes and/or description:
      • WY007 JAMES BABCOCK GROUND WESTERLY RI
      • Location: 15 ft east of WATCH HILL RD at TEL pole # 1100 40 burials with 28 inscriptions from 1731 to 1898 150 ft x 200 ft in fair condition enclosed with a stone wall; sign ??? NOTE: Frederic Denison recorded this lot 1867-8; This is south of Mastuxet Brook, on the slope of the hill, east of the highway leading to Lottery Village. It is perhaps the largest, and it is one of the oldest of the ancient burial places in the town. This contains John Babcock and his wife Mary, and many of their descendants. We copy from the inscriptions of the tombstones of all persons above the age of twenty, taking only the names and dates. see article in Westerly Daily Sun 10 Jul 1906 This cemetery has been recorded and checked.
************************* This memorial is in Westerly, Rhode Island, not far from '''the Babcock Historical cemetery'''. John & Mary (Lawton) Badcock eloped to Westerly, RI in 1662 to this area, originally known as Misquamicut, an Indian village. Their parents didn't approve of their marriage. They went by canoe from Portsmouth, RI. '''"On these shores of this cove landed John and Mary Lawton Babcock first white settlers in Westerly. 1648"''' <nowiki>-----</nowiki>The date of 1648 is not correct, John was born in 1644. Westerly was first settled in 1668.  

Spurious Pedigree

https://www.wikitree.com/wiki/Badcock-78

In 1844 Mr. Sidney Babcock, of New Haven, Conn., printed a leaflet containing the Babcock coat of arms, and certain Babcock family records which he states were copied from records prepared by Albert Wells, of Palmyra, N. Y.

In American Family Antiquity, published in 1881 by Albert Wells, the dates and incidents found in the leaflet referred to are essentially repeated.

JAMES DAVID'S SON , CAPTAIN JAMES (1612-1679)IS ACKNOWLEDGED BY MANY AS THE ORIGINAL DOCUMENTED BADCOCK IN NORTH AMERICA IN 1640. BUT, THIS IS NOT TRUE. THE FIRST BABCOCK IN NORTH AMERICA WAS RECTOR THOMAS BABCOCKE MINISTER OF THE QUAKER CHURCH. THOMAS WITH HIS WIFE ANN AND THEIR 5 CHILDREN LANDED IN CHESAPEAKE BAY, VIRGINIA ABOARD THE SHIP DISCOVERY IN MAY OF 1607.

From https://www.wikitree.com/wiki/Category:Albert_Welles_Fraud

Albert Welles was a 19th-century American purveyor of genealogical information, with a particular interest in coats of arms and heraldry.

He fabricated aristocratic pedigrees for a number of American families and for President George Washington. His publications included:

History of the Welles Family in England and Normandy: With the Derivation from Their Progenitors of Some of the Descendants in the United States, New England Historic Genealogical Society, 1876 American family antiquity, being an account of the origin and progress of American families, traced from their progenitors in this country, connected with their history abroad., 1880.

The fraudulent nature of Welles's "American College for Genealogical Registry and Heraldry" was exposed by the New York Tribune in an article entitled "A College in One Room: Exposing a Sham in Heraldry," that appeared on page 1 on February 7, 1881.[1]

 ***********************************

Surname has also been reported to be:

Place of death has also been (erroneously?) reported to be Westerly, Washington County, Rhode Island


THE BABCOCK GENEALOGY, by Stephen Babcock, page 1 thru 7.

  • Name: James-1 Babcock,
  • born 1612, probably in Essex County, England;
  • died June 12, 1679;
  • m. (1) Sarah, who died 1665 or later;
  • m. (2) 1669 (?) Elizabeth; she m. (2) Sept. 22, 1679, William Johnson and settled in Stonington, Conn.

A myth often repeated and published by writers, who probably believed it true, states that James came to his country in the ship Anne, etc. From the Early Records of the Town of Portsmouth, edited by State Librarian, under direction of the Rhode Island Legislature, published 1901, and from Colonial Records of Rhode Island, the account of James Badcock's from twenty years in Rhode Island, was copied. His residence for that period was in Portsmouth, and the records of that town meeting, namely, Badcock, Badcooke, Badcocke, and Badcook.

For the first forty years the surname of James and his sons was usually written Badcock. In the Probate records of John Badcock's estate the name is spelled Babcock, and at the time that spelling seems to have been adopted by the family.

James Badcock was admitted an inhabitant of the "towne" of Portsmouth Feb. 25, 1642. At that time no one was allowed to "build or plant" without first having been voted at town meeting an inhabitant. At a town meeting held Oct. 5, 1642, James Badcock and Richard Moris were ordered "to look up all the armes in the Towne within the month above writ," and "to mend any which were defective for use." Owners were to forfeit five shillings if they failed to bring the arms in time. At the same meeting ten acres of land were ordered to be "laide our to James Badcock at the first brooke, next the footpath eastward." The land is described as 'lying Toward the head of said brooke." (C.R. of RI)

About this time there must have been a threatening of war in the air, as every man was ordered to have "four pounds of shot and two pounds of powder lying by him in readiness by the 24th of this month, and to be in readiness to assemble at the beat of the drum". James Badcock was made a freeman July 10, 1648, and was appointed a member of a large committee "for the tryall of the general officers". He was chosen a juryman on several occasions and as an assessor in 1650. In 1650 he was again directed to mend all firearms in the community.

In 1656 James Badcock and seven others were "appointed to go over to the mayne to treat with the Indian Sachems to inform them of the mynd of the tiwne, that they come not upon the Island but according to order given." He was appointed one of a committee to apportion land in 1657 and was a member of the General Court of Commissioners of Rhode Island for Portsmouth in 1657, 1658, and 1659. In 1661 he was appointed with others ot lay out highways and settle disputed land boundaries.

In 1660 a tract of land, estimated to be twenty miles by ten miles, known as Misquamicut, afterward Westerly, was purchased from the Indian chief Sosoa by a company organized at Newport, RI. In September, 1661, the purchasers visited Misquamicut and a certain part of the tract was apportioned by lot. The number of James Badcock's lot was 52. The following March, 1662, the company made their first permanent settlement at Misquamicut (Westerly). The company named James Badcock and four others to manage their affairs at Misquamicut. He took a prominent part in a number of disputes caused by Connecticut's claim to the terriory in and about Westerly, RI, and by Indians' claims.

In 1665 James sold his dwelling house, barn, orchard, etc., in Portsmouth to Thomas Fish for fifty pounds. Westerly was incorporated May, 1669, at which time there were twenty-four freemen in the town, four of whom were Badcocks. James and his three sons, James, John and Job. Westerly then comprised the present towns of Westerly, Charlestown, Hopkinton, and Richmond.

James in his fifty-ninth year, 1678, was baptized by Elder William Hiscox and untied with the Seventh Day Baptist church of newport and Westerly. In his will he bequeathed all his housing and lands to his son Joseph and the remainder of his estate to his wife, Elizabeth.

These glimpses of an interesting life show that James Badcock (Babock), Sr. was a man of sterling integrity and of strong convinctions. He was respected by his neighbors, honored and trusted as a citizen, and ready to serve the community in whatever capacity he was appointed.

************************************* '''THE HISTORY OF STONINGTON, CONN.,''' by Richard A. Wheeler, page 211.
  • 1. James Babcock, born in 1612, who was the progenitor of the Babcock family of Westerly and the region round-about, first appears in Portsmouth, RI, in 1642.
    • He held the office of Commissioner from 1656 to 1659 and
    • was by occupation a blacksmith and gunsmith.
    • He came to Westerly with his family soon after 1664, after having sold his house and land in Portsmouth to Thomas Fish.
    • During the year 1670 he gave testimony, calling his age 58 years, his son James 29, and his son John 26.
  • He m. 1st, Sarah ___, and he d. June 12, 1679.
    • Mrs. Sarah Babcock d. in 1665 and
  • Mr. James Babcock m. his second wife, Elizabeth ____.
    • After his death his widow m. 2nd, William Johnson, Sept. 22, 1679.
  • James along with his son, John, were the first permanent settlers in the Westerly, RI area.
  • This area was claimed by both RI and CT until 1728.
  • John was a captain with the CT militia in the King Philip War. After the war he and his father were granted lands in Westerly.
  • Many of the Babcock relatives are buried in James Babcock Ground Cemetery.
  • He had 8 children.
    • 5 with his first wife, Sarah...Hannah, James, John, Job, and Mary and
    • 3 with his second wife Elizabeth...Joseph, Nathaniel, and Elizabeth.
  • 1638- Early settler of Portsmouth, RI.
  • 1642, February 25- Admitted inhabitant.
  • 1655- Freeman.
  • 1656, 1658-59: Member of Rhode Island General Court of Commissioners for Portsmouth, RI.
  • 1662, March - One of the first settlers of Westerly, RI.
  • 1668, May 18- Freeman.
  • 1678, March 2- Baptised by Elder William Hiscox of the Seventh Day Baptist Church.
  • The glimpses of an interesting life show that James Babcock Sr. was a man of sterling integrity and of strong convictions. He was respected by his neighbors, honored and trusted as a citizen, and ready to serve the community in whatever capacity he was appointed.
************************************* '''The Genealogical Dictionary of Rhode Island'''; By John Osborne Austin (printed 1887). 

James Babcock, Portsmouth, Westerly, R.I.

  • He was a blacksmith.
  • 1642, Feb. 25. Admitted inhabitant.
  • 1643, Oct. 5. He and another were ordered to lock up all the arms in the town. On the same date he had a grant of 10 acres at the first brook.
  • 1650, May 23. He and five others were appointed to mend and make all arms presented to them by any of the town.
  • 1655 Freeman.
  • 1656-58-59. Commissioner.
  • 1657, Dec. 10. He was granted 8 acres.
  • 1664, Mar . 1. Westerly. Upon consideration of Deputy Governor, to send a letter to the government of Connecticut, to see what they will say by way of answer to such riotous actings as are done and committed by the men of Southertown against the said Babcock, &c.
  • 1665, --18. He sold Thomas Fish, for L50, land and dwelling house, barn, orchard, &c., in Portsmouth, his wife Sarah, giving her consent.
  • 1667, May 18. He and others, of Rhode Island, having claimed certain land east of Pawcatuck River, a petition was sent to Connecticut authorities, by Harmon Garret, alias Wequascooke, Governor of the Pequots, praying 'that such men that wear hats and clothes like Englishmen, but have dealt with us like wolves and bears,' may be called to account.
  • 1669, May 18. Freeman.
  • 1670, Jun. 18. He was warned by warrant from the Commissioners of Connecticut, to appear before them to make answer for seizure of three Connecticut men, on a warrant issued by Tobias Saunders. He was released on bail. He gave testimony this year calling his age fifty-eight years, his son James twenty-nine, and his son John twenty -six years.
  • 1678, Mar. 2. He was baptised by Elder William Hiscox, of the Seventh-day Baptist Church.
  • 1679, Sep. 17. Testimony was given before a Court at Westerly, by John and Job Babcock, that James Babcock made the following will, 'as he verbally declared before us.' To son Job, all smith's tools. To daughter Mary Champlin, a cow. To the eldest daughter of William Champlin, a cow calf. To son Joseph, all housing and lands, at twenty one. To wife Elizabeth, rest of estate for maintenance and bringing up of the three children he had by her, and that his wife Elizabeth be administratix. Inventory, L61, 1s., viz: house and land, 20 acres, L30, bellows, anvil, vice and smith's tools, L5, 2 cows , 2 yearlings and 2 calves, L11, 7 small swine, 2 beds, 3 spinning wheels, pair of cards, 2 chests, churn, cradle, &c.
*************************************

From http://vredenburgh.org/babcock/pages/bristolbabcock.htm

ABOUT THE EARLY BABCOCKS

James Badcock (1612-1679) (spelling later chged to Babcock) came w/his family to Portsmouth in colony of RI sometime bet 1638, when it was founded & 1642. He was voted inhabitant of town of Portsmouth in 1642 & was made freeman (citizen) in 1648. He was appointed to various tasks in svc to town: he mended arms (guns), he was sent w/party to deal w/Indian leaders, & deal w/representatives of other towns. He doled out parcels of land to those who wanted it & settled boundary disputes. Year bef his death James was baptized & joined 7th-Day Baptist Church of Newport & Westerly. 7th-Day Baptist Church had been founded in this county only 6 yrs earlier in Newport, RI. 7th-Day Baptist Church was related to Sabbaterian Church in Eng. 1660 tract of land in what is now Westerly, RI, on CT border, was purchased from Indians by Misquamicut Co, of Newport. James & 2nd son, John (16544-1685) (by 1st wife, Sarah), were mbrs of his company & were amg 1st permanent setters there. Possession of this area was disputed by MA and CT as well as RI so in addition to dealing w/Indians, these early settlers had to contend w/aggressions of other colonies. 1675, King Philip's War, most vicious of Indian Wars, broke out. While most other inhabitants of Westerly fled to island of RI for protection, John & his family stayed put. As late as 1945, John's descendants were living on original parcel of land on which John & wife, Mary Lawton, built their 1st house. John served as Conservator of Peace & Deputy to Colonial Legislature. John Badcock d intestate, & when Town Council of Westerly made up his will they spelled his name Babcock & it has been spelled that way ever since. Amg his considerable holdings they listed "1 negger boy, 2 Injin men & Indian garls." James Babcock b c1612 Eng, resided in 1661 in Westerly, MA. christen Mar 2 1677/78 in Westerly, Washington, RI, d Jun 12 1679 in Westerly, RI. d Jun 12 1679 in Portsmouth, Newport, RI. Baptized in Baptist Church of Newport & Westerly, RI. by Elder Wm Hiscox. Blacksmith, Gunsmith, Feb 25 1642: Inhabitant. Oct 5 1643: He & another ordered to look up all arms in town. On same date he had grant of 10 acres at 1st brook. May 23 1650: He & 5 others appointed to mend & make all arms presented to them by any of the town. 1655: Freeman. 1656, 1658, 1659: Commissioner. Dec 10 1657: granted 8 acres. Mar 1 1664: Westerly, Upon consideration of his petition Court requests Gov & Dep Gov, send ltr to gov of CT, to see what they will say by way of answer to such riotous actings as are done & committed by men of Southertown against said Babcock &c. 1665: sold Thomas Fish, for L50, land & dwelling house, barn, orchard, &c. in Portsmouth, wife Sarah giving her consent. 1667 May 18: He & others of RI, having claimed certain land east of Pawtucket river, a petition was sent to CT authorities by Harmon Garret, alias Wequascooke, Gov of Pequots, praying "that such men that wear hats and clothes like Englishmen, but have dealt with us like wolves & bears," may be called to account. 1669 May 18: Freeman. 1670 June 18: warned by warrant from Commissioners of CT to appear before them to make answer for seizure of 3 CT men, on warrant issued by Tobias Saunders. Released on bail.

1678 Mar 2: baptized by Elder Wm Hiscox at 7th Day Adventist Baptist Church. 1679 Sep 17: Testimony given before Court at Westerly by John & Job Babcock, that James Babcock made following will, "as he verbally declared before us." To son Job, all smith's tools. To daughter Mary Champlin, a cow. To eldest daughter of William Champlin, a cow calf. To son Joseph, all housing & lands, at 21. To wife Elizabeth, rest of estate for maintenance & bringing up of 3 children he had by her, & that his wife be adminitrix. Inventory: 1s viz: $L61 cash, $L30 House & land, 20 acres, $L5 smith's tools, anvil, vice, & bellows, $L11 2 cows, 2 yearlings, & 2 calves. 7 small swine, 2 beds, 3 spinning wheels, pair cards, 2 chests, churn, cradle, &c. Jun 29 1660: purchased 10X20 mi tract of land known as Misquamicut from Indian Chief Sosoa. Land is now known as Westerly, RI. James was blacksmith, m Sarah Brown c1640 in Portsmouth, Newport Co, RI. Sarah Brown b 1616 in Essex, Eng, d c1665 in Westerly, RI. She d c1665 in Milton, Worcester Co, MA. *

  • James Babcock & Sarah Brown had following children:
    • i. Joseph Babcock
    • ii. Nathanial Babcock d Jan 2 1718/19 in Westerly RI.
    • iii. Elizabeth Babcock
    • iv. James Babcock Jr
    • v. John Babcock
    • vi. Job Babcock
    • vii. Mary Babcock
    • viii. Hannah Babcock
  • He m Elizabeth March Jun 12 1669 in Westerly, Washington, RI.
    • Elizabeth March b c1612, d WFT Est. 1681-1709. She d in Stonington, CT.
      • Husband James Babcock d Jun &
      • she remarried same yr Sep 1679.
  • James Babcock & Elizabeth March had following children:
    • i. James Babcock
    • ii. Joseph Babcock
    • iii. Elizabeth Babcock
    • iv. Nathaniel Babcock b c1672, d Jan 2 1718/19
    • v. Elizabeth Babcock b c1674, d WFT Est 1675-1768
  • About Stonington:
    • Stonington, CT, in SE corner of state, includes communites of Borough of Stoningtion, Mystic, Old Mystic, Pawcatuck & Wequetequock, site of 1st European settlement in 1649, in lands that had belonged to Pequots. North Stonington was set off from Stonington in 1724 & incorporated in 1807. Borough of Stonington occupies point of land that projects into Little Narragansett Bay. Lack of through traffic or modern industry, together with Borough's role as fashionable summer residence since Civil War era, have preserved its Colonial, Federal, & outstanding Greek Revival domestic architecture, while activity of CT's last remaining fishing & lobstering fleet save it from preciousness. There is a large Portuguese community. In waters off Stonington, states of NY, CT & RI come together. Stonington lighthouse, low stone building, was 1st lighthouse established by US Gov in 1823. In 19th Century Stonington supported small fishing, whaling & sealing fleet, with some direct trade with West Indies, enough volume for it to be made Port of Entry in 1842. Very young Capt Nathaniel Palmer, in charge of sloop "Hero" was seal hunting in South Shetland Islands in winter season of 1820, when he was sent southwards to investigate a volcanic eruption under the horizon, & sighted Antartica. Copied in part, Wikipedia, free encyclopedia.

Sources:

Babcock Genealogy, Stephen Babcock, MA, Eaton & Mains, NY, 1903, p 1 [Description: Compilation of family genealogy that begins w/James Badcock (Babcock), settler of Portsmouth, RI in 1642, & incl records of abt 2000 families that are direct descendants of James Badcock (up to 11th generation).]

History of Town of Stonington, Richard Anson Wheeler,

Press of Day Publishing Co, New London, CT, 1900, p 211

Religion: 7th-Day Baptist

Occ: Blacksmith

Note: Genealogical Dictionary of RI, John Osborne Austin (1887). James Babcock, Portsmouth, Westerly, R.I. He was a blacksmith. 1642, Feb 25. Admitted inhabitant. 1643, Oct 5. He & another were ordered to lock up all arms in town. Same date he had grant of 10 acres at 1st brook. May 23 1650: He & 5 others appointed to mend & make all arms presented to them by any of the town. 1655 Freeman. 1656-58-59. Commissioner. Dec 10 1657: Granted 8 acres. Mar 1 1664: Westerly. Upon consideration of Dep Gov, to send letter to govt of CT, to see what they will say by way of answer to such riotous actings as are done & committed by the men of Southertown against the said Babcock, & c1665,--18. Sold Thomas Fish, for L50, land & dwelling house, barn, orchard, &c, in Portsmouth, wife Sarah, giving her consent. May 18 1667: He & others of RI, having claimed certain land east of Pawcatuck River, a petition was sent to CT authorities, by Harmon Garret, alias Wequascooke, Gov of Pequots, praying 'that such men that wear hats & clothes like Englishmen, but have dealt with us like wolves & bears,' may be called to account. May 18 1669: Freeman. Jun 18 1670: Warned by warrant from Commissioners of CT to appear before them to make answer for seizure of 3 CT men on warrant issued by Tobias Saunders. Released on bail. Gave testimony this year calling his age 58 yrs, his son James 29, & son John 26 yrs. Mar 2 1678: Baptised by Elder William Hiscox of 7th-Day Baptist Church. Sep 17 1679: Testimony given before Court at Westerly by John & Job Babcock, that James Babcock made following will, 'as he verbally declared before us.' To son Job, all smithtools. To dtr Mary Champlin, a cow. To eldest dtr of William Champlin, a cow calf. To son Joseph, all housing & lands, at 21. To wife Elizabeth, rest of estate for maintenance & bringing up of 3 children had by her, & that wife Elizabeth be administratix. Inventory, L61, 1s, viz: house & land, 20 acres, L30, bellows, anvil, vice & smithtools, L5, 2 cows , 2 yearlings & 2 calves, L11, 7 small swine, 2 beds, 3 spinning wheels, pair of cards, 2 chests, churn, cradle, &c.

Sources:

M M Lewis, Babcock & Allied Families Americana 1927 p 243-250.

James Savage, Genealogical Dictionary of 1st Settlers of New England, (Baltimore, Genealogical Pub Co, 1860 reprint 1998) Vol 1 p 86.

John Osborne Austin, Genealogical Dictionary of RI Families Comprising 3 Generations of Settlers Who Came Before 1690, (Baltimore, Genealogical Pub Co, 1995)

Caroline E Robinson, Hazard Family of RI, (Boston, D B Updike, 1895)

From www.geocities.com/John.Warren:

James Badcock, b 1612, Essex Co, Eng, d Stonington, CT, Jun 12 1679. Admitted inhabitant of "towno, of Portsmouth, RI, Feb 25 1642, & at a town meeting held Oct 5 1642 he & Richard Moris were ordered "to look up all the armes in the Towne within the month above writ" & "to mend any which were defective for use." At the same meeting 10 acres of land were ordered to be "laide out to James Badcock at the 1st brooke, next the footpath eastward." At this time, too, every man was ordered to have "4 pounds of shot & 2 pounds of powder lying by him in readiness by the 24th of this month & to be ill readiness to assemble at the boat of the drum." James Badcock was made a freeman, Jul 10 1648, & was appointed member of a large committee "for the tryall of the general officers." Dec 28 1648, it was granted "to have 4 acres added to his house lot." He was chosen a jury man Nov 21 1649, Jun 1653, Aug 11 1656, Mar 2 1657, & Oct 1661; & an assessor Feb 19 1650. May 2 1650, James Badcock with 5 others, was ordered by the "General Courte, all excuses set aparte, to mende and make all locks, stocks, & pieces which by order from the warden of each towne shall be presented to them." If this duty was not performed a penalty of 10 pounds was levied, & men who failed to bring in their arms forfeited 10 pounds each. He was appointed appraiser of the estate of John Wood, May 7 1655, & Apr 8 1656, he & 7 others were "appointed to go over to the mayne to treat with the Indian Sachems to inform them of the mynd of the towne, that they come not upon the Island but according to order given." Jan 6 1657, "James Badcock & John Sanford are again authorized to meet with Newport men according to former order." James Badcock & 6 others were chosen a committee to meet with committees appointed from other towns. Nov 30 1657, James & 4 others were "appointed to apportion land to those that want land." He was member of General Court of Commissioners of RI for Portsmouth in 1657, 1658 & 1659; was appointed with others to lay out highways; Dec 27 1660, & May 11 1661, was appointed to settle disputed land boundaries; Aug 8 1661, was 1 of a coroner's jury. James Badcock moved to Westerly Mar 1662, but the last record which refers to him in Portsmouth is dated Dec 19 1662.

06/29/1660 purchased 10 X 20 mile trace of land known as Misquanmicut from Indian Chief Sosoa. Land is now Westerly, RI.

Pages 23-24, John Babcock, .. have for & in consideration of all the land that Nicholas Saterly is now possessed of where he now liveth with all the fencing & orcharding ...., 18 Mar 1724/5. Witnesses: Isaac Thompson, William Thompson.

Following is taken from: members.aol.com/picknell/deeds/westerly1.html:

Pg 24, Memorandum regarding the above. John Babcock is Town Clerk. Witnesses: John Saunders, Ichabod Babcock.

Pg 24, John Babcock, to John Lewis, land I bought of Wm Corey in Soloes ? Purchase that now lyeth on the West side of the now county rhod [sic] ... is scituate lying & being in Westerly containing by estimation 25A bounded: now county rhod, above sd Lewis, land now in possession of James Babcock blacksmith, May 1, 1719. Witnesses: Isaac Thompson, James Babcock Jr. Recorded July 15, 1725.

Pg 25-26, James Babcock to Capt John Babcock, all that my right title property & possession & claims in & unto a certain peace [sic] of land joyning to my farm lying in the shape of a gore ..., May 1, 1719. Witnesses: Isaac Thompson, James Babcock Jr.

Paraphrased from ultimatefamilyreunion.com:

Descendants of James Babcock--Generation 1

1. James Babcock b 1612 Essex, Eng, d 12 Jun 1679 Stonington, New London, CT, m (1) Sarah ___(d 1665). m (2) Elizabeth ___(d Unk).

Notes for James Babcock: James Babcock, b 1612, progenitor of Babcock family of Westerly & region round about, 1st appears in Portsmouth, RI in 1642. Held office of Commissioner 1656-1659 & was by occupation blacksmith & gunsmith. Came to Westerly with family soon after 1664, after selling his house & land in Portsmouth to Thomas Fish. During 1670 he gave testimony, calling his age 58 yrs, his son James 29, & his son John 26. He married 1st, Sarah___, & he died 12 Jun 1679.

Children of James Babcock & Sarah ___are:

+ 2 i. James Babcock, b 1641; d 1698

+ 3 ii. John Babcock, b 1644 Portsmouth, RI; d 1685 Westerly, Washington, RI

    4     iii.  Job Babcock, b 1646; d Unk, m Jane Crandall (d Unk)

+ 5 iv. Mary Babcock, b 1648; d 1747

Children of James Babcock & Elizabeth ___ are:

    6     i.   Nathaniel2 Babcock, b 1666; d Unk
    7     ii.  Joseph Babcock, b 1670; d Unk
    8     iii.  Elizabeth Babcock, d Unk, m Benjamin Sumner 03 May 1706 (d Unk)

Generation 2

2. James Babcock b 1641, d 1698, m Jane Brown, dtr of Nicholas Brown (d 1719).

Children of James Babcock & Jane Brown are:

    9     i.   James Babcock, d Unk
    10   ii.   Sarah Babcock, d Unk. Married James Lewis (d Unk)
    11   iii.  Jane Babcock, d Unk. Married Israel Lewis (d Unk)
    12   iv.   Mary Babcock, d Unk. Married George Brown (d Unk)
    13   v.   Hannah Babcock, d Unk. Married Roger Larkin (d Unk)
    14   vi.  Elizabeth Babcock, d Unk. Married David Lewis (d Unk)

3. John Babcock b 1644 Portsmouth, RI, d 1685 Westerly, Washington, RI, m Mary Lawton, dtr of George Lawton & Elizabeth Hazard (b Portsmouth, RI, d 08 Nov 1711 Westerly, Washington, RI).

Notes for John Babcock: John Babcock died last of Dec 1684 or 1st of Jan 1685, for on 06 Jan 1685, eldest son, James Babcock, & his mother, Mary Babcock, recognizing English law of primogeniture as in force in RI, agreed that he might take all real estate of his father, which he assumed, & gave his mother ½ there of by deed. Mary Lawton Babcock afterwards married Erasmus Babbitt 21 Apr 1698. Oldest son & child, James Babcock, was appointed guardian to 4 youngest children, viz: Elihu, Robert, Joseph & Oliver 21 Apr 1698. Deputy to RI Gen’l Assembly from Westerly, 1682, 1684. Served in King Philips War in Great Swamp Fight, 1675, & land was granted his heirs for his service. Conservator of Peace for Westerly, 1678.

Children of John Babcock & Mary Lawton are:

+ 15 i. James Babcock, b Abt 1664 Stonington, New London, CT; d 09 Jan 1736/37 Stonington, New London, CT

    16   ii.   Ann Babcock, b 1665; d Unk
    17   iii.  Mary Babcock, b 1667; d Unk

+ 18 iv. John Babcock, b Abt 1669 Westerly, Washington, RI; d 28 Mar 1746 Westerly, Washington, RI

    19   v.  Job Babcock, born 1671; d 1718, m Deborah ______ (d Unk)

+ 20 vi. Col Oliver Babcock, b Bet 1672-1673 Westerly, Washington, RI; d 07 Oct 1773 Hopkinton, Washington, RI

+ 21 vii. George Babcock, b 1673 Stonington, New London, CT; d 01 May 1756.

    22   viii. Elihu Babcock, b 19 Dec 1675; d Unk

Notes for Elihu Babcock: Was an invalid & helpless

+ 23 ix. Robert Babcock, b 1678; d Unk

    24   x.  Joseph Babcock, b 1681; d Unk, m Rebecca Stanton (b Apr 1678 Stonington, New London, CT; d Unk)

5. Mary Babcock b 1648, d 1747. Married (1) William Champlin (d 1715), m (2)_____ (d Unk).

Child of Mary Babcock & William Champlin is:

+ 25 i. Mary Champlin, d Unknown

Generation 3

15. James Babcock b Abt 1664 Stonington, New London, CT, d 09 Jan 1736/37 Stonington, New London, CT, m (1) Elizabeth ____Abt 1687 Stonington, New London, CT (d 03 Mar 1730/31), m (2) Content Maxson 09 Jul 1731 (d Unk).

Notes for James Babcock: Made his will 09 Jan 1737, d 10 days later, 17 Jan 1737. "In Memory of Capt James Babcock, who died 17 Jan 1746-1737. In ye___of his age, having been in his life One of righteousness, charity & benevolence, & not altogether silent at his death.”

Children of James Babcock & Elizabeth ____are:

+ 26 i. James Babcock, b 23 Dec 1688 Stonington, New London, CT; d 09 Apr 1731 Stonington, New London, CT

    27   ii.  Elizabeth Babcock, b 05 Feb 1690/91 Stonington, New London, CT; d Unk
    28   iii. Samuel Babcock, b 15 Feb 1696/97 Stonington, New London, CT; d Unk
    29   iv.  Daniel Babcock, b 11 Apr 1699 Stonington, New London, CT; d Unk
    30   v.   Anna Babcock, b 19 Nov 1701 Stonington, New London, CT; d Unk
    31   vi.  Sarah Babcock, b 03 Dec 1704 Stonington, New London, CT; d 13 Nov 1705

+ 32 vii. Dr Joshua Babcock, b 19 May 1707 Stonington, New London, CT; d Unk

Children of James Babcock & Content Maxson are:
    33   i.  Anne4 Babcock, b 20 Mar 1731/32 Stonington, New London, CT; d 07 Nov 1768 Stonington, New London, CT, m Capt Simon Rhodes 15 Dec 1756 by Elder Joseph Park (b 24 Jan 1715/16 Newport, RI; d 22 Apr 1784)

+ 34 ii. Dr James Babcock, b 01 Nov 1734 Stonington, New London, CT; d Sep 1781 Stonington, New London, CT

+ 35 iii. Jonathan Babcock, b 11 Oct 1736 Stonington, New London, CT; d Unk

     18.  John Babcock b Abt 1669 Westerly, Washington, RI, d 28 Mar 1746 Westerly, Washington, RI, m Mary Champlin Abt 1770, dtr of William Champlin & Mary Babcock (d unk)

Child of John Babcock & Mary Champlin is:

    36   i. William Babcock, b 15 Apr 1708 Westerly, Washington, RI; d 15 Jan 1752 Westerly, Washington, RI, m Sarah Denison (b 06 Jan 1709/10 Stonington, New London, CT; d Unk).
     20.  Col Oliver Babcock b Bet 1672-1673 Westerly, Washington, RI, d 07 Oct 1773 Hopkinton, Washington, RI, m (1) Deborah Knowles (d Unk), m (2) Susannah Clark Jan 1703/04, dtr of Joseph Clarke & Bethiah Hubbard (b 31 Aug 1683 Westerly, Washington, RI, & d Abt 1761).

Children of Oliver Babcock & Susannah Clark are:

    37   i.   Susannah Babcock, b 20 Sep 1705; d Unk, m James Beebe (d Unk)
    38   ii.  Thomas Babcock, b 07 Mar 1709/10; d Unk, m (1) Mary Davidson (d Unk), m (2) Judith Davis (d Unk)
    39   iii. Mary Babcock, b 08 Feb 1712/13; d Unk, m Henry Cobb (d Unk)
    40   iv.  Nathan Babcock, b 12 Oct 1715; d Unk

+ 41 v. Simeon Babcock, b 27 Sep 1717 Westerly, Washington, RI; d Abt 1796

    42   vi.  John Babcock, b 05 May 1720; d Unk

+ 43 vii. Oliver Babcock, b 16 Sep 1722 Westerly, Washington, RI; d 24 Feb 1806 Leyden, MA

    44   viii. Joseph Babcock, b 18 Oct 1726; d Unk, m Anna Harris (d Unk)

21. George Babcock b 1673 Stonington, New London, CT, d 01 May 1756, m Elizabeth Hall 28 Nov 1694, dtr of Henry Hall & Content ____ (d Unk).

Children of George Babcock & Elizabeth Hall are:

    45   i.   Mary Babcock, b 1695; d Unk, m Thomas Potter 19 Mar 1716/17 (d Unk)

+ 46 ii. George Babcock, b 1699 Stonington, New London, CT; d Unk

+ 47 iii. David Babcock, b 1700; d Unk

    48   iv.   John Babcock, b 1702; d Unk
    49   v.   Abigail Babcock, b 1706; d Unk, m ____Hall (d Unk)
    50   vi.   Ruth Babcock, b 1709; d Unk
    51   vii.   Eunice Babcock, b 1712; d Unk, m Silas Greenman (d Unk)
    52   viii.   Hezekiah Babcock, b 1715; d Unk
    53   ix.   Elisha Babcock, b 1718; died Unk
    54   x.   Elizabeth Babcock, d Unk, m Edward Sanders (d Unk)

Notes for Elizabeth Babcock: Mentioned in will as widow of Edward Sanders; other children are found on Wickford records.

23. Robert Babcock b 1678, d Unk, m Lydia Crandall (d Unk).

Child of Robert Babcock & Lydia Crandall is:

+ 55 i. Ezekiel Babcock, b 23 Jun 1716 Westerly, Washington, RI; d Unk

25. Mary Champlin d Unk, m John Babcock Abt 1770, son of John Babcock & Mary Lawton (b Abt 1669 Westerly, Washington, RI, d 28 Mar 1746 Westerly, Washington, RI).

Child is listed above under (18) John Babcock.

From Ancestry.com freepages:

James Babcock Sr b 1612, Wivenhoe, Essex, Eng, d 12 Jun 1679, Stonington, New London Co, CT, m Sarah Brown 1641, Portsmouth, Newport Co, RI.

Babcock Genealogy, Stephen Babcock, p 1-7.

James-1 Babcock, b 1612, probably Essex Co, Eng, d 12 Jun 1679, m (1) Sarah (d 1665 or later), m (2) Abt 1669 Elizabeth; she m (2) 22 Sep 1679, William Johnson & settled in Stonington, CT. Myth often repeated & published by writers, who probably believed it true, states James came to this country on ship Anne. The account of James Badcock for 20 years was copied from Early Records of the Town of Portsmouth, edited by State Librarian, under direction of RI Legislature, pub 1901, & Colonial Records of RI. His residence for that period was in Portsmouth, & records of that town meeting, namely, Badcock, Badcooke, Badcocke, & Badcook. For 1st 40 yrs surname of James & his sons was usually written Badcock. In Probate records of John Badcock's estate name is spelled Babcock, & at the time that spelling seems to have been adopted by the family.

James Badcock was admitted inhabitant of "towne" of Portsmouth 25 Feb 1642. At that time no one was allowed to "build or plant" without 1st having been voted at town meeting an inhabitant. At a town meeting held 05 Oct 1642, James Badcock & Richard Morris were ordered "to look up all the armes in the Towne within the month above writ," & "to mend any which were defective for use." Owners were to forfeit 5 shillings if they failed to bring arms in time. At same meeting 10 acres of land were ordered to be "laide our to James Badcock at the 1st brooke, next the footpath eastward." Land is described as 'lying Toward the head of said brooke." (CR of RI) About this time there must have been a threat of war, as every man was ordered to have "4 pounds of shot & 2 pounds of powder lying by him in readiness by the 24th of this month, & to be in readiness to assemble at the beat of the drum". James Badcock was made freeman 10 Jul 1648, & was appointed member of a large committee "for the tryall of the gen'l officers". He was chosen juryman on several occasions & as an assessor in 1650. In 1650 he was again directed to mend all firearms in the community. In 1656 James Badcock & 7 others were "appointed to go over to the mayne to treat with the Indian Sachems to inform them of the mynd of the towne, that they come not upon the Island but according to order given." Appointed to a committee to apportion land in 1657 & was a member of Gen'l Court of Commissioners of RI for Portsmouth in 1657, 1658, & 1659. In 1661 he was appointed with others ot lay out highways & settle disputed land boundaries. In 1660 a tract of land, estimated to be 20 mi X 10 mi, known as Misquamicut, afterward Westerly, was purchased from Indian chief Sosoa by a company organized at Newport, RI. In Sep 1661, purchasers visited Misquamicut & a certain part of the tract was apportioned by lot. Number of James Badcock's lot was 52. Following Mar 1662, company made their 1st permanent settlement at Misquamicut (Westerly). Company named James Badcock & 4 others to manage their affairs at Misquamicut. He took a prominent part in a number of disputes caused by CT's claim to the terriory in and about Westerly, RI, & by Indians' claims. In 1665 James sold his dwelling house, barn, orchard, etc, in Portsmouth to Thomas Fish for 50 Lbs. Westerly was incorporated May 1669, at which time there were 24 freemen in town, 4 of whom were Badcocks. James & his 3 sons, James, John & Job. Westerly then comprised the present towns of Westerly, Charlestown, Hopkinton, & Richmond. James in his 59th yr, 1678, was baptized by Elder William Hiscox & united with the 7th Day Baptist Church of Newport & Westerly. In his will he bequeathed all his housing & lands to son Joseph & the remainder of his estate to wife, Elizabeth. These glimpses of an interesting life show that James Badcock (Babcock) Sr was a man of sterling integrity & of strong convinctions. He was respected by his neighbors, honored 7 trusted as a citizen, & ready to serve the community in whatever capacity he was appointed.

Sources: Babcock & Allied Families, Louis E deForest (929.273, B114d)

Potter-Richardson Memorial; NEHGR, v12, p238 & v14

Saturday's Children, History of Babcock Family in America, C Merton Babcock (929.273, B114c)

Immigrants to America Before 1750

Ancestral Lines Revised

Founders of Early American Families

A Witter Family History

De Forest: James Babcocke or Badcocke, as he himself spelled the name, & as it is still spelled in England, b 1612, probably Essex, Eng. Recorded 1st in New England when admitted as inhabitant of Portsmouth, RI, 25 Feb 1642, & granted 10 acres of land, d 12 Jun 1679, m (1) Sarah ____, (d abt 1665); m (2) Elizabeth ____, abt 1669.

Memorial: James Babcock, b 1612, from Essex Co, Eng, to Portsmouth, RI, by 1642. He was blacksmith; freeman by 1655; commissioner from Portsmouth to Gen'l Court from 1656-1659. Removed to Westerly, RI, & became freeman there in 1669. Was baptized in 7th Day Baptist Church in 1676. Married (1) Sarah ____; (2) Elizabeth____.

NEHGR, v14: James Babcock Sr d 12 Jun 1679 Stonington. Verbal will mentions on Job, dtr Mary Champlin, gift to William Champlin's eldest dtr, son Joseph when he reaches age 20, & wife Elizabeth. Vol 12, p 238, lists him as free inhabitant of Westerly 18 May 1669.

NEHGR, v12: James Babcock Sr & Jr listed as free inhabitants of Westerly, RI, 18 May 1669.

C M Babcock: James Babcock, 1612-1679; m Sarah. Had 4 children. Believed he came from Essex. He was skilled blacksmith & gunsmith. Portsmouth freeman 10 Jul 1648. Tax assessor & collector 19 Feb 1650, town constable 1660 & 1661; member of RI Gen'l Court of Commissioners from Portsmouth, 1657-1659. Member of company that founded Westerly, RI, in 1661. Named town trustee 12 Nov 1661. He moved his family to Westerly from Portsmouth 28 Mar 1664 after selling his property there for 50 Lbs, d 12 Jun 1679.

Immigrants: James Babcock (Badcock), probably b 1612, Essex, Eng, d 12 Jun 1679 Westerly, RI, perhaps brother of Robert & George Badcock of Dorchester, MA. Came from England between 1630 & 1640 & settled at Portsmouth, RI. He was blacksmith. Baptized by Elder William Hiscox of 7th Day Baptist Church 2 May 1678.

Ancestral Lines: James Badcock, b 1612, perhaps in Essex, Eng (his age determined by an affidavit made 23 Jun 1670 concerning ages of himself & his sons), d in Stonington, CT, 12 Jun 1679, having given his will to his sons John & Job verbally on that day. He left most of his estate to his minor children by his 2nd wife. Married (1) Sarah _____, (2) 1669, Elizabeth. Admitted inhabitant of Portsmouth, RI, 25 Feb 1642. He lived there for 20 yrs, his name being spelled in town records as Badcock, Badcooke, Badcocke or Badcook, depending on whim of town clerk. He moved to Westerly, RI, in Mar 1662, a company headed by William Vaughn having bought Misquamicut, later called Westerly, from Chief Sosoa on 29 Jun 1660. 8 trustees for "Squamicuck" purchase were increased to 18 12 Nov 1661. Among 10 new trustees were James & son John. James was 1 of 5 men appointed to act for company in running affairs at "Misquamucock." Westerly was claimed by both RI & CT. James Badcock, company official, & the Pequot Indians also were involved in the dispute. In 1667 their chief described James Badcock & others as men who wore "hats & clothes like Englishmen, but have dealt with us like wolves & bears..." (Records of Colonial CT, bk 1665-1668, 529ff). Westerly was incorporated May 1669, with 24 freemen in town, including James Badcock & sons James, John & Job. Town included present towns of Westerly, Charlestown, Hopkinton & Richmond. In 1678 James was baptized by Elder William Hiscox & joined 7th Day Baptist Church of Newport & Westerly.

Founders: James Babcock/Badcock, Portmouth, RI, 1642; Westerly 1662, d 12 Jun 1679. Blacksmith. Commissioner. Freeman.

Witter Family: James Babcock, b abt 1612, probably in Essex, Eng; baptized 1678, age 59, Westerly, RI, as 7th Day Baptist. Will dated 12 Jun 1679 at Westerly or Stonington, CT. Emigrated to Portsmouth, RI, by 1642. Lived in Westerly, RI, & Stonington, CT. Bought land in Westerly in 1660. Was blacksmith & gunsmith & granted land there in 1664. Member of RI Gen'l Court, 1656-59, & of governing council of Westerly. "A man of sterling worth & integrity, a man of strong convictions, respected by his neighbors, honored & trusted as a citizen, ever ready to serve the community in whatever capacity he was appointed." Married Sarah ____, possibly Vose (d abt 1665). Had 7 children. He possibly married (2) Elizabeth ___, possibly Marsh, who re-m (2) William Johnson in 1679.

Sources: Ruth Mendenhall Kornitz 1968

...1st Babcock in America was James, who was recorded in Plymouth Colony abt 1630. There are no definite records found to firmly establish his ancetory but it is said he came from Essex, Eng. Mr Carl Boyer, Newhall, CA, has just published latest research on this subject & there still is no definite data to be written. According to facts we do have, such as his age when he became a freeman, he was born abt 1612. His 1st wife is known only as "Sarah". Their children were: James b 1641, Portsmouth, RI, m Jane Brown & d 1698. 2nd son was John, b 1644; m Mary Lawton; d 1718. Only dtr, Mary b 1648; m Peter Crandall & d 1717. Job b 1646; m Jane Crandall; d 1718. Sarah died & James married Elizabeth Gorton. James d 12 Jun 1679.

John Babcock b Jun 1644, RI; m Mary Lawton, dtr of George & Elizabeth (Hazard) Lawton. Unusual circumstances of this marriage have been written about in many histories & genealogies. Why this young couple chose to elope remains a mystery. In one romantic acct that appeared in Narragansett Historical Register, by Rev Thomas Barber, John was social station beneath the Lawtons but it also states Mary was only child & contains several other errors, so we doubt its veracity. Both families belonged to tight nucleus of families that formed foundation of 7th Day Baptists.

Fact is they did leave their home & lived in wilderness with the Indians for some yrs. They rec'd land from these Indians & John Babcock did a great deal to bring harmony in relations of white men & Indians. During King Philips War white people gathered at Babcock home for protection. It was during this seige son Elihu was born.

Family of John & Mary numbered 10 children. James b while parents lived w/Indians in 1663; m Elizabeth Saunders. 2. Anne b 1665, evidently did not survive. 3. Mary b 1667; m 1 Jul 1685 John Macomber, Sr. 4. John b 1669; m 1700 Mary Champlin & d 28 Mar 1746. 5. Job b 1671, m Deborah ? 1695 & d 10 Feb 1755. 6. George b 1673; m 28 Nov 1694, Elizabeth Hall & d 1 May 1756. 7. Elihu b 19 Dec 1675, during Indian battle was mentally retarded (bro Oliver appointed guardian). 8. Robert b 1678; m 1701 Lydia Crandall & d 27 Aug 1719. 9. Joseph b 1681; m Rebecca Stanton & d Feb 1706. 10. Oliver b 1683; m 1704 Susanna Clarke & d Oct 1773.

John, the father, d 1685 & left very interesting will. It is too long to put into this acct. Mary, the widow, m Erasmus Babbit, 21 Apr 1696.

Oliver, John & Mary's youngest son, m Suzanna Clarke, dtr of Joseph & Bethia (Hubbard) Clarke. This was well known family among Baptists & accts of Joseph's religious feuding with Plymouth Colony & CT appears in many history books. Oliver & Susanna's family were as follows: 1. Susanne b 20 Sep 1705, at Westerly, RI; m James Beebe. 2. Thomas b 3 Jul 1710; m Mary Davidson. 3. Mary b 8 Feb 1712; m 1732 Henry Cobb & d 1768. 4. Nathan b 12 Oct 1715 (no other info). 5. Simeon b 27 Sep 1717; m 3 Oct 1743 Sarah Gardner. 6. John b 12 May 1720; m 17 Mar 1747 Jemima Reynolds. 7. Oliver b 16 Sep 1722; m 1744 Patience Pendleton & d 24 Feb 1806. 8. Joseph b 18 Oct 1726; m 6 Sep 1757 Anna Harris & d 24 Jan 1776.

Susanna b 31 Aug 1681 at Westerly & d Jul 1757. Oliver took 2nd wife, Deborah Knowles Dec 1761. His death must have been in 1773 for his will was probated 1 Nov 1773.

Oliver, 2nd, m Patience Pendleton, dtr of Joseph & Sarah (Worden) Pendleton, descendant of Brian Pendleton, early warrior of the Colonies. He was member of 1st Artillery Co of Boston. Patience b 13 Jun 1726 in Westerly. Their marriage took place 1744. Their children were: 1. Oliver b 28 Jun 1746; m 18 Jul 1767 Tacy Maxson. 2. Peleg b 4 Oct 1748; m 14 Dec 1769 Luxy Maxson & 2ndly, 5 Jan 1776 Ruth Maxson. Peleg d bef 1827. 3. Susanna b 25 Jun 1750; m Mr Fen. 4. Deborah b 11 Apr 1752; m 26 Feb 1777 Nathaniel Stillman. 5. Lucy b 1754; m Benjamin Baker. 6. Sarah b 27 Apr 1756; m Philemon Steedman. 7. Mary b 11 Jun 1758; m her brother-in-law, Benjamin Baker, (Lucy must have died bef that date). 8. Ruth b 20 Apr 1760; m James Kenyon. 9. Clarke b 10 Jun 1762 also married into Baker family. 10. Ruhannah b 16 May 1764; m Edward Denison. 11. Ezra b 16 Sep 1769; m Seberah Stillman 20 Oct 1791 & d 16 Jul 1844. 12. Paul b 18 May 1766; m 10 Jan 1788 Hannah Burdick & d 27 Sep 1845. 13. Luke b 6 Aug 1772; m 1795 Betsy Main & d 11 Dec 1855.

Oliver answered call of Minute Men & served in Rev War. Anyone in family wishing to join DAR will find his records in order.

Shortly after War, Baptists decided to spread their doctrine to the wilderness. Oliver & family joined a group that went to Franklin Co, MA. Here Oliver & Patience are buried. At this time country underwent period of unusual weather. Autumn lasted past Christmas season & ft of snow covered ground in July. Colony was not prosperous & many families, Ezra Babcock among them, moved to NY. Family consisted of ...

http://www.babcockancestry.com/books/babcock/093babcockfirst5genera...

Babcock line is traced back to immigrant ancestor James Badcock, b 1612, in Essex Co, Eng. James was admitted inhabitant of towne of Portsmouth, RI Feb 25 1642. At that time no one was allowed to "build or plant" w/out 1st having been voted at town mtg inhabitant. Later that yr Oct 5 1642 James Badcock & Richard Moris were ordered "to look up all the armes in the Towne within the month above writ," & "to mend any which were defective for use." Owners were to forfeit 5 shillings if they failed to bring arms in time. At same mtg James was allotted 10n acres of land "at the first brooke, next the footpath eastward." He was allotted 4 more acres in 1648, & was made freeman of town. He served on various committees, was juryman on 5 different occasions & was mbr of Gen'l Court of Commissioners of RI for Portsmouth in 1657, 1658 & 1659. James moved to Misquamicut, RI in 1662. This tract of land which was approximately 20 mi X 10 mi in size was purchased from Indian Chief Sosoa in 1660. There would be battles w/both MA Bay Colony & CT for many yrs to come over ownership of area, which soon became known as Westerly. 5 generations of our Babcocks would be born in Westerly. James m Sarah Brown & had 4 children, James, John, Job & Mary. Sarah died in 1665, & James m 2nd wife, Elizabeth, who had 3 more children, Joseph, Nathaniel & Elizabeth. We trace our line thru 2nd son, John, b 1644 Portsmouth.

Will & Inventory of James Badcocke (spelling as found)

Last Will & Testament of James Badcocke Sen'r as he verbilly declared before us Under written.

Imp he willed & bequeathed unto his Son Job Badcocke all his Smith tooles of what sort of Kind Soever that he dyed posesed of:

2ly he Bequeathed one cow to be delivered unto his daughter Mary Champlin by his Administratrix hereafter mentioned with in convenient time after his decease.

3ly he bequeathed a Cow Calfe to William Champline Eldest daughter to be delivered as above said.

4ly he Bequeathed unto his Sonn Joseph all his housing and lands for him the said Joseph Badcocke to take posesion when he shall attained to the age of twenty one years.

5ly he Willed and declared that all the Remaining part of his Estate besides what he hath herein Bequeathed, he did give to his loveing wife, Elizabeth Badcocke for the Maintenance and bringing up of the three children he had by his said wife and for her and her heires and asignes forever.

Lastly of this his Will he declared that his loveing wife Elizabeth Badcocke should be the Administratrix to this his last Will and Testament.

This Testator dyed the 12th of June 1679.

JOHN BADCOCKE

JOB BADCOCKE

John Badcocke & Job Badcocke personally appeared before the Governor and Court, and being Solemnly Engajed Testefyed to the truth of what is above subscribed to Them: Taken at a Court Held at Westerly the 17th of September 1679 in the King's Province.

As Attests John Sanford,

Secretary

The Above written are True Copys of the Origonall entred & Recorded the 8th of December 1680 pr John Sanford Recorder.

Inventory of the Estate of James Badcocke Sen'r Deceased in June last in Stoning Towne without any written Will leaving a Widow with three children the Eldist a Sonn about nine year old.

L. s. d.

Imp. house & Land about twenty Acres............ 30 00 00

A Bellows, Anvill, Vise & other Smiths tooles.... 05 00 00

A 2 Cowes 2 yearlings & 2 Calves.................... 11 00 00

A 7 small Swine, 1 bed & bedstead with bedin.. 07 00 00

A 1 small bed & beding lb 5s., 2 chests 10s...... 00 15 00

A churn, pailes & tubbs & other vessels............ 00 10 00

Iron pot, Scillitt, pan, tramills, smuin Iron, spitt & slice..02 00 00

A 3 spining wheels, 12 axes, spade & old Iron hod. 00 02 00

A handsaw, drawing Knife, Reaping hooks, 2 botles, 1 hamer.. 00 05 00

A puter & tin one brass skillit, 2 sives........... 00 04 00

A 1 paire of Cards w/ some wool & flax & yarne..00 05 00

A chaires, cradle with other lumber.................. 00 10 00

Sum Totall......................................................61 01 00

This Inventory was Taken This 5th of July 1679 by us

EPHRAIM MINOR

JAMES PENDLETON

THOMAS WELLES

This above written Inventory was by the subscribers James Pendleton and Thomas Wells, in open Court on their Sollemn Engagements Testefied to be a true Inventory to the best of their Knowlidge and this was Testefied in the Court held at Westerly in the King's province, the 17th of September 1679 as Attests JOHN SANFORD, Secretary

The above written at True Copys of the origonall Entered and Recorded the 8th of December pr John Sanford, Recorder.

Secretary of State's Office, Providence, March 12th, 1868

I certify the above to be true copies of the will & inventory of James Badcock Sen'r - taken from the book of Land Records in this office.

JOHN R. BARTLETT, Secretary of State (for Rhode Island)

Family name was spelled Badcock & Badcocke in public documents up until this time. When James Badcocke's son John died 6 yrs later in 1685, his name was spelled with a "b".


[https://www.findagrave.com/memorial/139385934/james-badcock]

[https://www.wikitree.com/wiki/Babcock-1153]


James Badcock, Sr. (1612 - 1679)

Brief Biography

From https://vredenburgh.org/babcock/pages/James_Badcock.htm

‘Records in this book will show that James, Sr., was born in 1612; that he was in Portsmouth, R.I., 1642, where he resided for about twenty years; that March, 1661-2, he removed to that part of Rhode Island which was later named Westerly, where he spent the remainder of his life and died there June 12, 1679. It is not true that "he married his second wife in Plymouth about 1650." His first wife, Sarah, was living in Westerly in 1665, and joined by her husband in deeding land owned by them in Portsmouth. James Badcock by his first wife, Sarah, did have four children, James, John, Job and Mary, as stated by Wells, but it is not true that they "were born in England from 1612 to 1620," neither is it true that James, Job and Mary settled with their father in Plymouth. Records of these children found in this volume will show that they all settled in Westerly, R. I., where each married, had children, and died there.

"It is true that one of James Badcock’s children by his second wife, Elizabeth, was named Joseph, but it is not true that he was born about 1650 in Plymouth, nor that he settled near Saybrook, Conn. He was born in Westerly about 1670, as is shown by his father’s will and inventory, and settled in Stonington, Conn. (which town joins Westerly, R. I.), where he spent the remainder of his life.

Family

James Badcock (1612-1679) married Sarah [Brown?] (1616 - 1665) around 1641 in Portsmouth Rhode Island.

  • James was born in Wivenhoe, Essex, England. (Disputed)
  • Sarah was born in Essex, Essex, England. (Disputed)
  • James and Sarah had five children:
    • James IV (1641 - 1698);
    • John (1644 - 11/8/1675);
    • Mary Babcock (1648 - ?);
    • Job (1649 - 4/7/1718); and
    • Hannah (Babcock) Larkin (abt 1650 - ?).

All five children were born in Portsmouth, Rhode Island.

Sarah died in Westerly, Rhode Island. James Babcock died in Portsmouth, Rhode Island (Westerly ?)

Disputed Origins

Evidence needed to support as son of James Badcock, I & Mary Badcock

From https://vredenburgh.org/babcock/pages/James_Badcock.htm

"Again, at East Thorp... there is confirmatory evidence of the ancient residence of the Badcock people in Essex in the existence there of a manor of the Badcocks (* ibid).... But East Thorp is not Wivenhoe, and Abberton is not Wivenhoe, and we are assured, as above, that the name Badcock is not in the Wivenhoe parish register.

Nevertheless, ‘family tradition’ has it that at Wivenhoe lived -- born about 1580 -- a younger brother of Sir Richard, named James Badcock, a clergyman of the Church of England, of Puritanical persuasion, who became an exile in 1620 to Leyden, Holland, for the sake of religious liberty, and sailing thence, with others landed in New England -- some say at Plymouth, Mass. -- in 1623, thus becoming the founder of the family in this country. (* Dictionary of American Family Antiquity, vol.iii, p 199; also Hinman, Puritan Settlers, etc., p 106.)


Birth surname should be Badcock.

Given name has also been reported to be David.

Date of birth might be 1580.

Date and place of death have also been (erroneously?) reported to be:

  • 1640 at an unspecified location
  • June 12, 1677 at Dorchester (now part of Boston), Suffolk County, Massachusetts
  • June 12, 1677 at Norwich, New London County, Connecticut

Record of ship Anne posted because many sources have repeated story Albert Wells & R R Hinman wrote that our original ancestor, James Badcock came on ship Anne. If James did arrive on this ship, he was not listed on any offical records. Anne arrived in Plymouth Jul 1623 accompanied by Little James bringing new settlers along w/many of wives & children left behind in Leyden when Mayflower departed in 1620. Ship passenger list is reconstructed from 1623 Division of Land, passenger list compiled by Charles Banks' Planters of Commonwealth & research found in Eugene Aubrey Stratton's Plymouth Colony: Its History & Its People, 1620-1691.

  • Annable, Anthony
  • Jane (Momford) Annable, wife
  • Sarah Annable, dtr
  • Hannah Annable, dtr
  • Bangs, Edward
  • Bartlett, Robert
  • Buckett, Mary
  • Brewster, Patience
  • Fear Brewster, sister
  • Clarke, Thomas
  • Conant, Christopher
  • Cooke, Mrs. Hester (Mahieu)
  • Jane Cooke, dtr
  • Jacob Cooke, son
  • Hester Cooke, dtr
  • Dix, Anthony
  • Faunce, John
  • Flavel, Mrs Elizabeth
  • Flood, Edmond
  • Fuller, Mrs. Bridget (Lee)
  • Godbertson, Godbert
  • Sarah (Allerton)(Vincent)(Priest) Godbertson, wife
  • Samuel Godbertson, son
  • Sarah Priest, step-dtr
  • Mary Priest, step-dtr
  • Hatherly, Timothy
  • Heard, William
  • Hicks, Mrs Margaret
  • Samuel Hicks, son
  • Lydia Hicks, dtr
  • Hilton, Mrs William
  • William Hilton, son
  • Mary Hilton, dtr
  • Holman, Edward
  • Kempton, Manasseh
  • Long, Robert
  • Mitchell, Experience
  • Morton, George
  • Juliana Morton, wife
  • Nathanial Morton, son
  • John Morton, son
  • Ephraim Morton, son
  • Patience Morton, dtr
  • Sarah Morton, dtr
  • Morton, Thomas Jr
  • Newton, Ellen
  • Oldham, John
  • Mrs. Oldham, wife
  • Lucretia Oldham, sister
  • Palmer, Mrs Frances
  • Penn, Christian
  • Pierce, Abraham
  • Pratt, Joshua
  • Rand, James
  • Rattliff, Robert
  • Mrs Rattliff, wife
  • Snow, Nicholas
  • Southworth, Alice (Carpenter)
  • Sprague, Francis
  • Anna Sprague, wife
  • Mercy Sprague, dtr
  • Standish, Mrs Barbara
  • Tilden, Thomas
  • (Ann?) Tilden, wife
  • child Tilden
  • Tracy, Stephen
  • Wallen, Ralph
  • Joyce Wallen, wife
  • Warren, Mrs Elizabeth
  • Mary Warren, dtr
  • Elizabeth Warren, dtr
  • Anna Warren, dtr
  • Sarah Warren, dtr
  • Abigail Warren, dtr
********************* Original spelling of last name was Badcock, w/a d...

"For the first 40 years the surname of James and his Sons was usually written Badcock. In the Probate records of John Badcock estate the name is spelled Babcock, & at that time that spelling seems to have been adopted by the family."

1st record of James says...

"James Badcock was admitted an inhabitant of the “towne” of Portsmouth (RI) Feb 25, 1642. At that time no one was allowed to “build or plant” w/out 1st having been voted at town meeting an inhabitant."

********************* - From Babcock Genealogy by Stephen Babcock
  • Historical cemeteries buried by neglect; 12:02 AM EDT on Wednesday, October 31, 2007. By Donita Naylor, Journal Staff Writer

Here’s a scary story for Halloween. It’s interactive, & anyone can help write the ending. RI’s historical cemeteries are in danger of vanishing. Evelyn Wheeler doesn’t know why, but something coming from those cemeteries is speaking to her. Something compelling.

  • It could be weeds & poison ivy. Or maybe it’s that when cemeteries are forgotten, part of history is lost. Many of RI’s historical cemeteries are overgrown, disintegrating & often gathering spot for evil spirits, or at least underage drinkers. Wheeler, who w/husband, Frank, volunteered in nat'l parks for 20 yrs after he retired 1st time in 1983, lives in Narragansett & wondered who was in chg of taking care of historical cemeteries. Turned out to be her.
  • She started calling around last year to see about getting attention for cemetery she’d noticed. Historical cemeteries, she found, have no clear owner. They had no one to care for them. Closest thing to govt agency looking after them was Advisory Commission on Historical Cemeteries, & it was nearly dead itself. She undertook her own cemetery cleanup, then took steps to get commission revived & was elected chairman. In Apr, commission organized 150 volunteers to clean 53 cemeteries in 29 towns. Sat, she is hoping more volunteers will join brigade of souls looking after souls who walked ground before them. RI has at least 3500 historical cemeteries. They are listed & numbered, & number is posted on metal sign in each cemetery. Volunteers are trying to document each one, pinpoint its location w/global positioning device, photograph stones, transcribe what is written there & what is known about graves, & make everything searchable for genealogy enthusiasts online.
    • Genealogy led Carolyn Saleski, S Hadley, MA, to Westerly to find cemetery said to contain some of her Babcock ancestors. She is related to Capt James Babcock, father of Dr Joshua Babcock. Dr Babcock was friend of Benjamin Franklin’s, served as RI’s 1st postmaster, helped found Brown Univ & built Babcock-Smith House in Westerly. “I started doing Internet thing, I heard abt place called Babcock House,” Saleski said. Last spring, she & her husband drove to Westerly in search of Cemetery 7. They found Watch Hill Rd. “I’m seeing Babcock everywhere, so I’m thrilled,” she said. They drove up & down didn’t see a cemetery. “We come back 1 more time,” she said, & then: “Oh my God, that’s it! Historic site no 7. “I look at this cemetery & draw my breath in. It takes my breath away. Because it is trashed. “Beautiful stone wall is covered w/briars, headstones are on ground & leaning against trees, they don’t know where they belong,” she said. “I’m shocked.
    • “It was heartbreaking, for me, to see those ancestors in that disrepair.” When she returned home, she started calling RI officials, asking, “Who owns it? What’s going on?” As it turned out, Westerly Historical Society was waiting for warmer weather to begin cleanup. Years of overgrowth, briars & poison ivy were removed. Historical society member,John Leach, who worked on project, said they needed brush cutters & chain saw & help from town in hauling away brush. Refurbished cemetery was ready last Sat when wreath was placed at sarcophagus of Dr Babcock, ceremony that was part of Babcock-Smith House’s celebration of his birth 300 yrs ago. “I’m really happy they did it,” Saleski said yesterday when told of cleanup. Transformation of Babcock cemetery is what Wheeler’s commission is hoping will happen at historical cemeteries thru-out state. “People should know abt history of RI,” Wheeler said. “People who started this country” are buried in some of these cemeteries: people who “signed Declaration of Independence, governors, senators, millwrights, people who spun cotton that was grown.” Wheeler calls cemeteries “open-air museums.”
  • Names & dates on grave markers tell fascinating story, which grows more fascinating when interwoven with history & genealogy data online. She hopes volunteers will call her...to adopt their neighborhood historical cemetery, or 1 in which they have an ancestor. Adopting it means removing trash, pulling weeds & maybe planting fall bulbs, then returning in spring to rake, tidy & plant. If people call her, she can coordinate many efforts. But anyone can turn out Sat at neighborhood cemetery w/work gloves & tools & bags for carrying away rubbish. "I just feel this is challenge, & they should all be cleaned,” Wheeler said, “because it’s history of state." She hopes lawmakers will be able to establish who cemeteries belong to. “There are other cemeteries in country that are being taken care of,” she said. “RI should come forward & do same.” Wheeler is also hoping for another kind of help, kind that involves going to town halls to look up deeds & easements, to give commission names of property owners surrounding cemeteries if permission is needed for access. Volunteer w/hand-held GPS device, or cell phone w/global positioning feature, can take reading in cemetery & note coordinates. Commission can get cemetery noted on plat maps, she said, “so developers don’t build right on top of them...Other thing is, if people have Google Earth & they know exactly where it is,” they can enter coordinates, “so even people who are homebound can help.” Photographs are needed to capture each stone before it eventually disintegrates. Rubbings are forbidden, she said, except under expert supervision. Stone cleaning must be done gently & w/expert advice because of threat of erosion to stone. There’s 1 ritual that can be performed in cemeteries w/out drawing Wheeler’s disapproval. It involves mirror, & it’s performed not at midnight but in bright of day. If mirror is used to direct sunshine directly onto gravestone, Wheeler said, lettering once indistinct becomes more readable. That’s when to take photo or copy inscription.
  • For info on how you can help, plus safety advice for cleaning historical cemetery, visit commission’s Web site at www.historicalcemeteries.ri.gov/.
  • For more on RI genealogy & cemeteries, visit www.rootsweb.com/ ~rigenweb/cemetery/
  • You can help: Do you want to join historical cemetery cleanup brigade? Here are just some of 3500 historical cemeteries in need of attention:
    • Wightman-Sweet Cem, no 32, across from Carpenter Jenks Funeral Home, E Greenwich Av, W Warwick.
    • Burial grnd of Beriah Brown family, no 96, behind Gregg’s Restaurant, Scrabbletown Rd, N Kingstown.
    • N Burial Grnd, off N Main St, Warren.
    • St James Cem, north of Logee St, Woonsocket.
    • Thomas Cornell Cem, no 36, behind Valley Inn Restaurant, W Main Rd, Portsmouth.

dnaylor@projo.com

********************* Unless you have read "Babcock Genealogy" by Stephen Babcock (1903) you may not know of "tradition" that states James Badcock traveled to Leyden, Holland & w/Robinson family. After much research here is some interesting info that explains better why Leyden, & who Robinson Family were.

Hope you enjoy.

Story of Holland's rise due to free mkt policies. Holland's struggle for independence from Spain was of epic proportions: when, after siege of several mos, citizens of Leyden talked of surrender, 1 burgomaster fortified their spirits by saying, "Here is my sword; plunge it, if you will, into my heart, & divide my flesh amg you to appease your hunger; but expect no surrender as long as I am alive." Burgomaster lived & so did rest of citizens of Leyden to see day when William the Silent routed besieging Spaniards. Defense of Leyden turned tide, & from then on Dutch never looked back in their fight for freedom. Once they were free, Dutch embraced much of what we would call free mkt philosophy & set up limited govt. In early 1600s, Holland was most liberal society in Europe. When English Separatists began to think of emigrating, they thought of Holland. But emigrating to Holland would be no easy task: Englishmen could not leave country w/out permission. Never mind: Separatists would leave secretly. 1st group--mbrs of Brownist Church in Gainsborough--went over in 1607; hearing good reports, mbrs of Scrooby Congregation, group which included many Pilgrim Fathers, prepared to follow. Aft several attempts to escape, Pilgrims finally succeeded, arriving in Amsterdam on Dutch ship. Robinson, John, clergyman, b prob Lincolnshire, Eng, 1575-6; d Leyden, Holland, cMar, 1625. He entered Corpus Christi, Cambridge, in 1592, was chosen fellow, & is supposed to have recd degree of MA in 1599. He officiated as minister of established church near Norwich, but omitted parts of ritual, having become inclined toward Puritan doctrines at university, & was soon suspended from his functions. He removed to Norwich, where he gathered abt him band of worshippers. 1604 he formally w/drew from nat'l church, resigning his fellowship, & connected himself w/body of dissenters in Gainsborough, Lincolnshire, & adjacent district. He was 1 of ministers of congregation at Scrooby, Nottinghamshire. Part of flock went w/other minister to Holland. Some months later, Robinson & rest of congregation determined to emigrate, in order to escape persecution. Aft being detained by police & enduring various hardships, entire congregation escaped to Amsterdam, &, aft passing nearly yr there, settled in Leyden early summer 1609, where Robinson, w/3 others, in 1611, purchased lrg house w/enclosed court. Church met for worship in house, & some of company built homes w/in court. He was recognized by his opponents as "most learned, polished, & modest spirit that ever separated from Church of Eng," & in Leyden gained high reputation by his disputations in defence of Calvinism in 1613 w/Episcopius, successor of Arminius. He became also mbr of university in Sep 1615. His congregation was increased by accessions from Eng, & when, in 1617, plan of emigration to Am was discussed, he took heartiest interest in scheme, & was active in promoting negotiations w/VA Co. There was difficulty in bringing matter to conclusion, & abt beginning of 1620 he was party to proposition to certain Amsterdam merchants to remove to New Amsterdam ; but states-gen'l declined to further plan, & Robinson & his company fell back on their original purpose. When younger mbrs of congregation sailed in "Speedwell" Jul 1620, he took leave of them in memorable sermon, intending to follow w/others next yr. Part of remainder of church departed aft his death" as also, in 1631, did his son, Isaac, who has many descendants in US. Leyden pastor was author of "An Answer to Censorious Epistle" (1609); "Justification of Separation from Church of Eng against Mr Bernard's Invective entitled "Separatist's Schism" (1610); "Of Religious Communion, Private & Public" (1614); "Manumission to Manuduction" (1615); "People's Plea for Exercise of Prophecy" (1618)" "Apologia justa et necessaria" (1619), which was translated into Eng in 1625; "Defence of Doctrine propounded by Synod of Dort" (1624) ; "Letter to Congregational Church in London" (1624); "Appeal on Truth's Behalf" (1624); "Observations Divine & Moral" (1625); "On Lawfulness of Hearing of Ministers in Church of Eng (1634); & "Brief Catechism concerning Church Govt," earliest known edition of which was printed in 1642. "Works of John Robinson, Pastor of Pilgrim Fathers," have been published, w/memoir & annotations by Robert Ashton, & inaccurate acct of his descendants by William Allen (3 vols, London & Boston, 1851). Robinson, John, clergyman, b Cabarrus Co, NC, Jail, 1768; d in Poplar Tent, NC, 14 Dec 1843. Recd academic education at Winnsborough, SC, studied theology, was licensed to preach 4 Apr 1793, & organized several churches in Dupin Co, NC, accepted tilt chg of Presbyterian Church at Fayetteville in 1800, established classical school, preached in Poplar Tent 1801-5, & then in Fayetteville again till 1818, when he returned to Poplar Tent. Univ NC gave him degree of DD in 1829. He was 1 of most popular & persuasive preachers of his faith, & not less eminent as instructor. He published only "Eulogy on Washington " (1800):

Loving and Christian Friends,

I do heartily & in Lord salute you all as being they w/whom I am present in my best affection, most earnest longings aft you. Though I be constrained for while to be bodily absent from you. I say constrained, God knowing how willingly & much rather than otherwise, I would have borne my part w/you in this 1st brunt, where I not by strong necessity held back for present. Make acct of me in meanwhile as of man divided in myself w/great pain, & as (natural bonds set aside) having my better part w/you. & though I doubt not but in your godly wisdoms you both foresee & resolve upon that which concerneth your present state & condition, both severally & jointly, yet have I thought it but my duty to add some further spur of provocation unto them who run already; if not because you need it, yet because I owe it in love & duty. & 1st, as we are daily to renew our repentance w/our God, especially for our sins known, & generally for our unknown trespasses; so doth Lord call us in singular manner upon occasions of such difficulty & danger sailieth upon you, to both more narrow search & careful reformation of your ways in His sight; let He, calling to remembrance our sins forgotten by us or unrepented of, take advantage against us, & in judgment leave us for same to be swallowed up in 1 danger or other. Whereas, on contrary, sin being taken away by earnest repentance & pardon thereof from Lord, sealed up unto man's conscience by His Spirit, great shall be his security & peace in all dangers, sweet his comforts in all distresses, w/happy deliverance from all evil, whether in life or in death. Now, next after this heavenly peace w/God & our own consciences, we are carefully to provide for peace w/all men what in us lieth, especially w/our associates. & for that, watchfulness must be had that we neither at all in ourselves do give, no, nor easily take offense being given by others. Woe be unto world for offenses, for though it be necessary (considering malice of Satan & man's corruption) that offenses come, yet woe unto man, or woman either, by whom offense cometh, saith Christ, Matthew 18:7. & if offenses in unseasonable use of things, in themselves indifferent, be more to feared than death itself (as Apostle teacheth, 1 Corinthians 9:15) how much more in things simply evil, in which neither honor of God nor love of man is thought worthy to be regarded. Neither yet is it sufficient that we keep ourselves by grace of God from giving offense, except withal we be armed against taking of them when they be given by others. For how unperfect & lame is work of grace in person who wants charity to cover multitude of offenses, as Scriptures speak! Neither are you to be exhorted to this grace only upon common grounds of Christianity, which are, persons ready to take offense either want charity to cover offenses, or wisdom duly to weigh human frailty; or lastly, are gross, though close hypocrites as Christ our Lord teacheth (Matthew 7:1,2,3), as indeed in my own experience few or none have been found which sooner give offense than such as easily take it. Neither have they ever proved sound & profitable mbrs in societies, which have nourished this touchy humor. But besides these, there are diverse motives provoking you above others to great care & conscience this way: As 1st, you are many of you strangers, as to persons so to infirmities 1 of another, & so stand in need of more watchfulness this way, lest when such things fall out in men & women as you suspected not, you be inordinately affected w/them; which doth require at your hands much wisdom & charity for covering & preventing of incident offenses that way. &, lastly, your intended course of civil community will minister continual occasion of offense, & will be as fuel for that fire, except you diligently quench it w/brotherly forbearance. & if taking of offense causelessly or easily at men's doings be so carefully to be avoided, how much more heed is to be taken that we take not offense at God Himself, which yet we certainly do so oft as we do murmur at His providence in our crosses, or bear impatiently such afflictions as wherewith He pleaseth to visit us. Store up, therefore, patience against evil day, w/out which we take offense at Lord Himself in His holy & just works. Fourth thing there is carefully to be provided for, to wit, that w/your common employments you join common affections truly bent upon general good, avoiding deadly plague of your both common & special comfort all retiredness of mind for proper advantage, & all singularly affected any manner of way. Let ever man repress in himself & whole body in each person, as so many rebels against common good, all private respects of men's selves, not sorting w/gen'l conveniency. & as men are careful not to have new house shaken w/any violence before it be well settled & parts firmly knit, so be you, I beseech you, brethren, much more careful the house of God, which you are & are to be, be not shaken w/unnecessary novelties or other oppositions at 1st settling thereof. Lastly, whereas you are become body politic, using amgst yourselves civil govt, & are not furnished w/any persons of special eminency above rest, to be chosen by you into office of govt; let your wisdom & godliness appear, not only in choosing such persons as do entirely love & will promote common good, but also in yielding unto them all due honor & obedience in their lawful administrations, not beholding in them ordinariness of their persons, but God's ordinance for your good; not being like foolish multitude who more honor gay coat than either virtuous mind of man, or glorious ordinance of Lord. But you know better things, & the image of Lord's power & authority which magistrate beareth, is honorable, in how means persons soever. & this duty you both may more willingly & ought more conscionably to perform, because you are at least for present to have only them for your ordinary governors, which yourselves shall make choice of for that work. Sundry other things of importance I could put you in mind of, & of those bef mentioned in more words, but I will not so far wrong your godly minds as to think you heedless of these things, there being also diverse amg you so well able to admonish both themselves & others of what concerneth them. These few things therefore, & same in few words I do earnestly commend unto your care & conscience, joining therewith my daily incessant prayers unto Lord, that He who hath made heavens & earth, sea & all rivers of water, & whose providence is over all His works, espeically over all His dear children for good, would so guide & guard you in your ways, as inwardly by His Spirit, so outwardly by hand of His power, as both you & we also, for & w/you, may have aft matter of praising His name all days of your & our lives. Fare you well in Him in whom you trust, & in whom I rest. Unfeigned wellwiller of your happy success in this hopeful voyage,

John Robinson

************************ http://vredenburgh.org/babcock/pages/James_Badcock.htm

James Badcock: Who WAS This Man?

The Tradition: Fact or Fiction?

  • In speaking and/or corresponding with members of the Babcock extended family, I have encountered on a number of occasions references, stated as known facts, to this man and the circumstances of his immigration to the New World. In some of these accounts, both the dates given and the circumstances are at variance with those contained in the genealogical data which appears on this webpage. My data, here, is based on the research of Stephen Babcock and set forth in The Babcock Genealogy which he compiled and published in 1903.
  • There is a family tradition that tells of a James Babcock, born in 1580 in Wivenhoe, Essex, England, and who emigrated to Leyden, Holland in 1620 and then to Plymouth, MA, arriving aboard the ship "Anne" in 1623. Though this tradition appears to be widely believed, Stephen Babcock’s research, has, I believe, pretty well proved much of it to be false. Many of our people, not having access to The Babcock Genealogy, but having come across the above mentioned tradition, may well feel confused when reading the notes I’ve attached to James Badcock and his sons in the data base presented here, and the conflicts which become apparent.
  • I believe Stephen Babcock’s research is thorough and convincing and should be made available to any who peruse the material presented here. I will quote directly from The Babcock Genealogy, as it delves into the mystery of just who was this man and when and where did he arrive in the New World? The story is fascinating and should be of interest to anyone who is descended from James "The Immigrant." I’m sure that we are all concerned first and foremost with attempting to separate fact from fiction as best we can in regards to our family roots. -- Bryce Babcock, June, 2000.

Hinman and Wells Babcock Records

Next, Col. Andrew J. Babcock, in a separate section entitled "Hinman and Wells Babcock Records," (pp. xxiii-xxvi) of The Babcock Genealogy, explores in greater depth the sources and details of the "Babcock tradition" as set down by Royal Hinman and Albert Wells. He then proceeds to detail the evidence that has emerged to cast a cloud of doubt over this tradition and to attempt to separate fact from fiction. -- BB

  • "Many persons whose surname is Babcock in searching for their early ancestors have, unfortunately, fallen in with the records prepared by Mr. Royal Hinman, in his First Puritan Settlers of Connecticut, and the statements of Mr. Albert Wells.
  • "In 1881 I first saw their writings, and with many others believed them implicitly, but after the most diligent and careful research I am convinced there is but little truth in the writings of either Hinman or Wells concerning the Babcock family. I would advise all of our name who are interested in their earthly origin not to credit the writings of Wells and Hinman, for they are certainly fabrications.
  • "Hinman states: ‘James, the first of the name known in New England, was an Episcopal clergyman, and settled in the rectory of Wivenhoe, Essex County, England. He went to Leyden, Holland, for the purpose of embarking for America, and, persuading others to unite with him, and actually became one of the ‘Puritan Fathers’... James was born at Wivenhoe, Essex County, England in 1580, ...came to New England in the ship Anne, and landed at Plymouth in July 1623, and afterward removed to Dorchester, Mass. (now Milton), where he lived the remainder of his life.’
  • "Mr. Hinman then gives the children of James as follows: James, Jr., born 1616; John, born 1618; Job, born 1620; Mary, born 1621. He states that James, Jr., married at Dorchester about 1637, and had children (gives the names of fourteen). Now, there was no James Babcock came in the ship Anne in 1623, or in any ship that reached Plymouth later. His removal to Dorchester, Mass., where he resided the rest of his life, the marriage of his son James, Jr., at Dorchester, 1637, to Jeanne ______, the birth to them of fourteen children, have no foundation in fact whatever. The true history of this James, Jr., is entirely different from the above.
  • "Now comes Mr. Albert Wells, who in 1844 compiled a record of the early Babcocks in this country, which many of us have seen, read, and believed until, by a personal investigation, we found it was devoid of truth. Mr. Wells states nearly the same as Mr. Hinman. Which was first out, we know not, but it looks very much as if one copied from the other.
  • "Mr. Wells recites the ship Anne, Plymouth, 1623, tale, and that ‘James Badcock lived in Plymouth the residue of his life....
    • At the time of his immigration he brought four children, James, John, Job, and Mary, who were born in England from the years 1612 to 1620... James, the first child, Job, the third, and Mary, the fourth, remained with their father in Plymouth.... John Babcock, the second son, removed about 1648, to that part of Rhode Island now called Westerly....died there July 19, 1719, aged over one hundred years.’
  • "In 1889 we made a trip to Plymouth, the chief reason for going being to substantiate Hinman’s and Well’s statements, and examined every document likely to impart information upon this subject, but found nothing whatever. Since then we have read several of the histories of the Pilgrims and of Plymouth, and are much impressed with Baylie’s History of Plymouth Colony, Boston, 1830. From it we learn the ships Anne and Little James arrived at Plymouth in July and August 1623. The Anne brought sixty immigrants, some of whom were the wives and children of those already there.
  • "Nothing has been found to show that any Badcock or Babcock came in either ship. From a record of the division of cattle which occurred on the 27th of May, 1627, it is believed that every family and person in the town can be ascertained, and the town was at that time the colony. No person named Badcock or Babcock appears in that record. Again, on p. 264, vol.i, Baylie’s History, is a catalogue of names of all persons in the colony, but the name Badcock or Babcock does not appear among them.
  • "The names of the first settlers of the towns of Duxbury, Scituate, Taunton, Sandwich, Barnstable, Yarmouth, etc., all in Plymouth Colony, have been examined, and the name Badcock or Babcock does not appear upon any of the early records of these towns. The first date we find the name of Badcock or Babcock in records of Plymouth Colony is Nov. 27, 1685. Benjamin Badcock, et. al., all of New Dartmouth (New Bedford), are defendants in a suit of law brought by William Woods, et. al., to recover damages for land alleged to have been purchased by Wood et. al. of Woosamquin and Waumesetta. Case again heard Mar. 2, 1686. The court grants a nonsuit. Again, we find the name of Return Badcock among the names of the proprietors of Dartmouth in the confirmatory deed of William Bradford, Dept. Gov. of the Colony and executed Nov. 13, 1694. We now know that Benjamin and Return Badcock were of Milton, Mass., set off from Dorchester in 1662.
  • "It appears quite evident that there was no James Badcock who came to Plymouth on the ship Anne in 1623, and no settlers of an early date, surnamed Badcock, in Plymouth, nor in the colony of Plymouth. The first official information we find of James Badcock he is admitted an inhabitant of Portsmouth, R.I., Feb. 25, 1642. That he was related to Robert and George Badcock of Dorchester, Mass., later of Milton (set off from Dorchester), we believe there is no doubt. They may have been brothers. We have examined all the lists of immigrants who came to this country from 1600 to 1700 that we could find, and failed to find mention of either of the above. We are of the opinion they came between the years 1630 and 1640.
  • "Soon after James Badcock removed from Portsmouth to Westerly he with others became involved in the dispute with Connecticut relating to the boundary line; Connecticut claiming jurisdiction east of the Pawcatuck River....
    • (Acting on a warrant issued by a Rhode Island Justice of the Peace, James was constituted a constable and proceeded to arrest three Connecticut men. Connecticut authorities then issued a warrant under which James and the R.I. Justice were in turn arrested and placed on bond. -- Bryce Babcock)
  • "It was probably at the hearing of this case that James Badcock gave testimony, under oath, calling his age fifty-eight years, his son James, Jr., twenty-nine, and his son John twenty-six years. This testimony under oath establishes beyond a shadow of a doubt, the year of his birth to be 1612, his son James, Jr., 1641, and his son John, 1644. His first four children were born in Portsmouth, R.I.. At all events that was where the parents of James and John were then living.
  • "In 1623 James Badcock was eleven years of age. It will, for obvious reasons, be readily seen that he brought no children with him from England, as claimed by Messrs. Hinman and Wells. His son John died early in 1685 at Westerly, aged forty-one years, and not on July 19, 1719, aged over one hundred years, as given by Wells.
  • "In conclusion, I will add that these records have led many of the Babcock family astray and given untold annoyance to the genealogist to explain away the delusion they labored under, caused by the erroneous records of Royal R. Hinman, of Connecticut, and Albert Wells, of Palmyra, N.Y.. "Springfield, Ill., Feb. 4, 1903."
************************ [https://books.google.com/books?id=2bYaRLNfkk8C&pg=PA171&lpg=PA171&d... The Ancestry of Nathan Lewis Harrison Revisited Nineteen Years Later.  By Keith G Harrison, 2008 - 648 pages; The Babcock Family with Reference to the Brown, Leids, & Lewis Families, pg 171]  
  • (1) The earliest known representative of the Babcock family is James Babcock of Essex County, England.
    • He was born in 1554 and
    • died about 1580.
    • Little is known of him or his wife.
  • (2) His son was James Babcock II (1580 - 6/12/1679).
    • He was married to Mary (?) (1584-1650) in Wivenhoe, Essex, England in 1600.
    • Both James II and Mary (?) Babcock were born in Wivenhoe, Essex, England.
    • James II and Mary (?) Babcock had seven children:
      • Robert (1610 - 11/12/1694);
      • James III (6/12/1612 - 6/12/1679);
      • Elizabeth (Babcock) (1614 - ?},
      • Job (1616 - ?);
      • Mary (Babcock) Norton (1618 - ?);
      • Richard (1620 - ?); and
      • George (1622 - 9/26/1670).
    • All of the children except George were born in Wivenhoe, Essex England.
      • George was born in Dorchester, Massachusetts.
    • James Babcock II died in Stonington, Connecticut.
    • Mary (?) Babcock died in Dorchester, Massachusetts.
    • James Babcock II died in Essex County, England. [Believe this should be James I as it says that James II died in Connecticut./pscoggin 7/7/18]
  • (3) James Babcock III (1612-1679) married Sarah Brown (1616 - 1665) around 1641 in Portsmouth Rhode Island.
    • James III was born in Wivenhoe, Essex, England.
    • Sarah (Brown) Babcock was born in Essex, Essex, England.
    • James III and Sarah (Brown) Babcock had five children:
      • James IV (1641 - 1698);
      • John (1644 - 11/8/1675);
      • Mary Babcock (1648 - ?);
      • Job (1649 - 4/7/1718); and
      • Hannah (Babcock) Larkin (abt 1650 - ?).
    • All five children were born in Portsmouth, Rhode Island.
    • Sarah (Brown) Babcock died in Westerly, Rhode Island.
    • James Babcock III died in Portsmouth, Rhode Island.
  • (4) James Babcock IV (1641 - 1698) and Jane Brown (1645 - 2/4/1719) were married in Westerly, Rhode island around 1665.
    • James was born in Portsmouth, Rhode Island.
    • Jane (Brown) Babcock was born in Malford, Worcestershire, England.
    • James IV and Jane (Brown) Babcock had six children.
      • Sarah (Babcock) Lewis (abt 1666 - 1740);
      • Jane (Babcock) Lewis (abt 1667 - 3/23/1717);
      • Mary (Babcock) Brown (abt 1672 - ?);
      • Elizabeth (Babcock) Lewis (abt 1674 - 2/2/1719);
      • Hannah (Babcock) Larkin (about 1676 -?); and
      • William (abt 1678 - ?).
    • All six children were born in Westerly, Rhode Island.
    • Both James IV and Jane (Brown) Babcock died in Westerly, Rhode Island. [Info about Jane (Brown) Babcock’s parents & siblings listed also.]
************************

https://www.findagrave.com/memorial/82260102/james-babcock

James was born in Essex, England about 1580, probably near Wivenhoe. Family tradition says that he was a strict Puritan in his faith, and was forced to flee to Leyden, Holland about 1620, with his wife Mary and four children. Mary’s family name might have been Richards. They stayed in Holland for three years, then came to Plymouth in 1623, arriving in June or July of that year, possibly in the ship “Ann”. However, no record has ever been discovered that anyone named Babcock or Badcock ever sailed on the “Ann” or settled in Plymouth.

James & Mary had another child in Dorchester, but Mary died soon after. He married, probably in Dorchester, a second wife whos name is unknown. They had a son, named Joseph, who moved to Saybrook, Connecticut between 1670 and 1680 and became the ancestor of the Babcock family in Connecticut.

Information from “A Catalogue of the Names of the First Puritan Settlers of the Colony of Connecticut”, by R. R. Hinman and American Ancestry

NOTE: Badcock and other forms were the spellings in previous times before James came from England. Those included Badcook, Badcooke, and Badcocke, according to "The Babcock Genealogy" (by Stephen Babcock, 1832-1916. Pub. New York Eaton & Mains.) "For the first 40 years the surname of James and his sons was usually written Badcock. In the Probate records of John Badcock's estate the name is spelled Babcock, and at that time that spelling seems to have been adopted by the family. The Massachusetts branch of the family appear to have adopted the new spelling still later."

Gwen Lockwood


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@R1050710867@ Global, Find A Grave Index for Burials at Sea and other Select Burial Locations, 1300s-Current Ancestry.com Ancestry.com Operations, Inc. 1,60541::0

GEDCOM Source

1,60541::713561

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@R1050710867@ Millennium File Heritage Consulting Ancestry.com Operations Inc 1,7249::0

GEDCOM Source

1,7249::10725411

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@R1050710867@ Global, Find A Grave Index for Burials at Sea and other Select Burial Locations, 1300s-Current Ancestry.com Ancestry.com Operations, Inc. 1,60541::0

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Records not imported into INDI (individual) Gramps ID P1084:

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1 _UPD 7 NOV 2017 07:40:19 GMT -0600

view all 36

James Badcock, Sr.'s Timeline

1580
1580
Wivenhoe, Essex, England
1612
1612
Essex, England (United Kingdom)
1641
1641
Portsmouth, Newport County, Colony of Rhode Island and Providence Plantations
1644
1644
Portsmouth, Newport, Rhode Island
1646
1646
Portsmouth, Newport County, Colony of Rhode Island and Providence Plantations
1648
1648
Portsmouth, Newport County, Colony of Rhode Island and Providence Plantations
1662
1662
Age 50
Westerly, Washington Co., Rhode Island
1666
1666
Portsmouth, Newport County, Colony of Rhode Island and Providence Plantations