James Scott, 1st Duke of Monmouth, 1st Duke of Buccleuch

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James Scott (Crofts), 1st Duke of Monmouth, 1st Duke of Buccleuch

Also Known As: "James Fitzroy", "James Crofts"
Birthdate:
Birthplace: Rotterdam, Government of Rotterdam, Zuid Holland, Republiek der Zeven Verenigde Nederlanden
Death: July 15, 1685 (36)
Tower Hill, London, England (United Kingdom) (Executed for high treason)
Place of Burial: Chapel of St. Peter ad Vincula, Tower of London, Stepney, Middlesex, England
Immediate Family:

Son of Charles II of England and Lucy Walter, Mistress of Charles II
Husband of Anne Scott, 1st Duchess of Buccleuch; Elizabeth Waller and Henrietta Maria Scott
Partner of Eleanor Needham
Father of Anne Scott of Duke of Monmouth James Walter Scott Scott-Frost; Brig. Gen. James Croft; Henrietta Crofts; Isabel Crofts; Charles Scott and 8 others
Brother of Mary Crofts
Half brother of Walter Swan; Stillborn child1; Stillborn child2; Stillborn child3; Archibald Stewart and 15 others

Managed by: Private User
Last Updated:

About James Scott, 1st Duke of Monmouth, 1st Duke of Buccleuch

"James Scott, 1st Duke of Monmouth, 1st Duke of Buccleuch, KG, PC (9 April 1649 – 15 July 1685), was an English nobleman. Originally called James Crofts or James Fitzroy, he was born in Rotterdam in the Netherlands, the eldest illegitimate son of Charles II of England and his mistress, Lucy Walter.

He served in the Second Anglo-Dutch War and commanded British troops taking part in the Third Anglo-Dutch War before commanding the Anglo-Dutch brigade fighting in the Franco-Dutch War. Monmouth was executed by beheading in 1685 after making an unsuccessful attempt to depose his uncle, King James II, commonly called the Monmouth Rebellion. Declaring himself the legitimate King, Monmouth attempted to capitalise on his position as the son (albeit illegitimate) of Charles II, and his Protestantism, in opposition to James, who was Catholic."

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Links:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/James_Scott,_1st_Duke_of_Monmouth

http://www.englishmonarchs.co.uk/stuart_17.html

http://www.findagrave.com/cgi-bin/fg.cgi?GRid=6850&page=gr

http://histfam.familysearch.org/getperson.php?personID=I93058&tree=...

http://www.thepeerage.com/p10503.htm#i105021

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Citations / Sources:

[S6] G.E. Cokayne; with Vicary Gibbs, H.A. Doubleday, Geoffrey H. White, Duncan Warrand and Lord Howard de Walden, editors, The Complete Peerage of England, Scotland, Ireland, Great Britain and the United Kingdom, Extant, Extinct or Dormant, new ed., 13 volumes in 14 (1910-1959; reprint in 6 volumes, Gloucester, U.K.: Alan Sutton Publishing, 2000), volume II, page 366. Hereinafter cited as The Complete Peerage.

[S3409] Caroline Maubois, "re: Penancoet Family," e-mail message to Darryl Roger Lundy, 2 December 2008. Hereinafter cited as "re: Penancoet Family."

[S300] Michael Rhodes, "re: Ernest Fawbert Collection," e-mail message to Darryl Roger Lundy, 8 February. Hereinafter cited as "re: Ernest Fawbert Collection."

[S332] Artcyclopedia, online http://www.artcyclopedia.com/artists. Hereinafter cited as Artcyclopedia.

[S37] Charles Mosley, editor, Burke's Peerage, Baronetage & Knightage, 107th edition, 3 volumes (Wilmington, Delaware, U.S.A.: Burke's Peerage (Genealogical Books) Ltd, 2003), volume 1, page 561. Hereinafter cited as Burke's Peerage and Baronetage, 107th edition.

[S37] Charles Mosley, Burke's Peerage and Baronetage, 107th edition, volume 2, page 2442.

[S37] Charles Mosley, Burke's Peerage and Baronetage, 107th edition, volume 2, page 1850.

[S6] Cokayne, and others, The Complete Peerage, volume II, page 367.

[S6] Cokayne, and others, The Complete Peerage, volume II, page 212.


James Scott, 1st Duke of Monmouth, 1st Duke of Buccleuch KG PC (9 April 1649 – 15 July 1685), was an English nobleman. Originally called James Crofts or James Fitzroy, he was born in Rotterdam in the Netherlands, the eldest illegitimate son of Charles II of England, Scotland and Ireland and his mistress Lucy Walter.
He served in the Second Anglo-Dutch War and commanded English troops taking part in the Third Anglo-Dutch War before commanding the Anglo-Dutch brigade fighting in the Franco-Dutch War. In 1685 he led the unsuccessful Monmouth Rebellion, an attempt to depose his uncle, King James II and VII. After one of his officers declared Monmouth the legitimate King in the town of Taunton in Somerset, Monmouth attempted to capitalize on his position as the son of Charles II, and his Protestantism, in opposition to James, who was a Roman Catholic. The rebellion failed, and Monmouth was beheaded for treason on 15 July 1685. Born in Rotterdam in the Netherlands, to Lucy Walter, and her lover, Charles II (who was living in continental exile following his father's execution), James spent his early life in Schiedam. According to biographical research by Hugh Noel Williams (1870–1925), Charles had not arrived at The Hague until the middle of September 1648 – seven months before the child's birth (but he met Lucy for the first time nine months before) — and some unfounded voices whispered that Lucy Walter had in the summer of 1648 been mistress of Colonel Robert Sidney, a younger son of the Earl of Leicester. When the child grew to manhood, contemporaries observed that he bore a strong resemblance to Sidney. The unfounded voices had probably originated from the Duke of York, brother of King Charles II, who was afraid of his nephew's potential claim to the throne. Finally, in 2012, a DNA test conducted on Monmouth's descendant, the 10th Duke of Buccleuch, showed that he shared the same Y chromosome (inherited from father-to-son) as a distant Stuart cousin, providing strong evidence that Charles II was Monmouth's biological father after all. He had a younger sister Mary Crofts, who may also have been a daughter of Charles although Theobald Taaffe, 1st Earl of Carlingford is considered another potential father. Mary married the Irishman William Sarsfield and was a sister-in-law of the Jacobite general Patrick Sarsfield. As an illegitimate son, James was not eligible to succeed to the English or Scottish thrones, though there were rumors that Charles and Lucy did marry secretly. Monmouth later himself always claimed his parents were married and that he possessed their marriage lines, but he never produced them. Charles, as King, later testified in writing to his Council that he had never been married to anyone except his queen, Catherine of Braganza. In March 1658, young James was kidnapped by one of the King's men, sent to Paris, and placed in the care of the Crofts baronets, whose surname he took. He briefly attended a school in Family. James took the unusual step of allowing his nephew an audience, despite having no intention of extending a pardon to him. The prisoner unsuccessfully implored his mercy, and even offered to convert to Catholicism, but to no avail. He was executed by Jack Ketch on 15 July 1685, on Tower Hill. Shortly beforehand, Bishops Turner of Ely and Ken of Bath and Wells visited the condemned man to prepare him for eternity, but withheld the Eucharist as he refused to acknowledge that either his rebellion or his relationship with Lady Wentworth had been sinful. It is said that before laying his head to the block Monmouth specifically bade Ketch finish him at one blow, saying he had mauled others before. Disconcerted, Ketch did indeed inflict multiple blows with his axe, the prisoner rising up reproachfully the while - a ghastly sight that shocked the witnesses, drawing forth execrations and groans. Some say a knife was at last employed to sever the head from the twitching body. Sources vary; some claim eight blows, the official Tower of London fact sheet says it took five blows, while Charles Spencer, in his book Blenheim, states it at seven. His Dukedom of Monmouth was forfeited, but the subsidiary titles of that dukedom (Earl of Doncaster and Baron Scott of Tindale) were restored to his grandson, Francis Scott, 2nd Duke of Buccleuch (1695–1751), on 23 March 1743. His marriage to Anne Scott, 1st Duchess of Buccleuch resulted in the birth of six children: Charles Scott, Earl of Doncaster (24 August 1672 – 9 February 1673/1674) James Scott, Earl of Dalkeith (23 May 1674 – 14 March 1705). He was married on 2 January 1693/1694 to Henrietta Hyde, daughter of Laurence Hyde, 1st Earl of Rochester. They were parents to Francis Scott, 2nd Duke of Buccleuch. Lady Anne Scott (17 February 1675 – 13 August 1685) Henry Scott, 1st Earl of Deloraine (1676 – 25 December 1730) Francis Scott (died an infant; buried 8 December 1679) Lady Charlotte Scott (died an infant; buried 5 September 1683) His affair with his mistress Eleanor Needham, daughter of Sir Robert Needham of Lambeth resulted in the birth of three children: James Crofts (died March 1732), major-general in the Army. Henriette Crofts (c. 1682 – 27 February 1730). She was married around 1697 to Charles Paulet, 2nd Duke of Bolton. Isabel Crofts (died young) Toward the end of his life he conducted an affair with Henrietta, Baroness Wentworth.


The fist american soil link, he came from the zulu tribe of South Africa. He was brought by Rev. Glover of Charleston South Carolina. Scott had benefits, he was allow ed to marry legally.

Scott is Samuel His wife Classy is Clarinda Free moor of Ninety six... for his freedom.. how he traveled to visit his brother in Charleston possibly one of the other couples in the petition

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Moors_Sundry_Act_of_1790#:~:text=Th....

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James Scott, 1st Duke of Monmouth, 1st Duke of Buccleuch's Timeline

1649
March 9, 1649
Rotterdam, Government of Rotterdam, Zuid Holland, Republiek der Zeven Verenigde Nederlanden
1667
1667
1672
August 24, 1672
1674
May 23, 1674
1675
February 17, 1675
February 17, 1675
1676
1676
Dalkeith, Midlothian, Scotland, United Kingdom
1678
1678
1678